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Publication numberUS488773 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1892
Filing dateMay 23, 1892
Publication numberUS 488773 A, US 488773A, US-A-488773, US488773 A, US488773A
InventorsE. Peck
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reclining-chair
US 488773 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Moder.)

E.'E. PEOK. REGLINING CHAIR,

No. 488,773. Patented Dec. 27,1892.

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UNTTnn STATES A EDMUND E. PEOK, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

RECLINING-CHAIR.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 88,773, dated December 2'7, 1892.

Application filed May 23, 1892. Serial No. 433,951. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, EDMUND E. PEOK, a citizen of the United States, residing at Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State of New York, have invented an Improvement in Reclining- Ohairs, of which the following is a specification.

In the presentinvention the back and seatframe are hinged together and the back is pivoted to the upper portion of the back legs,

and there is a movable latch to hold the parts in the positions to which they may be moved, and the seat can be projected forward by the action of a treadle and cross shaft, so that when the improvement is applied upon a barbers chair the barber can easily adapt the chair to a reclining or a more or less upright position for the party seated in it, and a peculiar head-rest is provided at the upper end of the back.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a vertical section of the chair complete. Fig. 2 is an inverted plan, the frames being represented in skeleton without upholstering. Fig. 8 is a detached view of the back for the head-rest with the frame in section at the line 'y y, and Fig. at is a sectional plan at the line a; a: representing one corner of the seat frame and adjacent parts.

The front legs A and back legs 13 are connected together by suitable cross pieces D E and side pieces 0, and the front legs are extended up sufficiently for the reception of arm pieces F; all of these may be of any desired size, material or ornamental character. The back frame is composed of the side pieces G and cross pieces G, and the seat frame is made of the side pieces H and front cross piece I, and usually there will be a back cross piece I. The back frame is pivoted at K to the back legs at or near the arm pieces and there is a hinge connection between the lower ends of the back frame G and the seat frame H, such hinge being preferably in the form of a joint piece L upon the seat frame H and an intermediate link M between the joint piece L and the back frame G, and the forward portion of the seat frame H I is supported by links N that are either curved or L-shaped and pivoted at 4 to the inner faces of the front legs A, and their upper ends come devices, and these springs tend to draw the seat frame backwardly into a normal position to coincide with the chair frame.

A cross shaft P is supported by the chair frame and upon it is a crank arm P and a link Q to the seat frame, and there is also upon the cross shaft P a crank arm R to which is suspended the treadle S, which treadle is guided by an arm and link T to one of the back legs, and there is a foot piece at the lower end of the treadle so that the barber or attendant, by placing his foot upon the treadle S gives to the shaft P a partial rotation and the crank P and link Q press the seat-frame forward against the action of the springs O, and in so doing the links N swing and they take the weight of the person upon the seat frame at the front part thereof, so that there is but little friction in the movement; and when the back frame G is hinged directly to the back part of the seat frame, the back of the chair is brought into a more or less inclined position by every movement given to the seat frame, but where the links M are provided in the hinged connection between the back and seat frame, a limited movement can be given to the seat frame Without moving the back frame.

The latch bar U is pivoted at one end upon either the back leg or upon the back frame;

I have represented it as pivoted upon the more notches in it, and-it will hold the parts of the back frame in any position to which they may be adjusted in relation to the back legs, and this latch bar has to be lifted to disengage its notch from the stud 6 before the relative positions of the parts can be changed. I prefer to employ a spring 7 to press the latch bar down to its normal position, and a chain 8 upon the moving end of the latch bar by which the barber or other attendant can easily lift the moving end of the latch bar and disconnect it from its stud,so that the chair can be moved into a more or less inclined position, and it is to be understoodthat the treadle and cross shaft are specially convenient in barbers chairs, but in other reclining chairs these parts might be dispensed with.

