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Publication numberUS5072940 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 07/672,174
Publication dateDec 17, 1991
Filing dateMar 20, 1991
Priority dateSep 24, 1990
Fee statusPaid
Publication number07672174, 672174, US 5072940 A, US 5072940A, US-A-5072940, US5072940 A, US5072940A
InventorsJohn M. Bailey
Original AssigneeBailey John M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf course fairway including distance marker
US 5072940 A
Abstract
A visual distance marker for a golf course fairway which provides viewable indicia of distance along the fairway such as from a tee. The device includes an elongated resilient marker strip having an enlarged anchor portion at its lower end. When the anchor portion is embedded or buried in the ground, the marker strip is supported in an upright orientation extending above the ground. The marker strip is thin and sufficiently resilient in one plane so as to be deflected and bent over against the ground as a reel-type lawn mower approaches and passes thereover, thus eliminating the need for removing and replacing the device during normal mowing operations.
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Claims(3)
What is claimed is:
1. A visual distance marker which is implanted in an elongated fairway of a golf course and is unaffected by the operation of a reel-type lawn mower passing thereover said marker comprising:
a very thin, flat, generally straight flexible upstanding marker strip having an upper distal end and a lower end and a uniform generally rectangular cross section along substantially its entire length;
said marker strip lower end connected to an enlarged anchor portion, said anchor portion completely embedded into a grassy area of the golf course fairway;
said upper end extending above ground a distance such that said strip may be instantly depressed by the leading edge bar of the lawn mower and said strip will be sequentially depressed by the mower and following bar of said mower, so that said strip will not be severed when said grassy area of said fairway is being mowed in a direction lengthwise of said fairway;
said strip marker being oriented in the fairway so that its width or greatest transverse dimension faces the direction of the tee associated with said fairway, and being sufficiently resilient to return to its original straight and upstanding orientation thereafter;
indicia on the width portion of said marker strip for communicating to a golfer the distance has been driven from said tees golf ball lying along the length of the fairway.
2. A visual distance marker as set forth in claim 1, wherein: said marker strip is resilient plastic.
3. A visual distance marker as set forth in claim 2, wherein: said anchor portion is integrally molded to said marker strip.
Description

This is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 07/570,731 filed Sept. 24, 1990, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to viewable marking devices, and more particularly to a resilient viewable distance marker for use in golf courses along the length of a fairway.

Knowing the distance of a golf ball from a particular position on a fairway after being struck from a tee is quite important in the game of golf. This information not only provides the golfer with feedback as to the length of his initial drive from the tee, but also provides immediate information as to the distance from ball placement to the green of that particular fairway. When it is likely that, on the golfer's next shot, he will reach the green, this information becomes of even more importance.

One device known to applicant which serves this function is in the form of a concrete disc buried in the ground flush with the ground's surface so that mowing machines may pass thereover without damage. Other objects used for this purpose are stakes or shrubbery planted on each side of the fairway in the rough away from normal mowing operations.

These above devices are unsatisfactory for their intended use. The concrete discs are difficult to see from any distance and typically result in delay of the game as a player searches for the marker. Likewise, shrubbery and stakes planted in the rough are often damaged or knocked down despite careful mower operator avoidance maneuvers.

Applicant is also aware of one prior art device disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,067,717 to Imparato which teaches a portable resilient marker having a coiled spring member positioned just above the ground level as a lower extension thereof is embedded in the ground. However, this device would clearly become damaged or destroyed the first time that a fairway mower passes over it. Therefore, this device would require removal during normal mowing operations.

