Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5350361 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/150,673
Publication dateSep 27, 1994
Filing dateNov 10, 1993
Priority dateNov 10, 1993
Fee statusPaid
Publication number08150673, 150673, US 5350361 A, US 5350361A, US-A-5350361, US5350361 A, US5350361A
InventorsRoss Tsukashima, Matthew Jordan, Gordon Jung
Original AssigneeMedtronic, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tri-fold balloon for dilatation catheter and related method
US 5350361 A
Abstract
A tri-fold dilatation catheter balloon and a method for preparing the same. The disclosed balloon has a tri-fold configuration in which the longitudinal creases defined by three flaps of the balloon are softened to ensure symmetrical deflation of the balloon into its tri-fold form. The tri-fold configuration initially imparted to the balloon by drawing the balloon into an longitudinal interstitial channel defined by three substantially cylindrical pins arranged in a pyramid-type stack. While the balloon is secured within this channel, negative pressure is applied to an inflation lumen of the balloon to deflate the balloon. Negative pressure is maintained on the inflation lumen as the balloon is withdrawn from the interstitial channel, and continues to be maintained while the creases defined by the three tri-fold flaps are heated with a longitudinal heating element. This softens the balloon material in longitudinal creases, so that the same creases will tend form whenever the balloon is deflated. This enhances the reliabilty of symmetrical deflation of the balloon.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(4)
What is claimed is:
1. A method for preparing an elongate tri-fold dilatation catheter balloon, comprising the steps of:
(a) drawing said balloon into an elongate interstitial channel defined by three substantially cylindrical pins;
(b) applying negative pressure to a lumen of said balloon to deflate said balloon into a tri-fold configuration;
(c) removing said balloon from said interstitial channel while maintaining said negative pressure;
(d) softening said balloon along three longitudinal lines evenly spaced around said elongate balloon.
2. A method in accordance with claim 1, wherein said step of softening comprises pressing a longitudinally-oriented heating wire against said balloon along each of said longitudinal lines.
3. A method in accordance with claim 1 wherein said step of drawing said balloon into an elongate interstitial channel comprises a channel which is triangular in cross section.
4. A method in accordance with claim 2 wherein said balloon is folded to display three wings and said balloon is heated only in areas intermediate to said wings.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to the field of angioplasty, and more particularly relates to a balloon for a dilatation catheter.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is widely accepted as an effective treatment of blockages in the coronary arteries. Blockages (stenoses) may occur from cholesterol precipitation on the coronary wall which may be in any stage from initial deposit through aged lesions. Coronary arteries can also become blocked due to formation of thrombus.

The most widely used percutaneous coronary angioplasty makes use of a dilatation balloon catheter. The catheter is inserted into the patient's vascular system and guided until the balloon at the distal end of the catheter is positioned across the stenosis. A radiographic contrast fluid is then fed under pressure through an inflation lumen of the catheter to the balloon, which causes the balloon to expand outward, thereby opening the stenosis.

Various types and configurations of dilatation balloon catheters have been known and used in the prior art. Examples are shown, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,040,548 to Yock, U.S. Pat. No. 5,061,273 to Yock, and in U.S. Pat. No. 4,762,129 to Bonzel (see also Reexamination Certificate No. B14,762,129).

One important characteristic of a dilatation balloon catheter used for angioplasty is its profile, i.e., the outer diameter of its distal end portion when deflated. Considerable effort has been spent in developing low-profile dilatation balloon catheters by minimizing the dimensions of the core or inner tube which extends through the balloon to its distal end, and by reducing wall thickness, to the extent possible, of the balloon itself.

The outer diameter of the deflated distal end portion of a balloon dilatation catheter affects the ease and ability of the dilatation catheter to pass through a guide catheter, through the coronary arteries, and across tight lesions. Application of low-profile balloons can be in a variety of environments, including, but not limited to, over-the-wire, fixed-wire, and monorail systems, as well as with guiding catheters.

