Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5530582 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/427,060
Publication dateJun 25, 1996
Filing dateApr 24, 1995
Priority dateApr 24, 1995
Fee statusPaid
Publication number08427060, 427060, US 5530582 A, US 5530582A, US-A-5530582, US5530582 A, US5530582A
InventorsWilliam G. Clark
Original AssigneeClark Mxr, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fiber source for seeding an ultrashort optical pulse amplifier
US 5530582 A
Abstract
An apparatus for seeding a solid-state, ultrashort optical pulse amplifier system comprises an excitation source that pumps a gain medium which is restricted to the core of an optical fiber. The gain medium is disposed in a resonant cavity with components arranged to produce ultrashort pulses of light at a fundamental wavelength. Such systems are well known to those skilled in the art. These ultrashort pulses are then frequency-doubled in a non-linear crystal to produce a seed pulse whose doubled frequency substantially matches that of the amplifier gain medium. These seed pulses are then injected into the amplifier wherein they are amplified.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(57)
I claim:
1. An apparatus for amplifying ultrashort pulses of light, comprising:
a solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses having a fundamental wavelength of operation in the range of 1-3 microns;
a solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier having a gain bandwidth that does not overlap the fundamental wavelength of operation of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses; and
a frequency converter disposed between said solid-state source of ultrashort pulses and said solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier for converting the fundamental wavelength light output of the solid state source of ultrashort optical pulses to a wavelength that overlaps the gain bandwidth of the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 in which said solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier is selected from a group consisting of a regenerative-type amplifier, a multipass-type amplifier, or an amplifier containing elements of both a regenerative-type amplifier and a multipass-type amplifier.
3. The apparatus of claim 1 in which said solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses comprises a fiber-optic gain medium.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses for pumping said solid-state source of optical pulses selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, or a diode MOPA system.
5. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier for pumping said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, a diode MOPA system, a frequency doubled, Q-switched YAG laser, or a frequency-doubled, Q-switched YLF laser.
6. The apparatus of claim 1 in which said frequency converter is a crystal for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
7. The apparatus of claim 1 in which the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF or ZBLAN fiber.
8. The apparatus of claim 2 in which said solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses comprises a fiber-optic gain medium.
9. The apparatus of claim 2 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses for pumping said solid-state source of optical pulses selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, or a diode MOPA system.
10. The apparatus of claim 2 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier for pumping said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, a diode MOPA system, a frequency doubled, Q-switched YAG laser, or a frequency-doubled, Q-switched YLF laser.
11. The apparatus of claim 2 in which said frequency converter is a crystal for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
12. The apparatus of claim 2 in which the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF, or ZBLAN fiber.
13. The apparatus of claim 3 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said fiber-optic gain medium for pumping said fiber-optic gain medium selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, or a diode MOPA system.
14. The apparatus of claim 3 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier for pumping said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, a diode MOPA system, a frequency doubled, Q-switched YAG laser, or a frequency-doubled, Q-switched YLF laser.
15. The apparatus of claim 3 in which said frequency converter is a crystal for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
16. The apparatus of claim 3 comprising a plurality of optical fibers arranged in an oscillator amplifier configuration that together form the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
17. The apparatus of claim 3 in which said fiber-optic gain medium is an Erbium-doped fiber.
18. The apparatus of claim 3 in which the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF or ZBLAN fiber.
19. The apparatus of claim 4 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier for pumping said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, a diode MOPA system, a frequency doubled, Q-switched YAG laser, or a frequency-doubled, Q-switched YLF laser.
20. The apparatus of claim 4 in which said frequency converter is a crystal for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
21. The apparatus of claim 4 in which the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF or ZBLAN fiber.
22. The apparatus of claim 5 in which said frequency converter is a crystal for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
23. The apparatus of claim 5 in which the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF or ZBLAN fiber.
24. The apparatus of claim 16 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses for pumping said solid-state source of optical pulses selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, or a diode MOPA system.
25. The apparatus of claim 16 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier for pumping said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, a diode MOPA system, a frequency doubled, Q-switched YAG laser, or a frequency-doubled, Q-switched YLF laser.
26. The apparatus of claim 16 in which said frequency converter is a crystal for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
27. The apparatus of claim 16 in which the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF or ZBLAN fiber.
28. The apparatus of claim 17 in which said plurality of optical fibers arranged in an oscillator amplifier configuration that together form the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses comprises an Erbium-doped fiber.
29. The apparatus of claim 17 in which the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF or ZBLAN fiber.
