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Publication numberUS546700 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1895
Filing dateDec 6, 1894
Publication numberUS 546700 A, US 546700A, US-A-546700, US546700 A, US546700A
InventorsThomas J. Kean
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means foe analytically recording gaits of horses
US 546700 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

4 Sheets-Sheet 1.

(No Model.) T. J. KEAN.

MEANS FOR ANALYTIGALLY RECORDING GAITS 0E HORSES. No. 546,700. Patented Sept. 24, 1895.

Ill A I nventor.

Witnesses.

qw Attorney.

ANDREW E GRAHAMtPHOTO-LITHO.WASHINGTUmBC.

(No, Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 2.

T. J. KEAN. MEANS FOR ANALYTICALLY RECORDING GAITS 0F HORSES. No. 546,700. Patented Sept. Z4, 1895.

w '3 ooo@ oo oo oo oo 0000000000 oo NO- 546,700- Patented Sept. y24, 1895.

(No/v/Model.) v 4 Sheets-Sheet 3.

. J. KE

MEANS FOS ANALY LLY REG Ne GAITS 0F HORSES.

(No Model.)

T.'J.KEAN. l MEANS 'EOE ANALYTIGALLY RECORDING GAITS 0F HORSES.

Patented Sept. .24, 1895.

4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

ANDREW ELRHAM, PNTO-LITNO-WASHINGTON. D C,

Attorney.

vurrs STATES' trims.

THOMAS J. KEAN, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA.

MEANS FOR ANALYTICALLY RECORDING GAIT OF HORSES.

SPECIFCATION forming part of Letters Patent No.v546,700, dated September 24, 1895. Application filed December 5, 1894. Serial No. 530,862. (No modeLl To a/ZZ whom it may con/cern:

Be it known that LTHOMAS J. KEAN, a citizen of the United States, residing in the city and county of Philadelphia and State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Means for Analytically Recording the Gait of a Horse, of which the followingisa full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of thisspeciiieation.

The object of this invention is to provide a novel and efficient means for analytically recording the gait-c'. e., the foot and leg motions-0f a horse, to the end that any peculiar or faulty actions of the animal, together with the remedy therefor, may be accurately and expeditiously determined.

Vith this object in view the invention consists in the provision of novel electricallycontrolled recording mechanism, and in the operative connection thereof with a contact device or devices suitably disposed on the shoe or shoes of the animal, whereby the periodical action of such device or devices upon the ground, in point of time and position, will effect the operation of said mechanism in such a manner as to be progressively and relatively recorded thereby.

The invention consists, also, in novel features of construction and organization, that will hereinafter be particularly described and claimed.

Referring to the annexed drawings, Figure l is a side elevation of the apparatus as in actual use, the side of thewagon being broken away for clearness. Fig. 2 is a plan, enlarged, ofthe electrically-controlled recordingmechanism as mounted in the wagon. Fig. 3 is a side elevation of a means for throwing said mechanism into and out of operation. Fig. 4 :is a partial longitudinal section, as on theline 4 4 of Fig. 2. Fig. 5 is a vertical section through the lower portion of ahoop, its shoe, and adjuncts. Fig. 6 is a full horizontal section, as on the line 6 6 of Fig. 5. Fig. 7 is a detail vertical section, as on the line '7 7' of Fig. 5. Fig. 8 is a diagram illustrating the several electrical connections between the respective shoes and the recording mechanism. Fig. 9 is a plan of a portion of the strip or web with the analysis recorded thereon.

Fig. l0 is a vertical section of a modified construction of recording apparatus, hereinafter referred to. Fig. ll is a plan of a portion of said construction.

A designates an electrically-controlled recording apparatus suitably disposed within the wagon, which apparatus,in a convenient and efficient form, is ofthe following construction: o. is a base-board, upon which is supported a series of electromagnets a', the number of the series being determined by and corresponding with the number of contactdevices (hereinafter described) in the shoes of the animal, ln the present instance there are three contact devices in each shoe, and in consequence twelve magnets are provided. The armature a2 of each of the magnets is connected with one end of a horizontal arm a3, the forward end of which is connected with a depending spring-plate a4. The several plates are arranged in sets of three, as seen in Fig. 2, corresponding with the number of contact devices on each shoe, the respective sets being disposed at slight intervals apart. (See Fig. 6.) The arms converge from the armatures to these plates, as seen in Fig. 2, and the relative arrangement of parts is such that if the electric circuits between the magnets, or any of them, and the batteries be alternately broken and completed the depending springplates will be oscillated. Clamped or otherwise secured to the free ends of the depending springs are pencils a5 or other marking devices, which are adapted to impinge against a contiguous traveling strip' B, of paper or the like, and to imprint thereon parallel lines or dashes indicating the duration of the completed circuit or circuits.

