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Publication numberUS5247392 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 07/837,884
Publication dateSep 21, 1993
Filing dateFeb 20, 1992
Priority dateMay 21, 1991
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asEP0514745A2, EP0514745A3
Publication number07837884, 837884, US 5247392 A, US 5247392A, US-A-5247392, US5247392 A, US5247392A
InventorsErich Plies
Original AssigneeSiemens Aktiengesellschaft
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Objective lens for producing a radiation focus in the inside of a specimen
US 5247392 A
Abstract
Objective lens for producing a radiation focus in the inside of a specimen. Many laser measuring methods for sensing charge carrier density or the distribution of a potential in the inside of an integrated circuit (IC) of microelectronics are based on what is referred to as "backside-probing" technique, whereby the laser radiation (LA) is focused into the plane of the voltage-carrying components (SK) from the backside of the component using a conventional microscope objective. Since the irradiation occurs through the substrate (SU), a pronounced spherical aberration arises that limits the spatial resolution to approximately 2 through 4 μm. For producing a sub-μ probe in the substrate (SU), a lens is arranged on the polished backside (RS) of the integrated circuit (IC), this lens being composed of a silicon base plate (GP, refractive index of n1), a sphere (KU, refractive index of n2 <n1, radius of r2) lying in a recess of the base plate (GP), and a hemispherical silicon shell (KS, refractive index of n1, outside radius of r1, inside radius of r2). Given a suitable selection of the refractive indices and of the radii, the lens and the substrate (SU) form an optical unit acting as a 2-index Luneburg lens that focuses an incident, parallel ray beam (LA) at a point (LF) lying in the inside of the substrate (SU).
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Claims(18)
What is claimed is:
1. An objective lens for focusing radiation in the inside of a specimen, comprising:
a specimen;
a plate arranged on a planar surface of the specimen, the plate being composed of a first material having a first refractive index and provided with a hemispherical recess having a radius r2 ;
a sphere arranged in said recess and having a radius r2, said sphere being composed of a second material having a second refractive index, said second refractive index being lower than said first refractive index and being substantially constant over said radius r2 ; and
a hemispherical shell composed of said first material, said hemispherical shell having an outer radius r1 and an inner radius r2 and being arranged on said plate and said sphere.
2. The objective lens according to claim 1, wherein the radii r1 and r2 satisfy the condition r1 -r2 >d, where d is the thickness of the specimen measured in the direction of a parallel ray beam incident on the hemispherical shell.
3. The objective lens according to claim 1, wherein the specimen, the plate and the hemispherical shell are composed of the same material.
4. The objective lens according to claim 1, wherein the hemispherical shell is attached to the plate with a glue.
5. The objective lens according to claim 1, wherein the plate is displaceably arranged on the specimen.
6. The objective lens according to claim 5, wherein the objective lens further comprises an oil film between the plate and said planar surface.
7. The objective lens according to claim 1, wherein the plate, the hemispherical shell and the specimen are composed of silicon.
8. The objective lens according to claim 1, wherein said plate has mount elements.
9. An objective lens for focusing radiation in the inside of a specimen, comprising:
a specimen;
a plate arranged on a planar surface of the specimen, the plate being composed of a first material having a first refractive index and provided with a hemispherical recess having a radius r2 ;
a sphere arranged in said recess and having a radius r2, said sphere being composed of a second material having a second refractive index and said second refractive index being lower than said first refractive index; and
a hemispherical shell composed of said first material, said hemispherical shell having an outer radius r1 and an inner radius r2 and being arranged on said plate and said sphere, the plate, the hemispherical shell and the specimen being composed of silicon, and said second material having a refractive index of approximately 2.7.
10. An objective lens for focusing radiation in the inside of a specimen, comprising:
a specimen;
a plate arranged on a planar surface of the specimen, the plate being composed of a first material having a first refractive index and provided with a hemispherical recess having a radius r2 ;
