Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS4705708 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/579,291
Publication dateNov 10, 1987
Filing dateFeb 15, 1984
Priority dateMar 4, 1982
Fee statusPaid
Publication number06579291, 579291, US 4705708 A, US 4705708A, US-A-4705708, US4705708 A, US4705708A
InventorsJerald E. Briggs, Henry Pfutzenreuter
Original AssigneeAmerican Can Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-laminate structure containing a scrap layer and containers made therefrom
US 4705708 A
Abstract
A multi-layer laminate structure comprises a separate layer of scrap produced from the several thermoplastic resins used in making the laminate structure. In a preferred construction, the multi-layer laminate structure comprises an outer thermoplastic polyolefin layer, an inner thermoplastic polyolefin layer and an intermediate oxygen barrier layer preferably made of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer. An adhesive layer bonds the barrier layer to the inner polyolefin layer and a separate scrap layer is disposed interiorly of the outer polyolefin layer. A second adhesive layer bonds the scrap layer to the intermediate barrier layer. Containers having excellent oxygen barrier properties and good transparency are made by forming a parison from the multi-layer laminate structure and blow molding the parison to the desired container shape.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(23)
What is claimed is:
1. A multi-layer plastic container adapted to contain oxygen sensitive products or contain products sensitive to permeation losses, formed by coextruding in a molten state a plurality of plastic layers to form a parison, forming said parison into a container by blow-molding, said container having a plurality of layers formed from said parison comprising an inner thermoplastic polyolefin layer which is next to the product; an outer thermoplastic polyolefin layer; a barrier layer to prevent product oxidation or product permeation loss; a scrap layer including a mixture of a regrind of all the layers from previous containers of the same construction, said previous containers comprising inner and outer thermoplastic polyolefin layers, a barrier layer, an adhesive layer and a scrap layer; and at least one adhesive layer to adhere said barrier layer to a least one of the other layers.
2. A process of making a multi-layer plastic container which comprises coextruding in the molten state a plurality of plastic layers to form a parison, forming said parison into a container by blow-molding, said container having a plurality of layers formed from said parison comprising an inner thermoplastic polyolefin layer which is next to the product; an outer polyolefin thermoplastic layer; a barrier layer to prevent product oxidation or product permeation loss; a scrap layer including a mixture of a regrind of all the layers from previous containers of the same construction, said previous containers comprising inner and outer thermoplastic polyolefin layers, a barrier layer, an adhesive layer and a scrap layer; and at least one adhesive layer to adhere said barrier layer to at least one of the other layers.
3. A multi-layer plastic container adapted to contain oxygen sensitive products or contain products sensitive to permeation losses, said container being formed by internal blow-molding of a multi-layer tubular parison, said tubular parison having a plurality of layers coextruded in the molten state through a plurality of dies to form a parison with layers which are thereafter expanded by internal blow-molding said tubular parison into a mold having the shape of the container, said plurality of layers of said container including an inner thermoplastic polyolefin layer which is next to the product, an outer thermoplastic polyolefin layer; a barrier layer to prevent product oxidation or product permeation loss; a scrap layer including a mixture of regrind of all the layers from previous containers of the same construction, said previous containers comprising inner and outer thermoplastic polyolefin layers, a barrier layer, an adhesive layer and a scrap layer; and at least one adhesive layer to adhere said barrier layer to at least one of the other layers.
4. A process of making multi-layer plastic containers which comprises coextruding in the molten state a plurality of plastic layers through a plurality of dies to form a tubular parison, having a plurality of layers, internally blow-molding said parison to form a container, said container having a plurality of layers formed from said parison comprising an inner thermoplastic polyolefin layer which is next to the product; and outer polyolefin thermoplastic layer; a barrier layer to prevent product oxidation or product permeation loss; a scrap layer including a mixture of a regrind of all the layers from previous containers of the same construction, said previous containers comprising inner and outer thermoplastic polyolefin layers, a barrier layer, an adhesive layer and a scrap layer; and at least one adhesive layer to adhere said barrier layer to at least one of the other layers.