A complicating factor in minimizing the deflated profile of a dilatation catheter balloon is that the balloon membrane is typically not distensible, i.e., it does not stretch or contract in response to changes in internal pressure. Thus, the balloon membrane has a constant surface area regardless of whether the balloon is inflated or deflated. Therefore, in order to reduce the outer diameter of the balloon in its deflated condition, it is common to fold the balloon flat, so that two wings or flaps are formed. These two wings are then brought together in some fashion, as by folding or wrapping, so as to reduce the overall diameter of the deflated balloon. Often, some sort of protective sleeve or sheath is disposed around the folded or wrapped balloon to protect the balloon from contamination or damage prior to its use.

In actual use, when inflation fluid is applied to the folded balloon, it causes the flaps to unwrap so that the balloon can inflate to its full inflated state.

While it is desirable to minimize profile, it is also desirable to provide as large as possible an inflated outer diameter of the balloon relative to the deflated profile. One practical effect is that the two flaps formed when the balloon is deflated and prepared for wrapping (during balloon protector installation) become very large relative to the core or inner tube of the catheter. The result is that it is difficult to get these two large flaps to fold together and squeeze out all of the space between them when folded, without damaging the catheter during balloon protector installation.

Various methods and balloon configurations have been proposed in the prior art for providing a dilatation balloon catheter having the lowest profile as possible when deflated and the largest possible diameter when inflated. One approach, which is suggested, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,087,246 to Smith and in U.S. Pat. No. 5,147,302 to Euteneuer et at., is to provide a dilatation balloon having more than two flaps or wings, (for example, three wings) such that when the flaps or wings are wrapped circumferentially, the distance that each flap extends around the catheter is reduced compared with the conventional balloon configuration having only two flaps. The ease with which such flaps fold is also enhanced when their number is increased, such that when the balloon is deflated and withdrawn through the guide catheter following a procedure, the balloon more readily returns to its wrapped condition. The result is a reduced deflated profile given the same inflated diameter.

The above-referenced U.S. Pat. No. 5,147,302 to Euteneuer et al. proposes two different methods for formation of a tri-fold dilatation balloon. In one method, a clamping fixture is used to clamp approximately one-third of the distance across the balloon, this clamped portion defining a first wing or flap. Then the balloon is inflated at low pressure such that the unclamped portion of the balloon is inflated. Finally, pressure is applied against the exterior of the balloon while the balloon is deflated, so that the unclamped portion of the balloon is pressed against the side of the clamp, forming the second and third wings of the balloon.

Another method proposed in the Euteneuer et al. '302 patent involves centering the balloon within a tubular fixture having radially retractable blades circumferentially spaced at 120° intervals. Once the balloon is positioned, the blades are simultaneously moved inward toward the core of the balloon, while a vacuum is applied to the balloon.

Of course, a dilatation balloon must be deflated prior to withdrawal of the dilatation catheter from the patient's vascular system through the guiding catheter used in an angioplasty procedure. It is thus important that the balloon be reliably collapsible to its minimal, radially compact profile. Balloons having only two flaps or wings have proven to be fairly reliable in this regard. Applying negative pressure to the inflation lumen of the catheter causes the balloon to flatten, reforming the two wings. However, as the number of flaps or wings is increased, it becomes more difficult to ensure symmetrical deflation of the balloon.

One method that has been proposed in the prior art for enhancing a balloon's ability to collapse symmetrically is to subject the balloon to heat-treatment when it is initially brought into a multi-fold configuration and wrapped. Such heat-setting approaches have been suggested, for example, in the above-referenced Euteneuer et al. '302 patent and in the above-referenced Smith '246 patent.

While the foregoing may represent some improvement in field of balloon dilatation catheters, the inventor believes that there is an ongoing need for improvements in catheter design and preparation techniques, such that low (deflated) profile and large inflated balloon diameters may be achieved without sacrificing other characteristics, such as reliability of symmetrical deflation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention, therefore, is directed to tri-fold dilatation balloons and a method and apparatus for preparing such a balloon.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a method and apparatus is provided for efficiently forming an elongate dilatation balloon into a symmetrical, tri-fold configuration.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, a method and apparatus is provided for ensuring that the balloon deflates symetrically into the tri-fold configuration, while at the same time reducing the risk of damage to the balloon.

