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Publication numberUS5373712 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/124,215
Publication dateDec 20, 1994
Filing dateSep 21, 1993
Priority dateSep 21, 1992
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asCA2106541A1, CA2106541C, CN1086983A, CN1099264C, DE69309210D1, DE69309210T2, EP0589395A1, EP0589395B1
Publication number08124215, 124215, US 5373712 A, US 5373712A, US-A-5373712, US5373712 A, US5373712A
InventorsToru Yamamoto, Yoshio Matsuda, Mitsutoshi Ishihara
Original AssigneeYoshida Kogyo K.K.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Warp-knit cloth for surface fastener
US 5373712 A
Abstract
A warp-knit cloth for a surface fastener, comprising: a foundation design knitted of pile knitting yarns and foundation yarns so as to form pile loops, which serve as engaging elements of the surface fastener, on wales; a marquisette design in which inlaid yarn extend in the wale direction and course direction so as to form squared meshes, which serve as vents, between said wales.
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Claims(4)
What is claimed is:
1. A warp-knit cloth for a surface fastener, comprising:
(a) a foundation design knitted of pile knitting yarns and foundation yarns so as to form pile loops, which serve as engaging elements of the surface fastener, on wales; and
(b) a marquisette design in which inlaid yarns extend in a direction along said wales and a direction perpendicular to said wales forming course so as to form squared meshes, which serve as vents, between said wales, each said wale providing a plurality of loops between courses.
2. A warp-knit surface fastener cloth according to claim 1, wherein said pile knitting yarns run in a pattern of 1-0/1-1/0-1/0-0/1-0.
3. A warp-knit surface fastener cloth according to claim 1, wherein said foundation yarns run 1-0/0-0/0-1/1-1.
4. A warp-knit surface fastener cloth according to claim 1 wherein one set of said inlaid yarns run in a pattern of 2-2/2-2/1-1/1-1/2-2/2-2/0-0/0-0/1-1/1-1/0-0/0-0, while the other set of said inlaid yarns run in a pattern of 0-0/0-0/1-1/1-1/0-0/0-0/3-3/3-3/2-2/2-2/3-3/3-3.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to a warp-knit cloth to be used in a surface fastener, and more particularly to a warp-knit cloth for a surface fastener to be used in clothing, shoes and bags, which have air-permeability, and cleaning tools, such as mats and mops, which have air-permeability and water-permeability.

2. Description of the Related Art

A conventional surface fastener cloth having air-permeability is known from, for example, Japanese Utility Model Laid-Open Publication No. SHO 63-91009, in which a knit/woven cloth having pile loops on one surface is provided with circular through-holes in a checker-board pattern or a zigzag pattern and is treated at the back surface with coating treatment so that a female member of the surface fastener is formed.

However, with the conventional surface fastener, since in an attempt to keep adequate engaging force, the female member has through-holes spaced apart from one another by a distance larger than the hole diameter to have an increased area for engaging pile loops, high air-permeability cannot be achieved, and especially when used in a cleaning tool, dirt and dust tend to stick to the female member, thus deteriorating the water-permeability.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a warp-knit cloth, for surface fasteners, which has high air-permeability and adequate engaging force.

According to this invention, there is provided a warp-knit cloth for a surface fastener, comprising: a foundation design knitted of pile knitting yarns and foundation yarns so as to form pile loops, which serve as engaging elements of the surface fastener, on wales; a marquisette design in which inlaid yarn extend in the wale direction and course direction so as to form squared meshes, which serve as vents, between said wales.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view diagrammatically showing a warp-knit surface fastener cloth according to a first embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view diagrammatically showing one wale of the cloth of the first embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view diagrammatically showing the wales of the male-type cloth of the first embodiment;

FIG. 4 is a design diagram showing the knit structure of the cloth of the first embodiment;

FIG. 5 is a design diagram showing the running of various yarns of the cloth of the first embodiment;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged view showing a portion of the cloth of the first embodiment;

FIG. 7 is a design diagram showing the knit structure of a cloth according to a second embodiment:

FIG. 8 is a design diagram showing the running of various yarns of the cloth of the second embodiment; and

FIG. 9 is an enlarged view showing a portion of the cloth of the second embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Embodiments of this invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 diagrammatically shows a warp-knit surface fastener cloth embodying this invention, and FIG. 2 diagramtically shows one wale.