5. A process as in claim 2 or 4 wherein said adhesive is comprised of maleic anhydride-modified polyprophylene.
6. A process as in claim 2 or 4 wherein a second adhesive layer adheres said scrap layer to said inner thermoplastic layer.
7. A multi-layer parison blow-molded plastic container comprising a container-shaped structure having a multi-layer translucent laminate wall with an outer thermoplastic polyolefin layer; an inner thermoplastic polyolefin layer and an intermediate barrier layer; a first adhesive layer for adhesively joining said inner thermoplastic polyolefin layer to said barrier layer; a scrap layer interiorly of said outer thermoplastic polyolefin layer and a second adhesive layer for adhesively joining said scrap layer to said barrier layer, wherein said scrap layer includes a mixture of a regrind of all the layers from previous containers of the same construction, said previous containers comprising inner and outer thermoplastic polyolefin layers, a barrier layer, adhesive layers and a scrap layer.
8. A container as in claim 1, 3 or 7 wherein said adhesive is comprised of maleic anhydride-modified polypropylene.
9. A container as in claim 7 wherein said inner and outer thermoplastic layers are made of polypropylene or random copolymer of propylene and ethylene containing up to about 2 mol percent ethylene.
10. A container as in claim 8 wherein said inner and outer thermoplastic layers are made of polypropylene or random copolymer of propylene and ethylene containing up to about 2 mol percent ethylene.
11. A container as in claim 1, 3, or 7, wherein a second adhesive layer adheres said scrap layer to said inner thermoplastic layer.
12. A multi-layer plastic container adapted to contain oxygen sensitive products or contain products sensitive to permeation losses, and formed by coextruding in a molten state a plurality of plastic layers to form a parison, forming said parison into a container by blow-molding, said container having layers formed from said parison comprising a thermoplastic polyolefin layer; a layer functioning as a barrier layer to prevent product oxidation or product permeation loss; and a scrap layer, said scrap layer comprising a mixture of a regrind of all layers from previous containers of the same construction but said scrap layer not including the combination of scrap and an adhesive layer or bonding layer, said previous containers comprising a thermoplastic polyolefin layer, a layer functioning as a barrier layer, and a scrap layer.
13. A container as in claim 1, 3 or 12 wherein the container is formed from said parison so as to be translucent.
14. A multi-layer plastic container as in claim 1, 3, 7 or 12 wherein said parison is blow molded into a translucent container having a neck portion and a body portion and wherein said nect portion has a smaller cross-sectional area than the cross-sectional area of the body portion.
15. A container as in claim 12 further including an adhesive layer.
16. A container as in claim 12 wherein said thermoplastic polyolefin layer is made of polypropylene or random copolymer of propylene and ethylene containing up to about 2 mol percent ethylene.
17. A container as in claim 15 wherein said adhesive layer is comprised of maleic anhydride-modified polypropylene.
18. A process of making multi-layer plastic containers which comprises coextruding in the molten state a plurality of plastic layers to form a parison, forming said parison into a container by blow-molding, said container having a plurality of layers formed from said parison comprising thermoplastic polyolefin layer; a layer functioning as a barrier layer to prevent product oxidation or product permeation loss; and a scrap layer, said scrap layer comprising a mixture of a regrind of all the layers from previous parison blow-molded containers of the same construction but said scrap layer not including the combination of scrap and an adhesive layer or bonding layer, said previous containers comprising a thermoplastic polyolefin layer, a layer functioning as a barrier layer, and a scrap layer.
19. A process as in claim 2, 4 or 18 wherein the said parison is formed into a translucent container.
20. A process as in claim 2, 4 or 18 wherein said parison is blow molded into a translucent container having a neck portion and a body portion and wherein said neck portion has a smaller cross-sectional area than the cross-sectional area of the body portion.
21. A process as in claim 18 wherein said thermoplastic polyolefin layer is made of polypropylene or random copolymer of propylene and ethylene containing up to about 2 mol percent ethylene.
22. A process as in claim 18 wherein one of said layers is an adhesive comprised of maleic anhydride-modified polypropylene.
23. A process as in claim 22 wherein said adhesive layer adheres said scrap layer to said thermoplastic layer.
Description

