Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS4912364 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 07/219,933
Publication dateMar 27, 1990
Filing dateJul 15, 1988
Priority dateJul 16, 1987
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asDE3823602A1
Publication number07219933, 219933, US 4912364 A, US 4912364A, US-A-4912364, US4912364 A, US4912364A
InventorsSandor Hollo, Zsolt Marton, Balazs Nyiri, Janos Szanto
Original AssigneeTungsram Reszvenytarsasag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Three-phase high-pressure gas discharge lamp filled with a gas containing sodium or a metal-halide
US 4912364 A
Abstract
A three-phase high-pressure gas discharge lamp comprising a discharge vessel (1) made of a translucent heat-resistant material. Three electrodes are arranged in the discharge vessel (1), each being fed from a separate phase of a three-phase supply system, each electrode including an electrode tip (7), an electrode stem (5) and an electrode head (6). The electrodes are arrnaged so that their electrode tips (7) occupy the vertices of an equilateral triangle fully enclosed in the discharge vessel (1). The discharge vessel (1) contains a filling consisting of a noble gas, mercury and a further additive selected from the group consisting of preferably sodium and a metal-halide.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(17)
What we claim is:
1. A three-phase high-pressure gas discharge lamp comprising: a discharge vessel made of a translucent heat resistant material and a filling in said discharge vessel consisting of a noble gas, mercury and at least one further additive, an electrode arrangement consisting of three electrodes each fed from a separate phase of a three phase voltage source, each electrode comprising an electrode tip, an electrode stem attached to the respective current inlet and an electrode head, arranged so that the tips of said electrodes constitute the vertices of an imaginary equilateral triangle situated within said discharge vessel, wherein the filling in said discharge vessel is completed with at least one further additive selected from the group consisting of sodium and metal-halide.
2. The three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 1, wherein said discharge vessel consists of quartz and said current inlets and the sections of said electrode stems are located in a single star-shaped flattening formed by three planes with angles of 120 between them.
3. The three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 1, wherein said discharge vessel consists of aluminium-oxide or ittrium-oxide based ceramics and said current inlets and sections of said electrode stems are electrically isolated from each other, but located in a single ceramic sealing element.
4. The three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 1, wherein said current inlets and the sections of said attached electrode stems attached to them are isolated from each other and accommodated in a single planar flattening.
5. The three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 1, wherein two of said current inlets and two of said electrode stem sections are isolated from each other and accommodated in a single flattening, whereas the third of said current inlets (4) and of said electrode stem sections (5) are arranged in another flattening (2) arranged oppositely to the above mentioned flattening (2).
6. The three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 1, wherein said discharge vessel is enclosed in an external envelope made of translucent material.
7. The three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 1, wherein said electrode head is coated with an emissive material.
8. The three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 1, wherein said metal-halide is selected from the group including dysprosium-iodide and thallium-iodide.
9. A three-phase high pressure gas discharge lamp comprising:
a discharge vessel made of a translucent heat resistant material;
a filling in said discharge vessel consisting of a noble gas, mercury and at least one further additive selected from the group consisting of sodium and a metal-halide;
three current inlets; and
an electrode arrangment consisting of three electrodes each fed from a separate phase of a three-phase voltage source, each electrode comprising an electrode tip, an electrode stem attached to a respective one of the current inlets and an electrode head, said electrodes being arranged so that the tips of said electrodes constitute the vertices of an imaginary equilateral triangle disposed within said discharge vessel.
10. A three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 9, wherein said discharge vessel consist of quartz and includes a single star-shaped flattening formed by three planes each separated by 120 from the other planes, said current inlets and sections of said electrode stems being located in said single star-shaped flattening.
11. A three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 9, wherein said discharge vessel comprises one of aluminum-oxide and ittrium-oxide based ceramics; and further including a single ceramic sealing element sealing said discharge vessel; said current inlets and sections of said electrode stems being electrically isolated from each other and located in said ceramic sealing element.
12. A three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 9, wherein said discharge vessel includes a single planar flattening and said current inlets and sections of said electrode stems are isolated from each other and disposed in said single planar flattening.
13. A three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 9, wherein said discharge vessel includes a first flattening and a second flattening arranged on an opposite side from said first flattening, two of said current inlets and sections of two of said electrodes being isolated from each other and disposed in said first flattening and the third of said current inlets and a section of the third of said electrode stems being arranged in said second flattening.
14. A three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 9, and further including an external envelope made of a translucent material enclosing said discharge vessel.
15. A three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 9, and further including an emissive material coating each said electrode head.
16. A three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 9, wherein said metal-halide is selected from the group including dysprosium-iodide and thallium-iodide.
17. A three-phase gas discharge lamp as claimed in claim 9, wherein said discharge vessel has a spherical shape.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a high-pressure three-phase gas discharge lamp containing noble gas, mercury, sodium and/or metal-halide additives.