The back and seat frame may be caned, upholstered or otherwise finished in any desired manner; and at the upper part of the back frame and fastened thereto is a slide way V having a central longitudinal slot and teeth 9 upon the front face of the slide way, and the head rest W is upon the upper end of the bars 10 that pass down through the top cross piece of the back frame and they are united at 11 as a fork upon which fork is fastened a spring 12 with teeth 13 at its upper end that engage the teeth 9 upon the slide way, and there is a thumb piece 14 passing through the longitudinal slot of the slide way and projecting at the back, so that the attendant, grasping this thumb piece, can press the teeth 13 upon the spring 12 out of contact with the teeth 9 upon the slide way and then move the head-rest upwardly or downwardly, and when the pressure upon the thumb piece 14 is relieved the spring 12 throws the teeth 13 into the teeth 9 and holds the head-restin its elevated or depressed position.

The head rest has heretofore usually been connected directly to its supporting bars and it was necessary to pull out the bars when the head rest had to be disconnected from the back. To avoid this difficulty I make a plate 15 to screw upon the head rest with a flange 16 at one side and a clamp plate 17 and screw 18, there being half round sockets in the flange and clamp plate to receive the upper ends of the rods 10, hence the head-rest can be firmly clamped to the rods, or easily removed therefrom by simply slackening the screw 18 which is a great convenience in barbers chairs.

If the front part of the seat frame is held stationary by a pin through the hole 20 into the hole 21 or by any other device on the chair frame, the back can be inclined more or less as the links M allow for the back swinging without moving the seat forward or'backward.

I claim as my invention.

1. The combination with the legs and cross pieces forming the chair frame, of a back frame, pivots for connecting the same to the upper portion of the back legs, a seat frame, links connecting the back edges of the seat frame to the lower end of the back frame, curved links pivoted at their lower ends to the chair frame and at their upper ends to the seat frame, and a pivoted latch bar and stud between the back frame and the chair frame for retaining the parts in position, a cross shaft crank and lever connections to be acted upon by the foot, for inclining the chair more or less, substantially as specified.

2. The combination with the legs and cross pieces forming the chair frame, of a back frame, pivots for connecting the same to the upper portions of the back legs, a seat frame, links connecting the back edges of the seat frame to the lower end of the back frame, links pivoted at the lower ends to the chair frame and at their upper ends to the seat frame, and a cross shaft crank and lever connections to be acted on by the foot for inclining the chair more or less substantially as specified.

3. The combination with the legs and connections forming the chair frame, of a back frame pivoted to the back legs, a seat frame and hinge connections having swinging links between the back portion of the seat frame and the lower ends of the back frame, links connected at their upper ends to the seat frame and at their lower ends to the front legs for allowing the chair to be inclined more or less, a cross shaft supported by the chair frame, and crank arms and a connection from one of the crank arms to the seat frame, and a treadle connected to the other crank arm for giving motion to the seat frame, substantially as set forth.

Signed by me this 12th day of May, 1892.

EDMUND E. PEGK.

Witnesses:

GEo. T. PINCKNEY, WILLIAM G. Mom".

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2497395 *Mar 4, 1946Feb 14, 1950Cramer Sr Roy AReclining chair
US2517278 *Oct 12, 1945Aug 1, 1950Jarome F BensonFour point swing suspension
US2612211 *May 16, 1950Sep 30, 1952American Seating CoRemovable cushion plate and seat standard
US2616483 *May 19, 1945Nov 4, 1952Stanley Wood CReclining chair
US2677412 *Dec 3, 1947May 4, 1954Thomas Joseph RReclining chair
US3329463 *Mar 28, 1966Jul 4, 1967Budd CoCenter pivot reclining seat
US4709960 *Apr 17, 1986Dec 1, 1987Play, S. A.Reclinable children's chair
US4979778 *Jan 17, 1989Dec 25, 1990Brayton International, Inc.Synchrotilt chair
US5667277 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 16, 1997Herman Miller Inc.Height adjustable arm rest assembly
US6733080Sep 27, 2002May 11, 2004Herman Miller, Inc.Seating structure having a backrest with a flexible membrane and a moveable armrest
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/032