This application is a continuation of Ser. No. 354,636 filed Mar. 4, 1982, now abandoned.

FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention generally relates to multi-layered laminated structure, process of making the same and containers made therefrom. It is particularly related to such laminated structure which comprises an oxygen impermeable barrier layer and at least one scrap layer produced from the extrudate of the multi-layered laminate structure, to a process of making such scrap layer-containing laminated structure and containers made therefrom.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Multi-layered laminate structures have long been used to make containers for a variety of products wherein, due to industrial requirements and specifications, it is not possible to use containers made from a single layer plastic material. In packaging foods, liquids such as various juices, sanitary articles and a host of other products, the container wall must withstand attack by oxygen or some of the ingredients of the packaged product which often tend to permeate through the container wall.

It has, by now, become well known to make multi-layered laminate structures from thermoformable plastics and to make containers therefrom by injection molding or blow molding techniques, and numerous thermoplastic resins have been disclosed and recommended for this purpose. Some of these thermoplastic materials and the composite laminated structures made therefrom are described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,560,325; 3,595,740; 3,882,259; 3,955,697; 4,182,457 and 4,234,663, to cite a few.

As mentioned in U.S. Pat. No. 4,234,663 which issued to Cattee et al. on Nov. 18, 1980, when multi-layer foil structures are used to make containers by thermoforming of the foil, considerable amount of "scrap" is obtained which may be as high as 50% of the total weight of the initially coextruded materials. If the scrap cannot be included in the multi-layered laminate structure, it constitutes a waste which must be disposed of with consequent economic disadvantages.

In their aforementioned patent, Cattee et al. disclose re-introduction of at least part of the scrap into the multi-layer foil structure as a "supplementary" layer. The scrap-containing layer of Cattee et al., however, is constituted by a mixture of the scrap with sufficient amount of adhesive, which is, a graft copolymer of a styrenic monomer on a polyolefinic substrate.

In an article by Muneki Yamada entitled "Oriented Multi-Layer Containers for Food: Solid Phase Pressure Formed Cups and Stretch-Blow Molded Bottles", presented on Mar. 17-19, 1981 at the "5th Annual International Conference On Oriented Plastic Containers", the author discusses the technology of solid phase pressure forming and stretch-blow molding in the manufacture of multi-layer containers. With reference to FIGS. 2 and 3, the author describes a 7-layer structure which comprises a scrap layer interposed between a polypropylene layer and an adhesive layer with no significant reduction in clarity (transparency of the containers) provided the thickness of the scrap layer is within certain critical thickness ratio to the other layers.

At page 5, the Yamada article refers to U.S. Pat. No. 4,182,457 for making "oriented" containers. This patent, however, is basically concerned with making transparent containers obtained by orienting the thermoplastic polyolefin olefin layer during stretch below molding of the parison.

So far as it is known, there is not, at the present, a totally satisfactory method of utilizing all the scrap in making a satisfactory multi-layer laminate for forming containers.

It is, accordingly, an object of the present invention to provide a multi-layer laminate structure including a distinct and separate layer of scrap produced from the co-extrudate formed during coextrusion of the different layers of several thermoplastic materials.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a method for efficient and economical utilization of the scrap when making containers from multi-layer laminate structure comprising several thermoplastic materials.

