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Publication numberUS529690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1894
Filing dateMay 28, 1894
Publication numberUS 529690 A, US 529690A, US-A-529690, US529690 A, US529690A
InventorsBartlett Arkell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
blowers
US 529690 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

B. ARKELL 8v 0. A. BLOWERS.

PACKING BAG.

. No. 529,690, I Patented Nov. 2'7, 1894.

IRE Nonmsytfins cajmuroumu. WASHINDTON, u. c:

r U NITED STATES ATENT OFFroE.

BARTLETT ARKELL AND CHARLES A. BLOWERS, OF OANAJOHA RIE, NEW

-YORK; SAID BLOWERS ASSIGNOR TOFRANK O. MATTHIESSEN, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

PACKING-BAG.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 529,690, dated November 27,1894.

Application filed May 28,1894- Serial No.512,617. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern: I

Be it known that we, BARTLETT ARKELL and CHARLES A. BLOWERS, citizens of the United States, residing at Oanajoharie, in the county of Montgomery, State of New York, have invented certain new and usefulImprovements in Packing-Bags, of which the following, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification.

Our invention relates to packing bags and it has for its object to provide a bag adapted to securely hold a fine granulated or powdered substance such as sugar, salt, starch and similar substances, whereby any of these substances may be safely packed and shipped in the bag in bulk.

Heretofore it has been customary to packsugar. and salt in barrels for shipping, but the great expense involved by the barrels has induced those interested to seek some other satisfactory and less expensive package. Sugar refiners were thus .induced to employ a cotton bag inclosed in an outer bag of a coarsely woven textile fabric, the cotton bag affording a clean surface for contact with the sugar and the outer textile bag affording a strong reinforcement for the cotton bag. This package was little if any less expensive than the barrel, and was objectionable for the reason that any puncture of the cotton bag would permit the sugar to escape, the mesh of the outer bag beingtoo coarse to retain it. Moreover, if the mesh of the outer bag were fine enough to retain the sugar, the seams of the bag would open at the stitches under the ordinary strain to which they were subjected in handling.

Our invention is designed to remedy the defects of the old packing bag and also to provide a much cheaper bag in which a large bulk of sugar, or similar substance of a hundred pounds or more if desired, may besafely packed and shipped without damage to the substance inclosed or liability of its escape.

In the drawings, in which like letters designate similar parts in all the views, Figure 1 is an elevation of a bag embodying our invention. Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the bag turned inside out. Fig. 3 shows a strip of fabric before it is folded intothe form of a bag and stitched. Figs. 4, 5, 6 and 7 are detail sectional views on the lines 4-4, 5-5, 6--6, 77 respectively of Fig. 2.

The bag is made of a cheap, strong, firmly woven textile fabric, capable of sustaining a considerable weight, say a hundred pounds or more, and having a mesh sufficiently fine to retain a fine granular or powdered substance top. A narrow fold b about two inches wide is then turned down along the bottom, as shown in Fig. 3. The fold a is secured in place by a row of stitching a and then the strip of fabric A, is turned over along the line a; and the folds oand d are turned down and secured by a row of stitching e, passing through these folds and through the body A of the fabric, making thus fourt'hicknesses of fabric secured by the stitching e. The bottom is then fastened by a row of stitching g, which passes through two thicknesses of the fold b and two thicknesses of the body A, and thus makes a bag. To make the side seam thoroughly secure it is then folded over and a second row of stitching f run along this fold, passing through eight thicknesses of fabric. The bag as now made is inside out and when turned the finished bag is produced. When the bag is filled with the substance which it is intended-to carry, the fold a may be turned over and the bag securely closed by stitching which passes through at least four thicknesses of fabric. The bag as thus made is exceedingly strong, and it is, moreover, easy and inmay be stitched around the upper edge of the bag. While we prefer to employ the reinforcing strip a, yet in some cases it may be omitted.

In practically making our bags in quantities for commerce we proceed as follows: We take a long strip of the fabric out of which the bags are to be made, and fix along its upper edge, preferably by stitching a reinforcing band consisting either of a separate and distinct baud stitched in place along its upper and lower edges to the strip of fabric, or a band folded over from the upper edge of the strip of fabric and stitched in place along its lower edge. \Ve then cut the strip of fabric into a number of short strips of a proper bag length and fold each of these short strips into the form of a bag, completing the bag by a seam along its bottom and a seam along its side which has one or more rows of stitching through four or more thicknesses of fabric.

We have shown in the drawings the seam atthe bottom of the bag as comprising a single row of stitching through only four thicknesses of fabric, but it is of course understood that we may make this seam so as to comprise one or more rows of stitching through four or more thicknesses of fabric, and if desired may have one row of stitching through four thicknesses and another row through eight thicknesses of fabric, similar to the side seam.

What we claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. A bag made of strong, firmly woven textile fabric adapted to securely hold a fine granular or powdered substance, having its side closed by a seam provided with a row of stitching through four thicknesses of fabric and a row of stitching through eight thicknesses of fabric, and having its bottom closed by a seam provided with one or more rows of stitching through four or more thicknesses of fabric, substantially as set forth.

2. A bag made of a strong, firmly woven textile fabric adapted to securely hold a fine granular or powdered substance, provided with a reinforcing strip of textile material stitched about its open end and made by folding over the fabric of the bag, adapted together with the body of the bag to receive and securely hold a row of needle stitches when the bag is closed, and having its bottom closed by a seam having one or more rows of stitching through four or more thicknesses of fabric, and one side closed by a seam having a row of stitching through four thicknesses of fabric and a row of stitching through eight thicknesses of fabric, substan- 6o tially as set forth.

BARTLETT ARKELL. CHAS. A. BLOWERS. Witnesses:

E. B. BUMAP, E. L. BUNDY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2524982 *Feb 27, 1947Oct 10, 1950A L Siegel Co IncMethod of manufacturing garment bags
US2788039 *Jul 28, 1954Apr 9, 1957Brown & BigelowThermoplastic bag
US3200996 *Mar 23, 1964Aug 17, 1965Joe E PicattiCollapsible bag type applicator
US5238307 *Jan 28, 1992Aug 24, 1993Tri-Combined Resources, Inc.Ore sample bag
US5327851 *May 24, 1993Jul 12, 1994Pare Stephen FAnimal sleeping bag
US5645353 *Dec 21, 1993Jul 8, 1997Linnell; Michael CharlesMail bags
US5961034 *Jul 14, 1998Oct 5, 1999Demunnik; MaryCloth box sleeve
US7950509 *Nov 14, 2006May 31, 2011Travel Caddy, Inc.Dual compartment tool bag
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB65D29/00