30. The apparatus of claim 17 further comprising an excitation source optically coupled to said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier for pumping said solid-state ultrashort pulse amplifier selected from a group comprising a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, a diode MOPA system, a frequency doubled, Q-switched YAG laser, or a frequency-doubled, Q-switched YLF laser.
31. The apparatus of claim 17 in which said frequency converter is a crystal for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
32. The apparatus of claim 4 in which the solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF or ZBLAN fiber.
33. The apparatus of claim 17 in which said frequency converter is a crystal for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental of the solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses.
34. A method of amplifying ultrashort pulses of light, comprising:
generating pulses from a solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses having a fundamental wavelength of operation in the range of 1-3 microns;
frequency converting said pulses to a wavelength overlapping the gain bandwidth of a solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier;
injecting said frequency converted pulses into a solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier for amplifying them therein.
35. The method of claim 34 in which converting said pulses comprises frequency doubling the pulses.
36. The method of claim 34 further comprising the step of dechirping the pulses prior to the step of frequency converting the pulses.
37. The method of claim 34 further comprising the step of amplifying the pulses prior to the frequency doubling step.
38. The method of claim 34 further comprising the step of amplifying the pulses subsequent to the frequency doubling step.
39. A method of seeding a regenerative amplifier having a given peak operating wavelength from a source of seed oscillations, comprising the steps of:
optically pumping an optical fiber light source to generate an output pulse having a fundamental wavelength that is greater than the peak operating wavelength of the regenerative amplifier;
frequency converting the fundamental wavelength output pulse to generate a pulse having a wavelength substantially equal to the peak operating wavelength of the regenerative amplifier; and
optically coupling the frequency converted pulse into a gain medium of the regenerative amplifier.
40. The method of claim 39 in which the step of optically pumping an optical fiber light source to generate an output pulse comprises incoherently pumping the fiber source.
41. The method of claim 39 in which the step of optically pumping an optical fiber light source to generate an output pulse comprises coherently pumping the fiber source.
42. The method of claim 39 in which the step of optically pumping an optical fiber light source to generate an output pulse comprises generating an output pulse having a FWHM less than about 1 nanosecond.
43. The method of claim 42 in which the step of frequency converting the fundamental wavelength output pulse comprises generating a pulse having a FWHM less than the FWHM of the fundamental pulse.
44. The method of claim 39 in which the step of optically pumping an optical fiber light source to generate an output pulse comprises generating an output pulse having a wavelength of approximately 1550 nanometers.
45. The method of claim 44 in which the step of frequency converting the fundamental wavelength output pulse comprises generating a frequency converted pulse having a wavelength of approximately 780 nanometers.
46. The method of claim 39 in which the step of frequency converting the fundamental wavelength output pulse comprises frequency doubling the fundamental to obtain a second harmonic wavelength.
47. A regenerative optical amplifier system for ultrashort pulse generation, comprising:
a pumped optical fiber source that produces a light output having a fundamental wavelength;
a regenerative amplifier having a peak operating wavelength, arranged to receive said light output; and
a frequency converter disposed between said fiber source and said regenerative amplifier for converting the fundamental wavelength light output to a wavelength substantially equal to the peak operating wavelength of the regenerative amplifier.
48. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 47 in which the fundamental light output of the fiber source comprises a pulse having a full width at half maximum (FWHM) less than approximately 1 nanosecond, and further in which the frequency converted light output from the frequency converter comprises a pulse having a FWHM less than the FWHM of the fundamental pulse.
49. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 47 further comprising a light emitting diode optically coupled to said fiber source for pumping the fiber source.
50. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 49 in which the light emitting diode comprises a diode laser.
51. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 47 in which the regenerative amplifier comprises a Ti:Sapphire gain medium.
52. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 47 in which the pumped optical fiber source comprises an Erbium-doped fiber laser.
53. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 52 in which the regenerative amplifier comprises a gain medium selected from a group of materials consisting of Ti:Sapphire and Alexandrite.
54. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 47 in which the frequency converter is a frequency doubler for producing a second harmonic of the fundamental.
55. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 47 in which the frequency converter is an optically nonlinear crystal.
56. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 47 in which the fundamental wavelength is approximately 1550 nanometers.
57. The regenerative optical amplifier system of claim 47 in which the frequency converted fundamental wavelength is approximately 780 nanometers.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The subject invention relates to the combination of a fiber optic light source and an ultrashort pulse amplifier in which the light source comprises a fiber optic gain medium that generates ultrashort pulses at a wavelength substantially longer than the wavelength of operation of a solid-state, ultrashort pulse amplifier. These fundamental wavelength ultrashort pulses are frequency converted to another shorter wavelength that lies within the gain bandwidth of the amplifier, in a manner that substantially maintains their ultrashort pulse width. The frequency converted pulses are then seeded into the solid-state, ultrashort optical pulse amplifier, and amplified therein.