a sphere arranged in said recess and having a radius r2, said sphere being composed of a second material having a second refractive index and said second refractive index being lower than said first refractive index; and
a hemispherical shell composed of said first material, said hemispherical shell having an outer radius r1 and an inner radius r2 and being arranged on said plate and said sphere, the plate, the hemispherical shell and the specimen being composed of silicon, and said sphere being composed of one of arsenic triselenide glass, telluride glass, CdTe and As35 S10 Se35 Te20.
11. An objective lens for focusing radiation in the inside of a specimen, comprising:
a specimen;
a plate displaceably arranged on a planar surface of the specimen with an oil film between the plate and the planar surface, the plate being composed of a first material having a first refractive index and provided with a hemispherical recess having a radius r2 ;
a sphere arranged in said recess and having a radius r2, said sphere being composed of a second material having a second refractive index, said second refractive index being lower than said first refractive index and being substantially constant over said radius r2 ; and
a hemispherical shell composed of said first material, said hemispherical shell having an outer radius r1 and an inner radius r2 and being arranged on said plate and said sphere, the radii r1 and r2 satisfying the condition r1 -r2 >d, where d is the thickness of the specimen measured in the direction of a parallel ray beam incident on the hemispherical shell.
12. The objective lens according to claim 11, wherein the specimen, the plate and the hemispherical shell are composed of the same material.
13. The objective lens according to claim 11, wherein the plate, the hemispherical shell and the specimen are composed of silicon.
14. An objective lens for focusing radiation in the inside of a specimen, comprising:
a specimen;
a plate arranged on a planar surface of the specimen, the plate being composed of a first material having a first refractive index and provided with a hemispherical recess having a radius r2 ;
a sphere arranged in said recess and having a radius r2, said sphere being composed of a second material having a second refractive index of approximately 2.7 and said second refractive index being lower than said first refractive index; and a hemispherical shell composed of said first material, said hemispherical shell having an outer radius r1 and inner radius r2 and being arranged on said plate and said sphere, the radii r1 and r2 satisfying the condition r1 -r2 >d, where d is the thickness of the specimen measured in the direction of a parallel ray beam incident on the hemispherical shell.
15. An objective lens for focusing radiation in the inside of a specimen, comprising:
a specimen;
a plate arranged on a planar surface of the specimen, the plate being composed of a first material having a first refractive index and provided with a hemispherical recess having a radius r2 ;
a sphere arranged in said recess and having a radius r2, said sphere being composed of a second material having a second refractive index and said second material being one of arsenic triselenide glass, telluride glass, CdTe and As35 S10 Se35 Te20 and said second refractive index being lower than said first refractive index; and a hemispherical shell composed of said first material, said hemispherical shell having an outer radius r1 and inner radius r2 and being arranged on said plate and said sphere, the radii r1 and r2 satisfying the condition r1 -r2 >d, where d is the thickness of the specimen measured in the direction of a parallel ray beam incident on the hemispherical shell.
16. An objective lens for focusing radiation in the inside of a specimen that is composed of silicon comprising:
a specimen;
a plate displaceably arranged on a planar surface of the specimen with an oil film between the plate and the planar surface, the plate being composed of silicon having a first refractive index and provided with a hemispherical recess having a radius r2 ;
a sphere arranged in said recess and having a radius r2, said sphere being composed of a material having a second refractive index of approximately 2.7, said second refractive index being lower than said first refractive index and being substantially constant over said radius r2 ; and
a hemispherical shell composed of silicon, said hemispherical shell having an outer radius r1 and an inner radius r2 and being arranged on said plate and said sphere.
17. The objective lens according to claim 16, wherein the radii r1 and r2 satisfy the condition r1 -r2 >d, where d is the thickness of the specimen measured in the direction of a parallel ray beam incident on the hemispherical shell.
18. The objective lens according to claim 16, wherein said sphere is composed of one of arsenic triselenide glass, telluride glass, CdTe and As35 S10 Se35 Te20.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

