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Publication numberUS5536636 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/202,389
Publication dateJul 16, 1996
Filing dateFeb 28, 1994
Priority dateJun 26, 1991
Fee statusPaid
Publication number08202389, 202389, US 5536636 A, US 5536636A, US-A-5536636, US5536636 A, US5536636A
InventorsRobert M. Freeman, Jr., Jorge Plutzky, Benjamin G. Neel, Robert D. Rosenberg
Original AssigneeBeth Israel Hospital, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Methods for identifying a tyrosine phosphatase abnormality associated with neoplastic disease
US 5536636 A
Abstract
The present invention relates to the isolation of genes encoding novel protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) having SH2 domains, the nucleic acid sequences isolated, and the encoded phosphatases. The invention further relates to methods of altering tyrosine phosphatase activities encoded by the novel phosphatases. By altering (i.e., increasing or decreasing) tyrosine phosphatase activity, one can alter megakaryocyte cell function, and thereby alter platelet production. Alteration of the genes is associated with neoplastic disease.
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Claims(8)
We claim:
1. A method of detecting in a sample from an individual a chromosome 12p abnormality associated with neoplastic disease, comprising the steps of:
(a) rendering nucleic acids in the sample available for hybridization;
(b) contacting the nucleic acids of step (a) with a nucleic acid probe which only hybridizes to a nucleic acid fragment consisting of the sequence having nucleotides 537 to 653 shown in SEQ ID No.: 5, under stringency conditions which eliminate hybridization of the probe to extraneous nucleic acid sequences; and
(c) detecting hybridization of the probe with nucleic acids in the sample;
wherein the absence of hydbridization is indicative of a chromosome 12p abnormality associated with neoplastic disease.
2. A method of detecting in a sample from an individual a abnormality in the SH-PTP1 gene associated with neoplastic disease, comprising the steps of:
(a) rendering nucleic acids in the sample available for hybridization;
(b) contacting the nucleic acids of step (a) with a nucleic acid probe which only hybridizes to a nucleic acid fragment consisting of the sequence having nucleotides 537 to 653 shown in SEQ ID No.: 5, under stringency conditions which eliminate hybridization of the probe to extraneous nucleic acid sequences; and
(c) detecting the presence or absence of hybridization of the probe with nucleic acids in the sample;
wherein the absence of hybridization is indicative of an abnormality in the SH-PTP1 gene associated with neoplastic disease.
3. A method of detecting in a sample from an individual a chromosome 12p abnormality associated with neoplastic disease, comprising the steps of:
(a) isolating the SH-PTP1 gene from the sample;
(b) comparing the nucleic acid sequence of the SH-PTP1 gene from the sample to the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.: 5,
wherein a difference between the sequence of the SH-PTP1 gene from the sample and the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.: 5 is indicative of a chromosome 12p abnormality associated with neoplastic disease.
4. A method of detecting in a sample from an individual a chromosome 12p abnormality associated with neoplastic disease, comprising the steps of:
(a) obtaining SH-PTP1 RNA from the sample;
(b) generating SH-PTP1 cDNA by polymerase chain reaction; and
(c) comparing the nucleic acid sequence of the SH-PTP1 cDNA to the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.: 5,
wherein a difference between the sequence of the SH-PTP1 cDNA and the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.: 5 is indicative of a chromosome 12p abnormality associated with neoplastic disease.
5. A method of detecting in a sample from an individual a abnormality in the SH-PTP1 gene associated with neoplastic disease, comprising the steps of:
(a) isolating the SH-PTP1 gene from the sample;
(b) comparing the nucleic acid sequence of the SH-PTP1 gene from the sample to the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.: 5,
wherein a difference between the sequence of the SH-PTP1 gene from the sample and the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.: 5 is indicative of an abnormality in the SH-PTP1 gene associated with neoplastic disease.
6. A method of detecting in a sample from an individual a abnormality in expression of the SH-PTP1 gene associated with neoplastic disease, comprising the steps of:
(a) obtaining SH-PTP1 RNA from the sample;
(b) generating SH-PTP1 cDNA by polymerase chain reaction; and
(c) comparing the nucleic acid sequence of the SH-PTP1 cDNA to the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.:5,
wherein a difference between the sequence of the SHPTP1 cDNA and the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.: 5 is indicative of an abnormality in expression of the SH-PTP1 gene associated with neoplastic disease.
7. The method of claim 6, wherein the difference between the sequence of the SH-PTP1 gene from the sample and the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO.: 5 is a deletion.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein the deletion is a deletion of all or a portion of the sequence encoding the first and/or second SH2 domains of said SH-PTP1 gene.
Description
GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

The invention described herein was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health (5 ROI CA49152-04).