The strip is moved at a given rate of speed in reference to that of the horse, so that the relative lengths and intervals of the dashes will accurately prescribe the condition of the respective contact-points on the shoes of the animal. The contact-points, by which the :respective circuits are controlled, may be applied to the horses hoofs in any suitable manner. In the construction illustrated herein there is interposed between each shoe O and the hoof asupplemental shoe c, of vulcanized rubber or other non-conductor, in which are disposed at predetermined points three plates c' c2 c, of conducting material, provided with binding-screws c4, respectively. (See Figs. 5, 6, and 7.) The interposed shoe cis preferably formed with a flange c5, which coacts with the inner edge of the shoe proper, so as to insure the proper disposition of the former, and it is also preferably made in sections, as seen, so that it may be used in connection with horseshoes of various sizes. The metallic shoe C is perforated at points in line with the plates c c2 c3 on the interposed non-conduct ing shoe, and vertically-movable studs c(3 are iitted to the perforations thus formed. The upper ends of these studs are maintained normally depressed and out of contact with the respective plates by means of suitably-disposed springs c', while their lower ends project below the metallic shoe. Hence by depressing these studs, or any of them, into contact with the plates an electric connection will be elt'ected between the shoe and such plates or plate. In the present instance a separate battery D is provided for each magnet, the positive poles of the battery being connected with the respective plates by a wire d and the negative poles being connected by means of wires with a common return-wire d, which is in its turn connected withthe metal shoe. rlhus there are three electric circuits, which are broken between the plates and their studs, respectively, and consequently if the contact be made between the shoe and any of the plates, as above stated, a circuit will be completed, the energized magnet thereupon effecting the operation of the connected pencil; or, in other words, should the horse whose gait is being analyzed strike the ground in the first instance with the toe of his slice the forward stud will be moved upward to complete the circuit, the pencil thus imprinting a dashA upon the paper proportionate to the dwell of the stud upon the ground,and should he then in this step press the shoe to the right or to the left the corresponding stud will be operated, and the time and the position of the movement relative to that first named will be likewise recorded on the strip; or should he strike the ground squarely with the shoe the three studs will be simultaneously operated, and such operation be transmitted to the recorder. lVhere, as in this instance, the four feet of the animal are equipped with the described devices, the respective movements of the feet in reference to each other will be re corded in parallel lines, the strides of the horse being indicated by the longitudinal spaces between the adjacent sets of dashes, Hence the gait of the horse will be accurately analyzed and recorded, and, as a result, any defective foot actions thereby appearing may be readily ascertained, to the end that proper curative measures therefor, such as the use of peculiarlyeformed shoes, may be taken. The wires d d are extended along the legs of the horse, being held in place by means of suitably-disposed bands d2; thence they arc extended along the shafts of and into the wagon, where they are connected to bindingposts d3 on the base ot' the contained apparatus.

As asitnple and eflcient means whereby the strip of paper shall be fed to the markers at a prescribed rate of speed, in order that the relative lengths of the imprints in respect to the speed of the horse shall enable the active duration of the respective contacts to be accurately determined, I provide the following construction: E is a housing secured to the base-board and provided with a suitably-disposed bracket e, to which the upper ends of the depending spring-plates are fixed. (See Figs. 2 and Il.) In this housing,immediately in rear of the markers a, carried by said plates, is rotatably mounted a feed-roller c', the axis of which is preferably in line horizontally with the markers. In rear of this feed-roller are mounted two rollers e, one of which e2 is a supply-roller, and the other of which c3 is a tale-up roller. The web or strip B is drawn from the supply-roller to and around the front of the feed-roller, thence to the take-up roller. Bearing upon the web or strip on the feed-roller is a smaller roller t", the trunnions of which are supported in spring-actuated boxes ci in the housing, to the end that said roller el will exert pressure upon the web on the feed-roller and keep it taut. On one of the trunnions or journals of the feed-roller is a pulley c, which is belted with a similar pulley el on the talteup roller. (See Fig. Hence when the fced-roller is properly rotated to draw the web from the supply-roller the talteup roller is siinultaneously rotated in a manner to wind up the strip or web. On the journals of the supplyroller are tension-springs es, which, enacting with the pressure-roller, insure the uniform contact of the traveling-strip with the feed roller, and thus obviate the otherwise liability of the paper to buckle.