In the high-pressure, doped gas discharge lamps known and used so far the light of an arc discharge produced, between two cylindrically symmetrical electrodes fed from a single-phase supply network is utilized. The disadvantages of a lamp of this kind result from light modulation arc instabilities (e.g. convective side deflection of the arc in metal-halide and mercury vapour lamps), further from the reignition problems occuring at zero transition of current. The stroboscope effect resulting due to light modulation of single-phase gas discharge lamps is of special disadvantage when moving objects are to be illuminated and moving pictures or video records are taken.

To eliminate these drawbacks, gas discharge lamps fed from a three-phase supply, with three electrodes arranged in their discharge space are known from various publications.

UK patent specification GB 616404 discloses a heavy-duty three-phase lamp with a spherical quartz envelope filled with noble-gas, mercury and cadmium and/or zinc. The electrodes are accommodated in the envelope so that their heads "see each other", the heads being seated in the vertices of an imaginary equilateral triangle inscribed into said envelope.

German (laid open) Patent Application DE-OS 2 542 133 a three-phase discharge lamp, but designed to provide a discharge of linear pattern between the electrodes of the discharge vessel.

PCT International Application No. WO 83/041140 discloses a three phase discharge lamp including three electrodes accommodated in a discharge vessel having a very special shape and, in addition, a fourth electrode connected to the star point is built into the discharge space.

In East German Patent Application No. DD 215423, a low-pressure discharge lamp containing a layer of a luminophor is described, the discharge vessel being confined by planar surfaces and also having a fourth electrode connected to the star point of the three-phase electrode system.

In Japanese application JP 56-099965 (Kokai) a discharge lamp is described in which the three heated electrodes are located in a glass discharge vessel enclosed by planar lateral surfaces, but the discharge itself is also of linear shape.

All these lamps, however, have failed to find practical use, either because of their poor colour rendition (GB 614404), or because of the complicated shape of their discharge vessel or the requirement of adding a fourth electrode (WO 83/041140, DD 215423), or because, in spite of accommodating three electrodes in the discharge space, a linear discharge (DE 2542133, JP 56-099965A), instead of a spherical pattern, is provided by them.

A long-standing demand prevails, however, on the part of consumers of a high-pressure discharge lamp that is capable of providing illumination without giving rise to disturbing stroboscopic effects but yet has satisfactory colour rendition. The discharge lamps described in the patent specifications mentioned above fail to fulfil these requirements.

On the other hand, it has been recognized that the way to obtain a quasi-stationary spheroid plasma is by bringing about a spherical discharge in a discharge space filled with a substance ensuring good colour rendition, and where the time constants of the processes taking place are selected with a view to achieve this aim. It is important to make the discharge itself spherical rather than some rotating linear shape, because this is the only way of obtaining the required light source free of producing the undesired stroboscopic effects.

Further, by using a ceramic discharge vessel the possibility of setting up a three-phase, high-pressure sodium lamp containing a spheroid discharge plasma exists by properly arranging in the discharge space the three electrodes each fed from a single phase of the supply source. By proper arrangement it is meant that the electrode heads "see each other" and are sited in the vertices of an equilateral triangle inscribed in the discharge vessel.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Based on the foregoing recognitions, the present invention includes a three-phase high-pressure gas discharge lamp provided with a spherical shape discharge vessel made of some heat-resistant material enclosed, if necessary, in an external translucent envelope, and filled with an additive consisting of a noble gas, mercury and some other substance differing from mercury, and further comprising three electrodes, each consiting of a stem, fixed to the current inlet terminals, and fed from the respective phases of a three-phase voltage source and an electrode head, coated with an emitting layer if necessary, arranged so that the electrode tips constitute the vertices of an equilateral triangle inscribed in the outlines of the discharge vessel. In accordance with an advantageous feature of the present invention, the filling in this lamp additionally includes an additive differing from mercury, selected from the group consisting of sodium and a metal-halide.

