Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5032178 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 07/473,822
Publication dateJul 16, 1991
Filing dateFeb 2, 1990
Priority dateFeb 2, 1990
Fee statusPaid
Also published asEP0516872A1, EP0516872B1
Publication number07473822, 473822, US 5032178 A, US 5032178A, US-A-5032178, US5032178 A, US5032178A
InventorsJohn A. Cornell
Original AssigneeDemetron Research Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydrogen peroxide color indicator, thickener, plasticizer
US 5032178 A
Abstract
A dental composition and method for bleaching vital and non-vital teeth, comprising a preselected, concentrated, aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide and a nonaqueous component mixed to form an aqueous gel or paste, with the nonaqueous component including an inert silica gelling agent, an accelerator, a plasticizer and thickening agent, and means for establishing a substantially fixed time period for treating the teeth in response to the application of optical energy. A redox color indicator is used to transform from one color to another over the fixed time period to provide a visual indication that the treatment is completed, as well as an indication that the peroxide solution was active.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(6)
I claim:
1. A dental composition for bleaching vital and non-vital teeth, comprising a concentrated aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide having above at least about thirty percent (30%) by volume hydrogen peroxide and a nonaqueous component suspended in said concentrated hydrogen peroxide solution in a ratio of 50 to 100 parts by volume hydrogen peroxide solution to 100 parts by volume of said nonaqueous component for direct in vivo application to the teeth to be bleached, with said nonaqueous component comprising:
fifty to eighty percent (50% to 80%) by volume or inorganic particles of silica;
two to ten percent (2% to 10%) by volume of a catalytic activator selected form the class consisting of manganese sulfate monohydrate and ferrous sulfate;
0.01% to 0.5% by volume of a redox color indicator selected from the class consisting of ethyl[4-{p-[ethyl (m-sulfobenzyl)amino]-alpha-phenylbenzylidene{-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene](m-sulfobenzyl) ammonium hydroxide inner salt sodium salt and phenolphthalin; and
the remainder composed of a plasticizing and thickening agent selected from the class consisting of polymethylvinyl ether maleate potassium slat, carboxymethyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl celluose and sodium cellulose sulfate.
2. A dental composition, as defined in claim 1, wherein said silica is an hydrated, amorphous silica in a concentration of form fifty to seventy-five percent (50% to 75%) by volume of the nonaqueous component.
3. A dental composition, as defined in claim 2, wherein said thickening agent is a polymethylvinyl ether maleate potassium salt.
4. A method for bleaching teeth in vivo comprising formulating an aqueous bleaching gel or paste for immediate application by mixing a concentrated aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide of above at least thirty percent (30%) by volume hydrogen peroxide and a nonaqueous component in a ratio of 50 to 100 parts by volume hydrogen peroxide solution to 100 parts by volume of said nonaqueous component, with said nonaqueous component comprising: inert fifty to eighty percent (50% to 80%) by volume of particles of silica; two to ten percent (2% to 10%) by volume of a catalytic activator selected from the class consisting of manganese sulfate monohydrate and ferrous sulfate; and the remainder composed of a thickening agent selected from the class consisting of cellulose ethers and methyl vinyl ethers; applying said aqueous gel or paste to the teeth to be bleached, and initiating the bleaching treatment process by applying to the tooth surface to be treated optical energy within the light spectrum of 400 to 700 nanometers.
5. A process as defined in claim 4, further comprising the step of adding a redox color indicator to said nonaqueous component, selected from the class consisting of ethyl [4-{p-[ethyl (m-sulfobenzyl)amino]-alpha-phenylbenzylidene{-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene](m-sulfobenzyl) ammonium hydroxide inner salt sodium salt and phenolphthalin.
6. A process, as defined in claim 5, wherein said particles of silica and said plasticizing and thickening agent constitute over eighty percent (80%) by volume of the nonaqueous component.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a dental composition and method for bleaching vital and non-vital teeth.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

One commonly noticed problem during the normal development of the human dentition, particularly in adults, is the discoloration of the teeth. Discoloration in adult teeth is primarily characterized by a gradual yellowing of the teeth, which is presently attributed to the normal aging process. Teeth may also be discolored or blemished by staining. Stains are classified in two separate categories defined as extrinsic or intrinsic. An intrinsic stain may be attributed to ferric-containing salts, which are absorbed into the body in geographical areas containing high concentrations of iron in the water supply, or from tetracycline stains, which occur, for example, in utero during the third trimester of pregnancy. Examples of extrinsic stains are diet-related, such as from tea and/or coffee, or habit-related, such as from tobacco chewing and cigarette smoking.