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 07/983,926, filed Dec. 1, 1992, by Robert M. Freeman, Jr., Jorge Plutzky, Benjamin G. Neel and Robert D. Rosenberg, now abandoned; which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 07/829,141, filed Jan. 31, 1992, by Jorge Plutzky, Benjamin G. Neel and Robert D. Rosenberg, now abandoned; which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 07/721,112, filed Jun. 26, 1991 by Jorge Plutzky, Benjamin G. Neel and Robert D. Rosenberg, now abandoned. The contents of these applications are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Protein tyrosyl phosphorylation is an important cellular regulatory mechanism. Much work has implicated protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation. Many PTKs, when mutated and/or captured by retroviruses, can promote oncogenesis (Bishop, J. M., Cell 64:235-248 (1991); Cantley, L. et al., Cell 64:281-302 (1991); Hunter, T., Cell 64:249-270 (1991)). In addition, several PTKs have been shown to be essential for normal differentiation and development. For example, the Drosophila gene torso is essential for proper formation of anterior and posterior structures (Casanova, J. et al., Genes and Devel. 3:2025-2038 (1989)); Sprenger, F., et al., Nature 338:478-483 (1989)). The Caenorhabditis elegans let-23 gene regulates vulval development (Horvits, H. et al., Nature 351:535-541 (1991)), and murine c-kit is required during early embryogenesis for normal hematopoiesis (Geissler, E. N., et al., Cell 55:185-192 (1988); Chabot, B. et al., Nature 335:88-89 1988)).

Much has been learned about PTK signal transduction pathways (Cantley, L., et al., Cell 64:281-302 (1991)). Many growth factor (GF) receptors are transmembrane PTKs, which autophosphorylate upon ligand addition. Activated GF receptors are linked to downstream cellular events by recruitment of secondary signaling molecules to autophosphorylated receptors; some of these signaling molecules are also substrates for the receptor PTKs. Secondary signaling molecules such as GTPase-activating protein (Kaplan, D. R., et al. Cell 61:125-133 (1990)); phospholipase C-γ (Margolis, B., et al., Cell 57:1101-1107 (1989); Meisenhelder, J., et al., Cell 57:1109-1122 (1989)), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (Otso, M., et al. Cell 65:91-104 (1991); Skolnik, E. Y., et al., Cell 65:83-90 (1991); Escobedo, J. A. et al. Cell 65:75-82 (1991)) associate with activated receptors through src-homology 2 (SH2) domains, conserved stretches of approximately 100 amino acids which promote intra- or inter-molecular protein-protein interactions via binding to specific phosphorylated tyrosyl residues (Koch, C., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)). Since different subsets of phosphotyrosyl proteins bind to different SH2 domains with varying avidity, the specificity of the cellular response to GFs may be largely determined by the strength and spectrum of these intermolecular SH2/phosphotyrosyl interactions (Koch, C. et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)).

Src homology region 2 (SH2) is a sequence of about 100 amino acids and was originally identified in the v-Src and v-Fps tyrosine kinases. This noncatalytic domain is conserved among a variety of tyrosine kinases including Src, Src family members, and Fps, for example (Koch, C. A., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)). In addition, the SH2 domain is found in the cytoskeletal protein tension, as well as in several cytoplasmic signalling proteins that are regulated by receptor protein-tyrosine kinases, such as phospholipase C-γ and GAP (Ras GTPase activating protein) (Koch, C. A., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)).

The SH2 domains present in Src, Abl and Fps tyrosine kinases interact with the kinase domain to modulate activity and may play a role in substrate interaction. In cytoplasmic signalling proteins, the SH2 domain appears to mediate the formation of heteromeric complexes between growth factor receptors and the SH2 domain. In vitro studies have shown bonding of a fragment of GAP containing only the SH2 domains to a C-terminal phosphopeptide from the EGF receptor. It is also though that the SH2 domains of PI3K (phosphatidyl inositol 3'-kinase), GAP and PLC-γ recognize phosphorylated tyrosine on the β-PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase (Koch, C. A., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)).