In an advantageous embodiment of the discharge lamp, the vessel is made of quartz, and the current inlets and electrode stem sections are enclosed in a single trifurcated star-shaped flattening formed by three planes displaced by 120 with respect to each other. The shaping of the single-sided, trifurcated star-shaped flattening of the three-phase lamp is a novel form hitherto undescribed in technical literature. As regards its shape, it conforms functionally with the three-phase lamp, it can easily be made, and it satisfies the criteria of mass production.

In another advantageous embodiment of the invention the discharge lamp is enclosed in a quartz envelope and the three current inlets with the respective electrode stems attached to them are accommodated in a single planar flattening. In a further advantageous embodiment, one of the current inlets protrudes into the discharge space through a flattening arranged opposite a flattening common for the other two current inlets.

According to another advantageous embodiment of the invention, the sodium lamp is provided with a ceramic envelope, and all current inlets are isolated from each and other protrude into the discharge space through a single ceramic sealing element.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the following, the invention will be explained in more detail on the basis of examples with reference to the attached drawings. In the drawings

FIG. 1 shows a sectional view taken along a plane perpendicular to the axis of a three-phase metal-halide lamp, comprising three flattenings according to one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 shows a sectional view of another embodiment of a three phase metal-halide lamp according to the invention having one flattening on one side and formed to the shape of a trifurcated star;

FIG. 2a shows a sectional view through the flattening of FIG. 2;

FIG. 3 shows a cut-away view of a three-phase sodium lamp according to another embodiment of the invention, exposing the inside of the discharge space;

FIG. 4 is a longitudinal section of a three-phase metal-halide lamp flattened on one side to form a single plane according to another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 5 shows a longitudinal section of a three-phase metal-halide lamp having its flattenings at opposite sides of the lamp according to a further embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In FIG. 1 there is shown a section of a near-spherical quartz discharge vessel 1, the section being taken along the plane in which current inlets 4 extend through flattenings 2, electrode stems 5, electrode heads 6 and electrode tips 7. Clearly shown in FIG. 1 are the three electrode tips 7, that define an imaginary equilateral triangle with its vortices coinciding with electrode tips 7. This imaginary triangle lies fully within the discharge vessel. The imaginary triangle nowhere touches or intersects the wall of the discharge vessel 1. Vacuum-tight fixing of the current inlet 4 is ensured by a foil 8 made of molybdenum. The discharge space of the lamp drawn in outline in FIG. 1 contains a noble gas, preferably argon, in addition to mercury and some known metal-halide, such as preferably disposium-iodide, thallium-iodide and sodium-iodide. Each of the three current inlets is connected to one phase of a supply network (not shown) through an ignition device (not shown) inserted between two phases and through a three-phase choke (not shown). By energizing the lamp, discharge is started, soon assuming an extended spheroid shape. Due to this shape, the surface of discharge is smaller in relation to its volume than in the case of a linear discharge, resulting in increased luminous efficiency. Also, due to the prevailing symmetry conditions, thermal gradients are smaller than with a linear discharge. As a result, the diffusion processes associated with the effects of segregation are somewhat restricted, and natural flow is reduced so that the flux of cations along the wall is weaker than in other places, resulting in a longer service life of the lamp.

In the lamp design shown in FIGS. 2 and 2a, which also contains a spheroid-shape quartz discharge vessel 1, the electrode tips 7 are arranged for "seeing each other". Flattenings 2, on the other hand, are arranged on one side, their planes being displaced by 120 with respect to each other. The filling of the discharge vessel 1 consists of mercury, a known metal-halide, e.g. disprosium-iodide, thallium-iodide, sodium-iodide, and a noble gas, preferably argon. Connecting each phase of the current through an otherwise known ignition device and a three-phase choke to the respective electrode, the discharge is started. The spheroid-shape discharge will soon develop. The advantage of this lamp design is the simple way of connecting the electrodes to the current source. Further, this arrangement can be adopted with advantage in the design of small discharge lamps fed by high-frequency voltages, because risk of acoustic resounance is reduced as compared to that expected with single-phase cylindrically symmetrical designs.

