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Publication numberUS5494372 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/237,153
Publication dateFeb 27, 1996
Filing dateMay 3, 1994
Priority dateMay 3, 1994
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asCA2189230A1, CA2189230C, CN1105037C, CN1151138A, DE69506398D1, DE69506398T2, EP0758300A1, EP0758300B1, US5792511, WO1995029820A1
Publication number08237153, 237153, US 5494372 A, US 5494372A, US-A-5494372, US5494372 A, US5494372A
InventorsGerry B. Oliver, Bruce L. Burton
Original AssigneeIpc Technologies Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pavement imprinting apparatus and method
US 5494372 A
Abstract
A grid for producing a pattern on a surface. The grid includes elongated members connected together at intersections and extending about a plurality of open areas to form a mesh-like structure. Connecting members are connected to the elongated members at the intersections. The connecting members extend outwardly from at least one said elongated member. The connecting members have a thickness less than the thickness of the elongated members. The bottoms of the connecting members and bottoms of the elongated members are flush. The grid is placed on a surface and a liquid coating is spread over the surface in the open areas between the elongated members. The liquid coating is allowed to set. Preferably there is a removable coating on the grid which is removed after the liquid coating is set.
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Claims(32)
What is claimed is:
1. A grid for producing a pattern on a surface, the grid comprising:
elongated members connected at intersections and extending about a plurality of open areas to form a mesh-like structure, each said elongated member having a top, a bottom and a thickness extending between the top and the bottom thereof; and
connecting members connected to the elongated members at said intersections, each said connecting member extending outwardly from at least one elongated member, each said connecting member having a top, a bottom and a thickness extending between the top and the bottom of said each connecting member which is less than the thickness of said one elongated member, the bottoms of the connecting members and of the elongated members being flush with each other.
2. A grid as claimed in claim 1, wherein the connecting members have inner edges connected to the elongated members and outer edges distal therefrom, the outer edges being convexly curved.
3. A grid as claimed in claim 2, wherein the connecting members are tapered towards the outer edges thereof.
4. A grid as claimed in claim 1, wherein the elongated member have transversely concave tops.
5. A grid as claimed in claim 1, wherein the grid is of concrete.
6. A grid as claimed in claim 1, wherein the grid is of concrete with a polymer additive.
7. A grid as claimed in claim 1, including a plurality of first elongated members and second elongated members, the first elongated members being perpendicular to the second elongated members and being connected thereto at said intersections.
8. A grid as claimed in claim 7, wherein there is a plurality of connecting members at each said intersection, forming a disc-like flange.
9. A grid as claimed in claim 8, wherein there are three said connecting members at each said intersection, one said connecting member being semi-circular and two said connecting members being quarter-circular.
10. A grid as claimed in claim 1, wherein the elongated members are 0.48 to 0.64 cm. thick.
11. A grid as claimed in claim 1, wherein there is a removable layer on the tops of the elongated members.
12. A grid as claimed in claim 11, wherein the removable layer is a wax.
13. A grid as claimed in claim 12, wherein the elongated members and the connecting members have an adhesive on the bottoms thereof.
14. A grid as claimed in claim 1, wherein the connecting members are half the thickness of the elongated members.
15. A method of producing a grid-like pattern on a surface, comprising:
placing on the surface a grid which includes a plurality of elongated members connected together at intersections and extending about a plurality of open areas, said grid having a non-removable body portion having a concave top surface; and a removable layer on said rod surface;
spreading a liquid coating over the surface in the open areas between the elongated members of the grid such that said liquid coating does not substantially cover said grid;
allowing the liquid coating to set; and removing the removable layer from the grid, exposing said concave top surface.
16. A method as claimed in claim 15, wherein the top surface of the elongated members and the liquid coating have contrasting colors.
17. A method as claimed in claim 15, wherein the grid has connecting members extending outwardly from the intersections of the elongated members, said connecting members and elongated members having bottoms which are flush, the connecting members being thinner than the elongated members, the liquid coating being applied over the connecting members.
18. A method as claimed in claim 17, wherein the grid is secured to the surface by fasteners extending through the connecting members.
19. A method as claimed in claim 15, wherein the removable layer is removed by pressure washing after the liquid coating is set.
20. A method as claimed in claim 15, wherein a layer of the liquid coating is applied to the surface before placing the grid and more coating is applied after the grid is placed.
21. A grid for producing a pattern on a surface, said grid comprising;
(a) a plurality of elongated members connected at intersections and extending about a plurality of open areas to form a mesh-like structure, each of said elongated members having a non-removable body portion having a cylindrically concave top surface, a bottom surface and a thickness extending between said top and bottom surfaces; and
(b) a removable layer on said concave top surface.
22. The grid as defined in claim 21, wherein said removable layer comprises a removable wax coating.
23. The grid as defined in claim 21, wherein said removable layer comprises peelable tape.
24. The grid as defined in claim 21, wherein said removable layer comprises a plastic coating.
25. The grid as defined in claim 21, wherein said grid further comprises support means extending from said elongated members into said open areas, at least part of said support means having a thickness less than said elongated member thickness.
26. The grid as defined in claim 25, wherein said support means comprises a plurality of flanges connected to said elongated members for fastening said grid to said surface.
27. The grid as defined in claim 26, wherein said flanges are located at said intersections between said elongated members.
28. A grid for producing a pattern on a surface, said grid comprising:
(a) a plurality of elongated members connected at intersections and extending about a plurality of open areas to form a mesh-like structure, each of said elongated members having a top surface, a bottom surface and a thickness extending between said top and bottom surfaces; and
(b) support means extending from said elongated members into said open areas, at least part of said support means having a thickness less than said elongated member thickness.
29. The grid as defined in claim 28, further comprising a removable layer on said elongate member top surface.
30. The grid as defined in claim 29, wherein said removable layer comprises a removable wax coating.
31. The grid as defined in claim 29, wherein said removable layer comprises peelable tape.
32. The grid as defined in claim 29, wherein said removable layer comprises a plastic coating.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to an apparatus and method for imprinting a surface with a design similar to bricks or stones and mortar.

