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Publication numberUS5344341 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/041,314
Publication dateSep 6, 1994
Filing dateMar 31, 1993
Priority dateMar 31, 1992
Fee statusLapsed
Publication number041314, 08041314, US 5344341 A, US 5344341A, US-A-5344341, US5344341 A, US5344341A
InventorsToshinori Yoshino
Original AssigneeNec Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Connector having electromagnetic shielding film
US 5344341 A
Abstract
A connector includes first and second connector halves 100 and 200 in which contact pins 1 and 4 are respectively held by projections 3a and 6a protruding from insulation plates 3 and 6. The insulation plates are housed within an insulation housing (2, 5) whose internal and external surfaces are coated with a conductive film, so that crosstalk between the neighboring contact pins is prevented, and all elements can be constructed by molding.
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Claims(4)
What is claimed is:
1. A connector comprising a first connector half which holds first contact pins, and a second connector half which holds second contact pins;
said first connector half comprising:
a first insulation plate including a plurality of parallel projections in which said first contact pins are held, and
a first insulation housing including a plurality of holes for receiving said projections, said first insulation housing being coated with a conductive film on internal and external surfaces thereof; and
said second connector half comprising:
a second insulation plate including a plurality of parallel projections in which said second contact pins are held, and
a second insulation housing including a plurality of holes for receiving said projections of said second insulation plate, said second insulation housing being coated with a conductive film on internal and external surfaces thereof;
said first and second connector halves being coupled with each other to contact said first contact pins with said second contact pins;
wherein said conductive films respectively coated on said first and second insulation housing are each connected to a ground.
2. The connector of claim 1, wherein said projections of said first insulation plate are respectively provided with holes for holding said first contact pins in parallel, and said projections of said second insulation plate are respectively provided with holes for holding said second contact pins in parallel.
3. The connector of claim 2, wherein a tip of each of said first contact pins extends from a corresponding said projection of said first insulation plate, and a tip of each of said second contact pins is located within a hole of a corresponding said projection of said second insulation plate.
4. The connector of claim 3, wherein said second contact pins are provided with contact springs for holding the tips of said first contact pins.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a connector fixed to a printed circuit board via a plurality of contact pins, and more particularly to a connector constructed for electromagnetic shielding.

One known connector comprises a pair of insulating connector housings one of which holds a plurality of female contact pins and the other holds a plurality of male contact pins. Usually, the female and male contact pins are press-inserted or press-fitted into holes of the respective connector housings and separately located in the connector housings by leaving a predetermined space. When the two connector housings are coupled with each other, the male contact pins engage and electrically connect with the female contact pins.

However, in the above-described conventional connector, outer or external noise is easily received by the female and male contact pins. To prevent the external noise, a connector disclosed in the Japanese Patent Disclosure Gazette No. 50-55892 published on May 16, 1975, has an insulating housing whose external surface is coated with a conductive film, part of which is connected to a grounding pin among the contact pins.

In this connector, however, only shielding against external noise signals to the connector housings is provided, but shielding against crosstalk between neighboring contact pins in the connector housings is not provided.

Crosstalk between contact pins is cut off in a connector described in the Japanese Patent Disclosure Gazette No. 58-165284 published on Sep. 30, 1983. In this connector, the two connector housings, which are respectively holding the female and male contact pins, are made of metal, and the contact pins are respectively fixed in holes of the metal connector housings via cylindrical insulators so that they do not directly come into contact with the connector housings.

However, as the pair of connector housings is made of metal, the connector housings cannot be molded or fabricated easily, and the boring of the holes is troublesome. Moreover, a large number of cylindrical insulators have to be inserted into the holes in the connector housings one-by-one, which results in tedious and time consuming work.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of the present invention, therefore, is to provide a crosstalk-free connector permitting the prevention of crosstalk between contact pins, and moreover, readily permitting manufacture and assembly of the constituent parts.

According to the present invention, a connector is provided comprising a first connector half which holds first contact pins and a second connector half which holds second contact pins. The first connector half comprises a first insulation plate provided with parallel projections in which the first contact pins are held, and a first insulation housing provided with holes, for receiving the projections, and coated with a conductive film on internal and external surfaces. The second connector half comprises a second insulation plate provided with parallel projections in which the second contact pins are held, and a second insulation housing provided with holes, for receiving the projections of the second insulation plate, and coated with a conductive film on internal and external surfaces.