The steady-state level of protein tyrosyl phosphorylation is also controlled by the opposing action of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs); however, little is known about the role of PTPs in signal transduction. Molecular cloning of a large number of PTPs has revealed that they can be grouped into two forms, cytosolic and transmembrane (Fischer, E., et al., Science 253:401-406 (1991)). The cytosolic PTPs include PTP 1B and T cell PTP, both of low molecular weight (37 kD and 48 kD, respectively). These cytosolic PTPs consist primarily of a 300 amino acid domain containing two conserved cysteine active sites with 74% amino acid sequence homology between the two forms. These cytosolic PTPs can be further grouped into subfamilies, based upon distinctive structural features of their non-catalytic regions. These include the presence of a hydrophobic C-terminal sequence in PTP-IB and T-cell PTP (Cool, D. E., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:5257-5261; Chernoff, J., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:2735-2739 (1990); Brown-Shimer, S. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:5148-5152 (1990)), as well as the presence of domains with similarity to cytoskeletal proteins in PTP-Meg (Gu, M. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. USA 88:5867-5871 (1991)) and PTP-HI (Yang, Q., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. USA 88:5949-5953 (1991)). Whether these structural similarities have functional significance is not yet known; the regulation and function of non-transmembrane PTPs remain obscure.

The transmembrane PTPs include CD45, also known as leukocyte common antigen (LCA) (Charbonneau, H. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:7182-7186 (1988)); leukocyte common antigen related protein (LAR) (Streuli, M. et al., J. Exp. Med. 168:1523-1530 (1988)); and two Drosophila homologs (DPTP and DLAR). These transmembrane PTPs are thought to be receptors which modulate their activity in response to ligands as yet unidentified. The transmembrane forms contain a duplication of the 300 amino acid domain present in cytosolic PTPs, creating an imperfect tandem repeat with extensive internal homology between domains I and II. The tandem 300 amino acid domains display homology across forms (to other PTP's of both classes), and across species (human, rat, mouse--90% homology). Of the four conserved cysteines in the 300 amino acid tandem domains (2 per domain), only the first appears essential for phosphatase activity. Two of the cysteines in the first domain represent 2 out of 40 invariant amino acid residues in the first domain of all known PTPs. Although no PTPs have any serine/threonine phosphatase homology, the trans-membrane PTPs possess short hydrophobic transmembrane stretches followed by extracellular regions with immunoglobulin- and fibronectin-like repeats, consistent with ligand binding regions. Despite the sequence conservation in the intracellular (cytoplasmic) domains of the molecules, the extracellular portions have no homology with one another.

Further information concerning PTPs may provide insight into the role of PTPs in cellular function and in regulatory mechanisms in the cell.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to the isolation of genes encoding novel protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), the nucleic acid sequences isolated, and the encoded phosphatases. In particular, two clones encoding PTPs, designated M1PTP (see SEQ ID NO.: 1 and NO.: 2) and M2PTP (see SEQ ID NO.: 3 and NO.: 4), were isolated from a rat megakaryocyte cDNA library. A probe from the M1PTP clone was used to isolate a human cDNA clone, designated SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 5). Surprisingly, this clone contains two tandem Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, in addition to a cytosolic PTP homology domain. The SH-PTP1 gene sequences (see SEQ ID NO.: 5), or a portion thereof, may be used to isolate genes encoding related PTPs and other related SH2-containing proteins in particular. SH-PTP1 may be the prototype of a class of tyrosine phosphatases with SH2 domains. SH-PTP1 was found to map to 12p13, a region commonly involved in leukemia-associated chromosomal abnormalities. Gross chromosomal abnormalities are found in this region in approximately 10% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In an analysis of the SH-PTP1 gene in an ALL patient by single strand conformational polymorphism analysis, abnormalities consisting of significantly smaller bands were detected in DNA samples. The smaller bands were found to have a 117 nucleotide deletion compared to the wild type sequence. This deletion corresponded to nucleotides 537-653 of the SH-PTP1 cDNA sequence, which corresponds in the protein sequence to roughly the second half of the second SH2 domain of SH-PTP1. Western blot analysis of other ALL patients also demonstrated putative abnormalities in SH-PTP1 expression, including low levels of SH-PTP1 expression and smaller proteins immunoreactive with anti-SH-PTP1 antibodies (see Example 5). Thus, SH-PTP1 and sequences which hybridize to SH-PTP1 can be used as probes or primers in methods of detecting abnormalities associated with neoplastic disease, such as for diagnosis or for detection of minimal residual disease.

The invention further relates to methods of altering tyrosine phosphatase activities encoded by the novel phosphatases. By altering (i.e., increasing or decreasing) tyrosine phosphatase activity, one can alter megakaryocyte cell function, and thereby alter platelet production.