An article, "Picosecond Noninvasive Optical Detection Of Internal Electrical Signals In Flip-Chip-Mounted Silicon Integrated Circuits", IBM J. Res. Develop., Vol. 34, No. 2/3 (1990), pages 162-172 discloses a laser measuring method for sensing the charge carrier density in the inside of a component of microelectronics. It is based on what is referred to as a "backside-probing" technique, wherein the laser radiation is focused into the plane of the voltage-carrying components from the backside of the component using a conventional microscope objective. Since the irradiation occurs through the substrate that is approximately 0.4 mm thick, a pronounced spherical aberration arises that limits the spatial resolution to 2 through 4 μm. It has therefore been proposed to diminish the spherical aberration by grinding the substrate to such an extent that a spatial resolution lying in the sub-micrometer range is achieved with a conventional microscope objective at a wavelength of λ=1.3 μm. Grinding down the substrate to fractions of a millimeter, however, jeopardizes the mechanical stability of the component. Moreover, it is not assured that this type of preparation has no influence on the electrical functioning of the component.

What is referred to as a Luneburg lens belongs to the class of absolute optical instruments having perfect geometrical-optical imaging. It is composed of a nonhomogeneous sphere having a radius R whose refractive index n is a function of the distance r from the center of the sphere. When the refractive index n obeys the relationship n (r)=(2-r2 /R2)1/2, then every parallel beam incident from an arbitrary spatial direction is united in an ideal focus on the sphere surface. The Luneburg lens serves as antenna in microwave technology, whereby this antenna is then composed of a plurality of dielectric spherical shells having different but respectively constant refractive indices.

A Luneburg lens composed only of an inner sphere and of an outer sphere is disclosed in the references of J. Appl. Phys. 32 (1961) page 2051 and R. C. Hansen, Editor, "Microwave Scanning Antennas", Academic Press, New York (1965) pages 214-218. This lens has an extremely low spherical aberration with slight zonal aberration, so that it is employable up to an incident height of h=0.95 r1 (where r1 is the radius of the outer sphere).

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide an objective lens having a low spherical aberration for producing a radiation focus in the inside of a specimen. This object is achieved by an objective lens having: a plate arranged on a planar surface of the specimen, whereby the plate is composed of a first material having a first refractive index and is provided with a hemispherical recess having a radius r2 ; a sphere arranged in the recess and having a radius r2, whereby the sphere is composed of a second material having a second refractive index and wherein the second refractive index is lower than the first refractive index; and a hemispherical shell composed of the first material, the hemispherical shell having an outer radius r1 and an inner radius r2 and being arranged on the plate and on the sphere.

The advantage obtainable with the present invention is that the charge carrier density and the distribution of potential in a component of microelectronics can be sensed with a spatial resolution lying in the sub-micrometer range.

The following are advantageous improvements of the present invention. The radii r1 and r2 satisfy the condition r1 -r2 >d, whereby d is the thickness of the specimen measured in the direction of a parallel beam incident on the hemispherical shell. The specimen, the plate and the hemispherical shell can be composed of the same material. The hemispherical shell can be glued to the plate. Furthermore, the plate can be displaceably arranged on the specimen and an oil film can be provided between the plate and the planar surface. The plate, the hemispherical shell and the specimen can be composed of silicon. In this embodiment, the second material can have a refractive index of approximately n2 =2.7 and the sphere can be composed of arsenic triselenide glass, telluride glass, CdTe or As35 S10 Se35 Te20. Also, the plate can be provided with mount elements.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel, are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention, together with further objects and advantages, may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, and in which:

