Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5395342 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 07/557,869
Publication dateMar 7, 1995
Filing dateJul 26, 1990
Priority dateJul 26, 1990
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS6083203
Publication number07557869, 557869, US 5395342 A, US 5395342A, US-A-5395342, US5395342 A, US5395342A
InventorsInbae Yoon
Original AssigneeYoon; Inbae
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Endoscopic portal
US 5395342 A
Abstract
An endoscopic portal includes a valve assembly disposed at an open proximal end of a sleeve or cannula providing access to an internal operative site, the valve assembly having a passage therethrough of variable size to engage surgical instruments passing therethrough in sealing relation to prevent flow or leakage of fluid through the valve assembly.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(14)
What is claimed is:
1. An endoscopic portal comprising
a tubular sleeve for insertion through the skin to provide access to an internal operative site for surgical instruments, said sleeve having an open distal end adapted to be disposed within the body and an open proximal end adapted to be disposed externally of the body; and
valve means disposed at said open proximal end of said sleeve for controlling passage of fluids through said sleeve, said valve means including variable size passage means for communicating with said open proximal end of said sleeve and engaging surgical instruments of various sizes passing therethrough and through said sleeve in sealing relation.
2. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 1 wherein said passage means includes a plurality of passages of varying size.
3. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 2 wherein said valve means is movable relative to said open proximal end of said sleeve to permit alignment of individual ones of said plurality of passages with said open proximal end of said sleeve.
4. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 3 wherein said valve means includes a valve body and said plurality of passages pass through said valve body.
5. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 4 and further comprising a housing for said valve means coupled with said open proximal end of said sleeve, said valve body being movably mounted in said housing.
6. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 5 wherein said valve body is rotatably mounted in said housing.
7. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 6 wherein said valve body has a closed position blocking communication with said open proximal end of said sleeve.
8. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 7 wherein said valve means includes means biasing said valve body to said closed position.
9. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 7 wherein said valve body has an axis of rotation and said passages each have an axis disposed transverse to said axis of rotation.
10. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 9 wherein said valve means includes detent means for maintaining a selected one of said passages in alignment with said open proximal end of said sleeve.
11. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 1 wherein said passage means includes elastic means normally biased to a closed position blocking communication with said open proximal end of said sleeve and stretchable to engage various size surgical instruments in sealing relation.
12. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 1 wherein said valve means includes a flange having an opening therein, a plurality of spaced legs disposed around said opening to provide a configuration tapering to an apex axially aligned with said open proximal end of said sleeve, said legs being spreadable to receive surgical instruments of various sizes, and a stretchable membrane surrounding said legs to bias said legs to said tapering configuration and to allow said legs to be spread apart by a surgical instrument while engaging the surgical instrument in sealing arrangement in the spaces between said spread apart legs.
13. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 12 wherein said legs provide a conical configuration in a normal closed state and said stretchable membrane is made of rubber and has a conical configuration in an unstretched state.
14. An endoscopic portal as recited in claim 1 wherein said valve means includes means biasing said variable size passage means to a closed position.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention pertains to endoscopic surgical instruments and, more particularly, to a valve assembly for providing a variable size passage in an endoscopic portal to prevent fluid flow through the valve while allowing surgical implements of various sizes to be selectively introduced through the valve.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Surgical procedures involving the placement of an endoscopic portal, such as a sleeve or cannula, through a body wall to provide a passage for insertion of surgical instruments frequently require that the passage be sealed to prevent the flow of fluids through the endoscopic portal. For example, many medical procedures gain access to the interior of an anatomical cavity by utilizing a surgical puncturing or penetrating instrument, such as a trocar, obturator or needle, having a sharp penetrating point for puncturing or penetrating the cavity wall to establish communication with the interior of the anatomical cavity. A sleeve or cannula is then left in situ for utilization as a portal to introduce surgical instruments into the anatomical cavity. Because it is necessary to prevent fluid flow to and from the surgical site, the portal must be sealed prior to and subsequent to the introduction of surgical instruments and while such instruments are in place. Furthermore, fluids, such as gaseous phase carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide, may be introduced into the anatomical cavity for insufflation as part of the surgical procedure, and the escape of the gas must be prevented during puncturing and during the endoscopic surgical procedure. Typically, surgical instruments are inserted into the portal via a valve that has a single, particular size passage dependent upon the puncturing instrument. However, additional instruments to be introduced into the anatomical cavity through the passage may be of diverse types and sizes, and it will be appreciated that fluid can escape past smaller instruments.