In addition, the current invention pertains to a clone, designated 3B4-15, isolated from a λgt11 rat brain cDNA library. This clone, which contains a fragment of a novel PTP, was used to screen the rat brain library. A partial rat brain cDNA from this screen was used to screen a λgt11 human lung cDNA library; a cDNA clone from the human lung library was used to screen a λAZapII human fetal brain library. From this library was isolated several partial cDNA clones, and a clone encoding a novel PTP gene, designated S-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO.: 11). The SH-PTP2 gene sequences, or a portion thereof, may also be used to isolate genes encoding related PTPs and other related SH2-containing proteins in particular. SH-PTP2 was found to be expressed nearly ubiquitously and to be homologous to the Drosophilia corkscrew gene. Thus, SH-PTP2 and sequences which hybridize to S-PTP2 can be used to locate other genes which are involved in cellular growth control.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of the cloning strategy used to isolate SH-PTP1. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers with homology to nucleotide sequences encoding the amino acid sequences Lys-Cys-Ala-Glu-Tyr-Trp-Pro (KCAEYWP) and Val-His-Cys-Ser-Ala-Gly-Gly (VHCSAGG), with degeneracy of 512 and 8192, respectively, are represented by arrows. The expected 300 bp PCR product from PTP domain 1 is indicated. This probe is used to screen a library to isolate related clones with one or more homology domains.

FIG. 2 is the nucleic acid sequence of the coding strand of the human SH-PTP1 gene (SEQ ID NO.: 5). The two SH2 domains are underlined. The predicted protein sequence is shown. Standard single letter amino acid abbreviations are used: A=Ala; R=Arg; N=Asn; D=Asp; C=Cys; Q=Gln; E=Glu; G=Gly; H=His; I=Ile; L=Leu; K=Lys; M=Met; F=Phe; P=Pro; S=Ser; T=Thr; W=Trp; Y=Tyr; and V=Val. The two SH2 domains are underlined. Asterisks denote the stop codon, and a polyadenylation signal is marked by arrowheads. A potential phosphorylation site for cdc2 kinase is indicated by double underlining, and two potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites are noted by a dotted underline.

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the domain structure of the protein encoded by the human SH-PTP1 gene. The tandem SH2 domains are indicated (SH2) and the region having homology to the low-Mr (cytosolic) protein tyrosine phosphatases is indicated (PTP). Numbers refer to positions in the predicted amino acid sequence. "NH3" indicates the amino-terminus and "COOH" indicates the carboxyl-terminus.

FIGS. 4A and 4B are a pair of graphs illustrating the time course of dephosphorylation of model substrates Raytide (FIG. 4A) and myelin basic protein (MBP; FIG. 4B) by an SH-PTP fusion protein.

FIG. 5 is a histogram illustrating the effect of phosphatase inhibitors on GEX-SH-PTP activity. Phosphatase assays were carried out in the presence or absence of either sodium orthovanadate (NaVan; 200 mM) or sodium fluoride (NaF; 50 mM).

FIG. 6A shows the amino acid sequence comparisons of the phosphatase domains of rat brain SH-PTP2 (3B4-15 clone) (SEQ ID NO.: 15) and human fetal brain SH-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO.: 16) with other members of the PTP family. The phosphatase domains of the other members of the PTP family shown are csw (Csw; SEQ ID NO.: 17); SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 18); human receptor-linked PTPμ (hum RPTPμ; SEQ ID NO.: 19); human PTPβ (hum HPTPβ; SEQ ID NO.: 20); human LAR (hum LAR; SEQ ID NO.: 21); human PTPδ (SEQ ID NO.: 22); and DLAR (SEQ ID NO.: 23). Solid lines indicate identical residues; conservative substitutions, as determined by GAP (Devereux, J., et al., Nucl. Acids Res. 12:387-395 (1984)), are marked by colons and periods. In proteins containing more than one phosphatase domain, the N-terminal domain is shown. Residues common to SH-PTP2 and csw are indicated by boldface type and are also highlighted in the other PTPs; highly conserved residues found in PTPs are indicated by asterisks. Gapped alignments were made using PILEUP (Devereux, J., et al., Nucl. Acids Res. 12:387-395 (1984)). Sequence similarity extends throughout the entire PTP domain and is not shown due to space limitations.