It is also an object of the present invention to make packaging containers from multi-layer laminated structures which include a scrap layer, wherein the container has, inter alia, excellent oxygen permeability and transparency.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A multi-layer laminate structure is provided which includes a separate layer of scrap made from regrind of the extrudate of the various resins used in making the laminate structure. Preferably, the multi-layer laminate structure comprises an outer thermoplastic polyolefin layer, an inner thermoplastic polyolefin layer and an intermediate oxygen barrier layer. The outer and inner polyolefin layers are preferably made of polypropylene, particularly crystalline isotactic polypropylene, and the intermediate barrier layer is preferably made of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer. A first adhesive layer bonds the inner polyolefin layer to the intermediate barrier layer. A separate scrap layer may be disposed interiorly of the outer polyolefin layer and a second adhesive layer bonds this scrap layer to the intermediate barrier layer. Alternatively, the separate scrap layer may be interposed between the inner polyolefin layer and the second adhesive layer, or it may be interposed at both of said positions.

Both adhesive layers are preferably made of maleic anhydride modified polypropylene to provide interlaminar strength and the several layers are formed by co-extrusion.

In order to make a container, the multi-layer structure is coextruded into a parison tube which is then placed in a blow mold and inflated by injection of air, under pressure, to form the container. Notwithstanding the inclusion of a separate scrap layer in the multi-layer structure, containers made therefrom exhibit excellent structural integrity, impermeability to oxygen and moisture and transparency.

The scrap is produced from regrind of the extrudate of the several thermoplastic layers and is reintroduced into the laminate structure by proper coextrusion sequence.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

In the drawings, wherein like reference numerals designate like parts:

FIG. 1 is a schematic sectional view illustrating the arrangements of the various layers of a 6-layer laminate structure, including a separate scrap layer, made in accordance with a preferred embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of a typical collapsible dispensing container, with portions of the body wall broken away, and

FIG. 3 is an enlarged partial sectional view showing the joint between the container body and its headpiece and illustrating the several layers of the laminate structure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

According to the broad principles of this invention, the several layers are first coextruded to form a parison tube which is then molded and shaped into the desired container form. It must be mentioned, however, that the formation of the parison tube and the container are well known techniques in the plastic industry. For example, one such method is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,079,850 wherein a multi-layer resin in the molten state is coextruded to form a parison. A pair of split molds are disposed around the parison and the split molds have such a configuration that when they are in register with each other, they define a cavity which correspond to the shape of the desired container. By injecting air, under pressure, the parison is blow molded to form the container. A further disclosure of the apparatus for making the containers is disclosed in our copending application Ser. No. 445,261, filed Nov. 29, 1982, now U.S. Pat. No. 4,522,775, issued June 11, 1985, which is continuation-in-part of our parent application Ser. No. 354,636, now abandoned.

In the preferred practice of this invention as illustrated in the drawing, the laminate structure has an intermediate gas and oxygen barrier layer of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer, outer and inner structural layers of a thermoplastic polyolefin, a separate scrap layer adjacent to the outer polyolefin layer and two adhesive layers, one interposed between the intermediate barrier layer and the scrap layer, and the other is interposed between the intermediate barrier layer and the inner polyolefin layer.

The polyolefins which are suitable in forming the outer and inner layers of the laminate structure are thermoplastic olefinic polymers such as e.g., low density polyethylene and polypropylene. Preferably, the polyolefin is a propylene-ethylene random copolymer containing about 2 mol percent ethylene.

The intermediate barrier layer is preferably ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer obtained by saponification of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymers containing from about 15 to about 45 mol percent ethylene and from about 55 to about 85 mol percent vinyl acetate. The degree of saponification of the ethylene-vinyl acetate is usually at least about 96 percent and often ranges from about 98.5 to about 99.5 percent, the remainder being residual vinyl acetate. Other oxygen barrier materials may be used such as, for example, nylon, polyester polymers and copolymers and suitable blends thereof with ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers.

The saponfied (hydrolyzed) copolymer has a melt index measured by ASTMD1238-Test E, in the range of about 0.5 to about 2 and is an excellent barrier against oxygen permeation.