One method for treating discoloration in teeth is bleaching. Dentists have used bleaching to treat discoloration in vital and non-vital teeth. Because of the very different physiology of these teeth, dentists have developed two different methods of treatment, using a common bleaching solution. Presently, non-vital bleaching consists of placement of a rubber dam for isolating the tooth, preparing an opening in the pulp chamber into which a concentrated bleaching solution of about thirty-three percent (33%) hydrogen peroxide is placed, with a similar solution placed on the surface of the tooth. During this process, the tooth is heated externally by use of a heating instrument similar in design to an electric soldering iron or by means of a heat lamp to raise the temperature at the treated tooth to a range of about 120 F. to 160 F. The procedure takes approximately forty-five minutes. Vital bleaching uses the same concentrated hydrogen peroxide bleaching solution, but is placed only on the external lingual and labial surfaces of the teeth and heated for about forty-five minutes, in the same manner as described for non-vital bleaching. The present bleaching method causes great patient discomfort and potentially can cause gingival trauma. There is also substantial danger from the use of the electric heating element, which can cause burns and injury to adjacent teeth. The bleaching solution can easily run up or down the surface of the tooth and find its way into the gingival crevice, causing a severe burn of the gingiva, which is painful and difficult to heal. Moreover, there is no way for the dentist to know if the concentrated hydrogen peroxide solution is active or to what extent it has deteriorated, since its shelf life is very limited, with the hydrogen peroxide readily dissociating into water and oxygen.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a gel or paste of concentrated hydrogen peroxide as an oral composition for bleaching teeth. Another object of the present invention is to provide a gel or paste of concentrated hydrogen peroxide and a viscosity controlling ingredient which permits the paste or gel to be built up on the tooth surface without sagging under the influence of gravity. It is another object of the present invention to provide an aqueous hydrogen peroxide gel or paste which contains a redox color indicator which provides the operator with a visual indication of the activity rate of the hydrogen peroxide in the gel or paste.

It is an even further object of the present invention to apply an aqueous peroxide gel or paste to a stained tooth surface which will cause the hydrogen peroxide to penetrate the tooth surface to reach the stained area, with patient treatment initiated in accordance with the present invention by application of optical energy within the light energy spectrum of between 400 and 700 nanometers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The dental bleaching composition of the present invention overcomes all of the shortcomings of the prior art use of a concentrated hydrogen peroxide solution. The dental composition of the present invention is preferably packaged as a two-component system, with one of the components represented by a conventional concentrated solution of hydrogen peroxide, and with the other component comprised of an aggregate mixture of dry constituents which, when combined in an appropriate proportion with the concentrated aqueous hydrogen peroxide component, forms a gel or paste, with hydrogen peroxide remaining the principal bleaching constituent. The paste or gel may readily be applied to a specified tooth or surface area of the tooth where bleaching is desired. Furthermore, the dental composition does not require a heat source, and bleaching occurs over a short, controlled period of time, generally under fifteen minutes. The entire treatment time period is controlled by optically initiating the bleaching operation with a light source, and terminating the operation upon visual color transformation of the paste or gel from a firs to a second color, such as from green to colorless.

The dental composition of the present invention includes a nonaqueous component adapted to be mixed with a concentrated aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to form an aqueous paste or gel for direct in-situ application to the teeth to be bleach, with said first component comprising in combination:

an inert silica gelling agent;

a catalytic accelerator;

an agent for providing thixoplasticity and thickening properties to the composition, such as celluose ethers and methyl vinyl ethers; and

means for indicating completion of the bleaching treatment of the teeth, comprising a redox color indicator for transforming from one color to another in response to the dissociation of hydrogen peroxide over a given time period.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The aforementioned ingredients of the nonaqueous component of the dental bleaching composition of the present invention is critical to the performance of the present invention. Hydrogen peroxide is available to dentists in a thirty to thirty-five percent (30%-35%) aqueous solution. The nonaqueous component of the composition of the present invention permits the dentist to prepare an active bleaching composition in a solid form, either as a paste or gel, for direct application to the teeth to be bleached, with the period of treatment initiated photo-optically for activating the composition and terminated by removal of the paste or gel from the treated teeth upon a visual color transformation after a fixed time period. The color transformation will occur only if hydrogen peroxide dissociates to a concentration of nascent oxygen sufficient to cause color transformation of the color indicator in the composition within that time frame The color indicator is, accordingly, for practical purposes, a critical component which must be compatible with the other components and yet provide a distinct, uniform color to the gel or paste composition, which will oxidize and transform to another color or become colorless in response to the level of activity, corresponding to the dissociation of concentrated hydrogen peroxide over a fixed time period. Only guinea green and, to a lesser extent, phenolphthalin, has been found to satisfy this requirement of the invention. The concentration of guinea green in the gel or paste has little effect on its color transformation characteristic. It is thus a direct indicator of hydrogen peroxide activity. If the hydrogen peroxide used in forming the gel or paste was of a low concentration due to aging, no significant color change will occur in the time frame set for treating the patient, independent of the concentration of the color indicator in the gel.