Confronted with this problem, and being aware that a reel-type mower in either single or gang form is used for fairway mowing, the present invention is intended to provide a device which clearly satisfies this need and takes advantage of the inherent structural features of these reel-type mowers. A visual distance marker is provided which is embedded or buried within the ground on the fairway having an upwardly extending marker strip which is of sufficient width when placed generally transversely to the length of the fairway so as to be viewable by a golfer from a significant distance there from. Additionally, the marker strip, being resilient in one direction because of its thinness, will be resiliently deflected downwardly against the ground as the mower is passed thereover and then returning to its generally upright position thereafter without damage or the need for removal.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention is directed to a visual distance marker for a golf course fairway which provides viewable indicia of distance along the fairway such as from a tee. The device includes an elongated resilient marker strip having an enlarged anchor portion at its lower end. When the anchor portion is embedded or buried in the ground, the marker strip is supported in an upright orientation extending above the ground. The marker strip is thin and sufficiently resilient in one plane so as to be deflected and bent over against the ground as a reel-type lawn mower approaches and passes thereover, thus eliminating the need for removing and replacing the device during normal mowing operations.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a visual distance marker for golf course fairways which may be embedded or buried in the ground without the need for removal during normal mowing operations.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a visible distance marker for golf course fairways which is easily viewable from a considerable distance so that it may be quickly located during normal golf play.

It is yet another object of the above invention to be economical to manufacture and easily deployable into the fairway at any desired location.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide an upright viewable indicia strip which bears distance indicia either from a golf tee and/or to the next associated green or hole.

In accordance with these and other objects which will become apparent hereinafter, the instant invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective broken view of one embodiment of the invention deployed in the ground.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation section view of a modified form of the invention as shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a side elevation section view of another embodiment of the invention showing the approach of a reel-type lawn mower shown schematically in phantom.

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 as the lawn mower progresses over the invention shown deflected in phantom.

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing the law mower having progressed fully over the invention shown in phantom.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. 1, one embodiment of the invention is shown generally at numeral 10 and includes an elongated, thin rectangular marker strip 12 fabricated of resilient stainless steel having an upper viewable surface 14 and a lower end 18 which is embedded in a formed cylindrical anchor of concrete 16. The distance marker 10 is shown embedded or buried in the ground so that the upper end 22 of concrete anchor 16 is slightly below the surface of the ground forming cavity A thereabove to reduce the severity of flexible bending required of the marker strip 12 caused by a lawn mower passing thereover as will be described herebelow.

Although marker strip 12 may simply be of a width sufficient to be seen from a distance, the upper surface 14 facing the length of a fairway may also include distance indicia printed thereon providing further information to a golfer as to its position both from the tee and from the upcoming green.

Referring to FIG. 2, an alternate embodiment is shown generally at numeral 24 having a thin plastic upstanding marker strip 26 with an exposed upper flat surface 28 for viewing and/or for bearing written distance indicia as previously described thereupon. A molded anchor 30 formed of concrete is provided into which the lower end of marker strip 26 is firmly embedded. This concrete anchor 30 is somewhat shorter in overall height so that, when buried beneath the ground G into filled hole B, a layer of ground covers the upper end of anchor 30. A pocket C is still useful and should be provided in the form of a cup-shaped recess below the ground surface G to reduce the severity of flexible resilient deformation of marker strip 26 required during lawn mower passage thereover.

Referring now to FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, yet another and preferred embodiment of the invention is shown generally at 32. This embodiment 32 is integrally molded of resilient plastic or polyethylene material having an upstanding marker strip 34 of a width sufficient to be viewed by a golfer and sufficiently thin so as to accomplish the resilient deformation required of it during passage of a lawn mower thereover as depicted in these figures.

Integrally molded at the lower end of marker strip 34 is an enlarged anchor portion 36 also formed of molded plastic or polyethylene material. This anchor portion 36, as has been previously described, when buried in the ground, securely holds and orients the marker strip 34 in an upright position with respect to the surface of the ground upwardly extending therefrom for viewing.

As in all embodiments of the invention, this embodiment 32 is structured so that the anchor portion 36 is embedded in the ground and that the marker strip 34 extends in upright fashion above the ground a distance sufficient so as to interact with a reel-type lawn mower L shown in phantom as will be described herebelow. It is preferred that the deployment of these devices include forming a cup-shaped pocket or depression C below the grade level G surrounding the marker strip 34 as it exits the ground. This pocket C is for the purpose of reducing the severity of pliable or resilient deformation required of the marker strip 34 as the lawn mower L passes thereover.