Various apparatuses and methods have been devised to simulate the appearance of bricks and mortar or stones and mortar on horizontal or vertical surfaces such as driveways, floors or walls. Typically a paint or concrete mixture is applied in a thin coat on the surface with contrasting colors used for the bricks or stones and the mortar. The method commonly used is to apply a coating having the desired color of the mortar on the surface. Masking tape is then placed over this coating in a grid-like pattern to simulate the mortar. A second coating is then applied over the surface in the desired color of brick or stone. Finally the masking tape is removed, leaving lines of "mortar" between the "bricks" or "stones". However this method is labor intensive because of the considerable amount of work in laying out the pattern of masking tape and the requirement to apply two separate coatings to the surface.

Various products and methods have been developed in the past to simulate the appearance of brick or stone on other surfaces. One example is U.S. Pat. No. 4,379,187 to Seman. This discloses a method of simulating mortar lines on a brick wall using a preformed, grid-like structure. The grid is removed after the brick-like material is applied.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,239,820 discloses a method of creating a simulated stone surface of the like. A pattern is partially die cut and has an adhesive on one side. U.S. Pat. No. 5,186,983 to Brown shows a process for decorating a hard surface. A template with holes is used. However, the "mortar" is first applied by means of colored paint.

The art described above has one thing in common. All of the art relies on removing a peelable layer along the lines of "mortar" to expose a layer having a distinct color and appearance compared to the "brick". This generally requires the application of two separate coatings to the surface thus increasing the mount of work and time involved. Furthermore, the appearance of the "mortar" is not always true to life because the effect is limited to the preexisting surface or coating exposed when a peelable layer is removed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide an improved apparatus and method for producing a brick and mortar or stone and mortar appearance on a surface which is less labor intensive and time consuming compared to prior art methods and apparatuses.

It is also an object of the invention to provide an improved apparatus and method of this type which requires the application of only a single liquid coating to the surface.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved apparatus and method of this type which provides a more convincing brick and mortar or stone and mortar appearance on the surface.

It is still a further object of the invention to provide an improved apparatus and method of this type which produces a simulated brick and mortar or stone and mortar surface which is durable and long lasting.

In accordance with these objects, there is provided a grid for producing a pattern on a surface. The grid includes elongated members connected together at intersections and extending about a plurality of open areas to form a mesh-like structure. Each elongated member has a top, a bottom and a thickness extending between the top and the bottom. There are connecting members which are connected to the elongated members at the intersections. Each of the connecting members extends outwardly from at least one elongated member. Each connecting member has a top, a bottom and a thickness less than the thickness of said one elongated member. The bottoms of the connecting members and the elongated members are flush with each other.

According to another aspect of the invention, there is provided a method of producing a grid-like pattern on a surface. The method includes placing on the surface a grid which includes a plurality of elongated members connected together at intersections and extending about a plurality of open areas. The grid has a top with a removable solid coating thereon. A liquid coating is spread over the surface in the open areas between the elongated members of the grid. The liquid coating is allowed to set. The solid coating is then removed from the grid, exposing the elongated members.