A surgical puncturing instrument is usually received within a portal sleeve that passes through the wall of an anatomical cavity with the puncturing instrument and remains in place to establish communication with the interior of the cavity after the puncturing instrument has been removed from the sleeve. The sleeve typically has a proximal end secured in a housing provided with a valve that allows the puncturing instrument to be inserted into the sleeve. The valve prevents the flow of fluids to and from the anatomical cavity and closes when the puncturing instrument is removed from the sleeve. The size of the puncturing instrument utilized varies depending upon the surgical procedure and the type of anatomical cavity to be punctured. Once the puncturing instrument has been removed from the sleeve, a great variety of instruments of various sizes and diameters are introduced into the anatomical cavity via the portal dependent upon the procedure to be performed.

Prior art endoscopic portals utilize a valve, such as a flapper or gate valve, that is normally biased to a closed position but in an open position has a passage or lumen therethrough of only a single size. Accordingly, such endoscopic portals suffer from the disadvantages of allowing the passage or leakage of fluids when surgical instruments smaller than the single passage are introduced therethrough or of limiting the implements to be used in a procedure to a single size. Additionally, such endoscopic portals can be effectively used with only a single size puncturing instrument.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, it is a primary object of the present invention to overcome the above described disadvantages of the prior art by utilizing a valve assembly in an endoscopic portal that provides a variable size passage therethrough to engage surgical instruments of various sizes in sealing relation.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an endoscopic portal with a valve having multiple lumens or passages of diverse sizes for selection to produce a sealing relation with surgical instruments of various sizes.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a valve assembly for an endoscopic portal that normally seals an opening or passage therethrough and allows surgical instruments of diverse sizes to be introduced through the opening or passage while preventing fluid flow or leakage.

The present invention has another object in the use of an elastic or stretchable sleeve in combination with a plurality of spreadable legs to produce a valve for an endoscopic portal having a variable size passage therethrough.

Some of the advantages of the present invention over the prior art are that a complete endoscopic procedure can be performed with a single portal thereby reducing instrument costs and surgery time, a single endoscopic portal can be used with various sizes and types of puncturing instruments, and the endoscopic portal can be inexpensively manufactured to be economically disposable for single patient use.

The present invention is generally characterized in an endoscopic portal including a sleeve or cannula having an open proximal end to provide access to an internal operative site and a valve assembly disposed at the open proximal end of the sleeve for controlling fluid passing therethrough and including a passage of variable size for engaging surgical instruments of various sizes in sealing relation. In one embodiment, the valve assembly includes a plurality of different size lumens or passages that can be selectively aligned with the open proximal end of the sleeve. In another embodiment, the valve assembly stretches or elastically expands to accommodate various size surgical instruments.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiment taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view, partly in section, of an endoscopic portal according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a section taken along line 2--2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a broken view taken along line 3--3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a broken side view of the endoscopic portal of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a exploded, perspective view of another valve assembly for the endoscopic portal of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a broken side view, partly in section, of the valve assembly of FIG. 5 with a surgical instrument passing therethrough.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

With reference to FIG. 1, an endoscopic portal 10 including a valve assembly 12 according to the present invention is shown in combination with a surgical puncturing or penetrating instrument 14 for puncturing penetrating the wall of an anatomical cavity. The puncturing instrument 14 is illustrated as a hollow or tubular needle having an angled, sharp distal end 16; however, any type of puncturing instrument can be utilized in combination with the endoscopic portal 10, such as solid trocars or obturators. The puncturing instrument 14 has a proximal end 18 defining an enlarged handle to allow the puncturing instrument to be withdrawn after insertion.

