Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5245193 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 07/683,013
Publication dateSep 14, 1993
Filing dateApr 10, 1991
Priority dateApr 11, 1990
Fee statusLapsed
Publication number07683013, 683013, US 5245193 A, US 5245193A, US-A-5245193, US5245193 A, US5245193A
InventorsHiroaki Nakanishi
Original AssigneeShimaduzu Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Micromechanics forming method and micromechanics
US 5245193 A
Abstract
A new method for forming on a substrate such micomechanics as a micro link mechanism by means of micromachining. The new method includes a process of implanting carbon ions to improve frictional properties of at least a slidable portion of the micromechanics formed. Micomechanics having their slidable portion made of a compound of silicon and such a dopant as carbon.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(2)
I claim:
1. A method for forming micromechanics on a substrate wherein the micromechanics has a sliding portion, said method comprising:
accelerating ion dopant at an acceleration energy of at least one level in the range of 100 KeV to 1000 keV inclusive, and implanting said ion dopant into said sliding portion of the micromechanics.
2. A method according to claim 1, wherein the dopant is implanted at three steps with different acceleration energies of 100 keV, 500 keV and 1000 keV.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a micromechanics forming method and micromechanics formed on a semiconductor substrate.

Micromechanics such as micro link mechanisms and micro motors are formed on a silicon substrate by means of micro-machining technology including a low-pressure CVD (chemical vapor deposition) method, photolithography and others commonly used in the process of manufacturing a semiconductor device. In forming micromechanics it is essentially important to constitute their sliding portions with a material having as excellent frictional characteristics as possible, because not only friction itself but also heat generation due to the friction impair the life time and performance of the micromechanics. Conventionally the sliding portions have been often made of single-crystalline silicon or of polycrystalline silicon thin film or silicon nitride thin film in consideration of the above. However, the sliding portions made of these materials have their characteristics of friction left room for improvement.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention aims at improving the frictional characteristics at the sliding portions of micromechanics, and makes it an object to provide an improved micomechanics-forming method enabling formed micromechanics to have their sliding portions made of a material having as good physical properties as those of silicon carbide, which is very excellent in hardness, anti-abrasiveness, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and resistance to thermal shock and oxidation.

Another object of the present invention is to provide micromechanics having their sliding portions improved as to the characteristics of friction.

The improved micromechanics-forming method according to the present invention, which contains conventional processes such as photolithography and low-pressure CVD, is fundamentally characterized by having a process of adding a dopant substance such as carbon partially to the material forming micromechanics, for instance, by means of ion implantation.

The micromechanics according to the present invention have their sliding portions made of a compound of silicon and a dopant such as carbon.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the following the present invention is described in further detail on reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1A-H illustrates the micromechanics forming process according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 shows a plan view of a micro link mechanism formed in accordance with the process illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 shows the concentration distribution of carbon injected into a silicon film at various energies by means of ion injection; and

FIG. 4 shows a cross-sectional view of a piece of micro-mechanics according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

A process of forming a micro link mechanism as an example of micromechanics is described according to FIG. 1, in which the process is illustrated dividedly into eight aspects A to H corresponding to eight steps (a) to (h) into which the process is provisionally divided for convenience' sake.

Steps (a) and (b): First, after a SiO2 film 4 and a polycrystalline Si film 3 are deposited, in the order named, on a Si substrate 1 by means of low-pressure CVD method (aspect A), the polycrystalline, Si film 3 is photolithographed so as to form a predetermined pattern 3a (aspect B). The thickness of the polycrystalline Si film deposition is, for example 1 to 2 μm.

Step (c): Then, with a photoresist mask 6 applied so as to expose only the above patterned polycrystalline Si film 3a, carbon ions are implanted into this patterned Si film 3a as indicated with dots in aspect C.

Step (d): Next, after the photoresist mask 6 is removed, the SiO2 film 4 is etched off excluding partially the portion supporting the patterned Si film 3a (aspect D). In etching the SiO2 film 4 it is important to use an etchant which exhibits a high etching rate only in SiO2, because the patterned Si film 3 must be kept unetched. Fluoric acid is a good recommendation for such an etchant.

Step (e): The above structure formed in step (d) is uniformly covered with a SiO2 film 5 deposited thereon by means of low-pressure CVD method (aspect E).

Step (f): Then, a polycrystalline Si film structure 2 such as shown in aspect F is formed on the above structure (obtained in step (e)) by means of low-pressure CVD method and photolithography.

Step (g): Following step (f), carbon ions are implanted, in a similar manner as used in step (c), only to part 2a of the Si film structure 2, which part 2a confronts (through the SiO2 film 5) the patterned Si film 3a into which carbon ions are already injected in step (c) (step G).

Step (h): Finally, the SiO2 film 5 is etched off to make the part 2a of the Si film structure 2 comes into direct contact with the patterned Si film 3a, as is shown in aspect H.

A micro link mechanism is thus obtained, whose plan view is given in FIG. 2, in which a line L--L shows that the cross-sectional view taken along the line coincides with aspect H in FIG. 1. In this link mechanism the patterned Si film 3a serves as a ring-shaped flat bearing on which the part 2a of the Si film structure 2 can smoothly rotate.

The SiO2 films 4 and 5 used as separation layers in the above process can be replaced with PSG (phospho-silicate glass) films.