Both adhesive layers are preferably made of maleic anhydride modified polypropylene wherein the polypropylene backbone is modified with maleic anhydride moieties. One such adhesive is available from Mitsui, Japan, under the Trademark ADMER QB 530. In general, however, polypropylene modified with ethylenically unsaturated carboxylic anhydrides may be used as the adhesive layers for the present laminate structure.

It must be mentioned that the aforementioned adhesives are particularly well suited when polypropylene or propylene-ethylene random copolymers constitute the outer and inner structural layers. However, when this layer is made of polyethylene, it is preferable to use a different adhesive such as, for example, the Plexar adhesives manufactured by Chemplex Company, Rolling Meadows, Ill. These adhesives are a blend of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer and a graft copolymer of polyethylene and a dicarboxylic acid anhydride

The scrap layer is made of regrind of the coextrudates of the different thermoplastic layers used to form the parison tube. The nature of the scrap and its incorporation into the laminate structure will hereinafter be described in detail in connection with the description of the process of this invention.

Referring now to the drawing, the multi-layer laminate structure generally designated as 1 has an outer polyolefin structural layer 3, an inner polyolefin structural layer 5 and an intermediate oxygen barrier layer 7. The inner polyolefin layer 5 is adhesively bonded to the intermediate barrier layer 7 by the adhesive layer 9.

As is further shown in the drawing the laminate structure 1 includes a separate scrap layer 11 which is adhesively bonded to the intermediate layer 7 by a second adhesive layer 13.

All the layers are coextensively bonded along their respective junctions with no interlaminar separation between the respective layers of the laminate structure.

In order to form the laminate structure, the thermoplastic resins used to make the different layers are coextruded, in the molten state through several dies, to form the parison tube. The parison tube is then blow molded by injection of air, under pressure, and is shaped into a container in a separate container mold. The excess materials from this blow molding operation are ground-up and mixed as a homogeneous scrap and the scrap layer is reintroduced into the laminate structure. As a practical matter, therefore, this process permits utilization of all the scrap produced during the container forming operations. Accordingly, the economy of this operation is considerably improved and waste disposal is virtually eliminated.

In addition to improving the economy of operation and reduction of waste disposal, it has been found that inclusion of a separate scrap layer in the multilayer laminate structure does not detract from the transparency of unoriented containers made of such laminate structures. The ability to make transparent containers by nonoriented blow molding of a multilayer laminate structure having a completely separate layer of scrap constitutes a novel and surprising feature of the present invention.

In forming the composite laminate described herein, it is preferable to first combine the adhesive layers with the barrier layer of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer. The reason is that the barrier layer and the adhesive layers are relatively thin layers and their precombination therefore affords structural integrity to the combined layers and permit their uniform introduction into, and their extrusion through the die.

While the invention has heretofore been described with a certain degree of particularity and illustrated by a 6-layer laminate structure, several changes and modifications are suggested from the foregoing disclosure which arew nevertheless within the scope and contemplation of this invention. For example, additional layers may be used for decorative purposes or otherwise and more than one scrap layer can be reintroduced into the laminate structure if desired.

It is also within the contemplation of this invention to make a 5-layer laminate structure, and to form containers therefrom as aforesaid. In this construction, the scrap layer constitutes the outer layer and the outer polyolefin layer is therefore eliminated.

Additionally, if desired, the scrap layer may be interposed between the inner polyolefin layer and the second adhesive layer, or two scrap layers may be incorporated in the laminate structure; one interposed between the outer polyolefin layer and the first adhesive layer, and the other is interposed between the inner polyolefin layer and the second adhesive layer.

Containers having excellent oxygen barrier properties and good transparency can be made by varying the relative thicknesses of the different layers. For example, excellent barrier properties and good transparency can be obtained from the multi-layer structure of this invention when the thickness of the ethylene-vinyl alcohol layer is between about 0.5 to about 2 mils and the scrap layer constitutes up to about 40 weight percent of the total extrudate.