FIG. 6B shows the nucleic acid sequence and the predicted amino acid sequence of human SH-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO.: 11). The nucleic acid sequence is numbered on the right and the predicted amino acid sequence is numbered underneath the amino acids. The two SH2 domains are indicated by a solid underline and the phosphatase domain is indicated by a dotted underline. Positions of the oligonucleotides used to prime the rat 3B4-15 fragment are in boldface type. Potential serine/threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation sites (Kennelly, P. J., et al., J. Biol. Chem. 266:15555-15558 (1991), Kemp, B. E., et al., TIBS 15:342-346 (1990)) include: T127, S499, S576, and S591 for protein kinase C; T12, T73, S118, T153, S189, S264, T337, T356, T397, T422, S448, S548, T553 for casein kinase II; S189, S234, S265, S576 for S6 kinase; S558, T564, T566 for cdc2; and Y62, Y 63, Y66, 79, Y375 for tyrosine kinases. An asterisk denotes the stop codon. The sequences of the remaining 5' and 3' untranslated regions have not yet been determined.

FIG. 6C is a schematic diagram of the predicted protein structure of SH-PTP2. The relative positions of the two SH2 domains and the PTP domain are indicated, corresponding to their predicted amino acid sequence.

FIG. 7 is an illustration of amino acid sequence comparisons between SH-PTP2, csw, SH-PTP1, and other known SH2 domains. The following amino acid sequences are shown: amino-terminal SH2 domain of SH-PTP2 (SH-PTP2-N; SEQ ID NO.: 24); amino-terminal SH2 domain of csw (Csw-N; SEQ ID NO.: 25); amino-terminal SH2 domain of SH-PTP1 (SH-PTP1N; SEQ ID NO.: 26); carboxyl-terminal SH2 domain of SH-PTP2 (SH-PTP2-C; SEQ ID NO.: 27); carboxyl-terminal SH2 domain of csw (Csw-C; SEQ ID NO.: 28); carboxyl-terminal SH2 domain of SH-PTP1 (SH-PTP1-C; SEQ ID NO.: 29); SH2 domain of human fer (hum fer; SEQ ID NO.: 30); SH2 domain of bovine guanidine triphosphate (GTPase) activating protein (bov GAP; SEQ ID NO.: 31); amino-terminal SH2 domain of mouse fgr (mouse fgr-N; SEQ ID NO.: 32); amino-terminal SH2 domain of human Nck (hum Nck-N; SEQ ID NO.: 33); SH2 domain of hydra stk (hydra stk; SEQ ID NO.: 34); carboxyl-terminal SH2 domain of mouse fgr (mouse fgr-C; SEQ ID NO.: 35); SH2 domain of chicken yes (Chick yes; SEQ ID NO.: 36); SH2 domain of human fyn (hum fyn; SEQ ID NO.: 37); SH2 domain of mouse lsk (mouse lsk; SEQ ID NO.: 38); SH2 domain of mouse blk (mouse blk; SEQ ID NO.: 39); carboxyl-terminal SH2 domain of human Nck (hum Nck-C; SEQ ID NO.: 40); and the consensus regions. The two SH2 domains of SH-PTP2, SH-PTP1 and csw are aligned with and compared above other SH2-containing proteins. A consensus sequence for the SH2 domains found in SH2-containing PTPs is given. Residues common to SH-PTP2 and csw are indicated by boldface type and are also highlighted in the other SH2-containing proteins. A • indicates invariant residues in SH2 proteins; +marks basic amino acids thought to be involved in phosphotyrosine recognition (Koch, E., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)). Those proteins with two SH2 domains are suffixed --N for amino-terminal and --C for carboxyl-terminal domains. Gapped alignments were made using PILEUP (Devereux, J., et al., Nucl. Acids Res. 12:387-395 (1984)) and are grouped into the conserved SH2 subdomains I-V ((Koch, E., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)).

FIG. 8 is a graph illustrating the tyrosine-specific phosphatase activity of bacterially expressed SH-PTP2, and the time course of dephosphorylation of 32 P-Raytide. Equal amounts of soluble protein from E. coli expressing GST or GST-SH-PTP2 (10 ng for GST (open circles), and 10 ng (closed circles) or 1 ng (closed squares) GST-SHPTP2) were incubated with 100 nM 32 P-labeled Raytide. At the indicated times, the supernatant was assayed for release of 32 P by a charcoal binding assay (57). GST-SH-PTP2-expressing lysates assayed in the presence of 100 mM Na3 VO4 (closed triangle) or 50 mM NaF (open triangle) are indicated.