More particularly, this invention relates to the use of laser source that employs an Erbium-doped fiber as the gain medium to generate ultrashort optical pulses that are then frequency doubled to produce a seed pulse at a wavelength of approximately 780 nm. These seed pulses are then amplified in an ultrashort optical pulse amplifier that uses solid state materials like Ti:Sapphire as the gain medium.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In the discussion to follow amplifier(s) is taken to mean a solid-state ultrashort optical pulse amplifier(s) of the regenerative or multipass type, or combinations of the two which use solid-state materials to amplify optical pulses with durations Full Width, Half Maximum, (FWHM), less than one nanosecond duration. These amplifiers have become an important tool for the study of the temporal behavior of phenomena in nature, for the study of nonlinear effects in physics, chemistry, electronics and biology, and for the generation of short pulses in the UV, VUV and X-ray regions. Their high peak power makes them ideal sources for producing ultrashort pulses at virtually any wavelength of interest through the use of processes like parametric amplification.

Heretofore, amplifier systems for generating ultrashort pulses are seeded by pulses that are generated in oscillators whose fundamental output wavelength falls within the gain bandwidth of the medium used to amplify them. A well known example is the commercially successful regenerative amplifier system that use Titanium-doped Sapphire as the gain medium. This system is seeded by a pulse generated in a mode-locked, external cavity oscillator containing a bulk Ti:Sapphire gain medium. These oscillators are in turn pumped by other lasers like an argon ion laser (or by a diode or diode array, if the gain medium were, for example, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF or Li:CAF). Although useful, this "laser-pumped laser" configurations have a number of undesirable characteristics. First, because regenerative amplifiers generally use some switching device like a Pockel Cell or Acousto-optic (A/O) switch that is driven by fast electronics to trap the seed pulse in the amplifier portion of the cavity, and because these devices have finite (several ns duration) rise times, the seed pulse train produced by this type of oscillator source must have pulse separation times that are sufficient to ensure that the Pockel Cell electronics can select only one pulse for injection from the train of pulses generated by the oscillator. Generally, most Ti:Sapphire oscillators have a cavity round trip time of about 10 ns. This is marginally sufficient to ensure that only one pulse is injected into the amplifier at a time, and places restrictions on the speed at which the electronics must operate. It would be desirable to increase the time separation between seed pulses to relax the requirements on the Pockel Cell or A/O switch, and also increase pre-pulse and post-pulse extinction ratios. This quickly becomes impractical with standard Ti:Sapphire oscillators because the greater temporal separation between seed pulses makes for a long cavity. Long external cavities possess greater sensitivity to misalignment which makes for less stable performance, and for a larger footprint.

An additional undesirable feature of known oscillator-amplifier combinations is that a Ti:Sapphire oscillator is itself pumped with an argon ion laser. Argon ion lasers are expensive to purchase, operate and maintain. And, like most laser-pumped lasers, precision alignment must be maintained between the pump beam and the active gain volume in the Ti:Sapphire rod. This is especially important when the seed laser oscillator is Kerr Lens or self-mode-locked, because these systems are extremely sensitive to even minor changes in the degree of overlap of the pump beam with the active gain volume in the Ti:Sapphire oscillator gain medium. This fact places additional restrictions on both the mechanical and thermal stability of the environment in which they can be operated. And because argon ion lasers are relatively large devices, their use in combination with a Ti:Sapphire oscillator makes for a bulky and expensive system that only a scientist could use. If this technology is to find widespread use in less esoteric environments than the research laboratory, it must be made less sensitive to the thermal and mechanical properties of the environment in which it is used. Additionally, the amount of space consumed must be kept to a minimum, the utility requirements readily available, and the power consumption within reasonable limits.