The endoscopic portal 10 includes a tubular, cylindrical sleeve or cannula 20 for positioning through the body wall during the puncturing procedure to provide access to an internal operative site. The sleeve 20 has a tapered, open distal end 22 adapted to be disposed within the body and an open, proximal end 24 adapted to be disposed externally of the body. The proximal end 24 is externally threaded to engage internal threads at the forward end of a housing 26 to couple the housing with the proximal end of the sleeve. Housing 26 has an enlarged forward flange 28 joined to a tubular end 30 that is internally threaded for receiving the proximal end 24 of sleeve 20. Housing 26 has a generally cylindrical wall 32 extending from flange 28 and terminating at an open, internally threaded end 34, and a valve block 36 is received in end 34. Block 36 has an enlarged flange 38 extending therefrom and an external thread for engaging the internal thread at open end 34 to secure block 36 in the housing. Block 36 is closely received within wall 32 and terminates in a tapered wall 40 positioned adjacent end 30.

A longitudinal passage 42 is defined through the housing including an opening in flange 38 and a bore through block 36 in longitudinal alignment with the longitudinal axis of sleeve 20, and implements such as puncturing instrument 14 can be inserted into sleeve 20 via passage 42. A cylindrical recess 44 is formed in block 36 on an axis transverse to passage 42, and a cylindrical valve body 46 is disposed in recess 44 to be rotatable about its central longitudinal axis which intersects and is oriented transverse to the longitudinal axis of passage 42.

A plurality of different size passages or lumens 48, 50 and 52 are formed in valve body 46 radially with respect to the central longitudinal axis of the valve body. Lumens 48, 50 and 52 have longitudinal axes contained in a common plane, as shown in FIG. 2, which also contains the longitudinal axis of passage 42. Lumens 48, 50 and 52 are angularly spaced from each other and the angular spacing is selected to provide opposing solid surfaces 54 ad 56 on opposite sides of valve body 46 defining arcs of the cylinder large enough in size to cover and seal passage 42 when the solid surfaces 54 and 56 are aligned with passage 42 by rotation of the valve body. Lumens 48, 50 and 52 are of different size or diameter; and, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, lumen 50 is the largest diameter passage, lumen 52 is the next largest diameter passage and lumen 48 is the smallest diameter passage.

As depicted in FIGS. 2 and 3, a lower end 58 of valve body 46 has a shaft 60 extending therefrom in longitudinal alignment with the central longitudinal axis of the valve body to project through an opening in a bottom wall 62 of block 36 and terminates at an end surface 64. A slot 66 is formed in end surface 64 to receive one end of a coil spring 68 disposed around shaft 60. A pin 70 projects perpendicularly from wall 62, and the other end of spring 68 abuts pin 70. Spring 68 is rotationally biased to normally maintain valve body 46 in a closed position wherein solid surfaces 54 and 56 on the valve body are aligned with passage 42 to close off the passage and seal the housing 26. The upper end 72 of the valve body is fixed to a cover 74 disposed above housing 26, and an elongated ridge 76 projects from cover 74. In the normally closed position, ridge 76 is oriented transverse to passage 42 as shown in phantom in FIG. 4. Ridge 76 can be manually grasped and rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, looking at FIG. 4, to rotate valve body 46 to an open position corresponding to one of the lumens 48, 50 or 52 being aligned with passage .42 and the open proximal end 24 of sleeve 20. Thus, the first rotational position for valve body 46 aligns lumen 48 with passage 42, the second rotational position for valve body 46 aligns lumen 50 with passage 42, and the third rotational position for valve body 46 aligns lumen 52 with passage 42. Indicia 78 can be provided on the housing 26 to indicate open positions for valve 48 when the ridge 76 is radially aligned with such indicia.

While it is preferred to bias the valve assembly to a normally closed position, bias spring 68 is not required, and the valve body can be held in any of its open positions or its closed position with the use of suitable detents. For example, spring biased ball bearings 80 can be disposed in the block 36 and corresponding recesses 82 can be formed in the valve body 46, or vice versa, as shown in phantom in FIG. 2.