FIG. 9 shows the amino acid sequences for primers which can be used to amplify regions of SH-PTP1 DNA. 200A =SEQ ID NO.: 41; 200B=SEQ ID NO.: 42; 400A=SEQ ID NO.: 43; 400B=SEQ ID NO.: 44; 600A=SEQ ID NO.: 45; 600B=SEQ ID NO.: 46; 800A=SEQ ID NO.: 47; 800B=SEQ ID NO.: 48; 1000A=SEQ ID NO.: 49; 1000B=SEQ ID NO.: 50; 1200A=SEQ ID NO.: 51; 1200B=SEQ ID NO.: 52; 1400A =SEQ ID NO.: 53, AND 1400B=SEQ ID NO.: 54.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) represent a family of enzymes which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues in a highly specific manner. As such, they control, along with phosphotyrosine kinases (PTKs), tyrosine phosphorylation states, a factor implicated in many aspects of cell function: growth factor responses, cellular differentiation, cell cycle control and neoplastic transformation. Megakaryocytes, as a hematopoietic lineage, are of particular interest with regard to tyrosine phosphorylation. Megakaryocytes contain large amounts of tyrosine kinase activity, and of the PTK c-src in particular (Golden, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83:852 (1986)). Rapid changes in tyrosine phosphorylation are seen in platelets in response to physiological agonists like thrombin (Golden, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 86:901 (1986); Ferrel and Martin, Mol. Cell Biol. 8:3603 (1988)). Physiologically, megakaryocytes are influenced by multiple hematopoietic growth factors, and exhibit a unique cell cycle that allows endoreduplication (nuclear duplication to highly ploidy states without cell division), with known potential for transformation. Eventually, megakaryocytes produce platelets, highly reactive cytoplasmic fragments with abundant phosphotyrosine levels, which vary in response to stimulation. The identification of novel members of the PTP family in megakaryocytes could clarify the role of tyrosine phosphatases in megakaryocyte function.

Isolation of a Novel PTP--First Method

As described in Example 1, in order to identify novel PTPs, a pair of degenerate oligonucleotide primers derived from conserved peptide regions of known PTPs was used in the polymerase chain reaction to isolate novel members of the PTP family from a rat megakaryocyte library. The primers spanned conserved cysteine residues in both duplicated PTP domains of CD45, DPTP, DLAR, and the single domain of PTP1B. Several PCR products were observed; however, only the expected 300 bp PCR product yielded protein tyrosine phosphatase sequences. The PCR products were cloned and 20 isolates were sequenced. Multiple PTP forms were identified including LAR, LRP, CD45, as well as two novel highly conserved PTP clones.

The 300 bp fragments from the novel isolates were utilized as probes to screen a rat megakaryocyte cDNA library. The clones corresponding to two novel PTPs, designated M1PTP and M2PTP, were further characterized. Of the two novel PTP's, the first, designated M1PTP (SEQ ID NO.: 1 and NO.: 2), encodes a 3.0 kb message with high homology to rat and human LAR, LRP, LCA and PTP1B across the first phosphatase domain (approximately 56% nucleic acid homology). RNA expression of M1PTP appeared to be predominantly in lung and megakaryocytes, as determined by Northern analysis. The second novel PTP, designated M2PTP (SEQ ID NO.: 3 and NO.: 4), has an 8 kb message with expression largely limited to megakaryocytes.

These studies reveal the ability of degenerate oligo-based PCR to identify PTPs that are not only novel but also of apparently restricted tissue expression. Clones encoding M1PTP and M2PTP will be useful in determining the role of tyrosine phosphatases in pulmonary and megakaryocyte physiology, for example.

As the M1PTP rat clone appeared to be incomplete, the insert was used in an additional screening of human lung and human erythroleukemia cell cDNA libraries. Several overlapping clones were isolated from each library. Sequence analysis of the clones revealed a full-length cDNA (FIG. 2).

Properties of SH-PTP1

The nucleotide sequence of the human clones encodes a predicted protein of 595 amino acids (FIG. 2; SEQ ID NO.: 5 and NO.: 6). The 300 amino acid PTP homology domain is located near the C-terminal end of the predicted protein (see FIG. 3), and retains all 25 invariant and many conserved amino acids of the PTP family. SH-PTP1 appears to lack a signal sequence or potential transmembrane region, indicating that it is a non-transmembrane PTP. SH-PTP1 encodes a protein having phosphatase activity (Example 1).