Lasers that use a doped-fiber as the gain medium can be made to have cavity lengths that are longer than equivalent external cavity designs--producing pulse trains with pulse separation times that are a factor of 2 to 100 times longer than those which are realistically achievable with external cavity configurations. A fiber gain medium can be coiled into a relatively small space so the effective footprint can be made quite small. A fiber laser gain medium can be diode-pumped, and because diodes are themselves small, efficient, have less stringent utility requirements, and do not consume much power, all the undesirable features of the argon ion pump laser can be eliminated by using a diode-pumped fiber seed laser. Moreover, a diode-pumped fiber laser based seed source can be made impervious to mechanical and thermal perturbations. All these characteristics give fiber lasers a robustness, and compactness that cannot be duplicated by traditional seed oscillator designs.

However, there are no diode-pumped fiber laser sources with emission wavelengths in the near IR where most of the broad gain bandwidth materials like Ti:Sapphire operate. Indeed, it is unlikely that an fiber-laser can be made to operate in this range, even if a suitable dopant material was available, because of large group velocity dispersion (GVD) in this wavelength region. Even within some existing fiber lasers like the Erbium-doped fiber oscillator, it has been found to be advantageous to incorporate GVD compensation mechanisms in the form of a negative GVD component to balance the positive GVD existing in the material at its operating wavelength, or use external normal or anomalous GVD mechanisms to compensate for chirp on the pulse.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus and method for seeding an amplifier that has large temporal pulse separation, that possesses stable, robust operational characteristics, and has a small footprint.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an apparatus and method for seeding an amplifier that operates at a fundamental wavelength that does not overlap the gain wavelength of the amplifier medium.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide an apparatus and method for seeding an amplifier whose fundamental wavelength of operation is at half the operational wavelength of the amplifier gain medium.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide an apparatus and method for frequency doubling the output of the fundamental wavelength of the ultrashort pulse source in order to generate a seed pulse in the wavelength range that falls within the operating wavelength of an amplifier.

An apparatus for seeding a solid-state, ultrashort optical pulse amplifier system comprises an excitation source that pumps a gain medium which is restricted to the core of an optical fiber. The gain medium is disposed in a resonant cavity with components arranged to produce ultrashort pulses of light at a fundamental wavelength. Such systems are well known to those skilled in the art. These ultrashort pulses are then frequency-doubled in a non-linear crystal to produce a seed pulse whose doubled frequency substantially matches that of the amplifier gain medium. These seed pulses are then injected into the amplifier wherein they are amplified.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a schematic plan view of a preferred version of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of a mode locked erbium doped ring laser in accordance with the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A preferred version of the invention is shown in FIG. 1. A, mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser, 1, such as the laser described by Tamura, K., C. R. Doerr, L. E. Nelson, H. A. Haus, and E. P. Ippen, "Technique for obtaining high-energy ultrashort pulses from an additive-pulse mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser.", OPTICS LETTERS, Vol. 19, No. 1, Jan. 1, 1994, p. 46-48, generates pulses of 100 fs duration FWHM at 48.2 MHz.

The fiber ring laser source 1 is shown in more detail in FIG. 2. The figure shows a unidirectional polarization additive pulse mode-locked (APM) fiber ring laser designated generally at 10 that includes a bulk polarization sensitive isolator 12 for forcing unidirectional operation of the ring. A polarizing beam splitter (PBS) 14 is coupled to the input of the isolator, and the S polarization input of PBS 14 provides a linearly polarized output pulse that is preferably connected to a silicon slab dispersion delay line 16 for negative chirp compensation.

A first pair of bulk wave plates 18 is placed before the isolator and a second pair of bulk wave plates 20 is disposed after the isolator in the direction of circulation. Preferably, a pair of quarter wave plates is disposed at the input to PBS 14 and the combination of a quarter wave plate and a half wave plate is disposed at the output of isolator 12.

The fiber cavity comprises 2.5 m. of Corning SMF28 fiber and 45 cm. of Corning Flexcor 1060 fiber, which form a wave length-division multiplexing (WDM) coupler used to launch the pump, and 1.0 m. of erbium doped fiber. The fiber ring is coupled to the bulk wave plates 18 and 20 by lenses 32 and 34 respectively. The ends of the fiber are terminated with Brewster angler couplers 36 and 38.

The fiber ring is excited by an excitation source 40, preferably operating at about 980 nanometers. Preferably, the pump source is selected from a laser diode, a plurality of laser diodes, a light emitting diode, a plurality of light emitting diodes, or a diode MOPA system.