In operation, spring 68 rotationally biases valve body 46 to the closed position where solid surfaces 54 and 56 on the valve body are aligned with passage 42 to seal the housing. Valve body 46 may be rotated by grasping and turning ridge 76 to align the central longitudinal axis of a selected one of the lumens 48, 50 or 52 with the longitudinal axis of passage 42, and an implement such as puncturing instrument 14 having a size corresponding to the size of the aligned lumen can be inserted into the opening in flange 38 to extend through the aligned lumen of the valve body and sleeve 20. Since the aligned lumen corresponds to the size of the inserted implement and the valve body 46 is sealingly received in block 36, the passage of fluids through the housing and valve assembly are prevented. The valve assembly therefore, permits diverse surgical instruments to be inserted into the sleeve with a single portal in a manner maintaining a sealed environment.

When utilized in conjunction with puncturing instrument 14, valve body 46 is rotated to align lumen 50 in valve body 46 with passage 42 in block 36, lumen 50 corresponding in size and cross-sectional shape with puncturing instrument 14 to provide sealing engagement therebetween. The distal end 16 of puncturing instrument 14 is inserted into the housing 26 through the opening in flange 38 to extend through passage 42, lumen 50 and sleeve 20 such that distal end 16 projects from the distal end 22 of the sleeve. For laparoscopy, in many cases, a pneumoperitoneum will have been created, for example with the use of a verres needle. When the puncturing instrument is forced through the anatomical wall, escape of gas from the peritoneum will be prevented due to the seal between the puncturing instrument and the valve assembly. When the puncturing instrument is hollow, such as the illustrated needle, the distal end 18 will be closed to prevent passage of fluid therethrough. If no pneumoperitoneum has been created prior to insertion of the puncturing instrument, insufflation can be accomplished via a valve, not shown, in the proximal end 18 of the needle. Once the anatomical cavity is insufflated and the endoscopic surgical instrument is in place with sleeve 20 passing through the anatomical wall, the puncturing instrument is removed whereupon the spring 68 automatically restores the valve body to the closed position to prevent gas from escaping. Valve body 46 can now be rotated to align the same or a different lumen with passage 42 to allow the same or a different sized surgical instrument to be inserted therethrough for introduction via the sleeve to the operative site.

The number of different size lumens or passages in the valve assembly and the sizes thereof are dependent upon the instruments to be used in the endoscopic procedure to be performed. For example, frequently used instruments commonly have diameters of 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm; and, thus, lumens corresponding to these diameters are preferred. By use of indicia 78 on the housing wall 32 in combination with ridge 76, which can act as a pointer or indicator, accurate alignment of a desired lumen can be achieved. By use of detents 80, 82, the accurate alignment of the lumen or passage through the valve assembly with the housing and sleeve can further be assured.

Another embodiment of a valve assembly providing variable passage sizes therethrough in accordance with the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6 and includes a member 84 having a flange 86 adapted to be sealingly mounted in housing 26, for example by providing external threads on the peripheral edge of the flange. A plurality of spaced, spreadable legs 88 extend distally from flange 86 to produce a normally conical configuration tapering to an apex as shown in FIG. 5. The legs 88 and flange 86 are preferably integrally made of unitary construction of a material facilitating movement of medical instruments therethrough and allowing legs 88 to flex, such as a plastic like nylon. The legs 88 are concentrically disposed around a central opening 90 in flange 86 and are slightly spaced from each other as shown by gaps 92 which terminate at curved relief recesses 94. A conical, stretchable sleeve or membrane 96, preferably made of a rubber-like material such as silicone, has a configuration to tightly fit over legs 88 such that the sleeve and legs are normally biased to a closed position at the apex to prevent passage of fluids through the valve assembly.

In use, the valve assembly is normally biased to a closed position due to the elastic force of conical sleeve 96 around legs 88; and, when a surgical instrument 98 is inserted through housing 26 and sleeve 20, the surgical instrument 98 will pass through opening 90 and cause legs 88 to flex outwardly stretching conical sleeve 96 to the position shown in FIG. 6. The conical sleeve acts as a seal to prevent passage of fluids thereby and tightly engages the surgical instrument in the gaps 92 where the legs 88 are spread apart. The valve assembly provides a passage of variable size to accommodate surgical instruments of various sizes passing therethrough in that legs 88 and conical sleeve 96 contract to sealingly engage the surgical instrument regardless of the diameter thereof.