Surprisingly, the N-terminal end of the protein has two tandem SH2 homology repeats (underlined in FIG. 2; see also FIG. 3). Thus, the gene was designated SHPTP1. The N-terminal SH2 domain (SH2-N) begins at amino acid position 4, and the second SH2 domain (SH2-C) begins at amino acid position 110.

The homology between the two SH2 regions of SH-PTP1 and known SH2 domains spans the entire SH2 domain, clustering within the five conserved subdomains (Koch, C.A., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)). The three invariant residues of SH2 proteins are present in both SH2 domains of SH-PTP1. Two out of three basic amino acid residues proposed as possible phosphotyrosine recognition sites are also present. As with other SH2 proteins, the conserved subdomains of SH-PTP1 are interrupted by glycine/proline rich variable regions. Overall, the two SH2 domains in SH-PTP1 are most similar to the two SH2 domains of GAP (45% identity).

SH-PTP1 contains several potential phosphorylation sites (FIG. 2). There is a single site located in the second SH2 domain which conforms to the consensus target sequence for the cell cycle regulated cdc2 kinase (FIG. 2; Maller, Biochemistry 29:3157 (1990); Shalloway and Nurse, J. Cell Science, Supp. 12:53). There are also 12 potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites near the C-terminus. Numerous possible phosphorylation sites for other serine/threonine kinases exist throughout the molecule (Kemp and Pearson, Trends in Biochem. Sci. 15:342 (1990)).

Expression of SH-PTP1 and Implications for Its Role in Cell Signal Transduction

Interestingly, SH-PTP1 is expressed at high levels predominantly in hematopoietic cells. Disturbances in regulation of the activity of protein tyrosine kinases in hematopoietic cells, due to chromosomal abnormalities (e.g., the t(9;22) translocation in chronic myelogenous leukemia resulting in the bcr-abl gene fusion) or to retroviral gene transduction (e.g., of the v-erb B onogene), can contribute to leukemogenesis. Similarly, it is conceivable that deranged control of PTP with a key role in signal transduction could have similarly deleterious effects. Therefore, panels of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescent in situ hybridization were used to determine the chromosomal localization of the tyrosine phosphatase, SH-PTP1, which contains two SH2 domains. As shown in Example 2, SH-PTP1 was found to map to 12p13, a region commonly involved in leukemia-associated chromosomal abnormalities. Since SH-PTP1 is expressed at high levels in hematopoietic cells of all lineages, and since its expression is induced early in hematopoietic differentiation, altered expression and/or structure of SH-PTP1 may play a role in leukemogenesis. This hypothesis is supported by data demonstrating an abnormality in the SH-PTP1 gene of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). As described in Example 5, an ALL patient was found to have a deletion in the SH-PTP1 gene corresponding to roughly the second half of the second SH2 domain of the SH-PTP1 protein.

The presence of SH2 domains in a PTP also suggests several possible roles for SH-PTP1 in signal transduction (Plutzky, J., et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. USA 88:1123-1127 (1992); Yi, T., et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 12:836-846 (1992); Shen, S.--H., et al., Nature 52:736-739 (1991); Matthews, R. J., et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 12:2396-2405 (1992)). Further clues were provided by the recent finding that the Drosophilia developmental gene corkscrew (csw) is also a PTP containing two SH2 domains (Perkins, L. A. et al., Cell 70:225-236 (1992)). csw functions in the terminal class signal transduction pathway in concert with the Drosophila l(1)polehole gene to positively transduce signals generated by the torso receptor PTK (Perkins, L., et al., Cell 70:225-236 (1992)). l(1)polehole (D-raf) is the Drosophila counterpart of mammalian c-raf, a serine/threonine kinase (Ambrosio, L., et al., Nature 342.:288-290 (1989)). Based on sequence similarity between csw and SH-PTP1 , Perkins et al. (Cell 70:225-236 (1992)) suggested that SH-PTP1 might the mammalian csw homolog. However, unlike SH-PTP1, which is found mainly in hematopoietic cells (Plutzky, J., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. USA 88:1123-1127 (1992); Yi, T., et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 12:836-846 (1992); Matthews, R. J., et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 12:2396-2405 (1992))), csw is expressed ubiquitously during embryogenesis (Perkins, L., et al., Cell 70:225-236 (1992)).