In one disclosed embodiment of the invention, an elongate balloon is threaded or inserted into an elongate interstitial channel defined by three substantially cylindrical pins. Within the channel, the balloon has a substantially triangular cross-section. Negative (deflation) pressure is applied to the inflation lumen of the balloon, causing the balloon to deflate and collapse into a tri-fold configuration. The deflation pressure is maintained on the balloon as it is withdrawn from the interstitial channel, so that the balloon retains its tri-fold configuration. In the tri-fold configuration, the balloon defines three radial flaps or wings spaced 120° apart, and three longitudinal corners spaced 120° apart between each pair of adjoining flaps. Narrow heating elements are then used to soften the balloon material in each of the comers, thus forming three longitudinal creases in the balloon material. The creases ensure symmetrical deflation of the balloon into the tri-fold configuration. Since only narrow lines along the corners defined between the flaps are heated to produce the creases, the risk of damage to the rest of the balloon as a result of the heating is reduced.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing and other features of the present invention will perhaps be best understood with reference to the following detailed description of a specific embodiment of the invention, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged perspective view of a dilatation catheter balloon in accordance with one embodiment of the invention, shown in an uninflated condition;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged end view of the dilatation catheter balloon from FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged perspective view of the dilatation catheter balloon from FIG. 1, shown in an inflated condition;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged end view of the dilatation catheter balloon from FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a tri-fold formation apparatus in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the formation apparatus from FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an end view of the formation apparatus from FIG. 5;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are enlarged end views of a portion of the formation apparatus from FIG. 5 with the balloon from FIG. 1 disposed therein;

FIG. 10 is a top view of a heating fixture in accordance with one embodiment of the invention, with the balloon from FIG. 1 disposed therein;

FIG. 11 is an end view of the balloon from FIG. 1 being spiral wrapped;

FIG. 12 is a top view of an apparatus incorporating the tri-fold formation apparatus of FIG. 5 and the heating fixture of FIG. 10;

FIG. 13 is a side view of the apparatus of FIG. 12.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A SPECIFIC EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION

Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown an enlarged perspective view of a dilatation catheter balloon 20 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention. Balloon 20 is preferably made of an elastic biocompatible material such as PE, LLDPE, PET, POC, or the like. Balloon 20 can be made in various sizes, typically ranging from 20 to 30 mm in length, and from 1.5 to 4.0 mm inflated diameter. As shown in FIG. 1, balloon 20 is disposed at the distal end of a dilatation catheter 22 body having an inflation lumen extending therethrough. As will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art, this arrangement enables inflation pressure applied at the proximal end of catheter body 22 (not shown) to cause inflation of balloon 20 at the distal end of catheter body 22. In FIG. 1, balloon 20 is shown in a deflated, unwrapped condition.

It is contemplated that, as in some prior art dilatation catheters, catheter body 22 may also include therein or be otherwise associated with an elongate guide wire lumen for accommodating a guide wire used to steer and manipulate balloon 20 within a patient's vascular system during an angioplasty procedure.

Also shown in FIG. 1 is a core member 24 which extends from the proximal end 26 to the distal end 28 of balloon 20. FIG. 2 is an end view of the balloon from FIG. 1. As can be seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, balloon 20 is of the so-called tri-fold type, as it has three flaps or wings 30 when it is in its deflated condition. As noted above, and as would be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art, the provision of multiple (i.e., more than two) flaps in the deflated balloon 20 tends to reduce the profile of balloon 20 when the flaps are wrapped around central core 24.

FIGS. 3 and 4 are enlarged perspective and end views, respectively, of balloon 20 in an inflated condition. As shown in FIG. 4, balloon 20, when inflated, has a substantially circular cross section.

Turning now to FIGS. 5, 6, and 7, there are shown perspective, side, and end views, respectively of a forming apparatus 40 used in accordance with the presently disclosed embodiment of the invention to initially impart the tri-fold configuration to balloon 20. Forming apparatus 40 comprises three cylindrical pins 42 of equal diameter or asymetrical in configuration, arranged in pyramid-type stack. Pins 42 have smoothly rounded ends. In the presently preferred embodiment of the invention, pins 42 are made of stainless steel or another suitably rigid material.