FIG. 3 shows a cut-away view of a discharge vessel 1 made of aluminium-oxide ceramics and sealed with the same material from one side. The open end of the discharge vessel 1 is hermetically sealed by a ceramic plug 3 carrying current inlets 4 made of niobium and forming integral parts with their associated electrode stems 5 and electrode heads 6. It can be seen from FIG. 3 that the equilateral triangle defined by the electrode tips 7 lies fully inside the discharge vessel 1. The filling of discharge vessel 1 is a noble gas, preferably xenon containing a sodium amalgam additive. The three current inlets 4 are connected with the respective phases of the three-phase network through an otherwise known ignition device and choke. Soon after ignition the spheroid-shape discharge develops. Also with this lamp the light modulation is considerably reduced, since there is no zero transition of current due to the three-phase supply of the lamp,i.e. to the persistent presence of two electrodes between which a current path is incessantly available for maintaining the flow of discharge current.

In FIG. 4 there is shown a lamp design incorporating a quartz discharge vessel 1 and three flattenings 2 for supporting current inlets 4 isolated from each other, arranged on one side of the discharge vessel. In this case, current inlets 4 and the respective sections of the electrode stems 5 are arranged in parallel, but two electrode stems 5 are bent, so as to form in the discharge vessel the required equilateral triangle defined by the electrode tips 7 and fully remaining within the discharge vessel 1. The filling of the discharge vessel 1 contains mercury, metal-halides, e.g. preferably disprosium-iodide, thallium-iodide and sodium-iodide, and further a noble gas, preferably argon. The advantage of this lamp is the possibility of its easy connection to the supply source.

FIG. 5 illustrates a lamp comprising a quartz discharge vessel 1 of substantially spherical shape, which carries the flattenings 2 arranged on two opposite sides of the discharge vessel 1. This permits adapting of an arrangement where the lamp can be fed from two sides. One of flattenings 2 carries two current inlets 4, two foils 8, two electrode stems 5, as well as two electrode heads 6 and two electrode tips 7 constituting integral units with the respective electrode stems 5, whereas flattening 2 on the opposite side carries one current inlet 4, one foil 8, one electrode stem 5 and, connected to it, one electrode head 6 and one electrode tip 7 mounted thereon. It can clearly be established from FIG. 5 that electrode tips 7 can be made see each other so as to define an imaginary equilateral triangle situated fully inside the substantially spherical discharge vessel 1. A further advantage of this embodiment results from the ease of its adaptation to known constructions and manufacturing methods of the light source industry.

A further advantage of the lamp according to the invention, is the improved readiness of reignition due to the absence of zero transitions of current and due to the spherical shape of the discharge. Its suitability for being used as a light source in reflector systems, e.g. in projector lamps, should also be pointed out. In addition by spherical-surface discharge the design of suitable armatures for such lamps is facilitated. A further general advantage of the metal-halide doped lamps over conventional variants, owing to the substantially spherical symmetry of their design is the possibility of omitting the costly and problematic heat-reflecting layers, indispensable with former conventional designs for maintaining wall temperatures within specified limits during operation.

