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Publication numberUS525738 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1894
Filing dateJul 15, 1892
Publication numberUS 525738 A, US 525738A, US-A-525738, US525738 A, US525738A
InventorsGottfried Hatjseb
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gottfried hatjseb
US 525738 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

G. HAUSER. rnoonss 0F REMOVING BACKGROUND PROM EMBROIDERY. No. 525,738. Patented Sept. 11, 1894.

WITNESSES. INVE/VTOH a. yaw/4 4% 5 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

GOTTFRIED HAUSER, OF NEW YORK, Y., ASSIGNOR OF Tl/VO-THIRDS TO RUDOLF SPIESS AND EMIL KREIS, OF SAME PLACE.

PROCESS OF REMOVING BACKG R OUND FROM EMBROIDERY.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 525,738, dated September 11, 1894.

Application filed July 15, 1892. Serial No. 440,097. (No specimens.)

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, GOTTFRIED I-IAUSER, of

New York city, New York, have invented an Improved Process of Removing the Background from Embroidery, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to an improved process of removing the cotton background from machine made silk or metal embroidery.

In producing embroidery upon a machine the background is stretched upon a frame or between rollers, gauze is superposed if desired and then the embroidery is formed in relief by the needles, that penetrate the gauze and the background. The latter must then be removed so that the embroidery together represents a piece of machine made embroid-' ery with the background; Fig. 2, a cross section on line (B, m, Fig. 1. Fig. 3 represents the embroidery with the background removed. Fig. 4 is across section on line y, y, Fig. 3.

a, represents the cotton background; b, the

superposed silk gauze; c, the silk or metal embroidery formed upon the gauze and background. In this form (Figs. 1 and 2) the goods leaves the embroidery machine and it is the object of the invention to remove the background so that the gauze b, and embroidery 0, remain over (Figs. 3 and 4). In cases where no gauze b, is employed, the embroidcry 0, only is to remain over.

To remove the background the goods is subjected to the action of a bath consisting of chloride of aluminium and a suitable acid such as sulphuric acid. The proportions of these constituents are from five to ten parts of chloride of aluminium to one part of the acid. In place of sulphuric acid, nitric acid may also be employed, but I prefer the former. The product is then removed and dried and subjected to a temperature of about 100 Reauniur when the cotton backing will fall away, while the silk gauze and the embroidery will remain over without being in any way discolored or otherwise injured. The product is then brushed toremove the decayed fibers of the backing which completes the process.

The chloride of aluminium is not believed to have any efiect either upon the cotton backing or upon the embroidery material itself, or to influence in any way the action of the dilute acid upon either of these materials, but it is of value in the above process solely in relation to the coloring matter of the embroidery, threads, with regard to which it is believed to act as a mordant, fixing and retaining the colors during the action of the acid. Whatever be the nature of the chemical influence exercised, it is found by actual experiments that the chloride of aluminium in the above process prevents the coloring matter used in the embroidery, from being injuriously affected during the heating operation. Moreover it subsequently protects it eifectively against the influences of weather, light and weak lyes,"even diluted acids, while the firmness of the silk tissue is greatly augmented.

What I claim is- The process of removing a cotton background from colored silk or metal embroidery which consists in subjecting the same to the action of chloride of aluminium and an acid, and then to heat.

GOTTFRIED HAUSER.

Witnesses:

F. v. BRIESEN, A. JoNGHMANs.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2418347 *Nov 6, 1943Apr 1, 1947Oscar HaagProcess for producing gatherings
US2480984 *May 12, 1947Sep 6, 1949Fabric Dev Company LtdManufacture of pile fabrics
US3134138 *Mar 22, 1962May 26, 1964Pufahl JosephMethod and apparatus for forming plastic webs
US3438107 *Aug 30, 1965Apr 15, 1969Stevens & Co Inc J PProcess for forming textiles on heat degradable backings
US4092451 *Mar 8, 1976May 30, 1978Howard SernakerSheer diaphanous thermoplastic material, and an adhesive layer
US4140563 *Oct 4, 1977Feb 20, 1979Penn Textile Inc.Method of making embroidery transfer
US5111760 *Jun 22, 1989May 12, 1992Garzone Jr Raymond GDouble-embroidered lace
WO1990015895A1 *May 23, 1990Dec 23, 1990Raymond G Garzone JrDouble-embroidered lace
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD04C1/04, D06C23/00