Guinea green is a commercially available dye sold by the Aldrich Chemical Company, having the chemical identity: ethyl [4-(p-[ethyl (m-sulfobenzyl) amino]-alpha-phenylbenzylidene-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene) (m-sulfobenzyl) ammonium hydroxide inner salt sodium salt. Guinea green colors the composite material green and provides an identity of the activity level of the material by becoming colorless when sufficiently oxidized. If the hydrogen peroxide component has deteriorated due to age, insufficient oxidation will occur to neutralize the green color. It is at present difficult for a practicing dentist to know if the hydrogen peroxide supply in the dental office is active, since its activity is dependent upon storage time and temperature. It is also important to permit the hydrogen peroxide to penetrate the enamel in order to lighten the enamel of he teeth. The guinea green will neutralize to provide the total absence of color over a total treatment time period of from about five (5) to fifteen (15) minutes for the composition of the present invention.

Phenolphthalin is a colorless crystal derived from phenolphthalein which converts to a reddish color when sufficiently oxidized. This is a less preferred redox indicator. The concentration level of the color indicator is not a critical factor and, in fact, only a minor percent, of between 0.01 and 0.3 percent by volume, is all that is necessary to produce an intense color.

The preferred ratio of the aqueous hydrogen peroxide component to the nonaqueous component is 50 to 100 parts by volume, with a more preferred ratio of 50 to 70 parts by volume, with 60 parts being optimum. Stated otherwise, the preferred ratio is five parts of the nonaqueous powder to three parts hydrogen peroxide.

The inert silica gelling agent in the nonaqueous component is preferably an amorphous fumed silica. Fumed silica are silicon dioxide particles of extremely small size, substantially below one (1) micron. The preferred concentration of the silica gelling agent in the nonaqueous component is between fifty to eighty percent (50%-80%) by volume, and is the major ingredient of this component, as well as of the gel or paste.

Another essential ingredient of the nonaqueous component is the incorporation of an accelerator for controlling the breakdown of hydrogen time period. The preferred accelerator is manganese sulfate monohydrate. "Oxone," a potassium persulphinate product of the du Pont Corporation may also be used in combination, in instance the Oxone functions as a co-catalyst. The range for use of each component of the accelerator is indicated in the Table of examples.

The dissociation of hydrogen peroxide is initiated, in accordance with the invention, by the use of a dental curing light. The optical energy accelerates the catalyst for activating and promoting the acceleration of free radical polymerization of hydrogen peroxide, and by use of a redox color indicator, as discussed heretofore, for timing the duration of the bleaching operation after it is initiated. Preferably light energy in the visible spectrum of between 400 and 700 nanometers should be used to initiate the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide. The application of light energy may be maintained for the entire treatment period, but preferably at least about three minutes. The color indicator, as explained heretofore serves as a critical component for providing a visual indication of the completion of treatment, and as an indicator that the hydrogen peroxide was, in fact, active during treatment.

As an alternative to manganese sulfate, ferrous sulfate may be used as the catalytic activator and at essentially the same concentration level. In fact, using ferrous sulfate, it is possible to activate the composition at room temperature without the application of visible light. However, in such case a quiescent period of at least about five to seven minutes is necessary before catalytic activity begins to become meaningful. Thus, the ability to control the initiation of the operation is lost and much more time is necessary to complete treatment. Accordingly, it is preferred to operate with the application of light energy which provides a more effective control over catalytic activity. Manganese sulfate is preferred when applying light and has been found to be responsive to light energy, thereby accelerating catalytic activity during the application of light energy to provide a complete treatment in under ten to fifteen minutes.