Compared to prior art apparatuses and methods, the invention provides significant advantages. The appearance of mortar is achieved by applying a grid which is left in place instead of being removed as in the prior art. Thus the surface of the mortar can have a more convincing shape and texture than can be achieved simply by exposing the preexisting surface or an earlier applied liquid coating. Furthermore, the time to do the job can be appreciably reduced since only a single liquid coating is necessary.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a top plan of a grid for producing a pattern on a surface according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary isometric view thereof;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing a grid after a liquid coating has been applied therebetween; and

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4--4 of FIG. 2.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1 shows a grid 10 for producing a pattern on a surface. The grid includes a plurality of first elongated members 12 which extend in parallel relationship along the length of the grid. The first members 12 are interconnected by a plurality of second members 14 which are parallel to each other and extend perpendicularly between adjacent members 12. The members 14 are staggered so that open areas 16 between the members 12 and 14 are rectangular and form a brick-like pattern with the members 12 and 14 mimicking lines of mortar between. It should be understood however that other patterns of brick, stone or the like could be simulated by the grid as well by using other configurations of elongated members including curved elongated members instead of the straight members illustrated in FIG. 1. The elongated members form a mesh-like structure with the open areas 16 therebetween.

With reference to FIG. 2 and 4, each of the elongated members 12 and 14 has a top 18, a bottom 20 and a thickness 22 extending therebetween as seen in FIG. 4. The elongated members 12 and 14 are connected together by a plurality of intersections 24. There is a plurality of connecting members 26 and 28 at each intersection 24. The connecting members 26 are semi-circular while the members 28 are quarter-circular. However they may be other shapes as well.

Two members 28 and one member 26 form a disc-like flange at each complete intersection. Inner edges 27 and 37 of the members 26 and 28 are connected to at least one elongated member while edges 36 and 38 are convexly curved. The members 26 and 28 have bottoms 30 and 32 respectively which are flush with the bottoms 20 of the members 12 and 14 as seen in FIG. 4. However, the connecting members 26 and 28 have a thickness 34 substantially less than the thickness 22 of the members 12 and 14. In this preferred embodiment the thickness 34 of the connecting members 26 and 28 is one half the thickness 22 of the elongated members 12 and 14.

In this preferred embodiment the outer edges 36 and 38 of the connecting members are tapered as seen in FIG. 4, which helps to hide the outer edges of the connecting members when the grid is used as described. The preferred material for the grid is concrete with a additive. This provides compatibility with the liquid coating applied in the areas 16 as described below. The coating applied in areas 16 and the grid therefore have similar properties such as thermal expansion to ensure a durable long life for the finished surface. The grid can be made from a mixture of silica sand, cement powder and polymer with added fibres and/or carbon chucks for improved wear.

As seen in FIG. 4, each of the elongated member 12 and 14 has a transversely concave top 40 which initially is covered by a removable coating 42. This coating could be of various materials including peel-off tape. However, wax is used in this preferred embodiment. Candle wax, bees wax on other waxes may be used. The wax coating may be formed first in a mold having a concave bottom and a grid-like shape. The wax grid is then removed, inverted and placed in a second grid shaped mold having a flat bottom. The polymer enhanced concrete, or other material forming the permanent portion of grid 10, is poured on top of the wax. The elongated members is this example are 0.48 to 0.64 cm. thick. However, this is not critical.

METHOD

In use, the grid 10 is applied over a surface 50 where a brick-like or stone-like pattern is desired. The grid could be secured to the surface by an adhesive, such as some of the prior art grids, but no such adhesive is used in this example. This allows the grid to be moved about and positioned adjacent other similar such grids to achieve the desired effect. Once the grid is in the proper place, it is secured by fasteners 52 shown in FIG. 2. Various types of fasteners could be used, such as screws, nails or staples, but in this example lead or plastic plugs are preferred.

A concrete drill is used to drill through the connecting members 26 or 28 and into the surface to a depth of approximately 1 cm. The lead or plastic plugs are then insert through the connecting members and hammered into place there. It should be noted that these plugs are only required on low spots or dips in the surface. They hold the grid against the surface despite irregularities therein. If the surface is perfectly flat and generally horizontal then the grid may be held in place only by the liquid coating as described below. On the other hand an adhesive or fasteners are essential when a vertical surface, such as a wall, is to be coated.

Alternatively, the existing surface may first be prepped with a thin layer, about 1.5 mm, of the polymer concrete before applying the grid. This may be applied with a squeegee, doing a small portion at a time. The grid is applied while the coating is still damp, thus avoiding voids or air pockets under the grid. The coating acts as an adhesive so fasteners are not required. The remaining liquid coating is applied immediately after the grid is positioned. The coating goes over the connecting members and dries there permanently, thus further securing the grid in place.

Once the grid is in place a liquid coating 60, as shown in FIG. 3 is applied to the areas 16 between the elongated members 12 and 14. Such liquid coatings are known and commercially available and are made of concrete with a polymer additive and a coloring agent added thereto. A typical formulation is 1 part portland cement, 2 parts silica sand, 1 part polymer, 2 parts water and coloring as required. The polymer in this example is available from Concrete Solutions, 6160 Fairmount Avenue, P.O. Box 600526, San Diego, Ca. 92160 although other polymers may be substituted. The coating can be smoothed flush with the tops of the members 12 and 14 using a suitable tool such as a squeegee.

