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Publication numberUS548171 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1895
Filing dateOct 9, 1893
Publication numberUS 548171 A, US 548171A, US-A-548171, US548171 A, US548171A
InventorsJohn E. At Wood
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Windmill
US 548171 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 3 Sheets-Sheet 1.

J. E; ATWOOD.

WINDMILL;

Patented Oct. 22, 1895.

IN VENT 0R WITNESSES:

H N m H A 'AN'DREW B GRAHAM. PHOTOUTHQWASHINFIOMDC.

(No Model.) 3 Sheets-Sheet 2..

' J. E. ATWOOD.

WINDMILL.

No. 548,171.; Patented Oct. 22,1895.

WITN SE5:

DREW IGRNMM. PHOTO-UTHQWASHI N GTO (No Model.) ash et -sneet' 3.

J. nfATwoonl WINDIMILYL.

No 548,171. Patented Oct. 22, 1895.

jNVENTOR UNITED STATES.

PATENT OFFICE.

JOHN E. ATWOOD, OF STONINGTOTLCONNECTIOUT.

WINDMILL.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 548,171, dated October 22, 1895.

Application filed October 9, 1893. Serial No. 487,707- (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

of the oiling-sleeve of the power-transmitting Be it known that I, JOHN E. ATWOOD, a citior work pulley.

zen of the United States, and a resident'of Stonington, in the county of New London and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Windmills,

of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to windmills designed to run by belts and pulleys, dynamos, and other fast-moving machinery.

The object of my invention is to provide a windmill that shall be strong, efficient, and

These' on line y yof Fig. 30f the ratchet-hook which connects the power-transmitting pulley with the power-receiving pulley. Fig. 5 is a detailed vertical section, enlarged, of the standard and the main parts of the frame. Fig. 6

is a front view of the supporting-hub of the windmill-wheel. Fig. 7 is an enlarged sectional View at right angles to the view in Fig. 6 of the hub and the inner ends of the vanes and vane-braces. of parts similar to those shown in Fig. 7. Fig. 9 is a sectional view on line 2 z of Fig. 7, showing a portion of the segmental bracket and the lugs integral therewith. Fig. 10 is a top or plan view of the cap at the top of the standard or tube, showing the upper ends or inner extremities of the guy-ropes which support the windmill in an upright position. Fig. 11 is a cross-sectional vertical view of the parts similar to those shown in Fig. 10. Fig. 12 is a detail cross-section of the periphery of the Fig. 8 is a front elevation Fig. 15 is a vertical sectional view Referring to Figs. 1, 2, and 5 of the drawings, A .indicates the stationary vertical shaft 'or standard of the windmill, which is ordinarily an irontube, which is inserted or driven in the ground a certain distance, depending upon the circumstances of the case. This standard or tube has around its lowerend another tube A, which strengthens the tube A. This strengthening-tube A supports at its upper end a collar A, which in turn supports the lower end of asleeve B, which is arranged to turn on the shaftA, so as to bring the windmill into proper position with relation to the wind. The sleeve B has secured to it near its center a horizontal spindle G. This spindle is preferably formed integral with a sleeve 0, which is slipped over and secured to the sleeve B at a point near its center. On this horizontal spindle (J, arranged to turn freely on it, is a sleeve D, which carries or has formed integral with it the hub E, which carries the vanes of the windmill-wheel W. This sleeve D is prevented from sliding longitudinally to the inner end by a shoulder at on the spindle- O. This shoulder at is preferably formed integral with 0. At the other end movement is limited by the inner wall (1 of the oil-box D.

The oil-box D is, as shown in Figs. 5 and 14, clamped onto the horizontal spindle O by the cap 0 (Shown in Fig. 14.) The cap 0 is secured to the box D by bolts or other suitable securing devices. At the end of the oilbox are formed two lugs c c, engaging in grooves c c in the end of the spindle O, which prevent a lengthwise movement of the oil-box. The hub E may be formed integral with the sleeve D or may be attached thereto rigidly in any well-known manner.

The vanes F of .the windmill-wheel W are attached to the hub E in the following manner, attention being called to Figs. 5 to 8, inclusive: To the hub E is attached, by bolts b, a disk E. The vanes F are held between the hub E and the disk E, these vanes of course being at an angle to .the' axis of the wind-wheel. Small chambers may be cut in orlugs may be cast on the inner faces of E and E, so as to hold the vanes in place. On the inner periphery of Eand E are formed lugs f for holding the, bolts which keep the vanes F in position. Bolted by the bolts e to the spokes of the wheel or hub E are the vane-braces F. These braces F have, at different distances from the center of the wheel, bolted to them double sets of segments F and F by the bolts f. Each set of double segments has the segments arranged so as to break joints, and these segments, as is evident, form complete strengthening rims or circles for the'rods F. The vanes F are attached to these strengthening rimsor circles F and F by means of lugs f (shown in Fig. 9,) cast on segments 13 and F these lugs being of different lengths in each pair, respect-' ively, so as to insure the angular position of the vanes of the wind-wheel.