The warp-knit surface fastener cloth (hereinafter called "the cloth") comprises, as shown in FIG. 1, a pile portion 1 situated at the center and a pair of edge portions 2, .2 situated at opposite sides of the pile portion 1. The pile portion 1, as shown in FIG. 2, has a multiplicity of pile loops 4, which serves as engaging portions extending along the respective wales 3, and a multiplicity of squared meshes 5 between the wales 3, 3, which give the pile portion 1 air-permeability and water-permeability. Knitting yarns for forming the pile loops 4 may be monofilament yarns as shown in FIG. 1 or multifilament yarns as shown in FIG. 2 when knitting the female-type surface fastener cloth. On the other hand, when knitting the male-type surface fastener cloth, pile loops are knitted using monofilament yarns as shown in FIG. 3, whereupon the pile loops 4 are cut on side near top to form hooks 6. The back side of the cloth, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, is provided with coating treatment such as with synthetic rubber or resin in order to prevent the pile loops 4 and the hooks 6 from being removed and to give the knitted structure a shape-keeping characteristic. In a coating layer 7, foundation yarns L2 and inlaid yarns L3, L4 of a marquisette design are tightly interlaced with the base of the individual pile loop 4 to reduce the coating layer 7 in thickness.

FIG. 4 is a design diagram showing the cloth of this invention, and FIG. 5 is a design diagram showing various kinds of yarns. The cloth is knitted on a double Russell knitting machine equipped with two rows of needle threads. In FIGS. 4 and 5, B represents a back needle, and F represents a front needle. The central pile portion 1 is knitted of pile knitting yarns L1, foundation yarns L2 and two kinds of inlaid yarns L3, L4. The pile knitting yarns L1 are yarns forming the pile loops 4 and each runs in a pattern of 1-0/1-1/0-1/0-0/1-0, forming wales 3 together with the foundation yarns L2 by the front needle and causing the pile loops 4 to stand up on and along the wales 3 by the back needle. The foundation yarns L2 are knitted with the wales 3, which constitute a foundation design of the cloth, and each is a chain stitch of 1-0/0-0/0-1/1-1. The yarns L3 and L4 are inlaid yarns constituting a marquisette design in which L3 runs in a pattern of 2-2/2-2/1-1/1-1/2-2/2-2/0-0/0-0/1-1/1-1/0-0/0-0, while L4 runs in a pattern of 0-0/0-0/1-1/1-1/0-0/0-0/3-3/3-3/2-2/2-2/3-3/3-3. The inlaid yarns L3, L4 are interlaced with the knitting yarns L1 together with the foundation yarns L2 in and along the wales by the front needle and the inlaid yarns L3, L4 are laid in the courses in opposite directions and extend over a range of one to three wales for every course, thus forming squared meshes 5. Therefore, though ill the presence of the meshes 5, the knitted cloth is stable both in warp and weft directions; the inlaid yarns L3 and L4 together with the foundation yarns L2 are tightly interlaced with the base of the individual pile loop 4 to keep the pile loop 4 standing in a safe state as shown in FIG. 6, thus increasing the engaging force. Although it depends on the use, the size of the meshes 5 should preferably be in a range of 1 to 5 mm. It is also preferable that two or three pile loops 4 should be formed over a single-mesh length of the individual wale 3 in view of the engaging force with the male-type surface fastener.

The edge portion 2 is knitted of the foundation yarns L2 and reinforcing inlaid yarns L5 and is a margin to sew up by sewing thread 8 for attaching the surface fastener to a garment. In production, a wide cloth is knitted and is then cut into individual narrow surface fasteners along several edge portions 2, which are knitted at every predetermined width. Partly since the back surface of the cloth is provided with a coating layer 7 as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 and partly since the foundation yarns L2 and the auxiliary inlaid yarns L5 are knitted double, the cut edges are free from being frayed.

In the foregoing embodiment of FIGS. 4 through 6, the cloth is knitted on a double Russell knitting machine. Alternatively, the cloth may be knitted even on a single Russell knitting machine with the same result that the cloth has squared meshes.

FIGS. 7 through 9 shows a second embodiment. In the first embodiment of FIGS. 4 through 6, the pile loops constituting engaging elements of the surface fastener are formed on and along the wales of the foundation system knitted of the foundation yarns L2. Whereas in the second embodiment of FIGS. 7 through 9, though pile loops 4a are formed between adjacent wales 3a, 3a, squared meshes 5a are formed by inlaid yarns R3 and R4 of the marquisette design like the first embodiment.