While this particular construct was pumped at approximately 980 nm from a continuous wave Ti:Sapphire oscillator, in accordance with this invention is preferably pumped by a 980 nm diode master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration (or a series of 980 nm diodes) such as those available commercially from Spectra Diode Labs of San Jose, Calif. The output of this source at its fundamental operating wavelength of 1560 nm, 2, is then focused by focusing system, 3, which is preferably a simple convex glass lens which has a focal length that is preferably in the range of a few centimeters or less into a frequency doubling crystal, 4, which doubles the 1560 nm light to 780 nm at output 5. The frequency doubler, 4, for example, a BBO crystal of length sufficient to maintain a short pulse width, for example 1 mm to a few centimeters, while at the same time providing sufficient power to seed the regenerative amplifier for example in the range of a few pico joules to several hundred pico joules. If additional power is needed to seed the amplifier, an additional diode-pumped amplifier operating at the fundamental wavelength can be placed between the source, 1, and the doubling crystal, 4, or, alternatively, after the doubling crystal and before the ultrashort pulse amplifier. In the latter case, amplification is provided at a wavelength substantially identical to that of the amplifier itself. If a chirp is created as a result of subsequent amplification, it could be removed using chirp compensating and compression techniques such as glass plate for negatively chirped pulses or a prism pair for positively chirped pulses, or any other technique known to those skilled in the art. For this purpose of this discussion, all these possible configurations are meant to be included when we refer to a "solid-state source of ultrashort optical pulses"). This frequency doubled light at approximately 780 nm is directed through a collimating system 6 which is preferably a simple glass lens having the same local length as the focusing systems, then becomes the seed pulse which is directed into a Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier 7 and subsequently amplified therein. The amplifier preferably comprises an excitation source such as a laser diode or diodes, a light emitting diode or diodes, a diode MOPA system or a frequency doubled Q-switched YAG or YLF laser coupled to a gain medium such as Ti:Sapphire, Alexandrite, Li:SAF, Li:SGAF, Li:CAF or ZBLAN fiber.