Attached to the top of the sleeve B isa vane-frame H, carrying the vane H. This vane-frame His composed of a short sleeve h and a thimble h. This sleeve It may be attached to the vane H in anywell-known manner or may be formed integral therewith. The thimble h is bolted to H", and, as shown, it surrounds the shaft A. Attached to H is a rod or wire rope H whose lower end is looped around the lip c on the spindle (J. i

It is evident that the function of the vane H is to keep the windmill in a proper direction in relation to the wind. At the upper end of the tube or standard A is inserted a cap I, having a shoulder thereon for holding it on top of the tube. The upper guy-ropes I, which help to keep the windmill in an upright position, have loops 1) formed at their ends, which are placed over the'lugs 11' on the cap I. A washer i is placed over the inner ends of these loops and lugs and screwed down thereon by a screw 2'. The guy-ropes 1 supporting the lower part of the framework, are held in position in the following manner: The guy-ropes have heads or extensions i, which fit in sockets 2' in the oil-cup L (the heads and sockets being similar to those of the truss-rods and their supports,) which is sleeved on or otherwise aflixed' to the tube A K is a frame surrounding and attached to the sleeve B. This frame K has arms K, which, in turn, have pivoted to their ends adjustable supports K carrying the sheaves or idlers K As shown in 3, these supports K are adjusted or capable of adjustment by means of adjusting-rods K, which have on their inner ends screw-threads, which work in and out of the brackets K The purpose of this adjustment is to enable the tightening and slackening of the power-transmitting rope or belt P, which passes over K K from W to the pulley L.

L is a pulley which turns freely on the sleeve L, which is between it and the tube A, whose lower end rests in an oil-cup L, which is rigidly fixed to the strengtheningsleeve L. This. sleeve L has cut on its in nor periphery a spiral channel, which con Q formed on the spindle O. i and the collar Q may be either integral with the spindle. 0 or may be attached thereto in veys the oil from the oil-box L when L is revolving to lubricate the entire length of the bearing. A pulley L is fixed to the sleeve L and transmits motion to any machinery by a belt or rope. The pulley L may be clutched to the pulley L by any means, such as the hook M. As shown in Figs. 3 and 4, M is pivotally attached at one end to a spoke of the pulley-wheel L, and at the other end on M is a hook, which engages with another spoke of L. As shown, M is so shaped that a hook m, near its middle, engages with one of the spokes of L when M is down, thus positively connecting L with L in which case the pulleys move together and power is carried by L to any appropriate machinery.

The windmill-wheel W has on its periphery a leather friction-rim N, fastened down by guides N. These guides are composed of peripheral flanges, which are bolted to the periphery of the wheel W. N is made in segments.

A belt or powentransmitting rope P passes 1 over the periphery of the windmill-wheel W, 1 over the idler or sheaves K around the pulley L, and back again to W.

The windmill-frameisadditionally strengthened by the truss-rods Q Q, which have on their ends heads or extensions g, which fit 1 in to sockets q in the inner ends of the frames H and K. These truss-rods are held out in the middle by the struts Q and the collars The struts Q any well-known way. These truss-rods Q Q pass through wh-atfmight be called openings in the said struts and collar-that is, they may pass through holes therein or grooves therein, as the case maybe. Horizontal trussrods Q are also connected to the spindle O, as shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 5, and they are affixed in practically the same way as the vertical truss-rods Qthat is, by having heads at their ends which fit in the struts Q and the collar Q forming parts of the spindle C, by sockets similar to those in the vane and idler frames. Figs. 5 and 13 show plainly in cross-section howthese heads or extensions q fitv into the sockets q.

As shown in Fig. 5, the means by which oil is conveyed from the oil-box D to the sleeve D are as follows: On the inner periphery of the sleeve D is cut a spiral channel 01 by which the oil is carried up and along the sleeve to ahole on the inner and upper part of the spin dle 0, through which hole the oil drops down into the hollow spindle and flows along back improvements in difierent parts of a windmill by which said windmill is rendered much more efficient, yet I regard well-known modifications and mechanical changes, such as would occur to one skilled in the art, as entirely within the scope of my invention.

One of the purposes to which this windmill could be applied would be, especially in districts lacking fuel, to run dynamo-machines during the times that wind furnishes sufficient power and to charge secondary batteries by these dynamos, thus storing energy which could be taken off at any time when required to furnish light, heat, and power constantly and for a considerable period of time.