Although there is more than one way whereby the feed-roller may be impelled I shall describe a means which I consider very efiicientand desirable. @ne of thetrunnions of the feed roller is extended beyond thc housing and has connected therewith, by means of a universaljoint j', one end of a stud f', which is practically a continuation of said trunnion. On this stud is fixed a pinionf, which is designed, by means below described, to be moved into and ontof engagement with a pinion f3 on the inner end of an adjacent stud f4. On the outer end of the latter stud is a sprocket-wheel f5, which is geared by means of a chainfG with a similar wheel fr on one of the carrying-wheels of the wagon, whereby during the traverse ofthe latter the motion will be transmitted from the carrying wheel to the stud f and its pinion. llencc if the pinion]et be engaged with the pinion f3 the motion will be communicated to the feed-roller.

Fitted to suitably-arranged guidc-brackets g on the base-plate is a longitudinally-movable rod g', one end of which is connected With a collar g2 on the end of the pivoted stud by means of a link g3, and the other end of which is similarly connected With a normally-raised treadle G on the bottom of the Wagon by means of a link g4, whereby the act of depressing said treadle will advance the pivoted stud and move its pinion into engagement with the pinion f3. The treadle is arranged near the front of the Wagon, so that it Will be convenient to the foot of the driver.

4Hinged tothe rear of the base-board is a transverse bar d, on the upper face of which is arranged a series of contact-plates d5, which correspond with the poles of the respective batteries, the Wires of the latter being connected with binding-posts on said contactplates, respectively, (See Fig. 8.) These plates extend over the edge of the base-board and are adapted to be engaged with a corresponding series of contact-plates d6 on the board, which latter plates are wired with the respective magnets and the contact devices on the shoes of the horse, whereby the entire series of electrical connections may be simultaneously broken by properly turning the hinged contact-bar. The latter is normally maintained in the breaking condition by means of a bowed spring H, one end of which is secured to the bar, While its free end bears upon the base-board. This bar is connected at one end by means of a spring s, chain h, slide 7L', and link h2 with the collar on the movable stud, whereby the spring H not only acts to maintain the contact-bar out of action,

but also the pinion on said stud. 'When the treadle is depressed by the driver, the contaots are first made along the bar, and immediately thereafter the feed-roller mechanism is brought into operation. By this construction the operation of the machine is wholly under the control of the driver.

It is obvious that the condition of the contact-studs on the shoe may be reversed, so as normally to complete the circuits, in which case the contacts would be broken by their impact With the ground, and the markers be thereupon actuated. It is also obvious that the supplemental non-conducting shoe interposed between the main shoe and the hoof may be dispensed with, in which case the contact-plates would be embedded in the hoof. It is also obvious that instead of the recording mechanism above described other recording mechanisms may be used-as for example, the construction illustrated in Figs. lO and ll-namely, wherein the strip or web B is in the nature of a sensitized photographic film contained in a light tight box, said box 1 being provided with a row or series of transverse perforations 2, corresponding in number and position withthe markers in the first-described arrangement, and being also provided with a series of slides or shutters 3, movable upon the perforations, `which slides or shutters are formed on the ends of the arms a3, and are connected with the armatures a2 of the magnets a in a mannerto be reciprocated thereby similarlyto the markers. It is evident that when the slides are opened periodically the light will act upon the adjacent surfaces of the moving lm, so as to produce lines or dashes thereon proportionate to the duration of the exposure, and hence the time and the position of t-he respective contacts on the shoes of the horse Will be photographically recorded.

I claim as my inventionl. In means for analytically recording the gait of a horse the combination, with a receiving surface and means for advancing the sa me at a rate of speed controlled by that of the horse, of electrically-controlled means for antomatically recording on said surface, circuit Wires leading from said means to the hoof of a horse, and a contact device on said hoof connected with the circuit wires, substantially as described.

2. In means for analytically recording the gait of a horse the combination, with a strip or Web, and means for feeding the same at a rate of speed controlled by that of the'horse, of electrically controlled means for automatically recording on said strip, circuit Wires leading from said means to the hoof of a horse, and a contact device on said hoof connected With the circuit `wires, substantially as described.

3. In means for analytically recording the gait of a horse the combination, with an electrically-controlled recording device, of circuit Wires leading therefrom to the hoof of a horse, and a series of independent contact devices on said hoof connected with the circuit Wires,

substantially as described.