Typically, the mowing of grass on a fairway is accomplished by the lawn mower L moving in a set pattern lengthwise to the fairway. This arrangement is ideally suited for installation of the present invention in that the width of each marker strip is oriented transversely thereto so as to be optimally viewable by golfers and ideally oriented to be deflected as shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5. Virtually all lawn mowers used on golf course fairways are of a reel-type, the reel D having a plurality of spiral-wound bars or blades which rotate in the direction of the arrow and act against cutter bar H to shear the grass. A following roller R is used to stabilize the mower and to control the height of cutter bar H above the ground G.

In FIG. 3, the lawn mower L moving in the direction of arrow F, is just about to contact the marker strip 34 by engagement with the leading edge bar E of the lawn mower L.

As seen in FIG. 4, the lawn mower L has partially passed over the device 32 so as to have deflected the marker strip shown in phantom at 34 downwardly almost fully against the ground G. The maximum flexure occurs in region 38 and it should be now more evident as to the usefulness of cup C formed into the ground for reducing the severity of the deflection in this region. In FIG. 5, the lawn mower L is fully atop the marker strip 34 shown in phantom, with roller R causing the maximum deformation of marker strip 34 in region 38.

After the lawn mower L has fully passed over and beyond the deflected marker strip 34, it will resiliently return to its upright position shown in solid in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5.

Although the preferred material for manufacturing the present invention is in the form of flexible polyethylene or the like, other materials such a metallic strip of thin heat-treated stainless steel will serve equally well and is intended to be within the scope of the present invention.

Again it is stressed that the present invention having a width of the marker strip sufficiently broad so as to be viewable also is of a sufficiently thin thickness so as to be deflected in a fashion described in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 and to thereafter resiliently return to an upright orientation after the lawn mower passes thereover. Although the length of the marker strip above the surface of the ground G is somewhat variable, it must be of a sufficient length above the ground from the lower embedded anchor so as to avoid being drawn into the rotating spiral blades of the reel of the lawn mower. Otherwise, the device would be sheared just as a blade of grass.

While the instant invention has been shown and described herein in what are conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention, which is therefore not to be limited to the details disclosed herein, but is to be afforded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent apparatus and articles.

Patent Citations
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US2774323 *May 18, 1955Dec 18, 1956Kirk Everett SAudio road signal
US3362305 *Mar 30, 1967Jan 9, 1968Mark D. PellowskiHighway marking device
US4696134 *Jul 1, 1986Sep 29, 1987Robert NeaumeDevice for marking out land
US4862823 *May 5, 1988Sep 5, 1989Flexstake, Inc.Bendable marker and method of marking
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5356134 *Dec 28, 1993Oct 18, 1994Dande Plastics, Inc.Fairway distance marker
US5357897 *Mar 2, 1994Oct 25, 1994Bailey John MDistance marker within a golf course fairway
US5441257 *Oct 26, 1994Aug 15, 1995Sheaffer; Roger M.Golf course distance marker
US5497988 *Apr 7, 1995Mar 12, 1996Tolley; Philip A.Golf distance marker
US5593156 *Feb 14, 1995Jan 14, 1997Karoly-J Ltd.Ground marker and methods of using same to mark distances and/or advertise on a golf course
US5607153 *Dec 15, 1995Mar 4, 1997Bailey; John M.Distance marker within a golf course fairway
US5626525 *Mar 11, 1996May 6, 1997Tolley; Philip A.Golf distance marker
US5868630 *Feb 6, 1997Feb 9, 1999Cansak Products LimitedGolf course indicator device
US6142882 *Mar 6, 1995Nov 7, 2000Anglea; James H.Base anchor indicator and plug
US6941890 *Oct 4, 2002Sep 13, 2005Michael P. Cristo, Jr.Underground marking systems and methods for identifying a location of an object underground
US7150681Dec 5, 2002Dec 19, 2006Stieg NilssonDistance marker for a golf course, and a golf course
WO2003051470A1 *Dec 5, 2002Jun 26, 2003Stieg NilssonA distance marker for a golf course, and a golf course
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/150, 52/103, 116/209, 40/608, 404/11
International ClassificationA63B57/00, E01F9/019
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/00, E01F9/019
European ClassificationE01F9/019, A63B57/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 31, 2003FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
May 4, 1999FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
May 4, 1995FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Mar 23, 1993CCCertificate of correction