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Publication numberUS517306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1894
Filing dateAug 7, 1893
Publication numberUS 517306 A, US 517306A, US-A-517306, US517306 A, US517306A
InventorsHenry Seher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Henry seher
US 517306 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No Model.)

H. SEHER. DEVIOE FOR FASTENING SLIP COVERS ON UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE.

Patented Man 27, 1894.

WITNESSES:

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NITED' STATES HENRY SEHER, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

DEVICE FOR FASTENlNG SLIP-COVERS 0N UPHGLSTERED FURNITURE.

SPECIFICATIQN forming part of Letters Patent No. 517,306, dated March 27, 1894. Application filed August 7, 1893. Serial No. 482,548. (No model.)

of, to prevent the cover from assuming an untidy appearance.

To these ends, my invention consists of novel devices for firmly holding the slip cover down on the seat, back or other part of upholstered furniture, the said fastening devices being located at or along the edge of the seat, back, or other part. Where the cushions of two such parts meet, I employ spring fasteners that are adapted to be forced, with the slip cover, into the crease between the said cushions. The spring fasteners are held on a rod.

The invention will now be described specifically with reference to the accompanying drawings, and the features of novelty pointed out in the claims.

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a chair provided with a slip cover and fastening devices applied thereto according to my invention, the slip cover beinglifted from one of the arms to show the manner of securing the cover to the seat at the side. On the seat I have shown the rod with the fasteners ready for insertion between the seat and the back. Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation of an armless chair, the rod with the fasteners being in position. Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional detail view of the back, the seat and the rod with the fasteners in position between the back and the seat. Fig. 4 represents the rod with the fasteners thereon, the end of the rod being curved. Fig. 5 is an enlarged detail view of one of the fastening pins I shown in Fig. 1 as a means for securing the slip cover to the side of the seat. Fig. 6 shows the same pin with an ornamental ball attached thereto; and Fig. 7 is a detail view of one of the fasteners.

Like letters refer to corresponding parts throughout the several views.

In Figs. 1,2, and 3, A indicates the cushion of the seat, and B that of the back.

G is the slip cover, the portion 0' whereof is adapted to cover the seat, while the portion (J covers the back, and the side portions 0 cover the arms. The cushions A and B are in contact with one another in the chair illustrated by the drawings, but at the sides there is an opening between the arms D and the seat, so that the side edges of the seat A are freely accessible from the outside.

In order to fasten the slip cover 0 in the crease between the seat A and the back B, I employ the fastener or hold-fast E, shown in detail in Fig. 7. The fastener is made of an elastic material, preferably sheet brass, steel or another suitable metal, and is composed,

as illustrated, of acurved central portion E and parallel or diverging arms E The ends of the said arms are bent outwardly, as shown at E and the edges at the ends of the arms are provided with teeth or corrugations E Preferably the fasteners are loosely held on a rod F (see Fig. 4:), and a screw G, in conjunction with a nut H, serves to prevent the rod from slipping out from between the fastoners when the same are in position. The arms E of the fasteners E are preferably provided with apertures E It will be obvious that the spring power of the fastener will tend to keep the arms E in a diverging position. The rod F to be used for a chair of the type shown in the drawings would be straight, extending only to the point marked F' in Fig. 4.. The fasteners E are slid over the rod so that the latter lies between the central portions E of the fasteners and the screws G.

The slip cover 0 being in position, the rod F with the fasteners E is brought near the crease between the back and the seat, as shown in Fig. 1, the central portion of the fastener being adjacent to the crease. Then the rod with the fasteners is forced in between the back and the seat, into the position shown in Figs. 2 and 3. It will be understood that the spring arms E of the fasteners are pressed toward one another, but the elasticity of the said arms is sufficient to press the ends or 0&- sets E against and into the slip cover to hold the same firmly against the cushions A and B, and the serrations or teeth F. will increase the hold of the fasteners on the slip cover. When it is desired to remove the fasteners and the rod, a suitable hook is preferably inserted into the apertures E of the fasteners to withdraw the latter from between the back and the seat.

The rod F is considered a very advantageous feature of my invention since it will keep the fasteners in alignment with each other and thereby exert a uniform strain on the slip cover so as to keep it smooth. Furthermore, by using such a rod, all the fasteners are simultaneously brought into the position shown in Figs. 2 and 3. The nut H may be unscrewed to allow of spreading the arms E of the fastener to adjust their spring power. \Vhen such an adjustment is not required, rivets may be used instead of screws and nuts. It will be further obvious that the above described fasteners E can only be employed where two cushions abut against one another.