FIG. 2 shows a collapsible container generally designated as 15 having a tubular body 17 which, after filling with the product 19, is closed at its end 21 by heat sealing or some other suitable technique. Mounted at the opposite end of the tubular body 17 is a plastic headpiece 23 which is usually shaped to provide an externally threaded neck for threaded engagement with an internally threaded cap 25. The headpiece 23 may be fused to the tubular body 17 by a suitable procedure such as described in U.S. Pat. No. 2,673,374.

In FIG. 3, the tubular body 17 is shown to consist of six layers, laminated or otherwise bonded one to the other. The number of layers may vary, however, if desired. The layers shown in FIG. 3 are, from the outside to the inside of the tubular body:

outer layer 3 of a polyolefin

scrap layer 11

adhesive layer 13

oxygen barrier layer 7

adhesive layer 9

inner polyolefin layer 5

The nature and function of the different layers were previously discussed in connection with the description of the laminate structure shown in FIG. 1.

In bonding the headpiece 23 to the tubular body 17, headpiece 23 is provided with a cylindrical skirt portion 27 and a peripheral inwardly curved portion 29 which are bonded to the tubular body 17 and its upper marginal inner surface 31 and upper edge 33 to form a head Joint 35. The continuous peripheral and vertical fused areas of the Joint 35 result in a strong attachment of the headpiece 23 to the tubular body 17 with a high resistance to separation by either axial, radial or twisting forces, or combinations thereof. Preferably, the upper end 37 is turned in slightly and recessed into the headpiece 23 with the edge 33 of the body welded to the material of the head so that the outer surface of the Joint 35 is a smooth substantially uninterrupted surface.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3882259 *Mar 30, 1973May 6, 1975Toyo Seikan Kaisha LtdLaminate of ethylene/vinyl alcohol copolymer, ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer and polyolefins
US3940001 *May 6, 1974Feb 24, 1976Ethyl CorporationRecyclable plastic containers
US4234663 *Jan 29, 1979Nov 18, 1980Ato ChimieThermoplastic multi-layer foil structure
US4239826 *Dec 28, 1978Dec 16, 1980American Can CompanyMulti-layer barrier film
US4254169 *Dec 28, 1978Mar 3, 1981American Can CompanyMulti-layer barrier film
US4287147 *Apr 25, 1980Sep 1, 1981Mobil Oil CorporationBy coextrusion of polyacrylonitrile
US4289830 *Mar 14, 1980Sep 15, 1981American Can CompanyEthylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer gas barrier layer with phenol additive
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4808482 *Feb 6, 1987Feb 28, 1989Metal Box Public Limited CompanyBarrier and reclaim layers separately coextruded with skin layers and extrusion laminated together
US4846359 *Dec 18, 1987Jul 11, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyEnhanced flavor retention;for citrus beverages
US4894291 *Jan 28, 1988Jan 16, 1990Rampart Packaging Inc.Polypropylene, polyethylene, ethylene-propylene copolymer, blends, lamination
US4990382 *Sep 11, 1987Feb 5, 1991Continental Plastic Containers, Inc.Multilayer
US4999254 *Sep 21, 1990Mar 12, 1991Rampart Packaging Inc.Reuse of scrap material in food packaging, ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers, polyvinylidene chloride, polypropylene
US5035933 *Sep 28, 1989Jul 30, 1991Rohm And Haas CompanyPlastic articles with compatibilized barrier resin
US5039565 *May 30, 1990Aug 13, 1991E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyPlastic composite barrier structures
US5045369 *May 4, 1989Sep 3, 1991Ajinomoto Co., Inc.Multilayer; stretched barrier thermoplastic layer
US5049449 *Nov 30, 1989Sep 17, 1991Ofstein David EWithout increased turbulence