With the arrangement shown in FIGS. 5-7, pins 42 define an elongate interstitial channel 44, which is best observed in the end view of FIG. 7. The use of forming apparatus 40 to impart a tri-fold configuration to balloon 20 in accordance with the presently disclosed embodiment of the invention may be best appreciated with reference to FIG. 8, which shows a partially cut-away end view of pins 42. In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, balloon 20 is drawn into interstitial channel 44, as shown in FIG. 8. The flexibility of balloon 20 is such that balloon 20 assumes the substantially triangular shape of interstitial channel 44.

Next, negative pressure (i.e., a vacuum) is applied to the inflation lumen of balloon 20, such that balloon 20 collapses into a tri-fold shape, as depicted in FIG. 9. In the tri-fold configuration, balloon 20 defines three flaps or wings 30, radially oriented with respect to inner core 24 and oriented 120° apart from one another. Each pair of wings 30, in turn, defines one of three elongate corners 31, which are similarly oriented 120° apart.

As long as negative pressure is maintained on the inflation lumen of balloon 20, balloon 20 will remain in the tri-fold configuration shown in FIG. 9. Thus, balloon 20 can be withdrawn from interstitial channel 44 and subjected to the next stage of the formation process.

In particular, and with reference now to FIG. 10, the next stage in the formation process is to soften the material in each of the elongate corners 31, so that balloon 20 will be creased and thus retain its shape even after negative pressure is removed from its inflation lumen. In accordance with the presently disclosed embodiment of the invention, this is accomplished through the use of a heating fixture comprising three radial members designated as 50 in FIG. 10.

Members 50 are radially oriented 120° apart from one another. Each radial member 50 has coupled on its inner end a heating element 52. In the presently disclosed embodiment of the invention, heating elements 52 each consist of a single electrical resistance heating wire, similar to those found in ordinary household toasters, for example.

Radial members 50 are radially moveable with respect to a central region in which balloon 20 is disposed. As balloon 20 is brought into position within this central region, radial members 50 press heating elements 52 against corners 31 in balloon 20. That is, heating elements are pressed into corners 31 with pressure in the direction of arrows 54 in FIG. 10 exerted by radial members 50. Each separate one of heating elements 52 is thus brought into contact with a different one of the three corners 31 defined by tri-folded balloon 20. In accordance with an important aspect of the present invention, the heat from heating elements 52 softens the balloon material in comers 31 to form creases, but advantageously does not affect any other balloon material. The chance of damage to the rest of the balloon material is therefore significantly reduced as compared with prior art heat-treating procedures in which the entire balloon is subjected to high temperatures, or by the use of stretching techniques, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,087,246.

After radial members 50 are retracted radially outward, balloon 20 can be removed from the heating fixture, and the negative pressure can be removed from the balloon's inflation lumen. Balloon 20 is then ready for spiral-wrapping and heat-setting, as depicted in FIG. 11 and in accordance with common practice in the art. As shown in FIG. 11, a heat-set sleeve or protector 56 may be provided during the heat-setting operation, in accordance with common practice in the art.

Thus far, the present invention has been described in terms of balloon 20 being drawn through the formation apparatus previously described with reference to FIG. 5 and then having its tri-fold creases heated and softened, as described above with reference to FIG. 10, to ensure reliable symmetrical deflating of balloon 20. In FIGS. 12 and 13 there are shown top and side views, respectively, of an apparatus 60 which, in accordance with the presently preferred implementation of the invention, incorporated both formation apparatus 40 of FIG. 5 and the heating fixture of FIG. 10.

It is to be understood that elements of apparatus 60 which are identical to elements shown in FIGS. 1-11 have retained identical reference numerals in FIGS. 12 and 13. Thus, for example, FIGS. 12 and 13 show a dilatation balloon 20 disposed at the distal end of a catheter body 22. In FIGS. 12 and 13, catheter body passes through formation apparatus 40 and past the heating fixture comprising radial members 50 and heating elements 52.