In order to conceal the fasteners in the crease between the cushions, I provide pins such as shown in Fig. 6, the main parts of the said pin being represented at Fig. 5, and either of the pins illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6, may be further employed to fasten the slip cover to the free edge of a cushion, for instance, to the side edges of the seat cushion A of the chair shown in Fig. 1.

I is a coiled spring the ends whereof, I, are abruptly bent inward to extend parallel to one another. The ends I are pointed and constitute a pair of needles or pins, which overlap each other at their inner ends. A ball J of an ornamental character may be attached to the coiled spring I, as will be seen in Fig. 6. These fastening pins are employed in the following manner to secure the slip cover to the sides of the seat A. The outside flap of the side portion C of the slip cover is lifted off the arm D, as illustrated in Fig. 1, then the inside flap of the said side portion and the seat portion O of the slip cover are drawnforciblyoutward to stretch the slip cover smooth on the seat, and the fastening pins I I are successively passed into the cushion A through the slip cover, to hold the latter in position. ()ne of the ends I of the fastening pins is first forced into the cushion then the coils of the spring I are drawn apart and when the otherend I of the pin is stuck into the cushion and the pin released, the spring will be automatically contracted and thereby cause the pointed end to fully enter the cushion. It will be obvious that these fastening pins can be disengaged only by a strong lateral pull, and if any slight lateral pull should occur, the coiled spring I will bring the ends I to their original position as soon as the pull ceases. The fastening pins I I are preferably provided with ornamental balls J when they are to be used near the crease at the top of the back (Fig. 1) or at any other place where they are visible. It will be understood that the pins I I serving to pin the slip cover 0 to the sides of the seat A in Fig. 1, are normally out of sight, being covered by the outside flap of the portion (3 of the slip cover. The pins provided with ornamental balls (Fig. 6) when fastened on the back near the seat, as indicated in Figs. 2 and 3, will conceal the outer ends of the fasteners E which otherwise might be visible from the front.

It will be understood that the fastening pins may be dispensed with in a chair or other article of furniture in which the arms are provided with cushions that extend down to the seat and virtually form a continuation of the back cushion B. In such a case it will be sufficient to employ fasteners E either on several separate rods F (one rod for the back and one for each side of the seat), or on a single curved rod of the type shown in Fig. 4. It is however preferred to employ pins such as shown in Fig. 6 near the crease formed between two cushions, as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3, in order to conceal the fasteners E located in the crease.

By means of the above described fastening devices, a slip cover can be firmly and smoothly held on furniture, and will remain in position when a person sits down on the chair so that it will not be necessary to rearrange the slip cover each time the chair has been used.

Having thus fully described my invention, I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent-- 1. A device for fastening slip covers on upholstered furniture, the same com prising separate independent fasteners each provided with a tubular portion, and a rod passed loosely through the fasteners to hold them in alignment and allow them to be adjusted relatively to each other, substantially as described.

2. A device for fastening slip covers on upholstered furniture, the same comprising a rod and separate fasteners each provided with a tubular portion for the reception of the rod, and a stop located in advance of said tubular portion, for preventing the rod from slipping out from between the fasteners, substantially as described.

3. A device for fastening slip covers on upholstered furniture, the same comprising a rod and separate fasteners each provided with a tubular portion for the reception of the rod, a screw passing through the fastener in front of the said tubular portion, to prevent the rod from slipping out from between the fasteners, and a nut for holding the screw in position, as and for the purpose set forth.

HENRY SEI-IER.

Witnesses:

JOHN LOTKA, O. SEDewIcK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2697863 *Apr 9, 1952Dec 28, 1954Moser Marietta APin fastener for furniture covers and the like
US2703603 *Oct 26, 1953Mar 8, 1955Endicott Church Furniture Co IPadded church pew seats
US3338630 *Oct 22, 1965Aug 29, 1967S E Hyman CompanySeat cover
US4057292 *Jun 11, 1976Nov 8, 1977Flex-O-Lators, Inc.Trim retainer device for upholstered cushions
US6354661 *Jan 4, 2000Mar 12, 2002Anne Masako MossChair cocoon
EP1095597A2Jul 3, 1995May 2, 2001Prescient Partners, L.P.Stabilizing device for use with covers and cushions on seating and upholstered furniture
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF16B21/183