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Publication numberUS471990 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 29, 1892
Filing dateOct 14, 1891
Publication numberUS 471990 A, US 471990A, US-A-471990, US471990 A, US471990A
InventorsW. Daily
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Endoscopic instrument
US 471990 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 1.

J. W. DAILY.. ENDOSGOPIG INSTRUMENT.

,9'90. Patented'Mar. 29, 1892,

(No Model.) 2 Sheets$heet 2.

, J.,W. DAILY. ENDOSGOPIG INSTRUMENT.

No. 471.990. Patented. Mar..29, 1892.

UNITED STATES PATENT QFFICE.

JOHN W. DAILY, OF DENVER, COLORADO.

EN DOSCOPIC INSTRU M ENT.

SPECIFICATION forming partof Letters Patent No. 471,990, dated March 29, 1892.

Application filed October 14, 1891. Serial No. 408,732- (No model.)

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, JOHN W. DAILY, a citizen of the United States of America, residing at- Denver, in the county of Arapahoe and State of Colorado, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Endoscopic Instruments; and I do declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters and figures of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

My invention relates to improvements in endoscopic instruments, or those designed for use in examining or viewing the cavities of the body.

The object of theimprovementis the better illumination of these cavities during examinations or operations. This object I accomplish by attaching to the instrument a small incandescent electric lamp; and the improvement consists in the peculiar manner of making this attachment, whereby the lamp is entirely concealed or buried within the jaw of the instrument, the light passing therefrom through an opening covered bya transparent plate.

The invention will be fully understood by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which is illustrated an embodiment thereof.

In the drawings, Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 show a rectal speculum provided with my improvement, while in Figs. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 is illustrated the manner of applying the improvement to a vaginal speculum. Of these views, Fig. 5 is a cross-section taken on the line ,2 ,2, Fig. 4., while Figs. 9, 11, and 12 are sections taken on the lines a a, Fig. 7, a: or and y y, Figs. 8 and 9, respectively.

As illustrated in the drawings, the improvement is shown as applied to speculums, which are considered the best type of instruments with which the improvements would be useful. It must be understood, however, that I do not wish to limit myself to the use of the invention with speculums, as it may with equal advantage be applied to all instruments of a similar class, as those for examining the throat, ear, nostrils, &c.

In the construction ofinstruments with this improvement, one jaw thereof being made sufficiently thick, a recess is formed therein opening on the inside of the jaw. The bottom of this recess is then lined with a thin layer of asbestus wool or other suitable nonconductor of heat to prevent the possibility of unduly heating the surrounding parts. A small electric lamp is placed within the recess, resting upon the asbestus wool, which forms a cushion therefor. A transparent plate composed of suitable material, preferably mica, is then placed above the lamp, covering the recess and resting upon the surrounding metal. A metal plate provided with a suitable aperture is then placed above the transparent plate and secured to the jaw of the instrument in any suitable manner, preferably by the use of screws, so as to be readily removable when, for instance, it is desired to remove a burned-outlam p and substitute a new one. The covering for the lamp-recessshould be sufficiently tight to allow the cleaning of the instrument Without permitting the entrance of liquids to this recess. Hence the removable metal plate and the transparent plate may be sealed together before being placed in position on the instrument. The removable plate being preferably of considerable extent, it is then quite easy to secure the plate in such a manner as to prevent the entrance of liquids to the lamp while cleansing the instrument.

In Figs. 1 to 5, inclusive, I have shown the improvement in connection with a speculum provided with overlapping jaws on one side, said construction being protected by Letters Patent No. 458,708, issued to me and bearing date September 1, 1891. In Fig. l the overlapping part 2 of this instrument is made removable and is secured by means of screws. Hence in the construction of this instrument with my present improvement I form the recess B within the lower thickened part l of one of the jaws. Within this recess I place the asbestus cushion 5, above this cushion the lamp 6, above the lamp the transparent plate 7, and then the removable metal plate 2. In Figs. 2, 3, 4., and 5 the overlapping part. 2 is formed integral with the jaw, and a small plate 2, having a suitable aperture, is connected to part 2, and forms, in combination with the transparent plate, a sealed covering for the lamp-recess. Plate 2 is preferably sealed to part 2 by the use of jewelers cemcut, so that it may be unsealed by the use of hot water when it is necessary to replace a lamp. From the lamp-recess lead grooves 9, in which are locatedthe leading-in wires 10 and 12 for the lamp.

In the vaginal speculum (shown in Figs. (3 to 12, inclusive) one jaw 13 is provided with an enlargement 14, increasing the thickness of the metal sutliciently to permit the forming in this jaw of a recess 3 for the lamp 6. The removable plate 2 in this case preferably covers the entire inner face of the jaw. From the lamp-recess lead the grooves for the leading-in wires, which are located beneath the removable plate 2, passing out through suitable openings in said jaw and along the outside of the handles 15 to the binding-posts 1S and 19, respectively.

The incandescent lamp employed should of course be as small as consistent with furnishing sufficient light for the purpose. Lamps having a capacity of from one-half to one candle-power are found amply suificient for the purpose. An ordinary battery of two or four cells will furnish the required current to run the lamp. It will thus be seen that this application of electric light to endoscopic instruments is thoroughly practicable, and therefore a most valuable attachment, the lamp being entirely below the inner surface of the jaw, and consequently removed from all danger of being broken during use or while cleansing the instrument.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is- 1. An endoscopic instrument having a recess formed therein, an incandescent electric lamp located therein, and a removable fenestrated plate secured to the instrument in such a manner as to permit the light to illuminate the cavity during use, substantially as described.

2. An endoscopic instrument having a recess formed on the inner surface of its jaw, an incandescent electric lamp located there in, a cushion beneath the lamp, and a fenestrated plate secured to the jaw of the instrument and permitting the light from the lamp to illuminate the cavity during use, substantially as described.

An endoscopic instrument having a recessed jaw, an incandescent lamp located within the recess, a transparent plate covering the recess, and an outer plate securing the transparent plate in place and provided with an opening above the recess and so located as to permit the light from the lamp to illuminate the cavity during use, substantially as described.

l. An endoscopic instrument having a recessed jaw, an incandescent lamp located within the recess, an asbest-us cushion located beneath the lamp, a transparent plate covering the recess, and an outer plate securing the transparent plate in place and provided with an opening above the recess and so located as to permit the light from the lamp to illuminate the cavity during use, substantially as described,

In testimony whereof I allix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

JOHN W. DAILY. \Vitnesses:

WM. MoCoNNELL, G. J. ROLLANDET.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4300541 *Aug 22, 1980Nov 17, 1981Kermit BurginSpeculum lens structure
US4337763 *Apr 21, 1980Jul 6, 1982The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of Health, Education And WelfareIlluminated surgical instrument
US5785648 *Oct 9, 1996Jul 28, 1998David Min, M.D., Inc.Speculum
US6450952 *Apr 22, 1999Sep 17, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Medical body access device
US6702741Jul 19, 2002Mar 9, 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Medical body access device
US7691120 *Aug 26, 2004Apr 6, 2010Zimmer Spine, Inc.Access systems and methods for minimally invasive surgery
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA61B1/32