Inasmuch as the present invention is subject to many modifications, variations and changes in detail, it is intended that all subject matter discussed above or shown in the illustrative drawings be interpreted as illustrative only and not to be taken in a limiting sense.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3747812 *Oct 21, 1971Jul 24, 1973Medical Concepts IncSyringe
US3788318 *Jun 12, 1972Jan 29, 1974Dusseau AExpandable cannular, especially for medical purposes
US3789852 *Jun 12, 1972Feb 5, 1974Dusseau AExpandable trochar, especially for medical purposes
US3833003 *Jul 5, 1972Sep 3, 1974A TariccoIntravascular occluding catheter
US4187849 *Jul 28, 1978Feb 12, 1980Stim Edward MSuction curettage device with valve control and support means for differing diameter tubes
US4524770 *Jan 25, 1983Jun 25, 1985Ahmad OrandiEndoscope injection needle
US4535773 *Mar 26, 1982Aug 20, 1985Inbae YoonSafety puncturing instrument and method
US4601710 *Aug 6, 1984Jul 22, 1986Endotherapeutics CorporationTrocar assembly
US4654030 *Feb 24, 1986Mar 31, 1987EndotherapeuticsTrocar
US4668221 *Jun 22, 1985May 26, 1987Luther Medical Products, Inc.Assembly of stylet and catheter
US4735614 *Feb 25, 1986Apr 5, 1988Critikon, LtdCatheter for intravascular use
US4769005 *Aug 6, 1987Sep 6, 1988Robert GinsburgSelective catheter guide
US4790817 *Apr 28, 1986Dec 13, 1988Luther Medical Products, Inc.Assembly of stylet and catheter, and needle and catheter
US4808168 *May 19, 1986Feb 28, 1989EndotherapeuticsPneumoneedle
US4902280 *Jul 14, 1989Feb 20, 1990United States Surgical CorporationTrocar
US4919653 *Jul 13, 1988Apr 24, 1990Martinez Antonio EDevice for locating the epidural space
US4931042 *Oct 26, 1987Jun 5, 1990EndotherapeuticsTrocar assembly with improved latch
US4943280 *Dec 31, 1987Jul 24, 1990United States Surgical CorporaitonSelf-seating flapper valve for an insufflation cannula assembly
US5030206 *Feb 16, 1990Jul 9, 1991United States Surgical CorporationTrocar
US5053016 *Mar 2, 1990Oct 1, 1991United States Surgical CorporationValve seat for an insufflation cannula assembly
GB1024410A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5478318 *Aug 2, 1994Dec 26, 1995Yoon; InbaeMultiluminal endoscopic portal
US5492304 *Jun 16, 1993Feb 20, 1996United States Surgical CorporationSeal assembly for accommodating introduction of surgical instruments
US5554123 *Oct 31, 1994Sep 10, 1996Glenn HerskowitzPortable infusion pump
US5575777 *Apr 10, 1995Nov 19, 1996Becton Dickinson And CompanyRetractable needle cannula insertion set with refinements to better control leakage, retraction speed and reuse
US5628732 *Jan 19, 1996May 13, 1997Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Trocar with improved universal seal
US5702367 *Jul 29, 1996Dec 30, 1997Becton Dickinson And CompanyRetractable-needle cannula insertion set with refinements to better control leakage, retraction speed, and reuse
US5792113 *Dec 12, 1996Aug 11, 1998Ethicon Endo-Surgerym Inc.Universal seal for a trocar
US5807338 *Oct 20, 1995Sep 15, 1998United States Surgical CorporationModular trocar system and methods of assembly
US5843040 *May 6, 1997Dec 1, 1998Dexide, Inc.Surgical sleeve or cannula with rotating reducer
US5855566 *Jun 1, 1995Jan 5, 1999Urohealth, Inc. (California)Trocar assembly
US5980493 *Aug 25, 1998Nov 9, 1999United States Surgical CorporationModular trocar system and methods and assembly
US6482181Nov 24, 1999Nov 19, 2002Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US6551282Oct 21, 1999Apr 22, 2003Tyco Healthcare Group LpUniversal seal for use with endoscopic cannula
US6595946Feb 25, 2000Jul 22, 2003United States Surgical CorporationValve assembly
US6663598 *May 17, 2000Dec 16, 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Fluid seal for endoscope
US6702787Jun 6, 2002Mar 9, 2004Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US6740063 *Oct 15, 2002May 25, 2004Lawrence A. LynnLuer receiving vascular access system
US6755825Sep 13, 2001Jun 29, 2004Sherwood Services AgElectrosurgical device having a dielectric seal