For the sake of clarity, only one radial member 50 is depicted in FIGS. 12 and 13; it is to be understood, however, that three radial members 50 are provided, spaced apart 120° from each other. As shown in FIG. 13, radial member 50 has a heating element 52 disposed at one end thereof. At the other end, radial member 50 is pivotally coupled, at pivot point 63, to a support 64. Support 64 is rigidly secured to a base 66. Also coupled to radial member 50, at a pivot point 67 is the piston rod 68 of an actuator 70. In the presently preferred embodiment of the invention, actuator 70 is a Airpot™ dashpot, commercially available from Airpot Corp., Norwalk, Conn. Actuator 70 is rigidly supported by a supporting member 72 attached to base 66.

Those of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that as a result of the pivotal arrangement of radial arm 50 shown in FIG. 13, left and right motion of actuator piston rod 68 (i.e., movement of piston rod 68 in the directions indicated by arrow 76 in FIG. 13) is translated into up and down movement of the end of radial member 50 (i.e., movement of radial member 50, and hence of heating element 74, in the directions indicated by arrow 74 in FIG. 13). Actuator 70 is coupled to a pressure regulator (not shown), such that the movement of radial member 50 can be controlled. Also, as will be hereinafter described in greater detail, the force with which heating element 52 is pressed against balloon 20 to form creases 31 can be controlled.

In using apparatus 60, first the proximal end of catheter body 22 is threaded through interstitial channel 44 of formation apparatus 40. Catheter body also passes through a guide member 62. Catheter body 22 is also shown in FIG. 13 passing by radial member 50 in the heating fixture. Again, it is to be understood that two other radial members 50, not shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, would be similarly positioned around catheter body 22 passing through apparatus 60. Next, catheter body 22 is pulled or drawn in the direction of arrow 78 in FIG. 13. As a result, balloon 20 is pulled into interstitial channel 44 of formation apparatus 40, as previously described with reference to FIG. 8. It is contemplated that while this is being done, balloon 20 may be lightly inflated, e.g., inflated to 1 PSI or so, from the proximal end of catheter body 22.

Next, negative (deflation) pressure is applied to the proximal end of catheter body 22, so that balloon 20 collapses into a tri-fold configuration, as previously described with reference to FIG. 9.

While negative pressure is maintained, catheter body 22 is drawn further in the direction of arrow 78, so that balloon 20 is drawn past heating elements 52 on radial members 50. Actuators 70 associated with each radial member 50 ensure that heating elements 52 are pressed against corners 31 in balloon 20 with a predetermined and controlled force. This prevents damage to balloon 20. As corners 31 are drawn past heating elements 52, the balloon material is softened somewhat to form creases which will cause balloon 20 to tend to collapse into a tri-fold shape when deflated.

After balloon 20 has passed by heating elements 52, catheter body 22 can then be pulled even further in the direction of arrow 78, pulling balloon 20 free of apparatus 60. Balloon 20 is then ready for wrapping and heat-setting, as previously described with reference to FIG. 11.