Next, the feature of the carbon ion implantation to be employed at steps (c) and (g) is briefed in the following. If carbon ions are implanted into a 1.6 μm thick polycrystalline Si film at a dose of 11018 ions/cm2 with three different acceleration energies of 100 keV, 500 keV and 1000 keV, three carbon concentration curves as shown in FIG. 3 are obtained with respect to the depth of the Si film. These curves indicate that, if carbon ions are implanted at the above three acceleration energies, the relative concentration of carbon to silicon reaches approximately 1:1 substantially throughout the entire depth of the Si film including the surface, middle and bottom regions. The Si film is thus converted to a film made of SiC (silicon carbide) or of a material having physical properties substantially equal to those of SiC.

Therefore, the micromechanics forming method according to the present invention makes it possible to improve the slidable parts of micromechanics so as to have excellent physical properties nearly equal to those of SiC, which is excellent in such physical and chemical properties as hardness, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansibility, anti-abrasiveness, resistance to thermal shock and anti-oxidation resistance. Further, the carbon concentration variation in the depth direction of the Si film can be varied by controlling the dose of carbon ions in conjunction with ion acceleration energy. Improvement of Si film quality can therefore be achieved at any depth of the film.

In the above method described according to FIG. 1, the Si film quality improvement by means of implanting carbon ions can be restricted at shallow surface regions in the ring-shaped bearing portion 3a and the part 2a of the film structure 2. Further, the carbon ions implantation can be performed in advance of patterning the above horizontal projections 3a and 2a by implanting carbon ions, after the polycrystalline Si films 3 and 2 have been formed respectively, with a suitable mask applied so as to mask the areas other than where the projections 3a and 2a are to be patterned later.

The dopant, which is carbon in the present embodiment, is not necessarily restricted to carbon, but may be other elements such as nitrogen, oxygen, boron and phosphorus, if they can be added to a polycrystalline Si film by means of ion implantation to improve the physical properties of the film.

Further, the addition of dopant is not necessarily by means of ion implantation. The doping may be achieved, if possible, in any other way such as diffusion.

If it is necessary to improve the quality of a Si substrate itself, carbon or any other suitable dopant may be implanted into the substrate, or the Si substrate may be replaced with a SiC substrate.

FIG. 4 shows a cross-sectional view of a micromotor formed as an example of micromechanics based on the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 4, a SiO2 layer 15 and a Si3 N4 layer 16 are deposited, in the order named, on a Si substrate 11. On the Si3 N4 layer 16 there are formed a stator 14 and a base layer 17 made of polycrystalline Si. The base layer 17 bares thereon a shaft 12 inserted in a rotor 13. Both the shaft 12 and the rotor 13 are made of SiC, which is excellent, as is mentioned previously, in frictional characteristics such as anti-abrasiveness. Therefore, the thus formed micromotor has its performance, anti-abrasiveness and life time improved largely in comparison with conventional micromotors.

The formation of the shaft 12 and the rotor 13 made of SiC can be achieved by applying, after these members have been formed of polycrystalline Si by means of usual micromachining the carbon ion injection technique used in the micomechanics forming method previously described according to the present invention. In this case, it possible for the shaft 12 and the rotor 13 to have only their sliding portions made of SiC.

According to another method for forming these members 12 and 13 made of SiC, they can be formed also by directly photolithographing SiC films.

This embodied micrometer can be modified by using SiC also in the stator 14.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4371421 *Apr 16, 1981Feb 1, 1983Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyLateral epitaxial growth by seeded solidification
US4575180 *Aug 15, 1983Mar 11, 1986Chang David BIntrawaveguide fiber optic beamsplitter/coupler
US4859278 *Aug 11, 1988Aug 22, 1989Xerox CorporationFabrication of high resistive loads utilizing a single level polycide process
US4869781 *Oct 17, 1988Sep 26, 1989International Business Machines CorporationMethod for fabricating a semiconductor integrated circuit structure having a submicrometer length device element
US5041361 *Dec 27, 1989Aug 20, 1991Midwest Research InstituteOxygen ion-beam microlithography
US5123975 *Mar 14, 1990Jun 23, 1992Ricoh Company, Ltd.Single crystal silicon substrate
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5710466 *Jun 19, 1995Jan 20, 1998Georgia Tech Research CorporationFully integrated magnetic micromotors and methods for their fabrication
US5909069 *Sep 22, 1997Jun 1, 1999Georgia Tech Research CorporationFully integrated magnetic micromotors and methods for their fabrication
US6462371 *Jan 13, 1999Oct 8, 2002Micron Technology Inc.Films doped with carbon for use in integrated circuit technology
US6713807Aug 28, 2002Mar 30, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Films doped with carbon for use in integrated circuit technology
US6963101Mar 2, 2004Nov 8, 2005Micron Technology, Inc.Films doped with carbon for use in integrated circuit technology
US7282439Aug 31, 2005Oct 16, 2007Micron Technology, Inc.Anti-reflective coating doped with carbon for use in integrated circuit technology and method of formation
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/492.2
International ClassificationH01L21/20, B81B5/00, C10N40/06, B81C1/00, C10M103/00, H02N1/00, C10N50/08, C10N70/00, B81B7/00, C10N40/02
Cooperative ClassificationB81B7/0093, H02N1/004
European ClassificationH02N1/00B1, B81B7/00T4C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 8, 2005FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20050914
Sep 14, 2005LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Mar 30, 2005REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Feb 22, 2001FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Feb 27, 1997FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Sep 27, 1994CCCertificate of correction
May 31, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: SHIMADZU CORPORATION, JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:NAKANISHI, HIROAKI;REEL/FRAME:005729/0660
Effective date: 19910508