The remainder of the nonaqueous formulation is provided by a polymethylvinyl ether maleate potassium salt polymeric compound or cellulosics, preferably selected from the class consisting of carboxymethyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium cellulose sulfate. The preferred compound is sold under the trademark name Gantrez (MS-955) by the GAF Corporation of New Jersey. The polymethylvinyl ether maleate potassium salt or celulosic ether compound is also essential to the nonaqueous formulation, and provides thermoplasticity and thickening properties to the paste or gel composition formed with hydrogen peroxide, so as to permit the paste to be built up upon the teeth to be bleached and remain essentially erect, i.e., the material does not sag or slump during the treatment period. It also slows drying of the composition to maintain the level of activity on the tooth surface throughout the treatment time period. It is important that the gel or paste remain aqueous for the entire treating period and yet remain physically stationary and in place on the tooth surface to permit maximum surface interaction and prevent gingival damage. It is postulated that the hydrogen peroxide must penetrate the enamel of the tooth while dissociating to maximize bleaching. The combination of the silica gelling agent and the cellulose ether compound represents the major constituents of the nonaqueous formulation, and preferably should equal at least about eighty percent (80%) of such composition.

The following table indicates the preferred range for each constituent in the nonaqueous component and illustrates eight (8) examples of varying concentrations for the constituents, with example number (1) being the preferred composition. In the other seven examples, one element is eliminated or modified, with the other constituents adjusted relative to example number (1) functioning as the control for comparison purposes:

              TABLE______________________________________Constituent            Range (Percent)______________________________________(a)  Silica absorbent gelling agent                      50-75(b)  (1) Manganese sulfate monohydrate                      2-10(2) Oxone             0-10(3) Ferrous sulfate   2-10(c)  Gantrez               remainder to 25(d)  Guinea green          0.01-0.3______________________________________
EXAMPLES

______________________________________Consti- EXAMPLEStuent (1)    (2)    (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8)  (9)______________________________________(a)   70     70     70   70   30   100  70   70   70(b-1) 4.8    1.8    4.8  0    4.8  4.8  4.8  4.8  --(b-2) 5.75   0      5.75 5.75 5.75 5.75 5.75 15.0 --(b-3) --     --     --   --   --   --   --   --   4(c)   19.24  19.24  0    19.24                         19.24                              19.24                                   30   19.24                                             19.24(d)   0.1    0.1    0.1  0.1  0.1  0.1  0.1  0.1  0.1______________________________________

