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Publication numberUS534462 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1895
Filing dateOct 20, 1894
Publication numberUS 534462 A, US 534462A, US-A-534462, US534462 A, US534462A
InventorsGeorge S. Balsley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building-brick
US 534462 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'PATENT Errea.

GEORGE S. BALSLEY, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN.`

BUILDING-BRICK.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 534,462, dated February 19, 1895. Application iiled October 20, 1894. Serial No, 526,470- (NO model- To all whom. it may concern.-

I 3e it known that I, GEORGE S. BALsLnY, a citizen of the United States, residing at Detro1t, in the countyrot' Wayne and State of Michigan, have invented certain new and usefull Improvements in Building-Bricks, of which the following is a specification, reference being had therein to the accompanying drawings.

This'invention relates to an improved building material for hollow walls andconsists in the peculiar construction of building bricks adapted to be used in building hollow walls,

whereby a saving in brick is effected with an increase of strength, all as more fully hereinafter described.

.In the drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a hollow wall embodying bricks of my improved construction. Fig. 2 is a similar view showing a slightly different arrangement of bricks. Fig. 3 is a plan view of the various shapes and sizes of bricks which I employ, and Fig. 4 is a cross section on line ac- Fig. 3.

A are bricks of standard dimensions, that is the width of a brick is onehalf that of its length as in the ordinary size which is eight inches by four inches so that if a brick is divided as shown by the dotted line c in Fig. 3, the two halves are both like squares.

The upper side of each brick centrally of the squares is provided with pyramidal frustuni shaped projections or lugs B, having rounded edges as shown. On the bottom side and directly beneath these lugs, are similarly shaped sockets or depressions B slightly larger than the lugs.

C are bonding bricks integrally formed of two square end sections e f having central prog ections on top and depressions on the bottom as described for the standard brick with an additional intervening bridge section D of a length corresponding to the hollow space desired in the Wall.

E are half bricks corresponding in. shape and construction to one half the brick A. f

To construct a hollow wall, I lay with the bricks A the usual number of courses F, G of stretchers separated the desired distance apart to form the hollow wall, and then whenever a bonding course is required I use the bricks C as. headers alternately with the half bricks E as shown in Fig. 1 or by using Y the bricks O in pairs as headers alternately with bricks A as stretcliers as shown in Fig. 2. In this manner the bricks will interlock, and the joints will be broken while at the same time the continuity offthe air space is obtained through the entire wall.

The interlocking portions serve as a guide in laying the bricks and by tying the bricks to-y gether naturally strengthen the wall, but in connection with this invention, they have the two fold purpose, first to compel the workman to use the bonding brick'for the headers, as without their use he could not build the wall with the bricks A alone and second to compel him to dip his bricks into the cement or inortar before laying instead of spreading the mortar with his trowel upon the laid bricks, this latter practice leading invariably to the choking up of the air-space by the surplus mortar no matter how careful the workmen :are and nothing but the physical impossibility will compel the workman to resort to dipping.

This construction of bricks enables me to build a hollow bonded Wall ten inches thick with a two inch air space, while the' building of a hollow wall with standard bricks'alone requires that it be at least fourteen inches thick, one wallbeing eight inches, and the' other four inches, and in such constructions the bonding bricks can overlap at one end but two inches, which detractsfrom its strength.

Thus in building such a wall, I not only save four inches in space, but also save four inches of solid brick work, and produce a ten inch wall of at least the sameA strength as a fourteen inch standard brick wall.

What I claimas my invention is- 1. In a hollow Wall, the combination of standard bricks having interlocking projections and recesses on top and. bottom respectively, and bonding bricks of a length greater than the lengthof the standard bricks having end portions corresponding to the halves of the standard bricks with an intermediate portion between the end portions, substantially 'as described. v

2. In ahollow wall, the combination of three sizes of manufactured brick, one of standard size,one half length standard size, and one IOO of increased length beyond the standard size, and adapted to form a bonding brick, said bricks having pyramidal projections `amd corresponding recesses providedon top and bottom respectively, whereby the bricks are adapted to interlock, substantially in the Inanner and for the purpose described.

In testimony whereof .I ax `my signature in presence of two witnesses.

GEORGE S. BALSLEY.

WVitnesses:

M. B. ODOGHERTY, L. J. WHITTEMORE.

Referenced by
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US2520452 *Aug 9, 1944Aug 29, 1950Brune Sr Louis JDemountable stair structure
US2892338 *Apr 22, 1952Jun 30, 1959Dominaire Const IncBlock wall structure
US5848511 *Jan 21, 1997Dec 15, 1998Scales; John M.Blocks for constructing low-rise ornamental wall and method
US6918715Jun 19, 2001Jul 19, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7004158Feb 14, 2005Feb 28, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7066167Jan 6, 2005Jun 27, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7967001Jun 28, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8006683Aug 30, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8028688Oct 4, 2011Pavestone Company, LlcConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US8136516Aug 2, 2010Mar 20, 2012Pavestone, LLCConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus
US8327833Dec 11, 2012Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20050115555 *Jan 6, 2005Jun 2, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20050145300 *Feb 14, 2005Jul 7, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20060169270 *Dec 7, 2005Aug 3, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20080092870 *Oct 18, 2006Apr 24, 2008Pavestone Company, L.P.Concrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20080096471 *Oct 18, 2006Apr 24, 2008Pavestone Company, L.P.Concrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20080120931 *Jun 30, 2006May 29, 2008Mark JoslynMasonry block arrangements; wall units; and, methods
US20100313868 *Dec 16, 2010William Howard KarauConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20110061640 *Nov 23, 2010Mar 17, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20110168152 *Jul 14, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2002/0297