The first and second connector halves are coupled with each other to contact the first contact pins with the second contact pins, and the conductive films coated on the first and second housings are connected to ground.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a partially sectioned front view of a connector embodying the invention;

FIG. 1A and FIG. 1B are respectively enlarged section views of the circled portions of the connector in FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged and partially sectioned front view of the connector in FIG. 1 after completing coupling;

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of a first connector half shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of a second connector half shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In FIG. 1, a first connector half 100 is fixed on a printed circuit board 9, and a second connector half 200 is fixed on a printed circuit board 10. The first connector half 100 is a male connector in which male contact pins 1 are press-inserted or press-fitted. The second connector half 200 is a female connector in which the female contact pins 4 are press-inserted or press-fitted. The male and female contact pins 1 and 4 are respectively inserted into the through-holes 9a and 10a, which are covered with a solder compatible material (not shown), of the printed circuit boards 9 and 10, and soldered within the through-holes. When the first and second connector halves 100 and 200 are coupled as shown in FIG. 2, the tips of the male contact pins 1 are inserted into the connector half 200 and coupled to the respective contact springs 4a of the female contact pins 4 so that circuits on the printed circuit boards 9 and 10 are connected through the contact pins 1 and 4.

As shown in FIG. 3, the first connector half 100 comprises a first housing 2 which is fixed to the printed circuit board 9 (see FIG. 1), and a first insulation plate 3. The first insulation plate 3 has a plurality of square pillar projections 3a extending perpendicular to the plate 3. The square pillar projections 3a are located at regular intervals and holes 3b are bored in the center axes of the projections 3a. The male contact pins 1 are press-inserted in the holes 3b.

The first housing 2 is provided with a plurality of square holes 2a for receiving the square pillar projections 3a, frame 2b for receiving the second connector half 200, and flange 2c having holes 2d. Each hole 2a has a depth which is equal to the length of each square pillar projection 3a. The square pillar projections 3a are inserted from the bottom 2e of the housing 2 into the holes 2a. There is a recess in the bottom 2e for fitting therein the first insulation plate 3.

The first housing 2 is formed of an insulation material, such as synthetic resin, and all the internal and external surfaces including the surrounding surfaces in the holes 2a are coated with a conductive film F formed by electroplating or non-electroplating (e.g., dipped in a bath of liquified film material). Moreover, the conductive film is connected to a grounding circuit G provided on the printed circuit board 9 via a screw 11 fixed in the holes 2d and 9b as shown in FIG. 1.

Therefore, the crosstalk between the neighboring male contact pins 1 is prevented by the conductive film coated on the internal surfaces of housing 2, and assembly of the connector half 100 is simple because it is completed by coupling the insulation plate 3 into the first housing 2.

As shown in FIG. 4, the second connector half 200 comprises a second housing 5 which is fixed to the printed circuit board 10 (see FIG. 1), and a second insulation plate 6. The second insulation plate 6 is provided with a plurality of square pillar projections 6a extending perpendicular to the plate 6. Holes 6b (see FIG. 2) are bored at the center axes of the square pillar projections 6a. The female contact pins 4 are press-inserted from the tips of the projections 6a into the respective holes 6b and then the contact springs 4a of the female contact pins 4 are respectively positioned at the middle portion of the holes 6b. Each hole 6b is provided with a small hole 6d for passing the male contact pin 1 and a recess 6c surrounds the small hole 6d. Each recess 6c is constructed so that the tip of the corresponding male contact pin 1 is readily led into the hole 6b to contact with the contact spring 4a.

The second housing 5 is provided with holes 5a and a flange 5b. Each hole 5a has a depth which is equal to the length of the corresponding projection 6a. The projections 6a are inserted from a top face 5c of the second housing 5 into the holes 5a. All the internal and external surfaces of the housing 5 are coated with a conductive film F', and the conductive film is connected to a grounding circuit G' provided on the printed circuit board 10 via a screw 12 fixed in the holes 5d and 10b as shown in FIG. 2.

Therefore, crosstalk between the neighboring female contact pins 4 is prevented by the conductive film coated on the internal surfaces of the second housing 5, and assembly of the second connector half 200 is simple because it is completed by coupling the insulation plate 6 to the housing 5.

When the first connector half 100 is coupled to the second connector half 200 as shown in FIG. 2, each coupled pair of contact pins 1 and 4 are electrically separated from the housings 2 and 5 by the square pillar projections 3a and 6a of the insulation plates 3 and 6, and crosstalk between the neighboring contact pins is prevented by the conductive films coated on the internal surfaces of the housings 2 and 5.