From the foregoing detailed description of a particular embodiment of the invention, it should be apparent that a tri-fold dilatation catheter balloon, and a method and apparatus for making it, have been described. Although a specific embodiment of the invention has been described herein in some detail, this has been done for illustrative purposes only, and is not intended to be limiting with respect to the scope of the invention. It is contemplated that various substitutions, alterations, and/or modifications, including but not limited to those specifically discussed above, may be made to the embodiment of the invention disclosed herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined in the appended claims, which follow.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4762129 *Nov 15, 1985Aug 9, 1988Tassilo BonzelDilatation catheter
US5040548 *May 24, 1990Aug 20, 1991Yock Paul GAngioplasty mehtod
US5061273 *Jul 5, 1990Oct 29, 1991Yock Paul GAngioplasty apparatus facilitating rapid exchanges
US5087246 *Dec 29, 1988Feb 11, 1992C. R. Bard, Inc.Dilation catheter with fluted balloon
US5108415 *Dec 19, 1989Apr 28, 1992Cordis CorporationBalloons for medical devices and fabrication thereof
US5147302 *Apr 21, 1989Sep 15, 1992Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Method of shaping a balloon of a balloon catheter
US5226887 *Feb 7, 1992Jul 13, 1993Interventional Technologies, Inc.Collapsible folding angioplasty balloon
US5250069 *May 26, 1992Oct 5, 1993Terumo Kabushiki KaishaCatheter equipped with expansible member and production method thereof
EP0228787A1 *Nov 6, 1986Jul 15, 1987Datascope Corp.Prefolded balloon catheter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5478319 *Feb 28, 1995Dec 26, 1995Boston Scientific Corp.Medical balloon folding into predetermined shapes and method
US5490839 *May 22, 1995Feb 13, 1996Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Catheter balloon with retraction coating
US5496276 *May 22, 1995Mar 5, 1996Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Catheter balloon with retraction coating
US5640720 *Oct 28, 1993Jun 24, 1997Ansell Perry Inc.Medical apparatus
US5738901 *Nov 1, 1995Apr 14, 1998Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Returning to a preshaped, deflated folded configuration by applying a memory polymer coatings
US5782740 *Aug 29, 1996Jul 21, 1998Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Radiation dose delivery catheter with reinforcing mandrel
US5783227 *Jan 22, 1996Jul 21, 1998Cordis CorporationCatheter balloon folding device
US5836957 *Feb 26, 1997Nov 17, 1998Devices For Vascular Intervention, Inc.Large volume atherectomy device
US5851171 *Nov 4, 1997Dec 22, 1998Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Catheter assembly for centering a radiation source within a body lumen
US5910101 *Aug 29, 1996Jun 8, 1999Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Device for loading and centering a vascular radiation therapy source
US5928193 *Oct 3, 1997Jul 27, 1999Boston Scientific CorporationBalloon catheterization
US5954740 *Sep 23, 1996Sep 21, 1999Boston Scientific CorporationCatheter balloon having raised radial segments
US6013055 *Nov 13, 1997Jan 11, 2000Boston Scientific CorporationCatheter balloon having selected folding characteristics
US6013092 *Aug 18, 1998Jan 11, 2000Baxter International Inc.Folding of catheter-mounted balloons to facilitate non-rotational radial expansion of intraluminal devices
US6033380 *Feb 13, 1998Mar 7, 2000Cordis CorporationSix-pleated catheter balloon and device for forming same
US6110192 *Jan 8, 1999Aug 29, 2000Boston Scientific CorporationCatheter balloon having raised radial segments
US6126652 *Sep 8, 1998Oct 3, 2000Medtronic Inc.Catheter balloon refolding tool and method of use
US6135982 *May 25, 1999Oct 24, 2000Boston Scientific CorporationBalloon catheterization
US6142926 *Jul 16, 1998Nov 7, 2000Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Radiation dose delivery catheter with reinforcing mandrel
US6159139 *Feb 17, 1998Dec 12, 2000Advanced Cardiovascular Systems Inc.Radiation delivery catheter with a spring wire centering mechanism
US6159140 *Feb 17, 1998Dec 12, 2000Advanced Cardiovascular SystemsRadiation shielded catheter for delivering a radioactive source and method of use
US6159229 *Nov 10, 1998Dec 12, 2000Medtronic Ave, Inc.Stent delivery and deployment method
US6161049 *Apr 30, 1999Dec 12, 2000Urologix, Inc.Thermal therapy catheter
US6210312May 20, 1997Apr 3, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Catheter and guide wire assembly for delivery of a radiation source
US6224535Feb 17, 1998May 1, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Radiation centering catheters