The single FIGURE depicts an exemplary embodiment of an objective lens of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The objective lens schematically shown in FIG. 1 has the function of imaging a parallel beam LA incident along an optical axis OA into the plane of a voltage-carrying components SK of an integrated circuit IC of microelectronics. It is arranged at a backside RS of a silicon substrate SU (refractive index of n1 =3.5) that is polished optically flat, whereby an oil film F present between the lens and the substrate SU guarantees a low-friction displacement of the integrated circuit IC in a plane oriented perpendicular to the optical axis OA. The oil film F also contributes to improving the imaging quality since this effects less of a beam offset than an air gap between the lens and the substrate SU. The objective lens is composed of a silicon base plate GP (refractive index of n1 =3.5) equipped with mount elements H, H', a sphere KU (refractive index of n2 <n1) arranged in a hemispherical recess of the base plate GP and having a radius r2, and a hemispherical silicon shell KS (refractive index of n1, outer radius of r1, inner radius of r2) that is arranged on the sphere KU and that is glued to the base plate GP at the parting surfaces TF, TF'. Given a suitable selection of the refractive index n2 and of the radii r1 and r2, the hemispherical shell KS, the sphere KU, the base plate GP and the silicon substrate SU form an optical unit acting as a 2-index Luneburg lens that focuses the incident parallel beam LA at a point LF lying on a continuation of the spherical shell shown with broken lines. A lens spherically corrected up to the incidence height h<0.95 r1 is particularly obtained when the sphere material has a refractive index of n2 =2.71 and when the ratio of the radii r2 /r1 is 0.39.

The integrated circuit can remain unaltered with respect to the thickness d of the substrate SU insofar as the thickness d satisfies the condition:

d<r1 -r2                                         (1).

This can be easily met for standard substrate thicknesses of d>0.4 mm. A polishing of, the backside RS of the integrated circuit IC is merely required in order to guarantee a uniform contact between the objective lens and the substrate SU.

The spatial resolution δ obtained with the objective lens is calculated as:

δ=0.61 λ/NA                                   (2)

with

NA=n1 Ěsin σ'                          (3).

where λ is the vacuum wavelength of the incident radiation LA and σ' is half the aperture angle of the beam in the substrate SU. Since the objective lens has a numerical aperture of NA=n1 Ěsin σ'=0.96, equation (1) is simplified to read δ=0.64 λ, so that a spatial resolution of δ=0.83 μm is obtained for λ=1.3 μm (infrared radiation).

The absolute values of r1 and r2 do not enter into the spatial resolution. Nonetheless, a limitation of the sphere radii to values of r1 <4 mm and r2 <1.56 mm is required in order to keep the residual zonal aberration of the lens adequately low. Optical quality spheres having a radius of r2 <1.56 mm can be manufactured by machine. For example, they are utilized as hemispherical front lenses in apochromatic microscope objectives. Arsenic triselenide glass, telluride glass, CdTe or As35 S10 Se35 Te20 particularly come into consideration as sphere material, since their refractive indices for infrared radiation having the wavelength λ=1.3 μm lie in the region of n2 ≈2.7.

The techniques known from micromechanics are particularly employed in the manufacture of the lens parts composed of silicon (hemispherical shell KS, base plate GP with hemispherical recess). The lens parts should be fabricated tension-free in order to avoid causing disturbing birefringence effects.