The foregoing description of the invention is intended to be merely exemplary of the invention and those skilled in the art will appreciate that certain changes and modifications to the method and apparatus described above are well within the scope of the invention which is solely defined by the appended claims.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3875422 *Jul 24, 1974Apr 1, 1975Bell Telephone Labor IncFour photon parametric amplification in glassy optical waveguides
US5162940 *Mar 6, 1987Nov 10, 1992The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceMultiple energy level, multiple pulse rate laser source
US5309535 *Apr 30, 1993May 3, 1994At&T Bell LaboratoriesApparatus and method utilizing a rotating waveplate for reducing polarization dependent hole-burning in an amplified optical transmission system
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Technique for obtaining high energy ultrashort pulses from an additive pulse mode locked erbium doped fiber ring laser. K. Tamura, et al. Reprint from Optics Letters, vol. 1, Jan. 1, 1994.
2Technique for obtaining high-energy ultrashort pulses from an additive-pulse mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser. K. Tamura, et al. Reprint from Optics Letters, vol. 1, Jan. 1, 1994.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5745284 *May 1, 1996Apr 28, 1998President And Fellows Of Harvard CollegeSolid-state laser source of tunable narrow-bandwidth ultraviolet radiation
US5847816 *Jan 14, 1997Dec 8, 1998Mcdonnell Douglas CorporationFiber optic micro-doppler ladar system and operating method therefor
US5880877 *Jan 28, 1997Mar 9, 1999Imra America, Inc.Apparatus and method for the generation of high-power femtosecond pulses from a fiber amplifier
US5909306 *Jun 12, 1998Jun 1, 1999President And Fellows Of Harvard CollegeSolid-state spectrally-pure linearly-polarized pulsed fiber amplifier laser system useful for ultraviolet radiation generation
US6014249 *Mar 8, 1999Jan 11, 2000Imra America, Inc.Apparatus and method for the generation of high-power femtosecond pulses from a fiber amplifier
US6014388 *Apr 30, 1997Jan 11, 2000Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Short wavelength laser
US6097741 *Feb 17, 1998Aug 1, 2000Calmar Optcom, Inc.Passively mode-locked fiber lasers
US6188708 *Nov 10, 1997Feb 13, 2001Contraves Space AgLaser system and amplifying system to produce single-frequency laser irradiation
US6373867Jun 21, 2000Apr 16, 2002Calmar Optcom, Inc.Generation of a wavelength-tunable laser oscillation in a wave-guiding gain medium based on passive mode lock
US6404540Jun 20, 2000Jun 11, 2002Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.L-band optical fiber amplifier using seed beam
US6470113Jul 7, 2000Oct 22, 2002Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Broadband light source using seed-beam
US6570892Apr 16, 2002May 27, 2003Calmar Optcom, Inc.Passively mode-locked fiber lasers
US6749602 *Mar 4, 2002Jun 15, 2004Cynosure, Inc.Method and apparatus for the double output treatment of pigmented lesions and tattoos
US6980354May 19, 2003Dec 27, 2005Sandia CorporationSelf-seeding ring optical parametric oscillator
US7236504 *Jan 7, 2005Jun 26, 2007General Instrument CorporationStretched-pulse Raman fiber lasers and methods of operating the same
US7496117 *Nov 21, 2006Feb 24, 2009Nanyang Technological UniversityLaser arrangement and a method for generating power pulses
US7602825Sep 9, 2005Oct 13, 2009Calmar Optcom, Inc.Tunable passively mode-locked lasers with phase-lock feedback for low timing jitters
US7688499Dec 22, 2006Mar 30, 2010Imra America, Inc.Modular, high energy, widely-tunable ultrafast fiber source
US7782912Dec 19, 2008Aug 24, 2010Imra America, Inc.Yb: and Nd: mode-locked oscillators and fiber systems incorporated in solid-state short pulse laser systems
US7929203Jun 3, 2008Apr 19, 2011Imra America, Inc.Utilization of Yb: and Nd: mode-locked oscillators in solid-state short pulse laser systems
US8031396Oct 29, 2009Oct 4, 2011Imra America, Inc.Modular, high energy, widely-tunable ultrafast fiber source
US8072678Oct 29, 2009Dec 6, 2011Imra America, Inc.Modular, high energy, widely-tunable ultrafast fiber source
US8094691Jun 15, 2010Jan 10, 2012Imra America, Inc.Yb: and Nd: mode-locked oscillators and fiber systems incorporated in solid-state short pulse laser systems
US8179929Jan 23, 2009May 15, 2012Ipg Photonics CorporationApparatus and method for side mode suppression in slave-master laser by single mode fiber amplifier
US8509270Dec 21, 2011Aug 13, 2013Imra America, Inc.Yb: and Nd: mode-locked oscillators and fiber systems incorporated in solid-state short pulse laser systems
US8570646Jul 21, 2011Oct 29, 2013Imra America, Inc.Modular, high energy, widely-tunable ultrafast fiber source
USRE42499Aug 19, 2002Jun 28, 2011Coherent, Inc.System and method for amplifying an optical pulse and pumping laser therefor
DE19802845B4 *Jan 26, 1998Nov 10, 2005IMRA America, Inc., Ann ArborVorrichtung und Verfahren zur Erzeugung von Femtosekundenimpulsen mit hoher Leistung mittels eines Lichtwellenleiter-Verstärkers
WO1998022999A1 *Nov 10, 1997May 28, 1998Daimler Benz AgLaser system and amplifying system to produce single-frequency laser irradiation
WO1998023000A1 *Nov 10, 1997May 28, 1998Daimler Benz AgLaser system and amplifying system for producing a laser beam in the visible wavelength area
Classifications
U.S. Classification359/333, 359/346, 398/189
International ClassificationH04B10/17, G02F1/37, H01S3/067, H01S3/23
Cooperative ClassificationH04B10/291, G02F1/37, H01S3/06725, H01S3/06754
European ClassificationH04B10/291
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 5, 2011B1Reexamination certificate first reexamination
Free format text: CLAIMS 3-6, 8-12, 19-23 AND 34-38 ARE CANCELLED. CLAIMS 1, 13-18, 32, 39 AND 47 ARE DETERMINED TO BE PATENTABLE AS AMENDED. CLAIMS 2, 7, 24-31, 33, 40-46 AND 48-57, DEPENDENT ON AN AMENDED CLAIM, ARE DETERMINED TO BE PATENTABLE.
Dec 21, 2007FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Dec 22, 2003FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Nov 20, 2001DJAll references should be deleted, no patent was granted
Jul 31, 2001FPB1Expired due to reexamination which canceled all claims
Free format text: CLAIMS 1-57 ARE CANCELLED.
Jul 31, 2001C1Reexamination certificate (1st level)
Nov 22, 1999FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Mar 16, 1999RRRequest for reexamination filed
Effective date: 19990114
Apr 24, 1995ASAssignment
Owner name: CLARK MXR, INC., MICHIGAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CLARK, WILLIAM G.;REEL/FRAME:007483/0757
Effective date: 19950424