US6283743Mar 4, 1998Sep 4, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Balloon wrap device
US6296655 *Apr 27, 1998Oct 2, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Catheter balloon with biased multiple wings
US6309402Nov 10, 1998Oct 30, 2001Medtronic Ave, Inc.Stent delivery and deployment method
US6428568Jun 25, 2001Aug 6, 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Catheter balloon with biased multiple wings
US6496737Dec 8, 2000Dec 17, 2002Urologix, Inc.Thermal therapy catheter
US6540734Feb 16, 2000Apr 1, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Multi-lumen extrusion tubing
US6544224May 5, 2000Apr 8, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Lobed balloon catheter and method of use
US6582417Feb 16, 2000Jun 24, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatuses for radiation treatment
US6605031Feb 16, 2000Aug 12, 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stepped centering balloon for optimal radiation delivery
US6623689Jul 17, 2001Sep 23, 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Balloon wrap device and method
US6988881Mar 26, 2002Jan 24, 2006Machine Solutions, Inc.Balloon folding technology
US7041132 *Aug 16, 2002May 9, 20063F Therapeutics, Inc,Percutaneously delivered heart valve and delivery means thereof
US7090635May 28, 2003Aug 15, 2006Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatuses for radiation treatment
US7128868Jan 10, 2003Oct 31, 2006Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Applying radial force to medical balloon; shaping; vibration
US7160317Jan 4, 2002Jan 9, 2007Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Multiple-wing balloon catheter to reduce damage to coated expandable medical implants
US7163504Feb 16, 2000Jan 16, 2007Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Multi-lumen fluted balloon radiation centering catheter
US7186237Feb 14, 2002Mar 6, 2007Avantec Vascular CorporationBallon catheter for creating a longitudinal channel in a lesion and method
US7285109Feb 13, 2003Oct 23, 2007Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Device and method for collapsing an angioplasty balloon
US7318815Jul 2, 2002Jan 15, 2008Qureshi Adnan IAngioplasty device with embolic recapture mechanism for treatment of occlusive vascular diseases
US7407377Jul 13, 2005Aug 5, 2008Machine Solutions, Inc.Balloon folding technology
US7479149 *Oct 25, 2001Jan 20, 2009Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon configuring apparatus
US7597702Sep 17, 2003Oct 6, 2009Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon assembly with a torque
US7758604 *May 29, 2003Jul 20, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Cutting balloon catheter with improved balloon configuration
US7758605May 21, 2004Jul 20, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon folding apparatus, methods and products
US7771447Dec 19, 2003Aug 10, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon refolding device
US7815675Mar 10, 2008Oct 19, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Stent with protruding branch portion for bifurcated vessels
US7833266Nov 28, 2007Nov 16, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bifurcated stent with drug wells for specific ostial, carina, and side branch treatment
US7842082Aug 30, 2007Nov 30, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bifurcated stent
US7879005Mar 9, 2007Feb 1, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Device and method for collapsing an angioplasty balloon
US7896642Aug 3, 2006Mar 1, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon folding device
US7942661Jul 18, 2007May 17, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bifurcated balloon folding method and apparatus
US7951164Feb 28, 2002May 31, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon folding apparatus, methods and products
US7951191Sep 5, 2007May 31, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bifurcated stent with entire circumferential petal
US7951192Aug 25, 2009May 31, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Stent with protruding branch portion for bifurcated vessels
US7959669Sep 12, 2007Jun 14, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bifurcated stent with open ended side branch support
US7972351Jul 13, 2004Jul 5, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon folding design and method and apparatus for making balloons
US7994449May 25, 2005Aug 9, 2011Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Square-wave laser bonding
US8016878Jun 1, 2009Sep 13, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bifurcation stent pattern
US8034046Apr 13, 2006Oct 11, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Medical devices including shape memory materials