The formulation of example one (1) was the easiest to mix and apply. The composition did not dry out during bleaching. The process required three (3) to five (5) minutes of light activation and a total of about ten (10) minutes until the color changed from green to white. The formulation was applied to a stained tooth with the stain appreciably reduced upon completion of the process. Examples three (3), six (6), and seven (7) were failures in that the material dried too quickly and did not appear to bleach as well. Example five (5) did not form a satisfactory paste or gel and, accordingly, was too difficult to apply. Examples two (2) and four (4) provided results similar to example one (1), but took almost twice the time, indicating insufficient accelerator. Example eight (8) appeared unstable during storage, indicating the presence of an excess of Oxone. Example nine (9) used no light and at room temperature (23 C.) began bubbling in six (6) minutes and turned light brown (from green) after nine minutes.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1717723 *Apr 9, 1927Jun 18, 1929Calsodent Company IncMeans for and method of detecting and correcting mouth acidity
US3243377 *Aug 30, 1963Mar 29, 1966Warner Lambert PharmaceuticalDenture cleansing composition
US4223003 *Apr 20, 1979Sep 16, 1980Wurttembergische Parfumerie-Fabrik GmbhPaste and powder dentifrices
US4528180 *Mar 1, 1983Jul 9, 1985Schaeffer Hans ADental preparation, article and method for storage and delivery thereof
US4537765 *Jun 21, 1983Aug 27, 1985Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPeroxydiphosphate toothpaste composition
US4655953 *Dec 5, 1984Apr 7, 1987Lever Brothers CompanyCleaning fabrics at lower temperatures
US4661070 *Mar 17, 1986Apr 28, 1987Joshua FriedmanMethod for bleaching discolored teeth
US4696757 *Jun 16, 1986Sep 29, 1987American Home Products CorporationStable hydrogen peroxide gels
US4731196 *Oct 28, 1986Mar 15, 1988Ethyl CorporationProcess for making bleach activator
US4788052 *Apr 17, 1987Nov 29, 1988Colgate-Palmolive CompanyDentifrice for oral diseases
US4822375 *Mar 5, 1987Apr 18, 1989L'orealDyeing compositions for keratinous fibres based on indole derivatives, and new compounds
US4876082 *Jul 1, 1988Oct 24, 1989Roch RomeoTooth-paste with brushing time indicator
US4895721 *Jan 22, 1988Jan 23, 1990Carter-Wallace Inc.Peroxide gel dentifrice compositions
US4983381 *Apr 16, 1987Jan 8, 1991Futura Medical S.A.Method and device for producing the whitening of live teeth with pathological and normal colorations
JPS58180420A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5076791 *Oct 22, 1990Dec 31, 1991Madray Jr GeorgeShaping thermoplastic tray over teeth, adding bleaching agent
US5240415 *Jul 30, 1992Aug 31, 1993Haynie Michel BDental bleach system having separately compartmented fumed silica and hydrogen peroxide and method of using
US5611690 *Apr 2, 1996Mar 18, 1997E. Mishan & Sons, Inc.Method for whitening teeth
US5645428 *Dec 12, 1995Jul 8, 1997Britesmile, Inc.Accelerating bleaching by exposing laser light to generate oxygen free radical from peroxides and catalysts mixture coatings
US5648064 *Jul 7, 1995Jul 15, 1997Gaffar; AbdulPeroxygen compound for whitening teeth and dentifrice with manganese complex and releasing oxygen for oxidation
US5713738 *Sep 5, 1996Feb 3, 1998Britesmile, Inc.Using laser light to activate bleaching composition comprising oxygen radical generating agent
US5766011 *Nov 27, 1996Jun 16, 1998Sibner; Jeffrey A.Hydrogen peroxide gel, laser
US5785527 *Jan 10, 1997Jul 28, 1998Ultradent Products, Inc.Stable light or heat activated dental bleaching compositions
US5816802 *Sep 25, 1995Oct 6, 1998R. Eric MontgomeryFlexible dental tray
US5858332 *Jan 10, 1997Jan 12, 1999Ultradent Products, Inc.Dental bleaching compositions with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide
US5863202 *Aug 12, 1996Jan 26, 1999Fontenot; Mark G.Device and method for treatment of dentition
US5927981 *Feb 20, 1998Jul 27, 1999Widen; RandyMethod and apparatus for bleaching teeth
US6017515 *Feb 23, 1996Jan 25, 2000Diamond White A.V.V.Using a gel or paste which comprise a group 1a or 2a compound, the anion being, e.g., a chlorite, percarbonate or perborate; cosmetics; antiulcer agents (mouth); injuries; toothpaste; bandages
US6036493 *Jul 23, 1998Mar 14, 2000Ad Dent Inc.Dental bleaching system and method
US6056548 *Mar 26, 1999May 2, 2000Ceramoptec Industries, Inc.Hygienic dental laser photo treatment method
US6089740 *Jan 8, 1998Jul 18, 2000Kreativ, Inc.Multipurpose dental lamp apparatus
US6106293 *Dec 4, 1998Aug 22, 2000Wiesel; Peter E.Methods for whitening teeth
US6108850 *Mar 20, 1998Aug 29, 2000Mclaughlin; GeraldAccelerated method and instrumentation for whitening teeth
US6116900 *Nov 12, 1998Sep 12, 2000Lumachem, Inc.Binary energizer and peroxide delivery system for dental bleaching
