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Publication numberUS548216 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1895
Filing dateJul 12, 1894
Publication numberUS 548216 A, US 548216A, US-A-548216, US548216 A, US548216A
InventorsSamuel J. Murray
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of manufacturing playing-cards
US 548216 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' (No Model.)

WI TNESSES 2 sneeiis sliet 1 S. J. MURRAY. PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING PLAYING CARDS.

Patented Oct. 22, 1895 mvmron A TTOIHIEYS ANDREW snnmmmommmmsnmsmuuc.

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-SheetTZ.

S. J. MURRAY. PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING PLAYING CARDS. No. 548,216.

Patented Oct. 22, 1895.

IN VE N T08 A TTORNEYS AN DREW EGRAHAM. PHOTOUTHQWASHINGTONLDC llivrrno 'rn'rns SAMUEL J. MURRAY, OF INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA, ASSIGNOR TO THE UNITED STATES PRINTING COMPANY, OF CINCINNATI, OHIO.

PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING PLAYING-CARDS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 548,216, dated October 22, 1895.

Application filed July 12, 1894. Serial No. 517,282. (No specimens.)

2b all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, SAMUEL J. MURRAY, a resident of Indianapolis, Marion county, and State of Indiana, have invented an Improved 5 Process of Manufacturing Playing-Cards, of

which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to the manufacture of playing-cards, and has for its object to produce playing-cards from paper in the roll in to a rapid and economical manner.

Hitherto it has been customary to print playing-cards upon sheets of cardboard, from which the individual cards were afterward punched. This process required many manipulations 0f the sheet, and my invention is designed to obviate the disadvantages incident to such manipulations.

To this end my invention consists in the method or process of manufacturing playingcards from paper in the roll in contradistinction to sheet-printing, as will be hereinafter fully described and set forth and more particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings 1 have illus- 2 5 trated diagram matically an apparatus for carrying out my invention, such parts only as are germane to the operations of manipulating the web being shown.

Figure 1 shows a pasting, pressing, and

c sizing mechanism which may beemployed by me; and Fig. 2 illustrates the carrying and drying mechanisms, one figure being a continuation of the other.

In practicing my process I first take webs 5 of paper and enamel them on one side and print the designs for the faces or backs of the cards on the enameled side of one or more of the webs. These webs, for the purposes of convenience in handling, are thereupon reeled into rolls. I then take two or more of these rolls A B and, taking the web of paper a b from each, paste the said webs into one continuous web by means of any suitable pasting mechanism, such as is shown in Fig. 1, wherein C is a paste-vat, D is a paste-roller revolving therein, and E is a pasting-roller which takes the paste from the roller D and applies it to one face of one of the webs, as a. The webs a I) pass around andbetween rollers F G, which, subjecting the same to pressure, paste them together with their unenameled surfaces in contact to form a pasted web W.

From the rollers F G the pasted web passes around and between series vof rollers H J K L M N O P, which subject the said pasted web to a grad uallyt-increasing pressure, which has the effectof forcing out the air-bubbles from between the webs composing the pasted web and gradually forcing the paste into the body of the paper, which is of a bibulous char- 6o actor, and thus, produces a finished elastic web.

A further effect of the action of the rollers on the Web is to improve the enameled surface of the pasted web by a species of calendering action. From the last of the pressurerollers the pasted web W passes to a vat Q and under a roller R, which roller is suspended in such a manner as to bear upon the paper and to form a tension device therefor.

In some varieties of cards it will be found advantageous to size the web at this stage of the process. Hence I may fill the vat Q with size, if desired, or may simply use the roller as a tension device, at my option. From the 7 vat Q the web passes to a moistening device of suitable construction, shown in the present instance as consisting of a tank S, with which communicates a strip or strips of felt s, which felt removes water from the tank by capillary 8o attraction and transfers it to the edges of the pasted web, thus moistening the edges, which are afterward pressed down by the drawing- \V\W rollers T T, which rollers are preferably faced with india-rubber and run at a somewhat greater speed than the pasting-rolls. From the drawing-rolls the Web passes to a transferring device of suitable construction, shown in the present instance as sprocket-chains U U, passing over sprocket-wheels V and provided 0 with lifts n, which lifts serve to remove sticks 25 from a receptacle X, which sticks serve to engage and carry the Web W in festoons to the drying-room Z. From the last of the sprocket-wheels V the sticks are dropped in to 5 a suitable trough or receptacle Z, and the web passes between tension-rollers r 'r and-into the drying-room Z, which drying-room is provided with a suitable heating device Z and rollers 2, around which the web is carried to'and fro in the drying-room, whence it issues completely dried.

Throughout the process it will be noticed that the web, after leaving the pasting-rolls, is at all times unwound and at no time are any enameled surfaces brought in contact with each other by the operations of manipulating the web. After the web issues from the drying-room it is cut into sheets, which sheets may be finished in any suitable manner, which will, of course, vary with the varying conditions of practice and which will depend largely upon whether or not the web has been printed and upon the grade of cards it is desired to produce. Inordinary practice I cut the web into sheets, print the backs, subject the sheets to water proofing, powdering, brushing, and plating processes, and finally cut the individual cards from the sheets.

While I have described the operations and apparatus in positive terms throughout the specification, I would have it understood that I do not. mean to therebylimit myself to precisely the operations and apparatus described and shown herein, as other and analogous steps, and means for carrying the same into eifect, will readily suggest themselves to those who may desire to enjoy the fruits of my invention.

What I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. The process of manufacturing playing.

cards which consists in first enameling a web, pasting another web to theenameled web. and sub ecting the combined webs to an increasing pressure and drying the said compound web while in an unwound condition, substantially the printed web, subjecting the pasted web to gradually increasing pressure, drying the web, cutting the web into sheets, the combined webs being unwound from the time the paste is applied, substantially as described.

4. The process of manufacturing playing cards which consists in enameling a continuous web and printing the design for one side of the playing cards thereon, then pasting a web on the unprinted side of said printed web, subjecting the pasted web to a gradually increasing pressure and drying and cutting the same, the combined webs remaining unwound from the time the paste is applied, and in thereupon cutting the same into sheets and finishing the sheets, as specified.

5. The process of manufacturing playing cards which consists in enameling a continuous web and printing the designs for the faces of the playing cards thereon, then pasting another web on the unprinted side of' the web, subjecting the pasted web to a gradually increasing pressure, drying the same and cutting the same into sheets, the combined webs remaining unwound from the time the paste is applied, and in thereupon printing the backs of the playing cards on the sheets and surface finishing the sheets, substantially as described.

6. The process of manufacturing playing cards which consists in enameling a continuous web and printingthe designs for the faces of the playing cards. thereon, then pasting another web; on the unprinted side of the web, subjecting the-pasted web to a gradually increasing pressure, drying the same. and cutting the same into sheets, theoombined webs remaining unwound from the time the paste is applied, and in thereupon printing the backs of the playing cards on the sheets and surface finishing the sheets, and punching outthe individual cards, substantially as described.

JAMES A. WALSH, WILLIAM BEATLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2992153 *Jul 19, 1957Jul 11, 1961Lutwack Wilton JMethod of making protective book cover
US4817528 *Jul 21, 1986Apr 4, 1989Baker Jacqueline MMethod and apparatus for making personalized playing cards
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB29C63/024, B32B27/00