US8043296Mar 30, 2007Oct 25, 2011Kyphon SarlApparatus and methods for use of expandable members in surgical applications
US8088100Oct 20, 2006Jan 3, 2012Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Reinforced rewrappable balloon
US8128860Jul 13, 2005Mar 6, 2012Machine Solutions, Inc.Balloon folding technology
US8236223Jul 2, 2009Aug 7, 2012C.R. Bard, Inc.Checker balloon winding machine
US8277501Dec 21, 2007Oct 2, 2012Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Bi-stable bifurcated stent petal geometry
US8298192Oct 6, 2009Oct 30, 2012Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon assembly with a torque
US8377038Oct 11, 2011Feb 19, 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Medical devices including shape memory materials
US8425590May 31, 2011Apr 23, 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Stent with protruding branch portion for bifurcated vessels
US8439970Jul 13, 2010May 14, 2013Edwards Lifesciences CorporationTransapical delivery system for heart valves
US8475522Jul 13, 2010Jul 2, 2013Edwards Lifesciences CorporationTransapical delivery system for heart valves
US8568437May 27, 2011Oct 29, 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon folding apparatus, methods and products
US8609016 *Aug 28, 2006Dec 17, 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Refoldable balloon and method of making and using the same
US8647376Mar 30, 2007Feb 11, 2014Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon fold design for deployment of bifurcated stent petal architecture
US8679398Mar 1, 2012Mar 25, 2014Machine Solutions, Inc.Balloon folding technology
US8708955Jun 2, 2009Apr 29, 2014Loma Vista Medical, Inc.Inflatable medical devices
US8758429Sep 6, 2012Jun 24, 2014Micell Technologies, Inc.Polymer coatings containing drug powder of controlled morphology
US8764820Nov 16, 2005Jul 1, 2014Edwards Lifesciences CorporationTransapical heart valve delivery system and method
US8795762Mar 26, 2010Aug 5, 2014Battelle Memorial InstituteSystem and method for enhanced electrostatic deposition and surface coatings
US8834913Dec 28, 2009Sep 16, 2014Battelle Memorial InstituteMedical implants and methods of making medical implants
EP0935973A2Feb 12, 1999Aug 18, 1999Cordis CorporationSix-pleated catheter balloon and device for forming same
WO1995028985A1 *Mar 28, 1995Nov 2, 1995Boston Scient CorpMedical balloon folding into predetermined shapes
WO1998011933A1Aug 5, 1997Mar 26, 1998Boston Scient CorpCatheter balloon having raised radial segments
WO1999044669A1 *Feb 16, 1999Sep 10, 1999Scimed Life Systems IncCatheter balloon wrap device and method
WO1999055406A1 *Apr 27, 1999Nov 4, 1999Advanced Cardiovascular SystemCatheter balloon with biased multiple wings
WO2000010635A1 *Aug 3, 1999Mar 2, 2000Baxter IntFolding of catheter-mounted balloons to facilitate non-rotational radial expansion of intraluminal devices
WO2001085247A1 *May 3, 2001Nov 15, 2001Advanced Cardiovascular SystemLobed balloon catheter and method of use
WO2002076700A1 *Mar 26, 2002Oct 3, 2002Mach Solutions IncBalloon folding technology
WO2003068307A1 *Feb 11, 2003Aug 21, 2003Intella Interventional Sys IncBalloon catheter for creating a longitudinal channel in a lesion and method
WO2003082397A1 *Mar 6, 2003Oct 9, 2003Scimed Life Systems IncCatheter balloon with curved wings and manufacture thereof
WO2008016405A1May 4, 2007Feb 7, 2008Boston Scient Scimed IncBalloon folding device
WO2008027088A2May 7, 2007Mar 6, 2008Boston Scient Scimed IncRefoldable balloon and method of making and using the same
WO2009012043A1 *Jun 30, 2008Jan 22, 2009Boston Scient Scimed IncBifurcated balloon folding method and apparatus
WO2012031236A1Sep 2, 2011Mar 8, 2012Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Coating process for drug delivery balloons using heat-induced rewrap memory
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/103.07, 264/DIG.41, 604/916, 264/523, 606/194, 264/573
International ClassificationA61F2/958
Cooperative ClassificationY10S264/41, A61M25/1002, A61M2025/1004, A61M25/1038
European ClassificationA61M25/10G4, A61M25/10A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 28, 2006FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Feb 26, 2002FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Mar 2, 1998FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jun 6, 1994ASAssignment
Owner name: MEDTRONIC, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:TSUKASHIMA, ROSS;JORDAN, MATTHEW;JUNG, GORDON;REEL/FRAME:007011/0854
Effective date: 19931108
Nov 10, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: DIANNE M. F. PLUNKETT, MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:TSUKASHIMA, ROSS;JORDAN, MATTHEW;JUNG, GORDON;REEL/FRAME:006775/0316;SIGNING DATES FROM 19931105 TO 19931108