The lamp according to the present invention can be manufactured for small ratings, whereas only high-pressure three-phase lamps of high thermal inertia have become known so far.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2459516 *Jul 9, 1946Jan 18, 1949Gen ElectricHigh-pressure mercury vapor lamp
US4037128 *Sep 12, 1975Jul 19, 1977Izrail Aronovich LevinThree-phase discharge lamp
GB526401A * Title not available
GB616404A * Title not available
GB1039649A * Title not available
GB1138913A * Title not available
GB1280735A * Title not available
GB1360269A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1"Discharge Lamp", Appl. No. 55-2727 (Abstract), Matsushita Denko K.K., Japan, 11/1981.
2 *Discharge Lamp , Appl. No. 55 2727 (Abstract), Matsushita Denko K.K., Japan, 11/1981.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6545422Oct 27, 2000Apr 8, 2003Science Applications International CorporationSocket for use with a micro-component in a light-emitting panel
US6570335Oct 27, 2000May 27, 2003Science Applications International CorporationMethod and system for energizing a micro-component in a light-emitting panel
US6612889Oct 27, 2000Sep 2, 2003Science Applications International CorporationMethod for making a light-emitting panel
US6620012Oct 27, 2000Sep 16, 2003Science Applications International CorporationMethod for testing a light-emitting panel and the components therein
US6646388Dec 13, 2002Nov 11, 2003Science Applications International CorporationSocket for use with a micro-component in a light-emitting panel
US6762566Oct 27, 2000Jul 13, 2004Science Applications International CorporationMicro-component for use in a light-emitting panel
US6764367Aug 9, 2002Jul 20, 2004Science Applications International CorporationLiquid manufacturing processes for panel layer fabrication
US6796867Aug 9, 2002Sep 28, 2004Science Applications International CorporationUse of printing and other technology for micro-component placement
US6801001Aug 9, 2002Oct 5, 2004Science Applications International CorporationMethod and apparatus for addressing micro-components in a plasma display panel
US6822626Aug 9, 2002Nov 23, 2004Science Applications International CorporationDesign, fabrication, testing, and conditioning of micro-components for use in a light-emitting panel
US6902456Aug 20, 2003Jun 7, 2005Science Applications International CorporationSocket for use with a micro-component in a light-emitting panel
US6935913Aug 9, 2002Aug 30, 2005Science Applications International CorporationMethod for on-line testing of a light emitting panel
US6975068Nov 26, 2002Dec 13, 2005Science Applications International CorporationLight-emitting panel and a method for making
US6975069 *Apr 2, 2004Dec 13, 2005Transworld Lighting, Inc.Multi-phase gas discharge lamps
US7005793May 24, 2005Feb 28, 2006Science Applications International CorporationSocket for use with a micro-component in a light-emitting panel
US7025648Mar 2, 2004Apr 11, 2006Science Applications International CorporationLiquid manufacturing processes for panel layer fabrication
US7038380 *May 4, 2004May 2, 2006Everlite Electric Industries Corp.Three phase light bulb
US7125305Jul 8, 2003Oct 24, 2006Science Applications International CorporationLight-emitting panel and a method for making
US7137857Apr 17, 2003Nov 21, 2006Science Applications International CorporationMethod for manufacturing a light-emitting panel
US7140941Feb 3, 2006Nov 28, 2006Science Applications International CorporationLiquid manufacturing processes for panel layer fabrication
US7282864 *Jul 29, 2005Oct 16, 2007Seiko Epson CorporationDischarge lamp and control of the same
US7288014Jan 14, 2004Oct 30, 2007Science Applications International CorporationDesign, fabrication, testing, and conditioning of micro-components for use in a light-emitting panel
US7414366 *Jun 20, 2005Aug 19, 2008Osram Sylvania Inc.Single-ended discharge vessel with diverging electrodes
US7789725Oct 19, 2007Sep 7, 2010Science Applications International CorporationManufacture of light-emitting panels provided with texturized micro-components
US7804233 *Jul 25, 2008Sep 28, 2010Sundhar Shaam PLight bulb and method of use
US8043137May 13, 2009Oct 25, 2011Science Applications International CorporationLight-emitting panel and a method for making
US8246409Aug 18, 2011Aug 21, 2012Science Applications International CorporationLight-emitting panel and a method for making
WO2004091259A2 *Apr 5, 2004Oct 21, 2004Crandall Earl FMulti-phase gas discharge lamps
Classifications
U.S. Classification313/623, 313/631, 313/634, 313/636, 313/306
International ClassificationH01J61/12, H01J61/92
Cooperative ClassificationH01J61/92, H01J61/12
European ClassificationH01J61/12, H01J61/92
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 7, 1994FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 19940330
Mar 27, 1994LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Oct 26, 1993REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Sep 27, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: TUNGSRAM RESZVENYTARSASAG, VACI UT 77, H-1340 BUDA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNORS:HOLLO, SANDOR;MARTON, ZSOLT;NYIRI, BALAZS;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:004948/0480;SIGNING DATES FROM 19880802 TO 19880902
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HOLLO, SANDOR;MARTON, ZSOLT;NYIRI, BALAZS AND OTHERS;SIGNED BETWEEN 19880802 AND 19880902;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100526;REEL/FRAME:4948/480
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HOLLO, SANDOR;MARTON, ZSOLT;NYIRI, BALAZS;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 19880802 TO 19880902;REEL/FRAME:004948/0480