After the coating has been applied, it is allowed to set to produce a water proof surface. The next step is to remove the coating 42 from the tops of the members 12 and 14. In this embodiment the wax is pressure-washed off to reveal the polymer enhanced concrete. This exposes the concave tops 40 of the members 12 and 14 which yields a mortar-like appearance. The members 12 and 14 typically have a suitable contrasting color compared to the coating 60, thus giving a brick-like or stone-like appearance when the process is completed. The mortar-like appearance of the members 12 and 14 is enhanced by their concave tops, an effect not achieved by prior art devices and methods.

ALTERNATIVES AND VARIATIONS

The grid may be made of other materials besides the polymer enhanced concrete. Epoxy has been found suitable, for example G-2 epoxy available from Industrial Formulators of Canada, Ltd., 3824 William Street, Burnaby, Canada V5C 3H9. A fill of glass fiber and silica sand is mixed with the liquid epoxy and poured cold into a mold. Another option is injected molded plastic.

It would be understood by someone skilled in the art that many of the details provided above are by way of example only and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention which is to be interpreted by reference to the following claims.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US278238 *May 22, 1883 Embossing upon plastered walls and other surfaces
US333459 *May 18, 1883Dec 29, 1885 Method of decorating walls and ceilings
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US2365705 *Feb 26, 1941Dec 26, 1944Andrew Jeri Company IncMethod of applying temporary protective coatings
US3096195 *Apr 11, 1960Jul 2, 1963Seman Colman JProcess for producing an ornamental wall facing
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5792511 *Feb 26, 1996Aug 11, 1998Ipc Techniques Inc.Pressing template comprising grid and removable sheet into settable liquid (i.e., concrete) coated onto substrate, removing sheet while leaving grid permanently positioned as mortar lines; simplification
US6382871 *Jul 19, 2000May 7, 2002Guy RossAsphalt molding system
US6588975 *Dec 5, 2001Jul 8, 2003Guy RossMolded asphalt surfacing system
US6702559 *Dec 12, 1997Mar 9, 2004Jimmy W. NormanTemplate for creating designs
US6826846Aug 13, 2001Dec 7, 2004Paul Ralph FordhamDevice for marking out a pattern on a surface
US6998010Jul 21, 2003Feb 14, 2006Integrated Paving Concepts Inc.Positioning marking on substrate;gradually heating marking and substrate in situ by periodically passing at least one heater in proximity to substrate; andallowing marking to bind to substrate when marking is heated to a pliable state
US7066680Dec 4, 2001Jun 27, 2006Integrated Paving Concepts Inc.Method of forming an inlaid pattern in an asphalt surface
US7238406Oct 14, 2004Jul 3, 2007Dasa Enterprises, LlcWall surfacing template
US8119202Jul 21, 2003Feb 21, 2012Flint Trading, Inc.such as asphalt surfaces via heating thermoplastic sheets
US8133540Oct 25, 2007Mar 13, 2012Flint Trading, Inc.Forming a pattern in asphalt, placing a pre-formed thermoplastic on the substrate; heating in situ to adhere to the substrate
US8672580 *Feb 21, 2013Mar 18, 2014Butterfield Color, Inc.Apparatus and method for imprinting a curved pathway in concrete
WO2002016148A1 *Aug 13, 2001Feb 28, 2002Fordham Paul RalphMeasuring device
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/72, 404/89
International ClassificationB44F9/04, E04F13/02, E04F21/04, E01C9/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04F21/04, B44F9/04, E01C9/002
European ClassificationE04F21/04, B44F9/04, E01C9/00C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 15, 2008FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20080227
Feb 27, 2008LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Sep 3, 2007REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Aug 28, 2003SULPSurcharge for late payment
Year of fee payment: 7
Aug 28, 2003FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Aug 15, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: SURFACE GRID TECHNOLOGIES LLC., PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:IPC TECHNOLOGIES INC.;REEL/FRAME:012090/0439
Effective date: 20010625
Owner name: SURFACE GRID TECHNOLOGIES LLC. 408 NORTH MARKET ST
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:IPC TECHNOLOGIES INC. /AR;REEL/FRAME:012090/0439
Owner name: SURFACE GRID TECHNOLOGIES LLC. 408 NORTH MARKET ST
Aug 26, 1999FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jun 25, 1996CCCertificate of correction
Aug 10, 1995ASAssignment
Owner name: INTEGRATED PAVING CORP., CANADA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:OLIVER, GERRY BILL;BURTON, BRUCE LORING;REEL/FRAME:007589/0472
Effective date: 19950712
Owner name: IPC TECHNOLOGIES INC., CANADA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:INTEGRATED PAVING CORP.;REEL/FRAME:007589/0481
Effective date: 19950725