US6149895 *Jul 30, 1999Nov 21, 2000Kreativ, IncDental bleaching compositions, kits & methods
US6157661 *May 12, 1999Dec 5, 2000Laserphysics, Inc.System for producing a pulsed, varied and modulated laser output
US6162055 *Jan 19, 1999Dec 19, 2000Britesmile, Inc.Applying photosensitizing agent which absorbs actinic radiation when in contact with tooth, applying tooth whitening composition and oxidizing compound, exposing photosensitizing agent and whitening compound to actinic light
US6254388Feb 2, 1998Jul 3, 2001Britesmile, Inc.Method for whitening teeth
US6274122May 17, 1999Aug 14, 2001Mclaughlin GeraldDevice and method using dry mixtures for whitening teeth
US6282013Apr 27, 1998Aug 28, 2001Lasermed, Inc.System for curing polymeric materials, such as those used in dentistry, and for tailoring the post-cure properties of polymeric materials through the use of light source power modulation
US6287120Mar 27, 2000Sep 11, 2001Peter E. WieselMethods and apparatus for treating teeth
US6290935 *Jul 21, 2000Sep 18, 2001Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPeroxide compound and a second component containing in a vehicle a fe ion implanted synthetic silicate clay
US6343932Nov 13, 2000Feb 5, 2002Peter E. WieselDelivery system for whitening teeth
US6343933Aug 30, 2000Feb 5, 2002Britesmile, Inc.Transparent oxidizing compound, and a photosensitizer precursor which when chelated to endogenous metal ions present at the tooth surface becomes a photosensitizing agent; actinic light activates the oxidizing compound
US6384099Dec 8, 1999May 7, 2002Laser Med. Inc.Applying dental material including monomers and initiator sensitive to light of particular wavelength to dental surface, exposing material to light at first power level to initiate polymerization, exposing to light at second power level
US6387353 *Aug 11, 1999May 14, 2002Ultradent Products, Inc.Stable radiant energy absorbing dye activator; one-part, premixed viscous/gelled dental bleach of high concentration; hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide
US6391226May 3, 1999May 21, 2002Laboratoires Choisy LteeCoating or sealing composition
US6440396Feb 29, 2000Aug 27, 2002Mclaughlin GeraldCatalyzed bleaching using activated charcoal with such as hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, carbamyl peroxide or sodium percarbonate
US6485709 *Jan 23, 2001Nov 26, 2002Addent Inc.Includes an activator selected from manganous chloride, manganous citrate, ferrous sulfate, sodium (bi)carbonate, and catalase; long shelf life
US6503485 *Aug 6, 2001Jan 7, 2003Ultradent Products, Inc.Acidic hydrogen peroxide bleaching composition in one part and a strong base dispersed in a nonaqueous gel with polymeric thickener in another part for neutralizing the bleaching part
US6506053 *Feb 4, 2002Jan 14, 2003Peter E. WieselSystems for treating teeth
US6517350Mar 5, 2001Feb 11, 2003Dentovations Inc.Painting on patient's tooth whitening compound including resin causing compound to adhere to tooth
US6569353 *Jun 11, 1998May 27, 2003Lynntech, Inc.Reactive decontamination formulation
US6599126Dec 29, 1999Jul 29, 2003Professional Dental Technologies, Inc.Method and apparatus for whitening teeth using a fluid delivery toothbrush
US6602074Oct 23, 1998Aug 5, 2003Bisco, Inc.Dental composite light curing system
US6616451 *Jun 19, 1998Sep 9, 2003Biolase Technology, Inc.Electromagnetic radiation emitting toothbrush and dentifrice system
US6638496Aug 8, 2001Oct 28, 2003Mclaughlin GeraldIncluding a dry form of a gelation agent and a bleaching agent
US6682721Feb 13, 2001Jan 27, 2004Lg Household & Healthcare Ltd.Hydrophilic glass polymer as an adhesive layer in a matrix type on a backing layer and peroxide whitening agent
US6685922Mar 23, 2001Feb 3, 2004Dentsply International Inc.Tooth whitening material and method of whitening teeth
US6685923 *Jan 25, 2002Feb 3, 2004Dentsply Research & Development Corp.Hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution
US6689344Sep 13, 2002Feb 10, 2004Lg Household & Healthcare Ltd.Patches for teeth whitening
US6746664Aug 5, 2002Jun 8, 2004Ultradent Products, Inc.Multi-part dental bleaching systems and methods for bleaching teeth using such systems
US6780401May 27, 2003Aug 24, 2004Lg Household & Healthcare Ltd.Using peroxy compound in adhesive matrix; patch
US6843981Jul 3, 2000Jan 18, 2005Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Company, Inc.Tooth bleaching compositions and methods of bleaching discolored tooth
US6846182 *Jul 13, 1998Jan 25, 2005Jeffrey A. SibnerDental bleaching composition and method
US6946142Jun 20, 2002Sep 20, 2005Lg Household & Healthcare Ltd.Multi-layer patches for teeth whitening
US7067115Apr 17, 2002Jun 27, 2006Scientific Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Process and composition for high efficacy teeth whitening
US7086862Nov 17, 2003Aug 8, 2006Discus Dental, Inc.Tooth bleaching process