FIG. 7 is a design diagram of the second embodiment, and FIG. 8 is a design diagram showing the running of the yarns of the second embodiment. In the second embodiment, the cloth is knitted on a single Russell knitting machine.

In the pile portion 1a, the wales 3a of the foundation design is knitted of pile knitting yarns R1 and foundation yarns R2, and pile knitting yarns R1 forms pile loops 4a on adjacent needles as shown in FIG. 8, each pile loop 4a extending between adjacent wales 3a, 3a as shown in FIG. 9, thus facilitating the engagement of this cloth with a male-type surface fastener. The remaining yarns, i.e. the foundation yarns R2, the inlaid yarns R3, R4 of the marquisette design, and reinforcing inlaid yarns R5 of the edge portions 2a, are basically identical with those of the first embodiment.

With the cloth thus constructed, partly since pile loops are formed on the wales of the foundation design and partly since squared meshes are formed between adjacent wales, it is possible to give air-permeability to the surface fastener without lowering the engaging force. Further, since the meshes fully occupy the entire space between the wales, it is possible to give high air-permeability to the cloth so that the cloth can be used in a cleaning tool, to which dust and dirt are apt to stick. In addition, since the base of the individual pile loop is tightly interlaced with the inlaid yarns of the marquisette design, the pile loops are kept standing in a stable state and are also prevented from being removed, thus reducing the thickness of the coating layer over the back surface of the cloth.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5596888 *Oct 23, 1995Jan 28, 1997Milliken Research CorporationKnitted furniture support fabric
US6158255 *Jul 29, 1999Dec 12, 2000Milliken & CompanyLoop fabric with interlaced chain stitches
US6449989 *Apr 16, 1999Sep 17, 2002Milliken & CompanyHook and loop fastening structure
US6484325Dec 23, 1999Nov 26, 2002Liberty Fabrics, Inc.Athletic garment and equipment system
US6565943 *Aug 12, 1999May 20, 2003Ykk CorporationSurface fastener formed of fibers
US6694576 *Oct 15, 2002Feb 24, 2004Ykk Corporation Of AmericaFastener strip having vent holes
US6964063 *Sep 26, 2003Nov 15, 2005Bamber Jeffrey VSports glove
US6988386 *Jul 25, 2005Jan 24, 2006Ykk CorporationKnitted surface fastener
US7549303 *Nov 21, 2007Jun 23, 2009Milliken & CompanyTextile-reinforced composites with high tear strength
US7901415 *Feb 8, 2002Mar 8, 2011Deutsche Institute für Textil-und FaserforschungTension-free elastic tape
US8152857Jan 28, 2011Apr 10, 2012Deutsche Institute Fur Textil-Und FaserforschungTension-free elastic tape
US8826467 *Jun 25, 2009Sep 9, 2014Maxi Support Sdn BhdGlove with liquid storage and dispensation capabilities
US20110113528 *Jun 25, 2009May 19, 2011Maxi Support Sdn BhdGlove with liquid storage and dispensation capabilities
US20120107526 *Oct 25, 2011May 3, 2012Leeshin CorporationArtificial turf
WO2010030548A2 *Sep 3, 2009Mar 18, 20103M Innovative Properties CompanyFemale part of hook and loop fastener
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/195, 24/450, 66/192
International ClassificationD04B21/10, A44B18/00, D04B21/02
Cooperative ClassificationD10B2501/0632, A44B18/0034, D04B21/10, D04B21/02
European ClassificationD04B21/02, A44B18/00D6, D04B21/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 13, 2007FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20061220
Dec 20, 2006LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Jul 5, 2006REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
May 30, 2002FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Mar 20, 1998FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Mar 10, 1995ASAssignment
Owner name: YKK CORPORATION, JAPAN
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:YOSHIDA KOGYO K.K.;REEL/FRAME:007378/0851
Effective date: 19940801
Sep 21, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: YOSHIDA KOGYO, K. K., JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:YAMAMOTO, TORU;MATSUDA, YOSHIO;ISHIHARA, MITSUTOSHI;REEL/FRAME:006699/0596
Effective date: 19930820