Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS483771 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 4, 1892
Publication numberUS 483771 A, US 483771A, US-A-483771, US483771 A, US483771A
InventorsAlbert P. Seymour
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulator
US 483771 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

A. P. SEYMOUR.

INSULATOR.

No. 483,771. Patented Oct, 4, 1892.

I VENTUH: JTLZJ art-P 69mm ur '3 Q14 Morn/a2 ,ATTEs'T m: moms versus cm, mom-mm), msnmcmu, n. c

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ALBERT P. SEYMOUR, OF SYRACUSE, NE\V YORK.

INSULATOR.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 483,771, dated October 4, 1892.

Application filed March 5 1892.

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, ALBERT P. SEYMOUR, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Syracuse, in the county of Onondaga and State of New York, have invented a certain new and useful lViring-Insulator, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to the construction of electric wiring-insulators, and more particularly to porcelain-block insulators adapted to be secured to ceilings, Walls, or other plane surfaces.

The object of my invention is to provide a porcelairrblock insulator that may be held or fastened by a single central screw, and that shall at the same time hold the wire securely without tie-wires and without making a loop or turn in the wire itself and which shall, moreover, not be liable to turn by the tension of the wire.

The invention consistsin the new article of manufacture hereinafter described and comprising, essentially, a solid block of porcelain provided on its periphery at one end with two hooks or lugs disposed on opposite sides of the line in which the wire lies when passed beneath both the lugs or hooks and havinga central axial perforation extending through it endwise from the central depressed or recessed portion between the lugs or hooks where the wire lies.

My invention consists, further, in other features of construction hereinafter described, and more particularly specified in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of an insulator embodying my invention, a piece of wire being shown in place therein. Fig. 2 is a vertical central section of the insulator on a line parallel to the wire held therein.

A indicates a solid block of porcelain or similar good insulating substance, and B B the hooks or lugs which, as shown in the perspective, lie at opposite sides of the line-wire L and project from the body of the block at the end opposite that which rests upon the surface of the wall or ceiling. Grooves (J exist at the side of the insulator, which are for the purpose of facilitating the formation of the plastic body of clay by a die or in a press.

Serial No. 423,830. (No model.)

At D are openings forming a space to allow the wire to be passed under the hook.

E is a central axial perforation extending endwise through the block from the central depressed or recessed portion between the lugs or hooks where the wire L lies. This perforation receives the screw which fastens the insulator-block to a suitable support, the end of said insulator opposite the hooks B resting upon the surface of such support. At the end bearing upon the surface of the support the block is furnished with several feet or studs G, which studs are preferably rounded or pointed at their ends, so that there is but little surface contact between the insulator and the body to which it is secured.

As will be seen from the vertical section, the inside or under side of the hooks or lugs upon which the wire bears is nearly on a level with the surface of the central depressed portion around the perforation, at which part the Wire also is supported, the effect being to pro duce a bend in the wire at this point which holds the wire fast.

As will be observed, the wire runs through the center of the insulator, and any tension on it will not have the effect of turning the insulatoigand thus throwing slack onto the wire on one side. The central perforation is countersunk at its outer end, as shown, so that the head of the screw will be well below the wire, and a short screw maybe employed for fastening the insulator to a ceiling. It will be observed, further, that the end of the perforation for the screw is guarded by the wire, so that the screw cannot fall out of the insulator. The central depressed portion upon which the wire rests between the hooks forms, in eifect, a shoulder adapted to bend the wire in a direction transverse to the direction in which the wire has to be bent or deflected in order to enter it under the second hook. After theinsulator is fastened in position the Wire is simply applied by fastening it under one lug, pulling it tight, and then deflecting it to one side and passing it under the otherlug, the slight bend which is necessary to thus pass it under the other lug serving to hold it fast.

As will be observed, the insulator is not only securely fastened, but the wire is held a good distance from the ceiling or other support whlch is not the case in any of the block insulators at present in use for electric wiring purposes.

\Vhat I claim as my invention is 1. As a new article of manufacture, a block insulator consisting of a solid block or piece of porcelain or similar material provided on its periphery at one end with two hooks or lugs disposed on opposite sides of the line in which the wire lies when passed beneath both said lugs or hooks and having a central axial perforation extending through the block endwrse from a depressed or recessed end portion lylng between the lugs or hooks, as and for the purpose described. 2. As a new article of manufacture, a block lnsulator provided at the end that engages the surface of the support with a number of bearing-studs projecting directly from the body thereof at a number of points between the edge and the central perforation for the fastening-screw. 3. As anew article of manufacture, a block insulator consisting of a solid block of porcelain having at one end two hooks or lugs inclosing a central depressed end portion from which extends a hole centrally through the block to the opposite end, where the block is provided with several bearing studs or projections engaging the surface to which it is applied.

&. As a new article of manufacture, a wiring-insulator consisting of a solid block of porcelain or similar material, having at one end a pair of hooks lying on opposite sides of the line in which the wire lies, a central depressed or recessed portion at the same end connected with the opposite end of the block bya countersunk hole or perforation, said depressed portion and hooks being disposed or arranged so as to tend to produce a slight bend in the wire in a direction transverse to that in which it has to be bent or deiiectedin order to pass it under the hooks or lugs.

Signed at Syracuse, in the county of Onondaga and State of New York, this 2d day of March, A. D. 1892.

ALBERT P. SEYMOUR.

Witnesses:

JOHN G. Knnrrn, ED\VARD 0. WARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5791022 *Jan 23, 1997Aug 11, 1998Bohman; LarsCord locking mechanism
US5952616 *Aug 26, 1997Sep 14, 1999Hughes Electronics CorporationCable retainer with retaining surfaces having offset protrusions
US5987707 *Jan 5, 1999Nov 23, 1999Deshon; James RichardBungee cord shortening device
US6793595Sep 2, 2003Sep 21, 2004Michael James MonnetCord fastener for sports nets
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationH01B17/24