I claim- 1. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying the wind-wheel apparatus, a frame carrying a vane at the upper part of said sleeve, and a frame carrying idlers at the lower part of the sleeve, truss rods connecting the vane frame and idler frame together, said truss rods having heads or extensions on their ends, and. sockets in the inside ends of the vane and idler frames to hold the heads of the truss rods.

2. In a wind mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying the wind wheel apparatus, a frame carrying a vane at the upper part of said sleeve, a frame carrying idlers at the lower part of the sleeve, and truss rods connecting the vane frame and the idler frame together, substantially as described.

3. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying a horizontal spindle, a wind-Wheel carried by the said spindle, an oil-box having lugs or extensions fitting into grooves or depressions in the spindle, and a cap to hold the oil-box rigidly to the spindle and to prevent longitudinal movement of the windwheel hub.

4. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying a horizontal spindle, a wind-wheel carried by the said spindle, a vane frame attached to the said sleeve, and a rod or outside support extending from the vane frame to the end of the wind-wheel spindle.

5. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying ahorizontal spindle, a wind-wheel carried by the said spindle, a vane frame attached to the said sleeve, and a rod or outside support extending from the vane frame to the end of the wind-wheel spindle, and a lip on the end of the spindle, for keeping the rod or support in place.

6. In a wind mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, asleeve thereon carrying the wind wheel apparatus, a frame carrried by the lower part of the sleeve and pivotally connected therewith, idle pulleys carried by said frame, a driving pulley supported below the idler frame, a driving belt passing over the wind wheel, the idlers and the driving pulley, and another pulley connected with the driving pulley for communicating motion to the object to be driven.

7. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube,a sleeve thereon carrying the wind-wheel apparatus, a spindle extending from said sleeve, truss rods connected to the upper and low ends of the said sleeve, the said truss rods passing through vertical openings in the wind-wheel spindle, and other truss rods attached to the horizontal spindle and passing through horizontal openings in the part of the spindle near the main supporting sleeve. v

8. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying a horizontal spindle, a wind-wheel carried by the said spindle, pulleys carried below the lower part of said sleeve, one of said pulleys being positively connected with the wind-wheel, the other being loose on the shaft or tube, and a hook or clutch for connecting the two pulleys to each other so that they move in unison.

9.'In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying a spindle, a wind-Wheel carried by said spindle, the periphery of the windwheel having upon it a separate friction surface and guides whereby the driving belt is retained on the wind-wheel, said guides serving to secure the friction surface to the wheel proper.

10. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying a horizontal spindle, which spindle carries the wind-wheel, an oil-box rigidly attached to said spindle, a spiral groove in the wind-wheel hub or on the hollow spindle, said spindle having an opening or openings therein for the return of the oil from the opening to the oil-box, said spindle being hollow.

11. In a wind mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying the wind wheel apparatus, a frame at the lower part of said sleeve pivotally connected therewith, rods pivotally connected with said frame, idlers carried by the rods, and adjusting rods and levers to regulate the position of the idlers so as to control the ten sion of the driving belt. p

12. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve there on carrying the wind-wheel apparatus, a collar below the said sleeve on the said shaft, and a strengthening sleeve or tube on the lower part of the shaft for supporting the wind-mill sleeve.

13. In a wind-mill apparatus, the combination of a vertical shaft or tube, a sleeve thereon carrying the wind-wheel, the said windwheel having a hub which carries the vanes, vane braces carried by the said hub and bolted thereto, segments bolted to the said braces at diiferent distances from the center of the strengthening rims or circles from the center wheel, each set of segments forming a complete of the wheel outward, projections on the faces bracing circle or rim, the said bracing circles of the segments to which are bolted the vanes 15 or rims being bolted to the vanes. of the wind-wheel.

14. In a windmill apparatus, the combina- Signed at Stonington, in the county of New tion of the following elements forming a wind- London and State of Connecticut, this 3d day wheel: a hub, vane braces bolted to said hub, of October, A. D. 1893.

a disk bolted to said hub for holding the inner ends of the vanes in place, double sets of seg- JOHN E. ATWOOD. mental pieces which break joints, bolted to the several vane braces so as to form strengthening rims 0r circles, there being different Witnesses:

JOSEPH F. JOSEPH, WM. A. GILBERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4417853 *Feb 17, 1981Nov 29, 1983Windpowered Machines Ltd.Wind turbine soft airfoil control system and method
US4729716 *Feb 25, 1986Mar 8, 1988Montana Wind Turbine, Inc.Wind turbine
US20120121429 *Nov 16, 2010May 17, 2012Herbert WilliamsConcentric ring wind turbine
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB63H21/28, B64D35/00