US5064724 *Oct 9, 1990Nov 12, 1991Shell Oil CompanyIncreased regrind usage in coextruded structures
US5300570 *Jul 8, 1992Apr 5, 1994Rohm And Haas CompanyPlastic articles with compatibilized barrier resin
US5320889 *Oct 21, 1991Jun 14, 1994Tropicana Products, Inc.Plastic bottle for food
US5372863 *Apr 30, 1993Dec 13, 1994Kansai Tube Co., Ltd.Single layer of melt-blended composition of polyethylene, ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer, saponified ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, and acid-modified polyethylene
US5433984 *Oct 13, 1993Jul 18, 1995Rohm And Haas CompanyOlefin-methacrylate
US5451075 *Jun 29, 1994Sep 19, 1995Davidson Textron Inc.Closure for an air bag assembly
US5462777 *Jun 28, 1994Oct 31, 1995Sumitomo Chemical Company, LimitedWrapping multilayer film
US5569959 *May 3, 1995Oct 29, 1996David Textron, Inc.Closure for an air bag assembly
US5605660 *Apr 20, 1995Feb 25, 1997W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.Process for making a multi-layer film containing recycle polymer from cross-linked films
US5624516 *Dec 20, 1994Apr 29, 1997Atlantic Research CorporationMethods of making preforms for composite material manufacture
US5693424 *Jun 7, 1995Dec 2, 1997Showa Denko K.K.Polypropylene, ethylene-n-alkyl- or dialkyl-acrylamide; improved transparency
US5712009 *Sep 16, 1993Jan 27, 1998Owens-Illinois Plastic Products Inc.Coextruded multilayer plastic container utilizing post consumer plastic
US5928798 *Sep 18, 1996Jul 27, 1999Cryovac, Inc.Multi-layer polyolefin film containing recycle polymer from cross-linked films
US5935847 *May 4, 1998Aug 10, 1999Baxter International Inc.Flexible, gas permeable film comprising polystyrene layer, styrene copolymer layer
US5976300 *Dec 15, 1997Nov 2, 1999Baxter International Inc.Method of sealing a port tube in a container
US5998019 *Nov 16, 1993Dec 7, 1999Baxter International Inc.Multi-layered polymer structure for medical products
US6024220 *Dec 24, 1997Feb 15, 2000Baxter International Inc.Encapsulated seam for multilayer materials
US6170535Nov 12, 1999Jan 9, 2001Salflex Polymers Ltd.Multi-layer conduit
US6183460Jan 22, 1998Feb 6, 2001Baxter International Inc.Multi-use solution container having flaps
US6297046Oct 28, 1994Oct 2, 2001Baxter International Inc.Flexible film for forming container has polystyrene inner layer for cell growth surface and outer layer of polymer alloy blend adhered to inner layer; can be manufactured for adjustable gas permeability
US6361843Jun 29, 2000Mar 26, 2002Baxter International Inc.Core layer of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer having ethylene content of 25-45 mole percent, solution contact layer of polyolefin, outer layer selected from polyamides, polyesters and polyolefins, tie layer; flexibility, toughness
US6371318Dec 24, 1997Apr 16, 2002Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Plastic closure with compression molded sealing/barrier liner
US6383589Mar 29, 1999May 7, 2002Pechiney Plastic Packaging, Inc.Multilayer plastic structures, containers made therefrom, and methods of making the structures
US6399170Dec 24, 1997Jun 4, 2002Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Plastic closure with compression molded barrier liner
US6405896 *May 18, 2001Jun 18, 2002Alusuisse Technology & Management Ltd.Packaging tube, in particular a tubular pipe, having a container body opening; single-piece hinged cover seal; composite film with an inner and an outer external film each comprising a propylene polymer cover layer
US6499878Dec 21, 1999Dec 31, 2002Pactiv CorporationReclosable packages with barrier properties
US6508275Mar 15, 2000Jan 21, 2003Salflex Polymers Ltd.Flexible fuel filler pipe