The invention is not limited to the particular details of the apparatus depicted and other modifications and applications are contemplated. Certain other changes may be made in the above described apparatus without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention herein involved. It is intended, therefore, that the subject matter in the above depiction shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4577566 *May 11, 1984Mar 25, 1986Betz Laboratories, Inc.Antideposit
US5004328 *Sep 25, 1987Apr 2, 1991Canon Kabushiki KaishaSpherical lens and imaging device using the same
DE2954333C2 *Jul 24, 1979Jul 18, 1985Messerschmitt-Boelkow-Blohm Gmbh, 8012 Ottobrunn, DeTitle not available
EP0384377A2 *Feb 20, 1990Aug 29, 1990Honeywell Inc.Optical sensing system
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1"Microwave Scanning Antennas", Edited by R. C. Hansen, Academic Press, New York, (1964), pp. 214-218.
2"Picosecond Noninvasive Optical Detection of Internal Electrical Signals in Flip-Chip-Mounted Silicon Integrated Circuits", by H. K. Heinrich, IBM Journal of Research & Development, vol. 34, No. 2/3, Mar./May 1990, pp. 162-172.
3"Spherical Lenses for Infrared and Microwaves", by G. Toraldo Di Francia, J. Appl. Phys. 32, May 19, 1961, p. 2051.
4 *Microwave Scanning Antennas , Edited by R. C. Hansen, Academic Press, New York, (1964), pp. 214 218.
5 *Picosecond Noninvasive Optical Detection of Internal Electrical Signals in Flip Chip Mounted Silicon Integrated Circuits , by H. K. Heinrich, IBM Journal of Research & Development, vol. 34, No. 2/3, Mar./May 1990, pp. 162 172.
6 *Spherical Lenses for Infrared and Microwaves , by G. Toraldo Di Francia, J. Appl. Phys. 32, May 19, 1961, p. 2051.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5526373 *Jun 2, 1994Jun 11, 1996Karpinski; Arthur A.Lens support structure for laser diode arrays
US5555133 *Dec 20, 1994Sep 10, 1996Olympus Optical Co., Ltd.Objective lens for microscope
US5638111 *May 23, 1994Jun 10, 1997Sharp Kabushiki KaishaOptical probe element, and a recording and reproduction device using the optical probe element
US5668825 *Apr 30, 1996Sep 16, 1997Laser Diode Array, Inc.Lens support structure for laser diode arrays
US5767891 *May 26, 1995Jun 16, 1998Sharp Kabushiki KaishaMethod of manufacturing an optical probe element
US5982409 *Jan 27, 1997Nov 9, 1999Sharp Kabushiki KaishaOptical probe element, and a recording and reproduction device using the optical probe element
US6594086Jan 16, 2002Jul 15, 2003Optonics, Inc. (A Credence Company)Bi-convex solid immersion lens
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US6778327May 19, 2003Aug 17, 2004Credence Systems CorporationBi-convex solid immersion lens
US6864972 *Jul 26, 2002Mar 8, 2005Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.IC die analysis via back side lens
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US7227702Jul 1, 2004Jun 5, 2007Credence Systems CorporationBi-convex solid immersion lens
US7242521May 27, 2004Jul 10, 2007Optical Biopsy Technologies, Inc.Dual-axis confocal microscope having improved performance for thick samples
US7450245May 17, 2006Nov 11, 2008Dcg Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for measuring high-bandwidth electrical signals using modulation in an optical probing system
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US7492529May 8, 2007Feb 17, 2009Dcg Systems, Inc.Bi-convex solid immersion lens
US7616312Jun 29, 2005Nov 10, 2009Dcg Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for probing integrated circuits using laser illumination
US7659981Oct 27, 2005Feb 9, 2010Dcg Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for probing integrated circuits using polarization difference probing
US7733100May 18, 2006Jun 8, 2010Dcg Systems, Inc.System and method for modulation mapping
US7990167Jul 31, 2009Aug 2, 2011Dcg Systems, Inc.System and method for modulation mapping
US8686748Apr 27, 2011Apr 1, 2014Dcg Systems, Inc.System and method for modulation mapping
US8754633May 3, 2010Jun 17, 2014Dcg Systems, Inc.Systems and method for laser voltage imaging state mapping
EP0909947A2 *Oct 1, 1998Apr 21, 1999Bayer AgOptical measurement system for detecting luminescence or fluorescence emissions
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Classifications
U.S. Classification359/661, 359/664, 359/660
International ClassificationG02B3/00, G02B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationG02B3/00
European ClassificationG02B3/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 2, 1997FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 19970924
Sep 21, 1997LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Apr 29, 1997REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Feb 20, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: SIEMENS AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT, GERMANY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:PLIES, ERICH;REEL/FRAME:006030/0580
Effective date: 19920205