4. In means'for analytically recording the gait of a horse the combinatiomwith an electrically-controlled recording device, of circuit Wires leading therefrom to the respective hoofs of the horse, independent contact devices on said hoofs connected With the respective circuit wires, substantially as described.

5. The combination, With a strip or web, and means for actuating the same, of a series of markers adjacent thereto, magnets operatively connected with said markers, a battery or batteries, circuit Wires connecting said battery or batteries With the magnets, and leading to the hoof of the horse, and a series of independent contact devices on said hoof connected with the circuit Wires, substantially as described.

6. The combination, with a strip or Web, and means for actuating the same, of markers arranged adjacent thereto in independent sets, magnets operatively connected with said markers, a battery or batteries, circuit Wires connecting said battery or batteries with the IOC) IIO

magnets and leading to the respective hoofs v leading therefrom to the hoot of a horse, a series of independent contact devices on said hoof connected with the circuit wires, and means for breaking the circuits simultaneously, substantially as described.

S. The combination, with a strip or web, and means for actuating the same,of a series of markers adjacent thereto, magnets operatively connected with said markers, a battery or batteries, circuit wires connecting said battery or batteries, with the magnets and leading tothe hoof of ahorse, a series of independent contact devices on said hoof connected with the circuit wires, means to break the electrical connections between the battery or batteries and the magnets, and means to throw the strip or web operating mechanism out of action, substantially as described.

t). In means for analytically recording the gait of a horse, the combination, with an electrically controlled recording device, of a horses shoe, a vertically-movable contact stud therein, a contact plate arranged adjacent to said stud and insulated from the shoe, and circuit wires connected with said plate, the shoe and the recording device, substantially as described.

l0. In means `for analytically recording` the gait of a horse, the combination, with an electrically controlled recording device, of a horses shoe, a contact device therein, a supplemental shoe of non-conducting` material provided with a contact plate, and circuit wires connected with said plate, the shoe and the recording device, substantially as dcscribed.

ll. The combination, with a horsels shoe, of a series of contact devices arranged thereon, at predetermined points, a corresponding series of contact devices insulated from said shoe, and circuit wires connected with said latter devices and the shoe, substantially as described.

l2. The combination, with a horses shoe, and a series of contact devices arranged therein at predetermined points, ot' a supplemental shoe of non conducting material provided with a corresponding series of contact devices, and circuit wires connected with said latter devices and the shoe, respectively, substantially as described.

1.3. The combination, with a horses shoe,

sterco and a series of contact devices arranged there` in at predetermined points, of a sectional supplemental shoe of nonconducting material provided with a corresponding series ot' coutact devices, and circuit wires connected with said latter devices and the shoe, respectively, substantially as described.

let. The combination, with a vehicle, of a mechanism therein comprising a suitable frame or housing, a web supply roller, a feed roller, and gearing between the feed roller and one of the wheels of the vehicle, electrically-controlled means for recording on thc web, circuit wires leading from said means to the hoot of a horse, and a contact device on said hoof connected with the circuit wires, substantially as described.

l5. The combination, with a vehicle, of a mechanism therein comprising a suitable frame or housing, a web supply roller, a feed roller, gearing between the feed roller and one of the wheels ot' the vehicle, and means for throwingsaid gearing into and out of operation, electricallycontrolled means for recording on the web, circuit wires leading from said means to the hoof ot a horse, and a contact device on said hoof connected with the circuit wires, substantially as described.

IG. The combination, with a vehicle, of a mechanism therein comprising a suitable frame or housing, a web supply roller, a feed roller, gearing between the ieed roller and one of the wheels of the vehicle, a series of markers adjacent to said feed roller, magnets operatively connected with said markers, a battery or batteries electrically conl nected with the magnets, a series ot independent contact devices arranged on the hoof oi a horse and connected with the electric circuits as described, means whereby the circuits may be simultaneously broken, and means whereby the feed roller gearing may be thrown out of operation, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto attiXed mysignature in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

TIIOM AS I. I( EAN Witnesses: Y

Jol-IN R. Nonna, A. V. GROUPE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5736656 *May 22, 1996Apr 7, 1998Fullen Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for measuring the magnitude and distribution of forces on the foot of a quadruped
US6038935 *Mar 27, 1998Mar 21, 2000Fullen Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for measuring the magnitude and distribution of forces on the foot of a quadruped
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG01P1/122