US6863661May 28, 2003Mar 8, 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Fluid seal for endoscope
US6923783Jul 1, 2003Aug 2, 2005United States Surgical CorporationValve assembly
US6926696May 31, 2002Aug 9, 2005Owais MohammedHypodermic syringe needle assembly and method of making the same
US6942671Nov 6, 2000Sep 13, 2005Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical sealing apparatus
US7011314Apr 28, 2003Mar 14, 2006Taut, Inc.Floating seal assembly for a trocar
US7025721Jan 29, 2004Apr 11, 2006Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Endoscope channel cap
US7033339Aug 8, 2000Apr 25, 2006Becton Dickinson And Company (Part Interest)Self sealing luer receiving stopcock
US7169130Apr 21, 2003Jan 30, 2007Tyco Healthcare Group LpUniversal seal for use with endoscopic cannula
US7244244Oct 9, 2002Jul 17, 2007Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US7311706Jun 28, 2004Dec 25, 2007Sherwood Services AgElectrosurgical device having a dielectric seal
US7470261Jul 30, 2002Dec 30, 2008Lynn Lawrence AMedical valve
US7537583Jan 19, 2005May 26, 2009Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Fluid seal for endoscope
US7559918Mar 21, 2005Jul 14, 2009Joseph PasqualucciValve assembly
US7582071Mar 28, 2005Sep 1, 2009Tyco Healthcare Group LpIntroducer seal assembly
US7608082Jan 6, 2005Oct 27, 2009Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical seal for use in a surgical access apparatus
US7645266Feb 24, 2006Jan 12, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Fluid seal for endoscope
US7717878Apr 19, 2006May 18, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical portal with seal system
US7727255Feb 10, 2004Jun 1, 2010Applied Medical Resources CorporationAccess sealing apparatus and method
US7842035Mar 29, 2004Nov 30, 2010Cytyc CorporationMethod and apparatus for tubal occlusion
US7850655Jul 13, 2009Dec 14, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpValve assembly
US7896846Nov 20, 2003Mar 1, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US7896847Aug 5, 2009Mar 1, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpIntroducer seal assembly
US7905880May 22, 2007Mar 15, 2011Cytyc CorporationMethod and apparatus for tubal occlusion
US7918826Sep 14, 2007Apr 5, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Trocar assembly
US7918827Sep 25, 2007Apr 5, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpSeal assembly for surgical access device
US7976501Dec 7, 2007Jul 12, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Trocar seal with reduced contact area
US7981092May 8, 2008Jul 19, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Vibratory trocar
US7988128 *May 28, 2004Aug 2, 2011Medical Components, Inc.Sealing luer
US7988671Jan 11, 2010Aug 2, 2011Applied Medical Resources CorporationPleated trocar shield
US7998122Feb 9, 2006Aug 16, 2011Becton, Dickinson & CompanyLuer receiver and method for fluid transfer
US8002934Aug 25, 2009Aug 23, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US8007472Dec 15, 2006Aug 30, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpUniversal seal for use with endoscopic cannula
US8092430Jan 5, 2009Jan 10, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSingle port device with multi-lumen cap
US8100929Jun 29, 2007Jan 24, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Duckbill seal with fluid drainage feature
US8118783Dec 11, 2008Feb 21, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpAccess assembly with spherical valve
US8152774Sep 30, 2010Apr 10, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpValve assembly
US8172806Apr 21, 2010May 8, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical portal with seal system
US8192405Aug 25, 2009Jun 5, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US8226645Oct 26, 2010Jul 24, 2012Cytyc CorporationApparatus for tubal occlusion
US8231525Dec 29, 2005Jul 31, 2012Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Endoscope channel cap
US8231619Jan 22, 2010Jul 31, 2012Cytyc CorporationSterilization device and method