US7192573 *Dec 22, 2004Mar 20, 2007Leonard Macklesorally acceptable inorganic cationic salts of sulfates, bisulfates or pyrosulfates in these rinses enhances the generation of saliva in the oral cavity and thus the level of peroxidase therein
US7261558 *Jul 21, 2003Aug 28, 2007Biolase Technology, Inc.Electromagnetic radiation emitting toothbrush and dentifrice system
US7329273Feb 10, 2004Feb 12, 2008Palomar Medicaltechnologies, Inc.Tissue penetrating oral phototherapy applicator
US7329274Feb 10, 2004Feb 12, 2008Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Conforming oral phototherapy applicator
US7354448 *Feb 10, 2004Apr 8, 2008Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Dental phototherapy methods and compositions
US7422598Feb 10, 2004Sep 9, 2008Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Multi-wavelength oral phototherapy applicator
US7467946May 18, 2006Dec 23, 2008Biolase Technology, Inc.Electromagnetic radiation emitting toothbrush and dentifrice system
US7569185Oct 2, 2006Aug 4, 2009Ultradent Products, Inc.Method for indicating shelf-life after mixing pre-dosed, pre-packaged two-part dental compositions
US7572124Oct 4, 2004Aug 11, 2009Discus Dental, LlcApparatus for simultaneous illumination of teeth
US7748070Aug 14, 2008Jul 6, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyElectric toothbrush comprising an electrically powered element
US7758621May 19, 2006Jul 20, 2010Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Method and apparatus for therapeutic EMR treatment on the skin
US7763016Dec 12, 2005Jul 27, 2010Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Light energy delivery head
US7776010Feb 9, 2007Aug 17, 2010Ultradent Products, Inc.Syringe-in-syringe hollow inner barrel/plunger with integral seal and rupturable membrane and related kits, systems, and methods
US7785572May 28, 2004Aug 31, 2010Lg Household And Health Care Ltd.Method and device for teeth whitening using a dry type adhesive
US7845039May 17, 2004Dec 7, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyToothbrush with severable electrical connections
US7862802Aug 10, 2004Jan 4, 2011Lg Household & Health Care Ltd.adhesive matrix layer contains a peroxide teeth whitening agent and a hydrophilic glassy polymer that provides strong adhesion to teeth when hydrated and little or no adhesion prior to hydration
US7887328Dec 5, 2005Feb 15, 2011Dentovations Inc.Applying a viscous whitening solid compound containing urea hydrogen peroxide whitener directly on the surface of the teeth using a manual lipstick-type dispenser and sufficient pressure
US7910531Jun 13, 2005Mar 22, 2011C2C Technologies LlcComposition and method for producing colored bubbles
US7935107May 19, 2010May 3, 2011Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Heads for dermatology treatment
US7942667Nov 3, 2008May 17, 2011Biolase Technology, Inc.Electromagnetic radiation emitting toothbrush and dentifrice system
US7942915Nov 13, 2006May 17, 2011Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Phototreatment device for use with coolants
US7942916Dec 1, 2006May 17, 2011Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Phototreatment device for use with coolants and topical substances
US8002768Jul 21, 2010Aug 23, 2011Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Light energy delivery head
US8109924Mar 24, 2011Feb 7, 2012Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Heads for dermatology treatment
US8182473Nov 22, 2006May 22, 2012Palomar Medical TechnologiesCooling system for a photocosmetic device
US8241035May 25, 2006Aug 14, 2012Biolase, Inc.Device having activated textured surfaces for treating oral tissue
US8308479Feb 11, 2009Nov 13, 2012Dentovations Inc.Method and apparatus for tooth whitening
US8328794Sep 22, 2008Dec 11, 2012Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.System for electromagnetic radiation dermatology and head for use therewith
US8328796Jul 11, 2011Dec 11, 2012Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Light energy delivery head
US8346347Sep 15, 2006Jan 1, 2013Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.Skin optical characterization device
US8376746Feb 15, 2011Feb 19, 2013Dentovations Inc.Method for whitening teeth
US8383163Dec 19, 2008Feb 26, 2013Ultradent Products, Inc.Fluoride varnish compositions including an organo phosphoric acid adhesion promoting agent
US8394052Aug 16, 2010Mar 12, 2013Ultradent Products, Inc.Syringe-in-syringe hollow inner barrel/plunger with integral seal and rupturable membrane and related kits, systems, and methods
US8454558Apr 26, 2007Jun 4, 2013Ultradent Products, Inc.Syringe-in-syringe hollow inner barrel/plunger with integral seal and rupturable membrane and related kits, systems and methods
US8562955 *Jul 12, 2005Oct 22, 2013Discus Dental, LlcLight-activated tooth whitening method
US8574555Feb 1, 2007Nov 5, 2013Premier Dental Products CompanyStable one-part aqueous tooth whitening composition