In the above embodiment, the ground potential of the printed circuit boards 9 and 10 can be connected via one of the coupled contact pins 1 and 4. The first and second housings 2 and 5 and the first and second insulation plates 3 and 6 can be constructed of molded plastics.

It will be appreciated that modifications may be made in the present invention. For example, although the insulation plate 3 is inserted from the bottom 2e of the first housing 2 and the insulation plate 6 is inserted from the top 5c of the housing 5, the insulation plates can be inserted from the opposite side, respectively. Another modification is to change the configurations of the holes 2a and 5a, and the projections 3a and 6a. For example, the projections 3a and 6a can be cylindrical ones.

Although the present invention has been fully described by way of the preferred embodiments thereof with reference to the accompanying drawings, various changes and modifications will be apparent to those having skill in this field. Therefore, unless these changes and modifications otherwise depart from the scope of the present invention, they should be construed as included therein.

Patent Citations
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US3551874 *Jul 31, 1968Dec 29, 1970Amp IncMultiple coaxial connector
US4812136 *Apr 22, 1988Mar 14, 1989Otto Dunkel Gmbh, Fabrik Fur Eletrotechnische GerateElectrical plug and socket connector
US5015192 *Nov 13, 1989May 14, 1991Itt CorporationContact retention and sealing system
US5037332 *Aug 7, 1990Aug 6, 1991Itt CorporationIntermodule electrical coupling
JP46017736A * Title not available
JPS5055892A * Title not available
JPS58165284A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5509823 *Nov 28, 1994Apr 23, 1996Harting Elektronik GmbhElectrical mating connector
US5618196 *Aug 18, 1995Apr 8, 1997Lucent Technologies, Inc.Socket connector having improved protection against electrostatic discharges
US5626483 *Aug 11, 1995May 6, 1997The Whitaker CorporationElectrical connector having contacts formed by metal plating
US5632652 *Apr 11, 1995May 27, 1997Siemens AktiengesellschaftPlug-type connector for backplane wirings
US5637006 *Nov 9, 1994Jun 10, 1997Sextant AvioniqueElectrofluidic mixed connector
US5713762 *Jul 17, 1995Feb 3, 1998Berg Technology, Inc.Selectively metallized plastic hold-down connector
US5743765 *Jul 17, 1995Apr 28, 1998Berg Technology, Inc.Selectively metallized connector with at least one coaxial or twin-axial terminal
US5785534 *Mar 29, 1996Jul 28, 1998Siemens AktiengesellschaftElectrical connector
US5860812 *Jan 23, 1997Jan 19, 1999Litton Systems, Inc.Electrical connector attachable to a mounting surface
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US6276945Jul 29, 1998Aug 21, 2001Hybricon CorporationConnectors having a folded-path geometry for improved crosstalk and signal transmission characteristics
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US6702590Jun 13, 2002Mar 9, 2004Molex IncorporatedHigh-speed mezzanine connector with conductive housing
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US6916188 *May 6, 2003Jul 12, 2005Molex IncorporatedDifferential signal connectors with ESD protection
US7018239Jan 22, 2001Mar 28, 2006Molex IncorporatedShielded electrical connector
US7789676Aug 19, 2008Sep 7, 2010Tyco Electronics CorporationElectrical connector with electrically shielded terminals
US8109770Apr 4, 2006Feb 7, 2012Advanced Interconnections Corp.High speed, high density interconnection device
US8267707Feb 3, 2011Sep 18, 2012Tronic LimitedUnderwater or sub sea connectors
US20130189858 *Dec 17, 2010Jul 25, 2013Douglas M. JohnescuElectrical connector having conductive housing
EP1317027A1 *Jul 18, 2002Jun 4, 2003DDK Ltd.Electrical connector
WO2002101882A2 *Jun 13, 2002Dec 19, 2002Molex IncHigh-speed mezzanine connector
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/607.03, 439/931
International ClassificationH01R13/658, H01R24/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S439/931, H01R23/688
European ClassificationH01R23/68D2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 31, 2006FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20060906
Sep 6, 2006LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Mar 22, 2006REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Feb 7, 2002FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Mar 5, 1998FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Mar 31, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: NEC CORPORATION, JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:YOSHINO, TOSHINORI;REEL/FRAME:006511/0179
Effective date: 19930329