US6558762 *Mar 28, 2002May 6, 2003Bp Corporation North America Inc.Zero oxygen permeation plastic bottle for beer and other applications
US6670007Apr 7, 1999Dec 30, 2003Owens-Brockway Plastic Products Inc.Multilayer container
US6677016Jan 16, 2002Jan 13, 2004Owens-Illimois Closure Inc.Plastic closure with compression molded sealing/barrier liner
US6696123Feb 5, 2002Feb 24, 2004Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Plastic closure with compression molded barrier liner
US7651651Oct 7, 2003Jan 26, 2010Rexam Closure Systems Inc.Plastic closure with compression molded sealing/barrier liner
USRE34537 *Sep 21, 1992Feb 8, 1994E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyFoils of high density polyethylene and foils of polar oxygen barrier resins adhered to each other
EP0496704A1 *Jan 21, 1992Jul 29, 1992Kmk Lizence Ltd.Packaging tube
EP0630747A2 *Jun 27, 1994Dec 28, 1994Sumitomo Chemical Company, LimitedMultilayer wrapping films
EP0697342A1 *Jul 12, 1995Feb 21, 1996Alusuisse-Lonza Services AGAnti-theft device for tubular containers
WO1996019618A1 *Dec 20, 1995Jun 27, 1996Atlantic Res CorpPreforms for composite material manufacture and methods of making
WO2000063085A1 *Apr 14, 2000Oct 26, 2000Curie Kevin JamesTransparent multilayer polypropylene container with barrier protection
WO2007125256A1 *Apr 26, 2007Nov 8, 2007LagardeMulti-layer semi-rigid sheet material with high thermal resistance for the manufacture by folding of product packaging containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/36.7, 264/37.31, 428/518, 428/516, 428/349, 264/37.33, 428/520, 264/515, 426/127
International ClassificationC08J11/06, B65D35/12, B29C49/22, B32B27/00, B65D35/08
Cooperative ClassificationB32B2272/00, B29K2105/26, B29C49/22, B65D35/12, B65D35/08, B29K2023/00, C08J11/06, B29C49/041
European ClassificationC08J11/06, B29C49/22, B65D35/12, B65D35/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 19, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: PECHINEY EMBALLAGE FLEXIBLE EUROPE, FRANCE
Free format text: RESUBMISSION OF DOCUMENT ID NO 102198992;ASSIGNOR:PECHINEY PLASTIC PACKAGING, INC.;REEL/FRAME:013467/0484
Effective date: 20020117
Owner name: PECHINEY EMBALLAGE FLEXIBLE EUROPE 1 RUE DE L UNIO
Free format text: RESUBMISSION OF DOCUMENT ID NO 102198992;ASSIGNOR:PECHINEY PLASTIC PACKAGING, INC. /AR;REEL/FRAME:013467/0484
Mar 1, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: PECHINEY PLASTIC PACKAGING, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: DUPLICATE RECORDING;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN NATIONAL CAN COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:012463/0493
Effective date: 20011112
Owner name: PECHINEY PLASTIC PACKAGING, INC. 8770 W. BRYN MAWR
Free format text: DUPLICATE RECORDING;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN NATIONAL CAN COMPANY /AR;REEL/FRAME:012463/0493
Jan 17, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: PECHINEY PLASTIC PACKAGINC, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN NATIONAL CAN COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:012463/0131
Effective date: 20011112
Owner name: PECHINEY PLASTIC PACKAGINC, INC. 8770 W. BRYN MAWR
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN NATIONAL CAN COMPANY /AR;REEL/FRAME:012463/0131
May 10, 1999FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
May 1, 1995FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Apr 2, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: AMERICAN NATIONAL CAN COMPANY, ILLINOIS
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:NATIONAL CAN CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:006507/0715
Effective date: 19870430
Apr 22, 1991FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4