US8235947Jan 31, 2011Aug 7, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpIntroducer seal assembly
US8257317Jun 22, 2011Sep 4, 2012Applied Medical Resources CorporationPleated trocar shield
US8267898Oct 5, 2010Sep 18, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpTrocar seal system
US8273060Apr 28, 2008Sep 25, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Fluid removal in a surgical access device
US8403894Oct 30, 2007Mar 26, 2013Becton, Dickinson and Company (partial interest)Luer receiver and method for fluid transfer
US8414485Dec 7, 2011Apr 9, 2013Covidien LpSingle port device with multi-lumen cap
US8475416Oct 30, 2007Jul 2, 2013Lawrence A. LynnLuer receiver and method for fluid transfer
US8550086May 4, 2010Oct 8, 2013Hologic, Inc.Radiopaque implant
US8551048Apr 27, 2004Oct 8, 2013Covidien LpSurgical sealing apparatus
US8568362Jul 31, 2009Oct 29, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical access device with sorbents
US8579804Jun 23, 2003Nov 12, 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Variable length nephrostomy sheath
US8579807Apr 28, 2008Nov 12, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Absorbing fluids in a surgical access device
US8579860Jan 18, 2012Nov 12, 2013Covidien LpAccess assembly with spherical valve
US8597251Aug 22, 2012Dec 3, 2013Applied Medical Resources CorporationPleated trocar shield
US8636686Oct 12, 2010Jan 28, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical access device
US8663170Jan 12, 2010Mar 4, 2014Covidien LpRotating valve assembly including multi-lumen spherical valve
US8672890Jun 24, 2011Mar 18, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Trocar seal with reduced contact area
US8690831Apr 25, 2008Apr 8, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Gas jet fluid removal in a trocar
US8702657Feb 23, 2012Apr 22, 2014Covidien LpTrocar seal system
US8702727Nov 22, 2006Apr 22, 2014Hologic, Inc.Delivery catheter with implant ejection mechanism
US8715165Apr 21, 2009May 6, 2014Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Fluid seal for endoscope
US8721539Jan 20, 2011May 13, 2014EON Surgical Ltd.Rapid laparoscopy exchange system and method of use thereof
US20110282287 *Jan 29, 2010Nov 17, 2011St. Jude Medical, Inc.Transapical mini-introducer homeostasis valve and punch
US20120316494 *Dec 16, 2010Dec 13, 2012Scholly Fiberoptic GmbhDevice for monitoring and/or manipulating objects arranged in a cavity that can be accessed through a narrow opening
EP0784961A1Jan 17, 1997Jul 23, 1997Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Trocar with improved universal seal
EP1651096A2 *Aug 9, 2004May 3, 2006Taut, Inc.Seal positioning assembly
EP1971378A2 *Oct 23, 2006Sep 24, 2008Ceeben Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for peritoneal hypothermia and/or resuscitation
WO2005000132A1 *Jun 23, 2004Jan 6, 2005Joseph P DesmondVariable length nephrostomy sheath
WO2008067266A1 *Nov 27, 2007Jun 5, 2008Cytyc CorpSide-arm port introducer
WO2010087975A1 *Jan 29, 2010Aug 5, 2010St. Jude Medical, Inc.Transapical mini-introducer homeostasis valve and punch
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/167.03, 604/248, 604/167.05
International ClassificationA61B17/34, A61M39/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61M39/06, A61B17/3498, A61B2017/3464, A61M2039/0626, A61B17/3462, A61B17/3421
European ClassificationA61B17/34H, A61M39/06, A61B17/34V, A61B17/34G4
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 15, 2007PRDPPatent reinstated due to the acceptance of a late maintenance fee
Effective date: 20071016
Aug 31, 2007FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Aug 31, 2007SULPSurcharge for late payment
May 1, 2007FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20070307
Mar 7, 2007REINReinstatement after maintenance fee payment confirmed
Sep 20, 2006REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Sep 25, 2002REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Sep 9, 2002FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Sep 4, 1998FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4