US8602774Jun 18, 2004Dec 10, 2013Bryan WasyluchaProcess of tooth whitening and apparatus therefor
US8647607Apr 28, 2006Feb 11, 2014Lg Household & Health Care Ltd.Patches for teeth whitening
US8652446Nov 19, 2003Feb 18, 2014Lg Household & Healthcare Ltd.Apparatus and method for whitening teeth
US8747113Apr 13, 2009Jun 10, 2014Dentovations Inc.Moldable tray, system, and method for whitening teeth
US8758729May 18, 2009Jun 24, 2014Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral compositions containing polyguanidinium compounds and methods of manufacture and use thereof
US20100196857 *Apr 14, 2010Aug 5, 2010Discus Dental, LlcMethod for Whitening Teeth
EP0516872A1 *Jun 5, 1991Dec 9, 1992Demetron Research Corp.Dental composition and method for bleaching teeth
EP1020178A1 *Jul 23, 1999Jul 19, 2000AdDent Inc.Dental bleaching system and method
EP1649827A1Oct 21, 2005Apr 26, 2006Dezac LimitedTooth whitening apparatus and methods
EP2630944A1 *Feb 23, 2012Aug 28, 2013Edmund HerzogSilicon-based particle composition
WO1992006647A1 *Oct 7, 1991Apr 30, 1992George W Madray JrProfessional home method for bleaching teeth
WO1997002805A1 *Jun 18, 1996Jan 30, 1997Colgate Palmolive CoOral compositions having accelerated tooth whitening effect
WO1997021420A1 *Dec 11, 1996Jun 19, 1997Britesmile IncMethod for whitening teeth
WO1998055001A1 *May 14, 1998Dec 10, 1998Gerald MclaughlinAn accelerated method and instrumentation for whitening teeth
WO1999040870A1Feb 12, 1999Aug 19, 1999Britesmile IncLight-activated tooth whitening composition and method of using same
WO2000009079A1 *Aug 10, 1999Feb 24, 2000Mclaughlin Gerald GMethods and compositions for whitening teeth
WO2001001943A1 *Jul 3, 2000Jan 11, 2001Emi HigashiizumiTooth bleaching compositions and method of bleaching discolored tooth
WO2001051005A2 *Dec 21, 2000Jul 19, 2001Britesmile IncTooth whitening and image enhancement center method
WO2008140936A2 *Apr 30, 2008Nov 20, 2008Colgate Palmolive CoOral care composition to reduce or eliminate dental sensitivity
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/35, 424/53, 433/216, 433/215, 252/186.41, 424/49
International ClassificationA61K8/25, C11D3/395, A61K8/73, A61K8/81, A61Q11/00, A61K8/22
Cooperative ClassificationA61K2800/45, A61K8/731, A61K8/22, A61K8/25, A61K8/8164, A61Q11/00
European ClassificationA61K8/25, A61K8/73C, A61K8/22, A61K8/81M, A61Q11/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 21, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: PINNACLE PRODUCTS, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON (N/K/A CREDIT SUISSE, CAYMAN ISLANDS BRANCH);REEL/FRAME:017507/0250
Effective date: 20060323
Dec 13, 2002FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Jun 28, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON, NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:KERR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:013036/0860
Effective date: 20020606
Owner name: CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON ELEVEN MADISON AVENUE N
Owner name: CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON ELEVEN MADISON AVENUENE
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:KERR CORPORATION /AR;REEL/FRAME:013036/0860
Jun 13, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON, NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:PINNACLE PRODUCTS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:012983/0743
Owner name: KERR CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ABN AMRO BANK N.V.;REEL/FRAME:012967/0856
Effective date: 20020606
Owner name: CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON ELEVEN MADISON AVENUE N
Owner name: CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON ELEVEN MADISON AVENUENE
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:PINNACLE PRODUCTS, INC. /AR;REEL/FRAME:012983/0743
Owner name: KERR CORPORATION C/O SYBRON DENTAL SPECIALTIES, IN
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ABN AMRO BANK N.V. /AR;REEL/FRAME:012967/0856
Dec 26, 2000ASAssignment
Owner name: ABN AMRO BANK NV, ILLINOIS
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KERR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:011722/0683
Effective date: 20001211
Owner name: ABN AMRO BANK NV 135 S LASALLE ST CHICAGO ILLINOIS
Jan 4, 1999FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Mar 3, 1997ASAssignment
Owner name: KERR CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DEMETRON RESEARCH CORP.;REEL/FRAME:008376/0701
Effective date: 19960923
Mar 8, 1995FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Mar 8, 1995SULPSurcharge for late payment
Feb 21, 1995REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Apr 19, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: DEMETRON RESEARCH CORPORATION, 5, YE OLDE RD., DAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CORNELL, JOHN A.;REEL/FRAME:005668/0990
Effective date: 19910321