Identification of a Novel PTP--Second Method

As described in Example 3, a method slightly different from that used to isolate SH-PTP1 was employed to isolate additional novel PTPs. Degenerate mixed oligonucleotides (sense, AA(A/G)TG(C/T) (C/G) (A/C)X(C/G)A(A/G)TA(C/T)TGGCC (SEQ ID NO.: 13); antisense, CCXA(C/T)XCCXGCXGA(A/G)CA(A/G)TGXAC (SEQ ID NO.: 14)) to conserved sequences in the catalytic domains of known PTPs, including SH-PTP1, were used to prime PCRs from a rat brain cDNA library. PCR fragments of the same size as those from the non-transmembrane PTP PTP-1B (˜300 bp) were subcloned and sequenced. Forty-two subclones which contained sequences from the phage vector or the elongation factor, but not conserved sequences from PTPs, were labeled and used in negative selection to eliminate any remaining clones which contained phage vector or elongation factor, but not sequences. Over half of the remaining clones contained inserts with strong PTP similarities; although most represented rat homologs of known PTPs, one novel clone, designated 3B4-15, was isolated (SEQ ID NO.: 9). 3B4-15 was used to re-screen the rat cDNA library and partial cDNAs from the rat cDNA library were used to screen a human being library. A partial cDNA clone from the lung library was used in turn to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library, which resulted in several partial cDNA clones as well as a novel PTP gene, designated SH-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO.: 11).

Properties of SH-PTP2

The nucleotide sequence of the human clone encodes a predicted protein of 593 amino acids (SEQ ID NO.: 11 and 12), with a predicted molecular weight of 68 kD. A single tyrosine phosphatase domain is located at amino acids 268-525; it contains residues essential for catalysis. Two SH2 domains are found N-terminal to the PTP domain. No hydrophobic region appears to be present, indicating that SH-PTP2, like SH-PTP1, is a cytosolic protein. Human SH-PTP2 was found to be similar to the Drosophilia gene corkscrew (csw); overall, the protein sequences are 62% identical. As described in Example 3, the SH2 domains of SH-PTP2 are more similar to csw than to SH-PTP1.

Role of SH2 Domains in PTPs

The specificity and avidity of SH2 domains for phosphotyrosyl residues are dictated by their amino acid sequences (Koch, C., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)). Since the SH2 domains of SH-PTps comprise a distinct subfamily, the SH-PTPs may bind to similar or related subsets of phosphotyrosyl proteins. In addition, the phosphotyrosyl binding partners of the SH-PTPs may be distinct from those bound by other SH2-containing proteins. As mentioned above, the first conserved basic amino acid in both SH2 domains of the SH-PTPs is replaced by a glycol residue. Recent x-ray co-crystallographic studies of the SH2 domain of Src (J. Kuriyan, personal communication) indicate that this conserved residue is located on the surface and interacts with the phenolic ring of the bound phosphotyrosine. SH2 domains with an arginine to glycine substitution at this position might be predicted to have lower avidity and/or relaxed specificity for phosphotyrosyl peptides. Decreased avidity of binding might be important to prevent binding of SH-PTPs to key tyrosyl-phosphorylated secondary signaling molecules at inappropriate times during signal transmission. Specific SH-PTP2/phosphotyrosyl interactions might then be promoted at particular times by post-translational modifications of SH-PTP2 that function to increase binding avidity. Altered specificity conceivably could include binding to phosphoseryl or phosphothreonyl residues. However, substitution at the first conserved basic residue is clearly not necessary for relaxed specificity; the SH2 domain of Abl, which does bind to serylphosphorylated peptides (Pendergast, A. M., et al., Cell 66:161-171 (1991)), has an arginine at this position. Moreover, glycol substitution does not preclude phosphotyrosyl binding, since recent work indicates that SH-PTP1 binds to specific phosphotyrosyl proteins. Experiments in progress should help to define how glycol substitution alters the physicochemical properties of SH2-phospho-tyrosyl peptide interactions.

The SH2 domain of an SH-PTP could target an SH-PTP to signal transduction complexes for signal termination or amplification. Termination could occur by reversing the tyrosine phosphorylation of receptor activated signalling proteins. Amplification could take place by releasing bound signaling molecules, freeing them to find other substrates within the cell.

The observation of SH2 domains in a PTP, previously identified only in tyrosine kinases, signal transduction proteins, and certain cytoskeletal proteins (e.g., tension) provides a possible link between the tyrosine kinases and tyrosine phosphatases. Both classes of proteins have recognized roles in control of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of tyrosine has also been implicated in the response of cells to growth factors and hormones. The balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states depends upon the balance of activities of tyrosine kinases and tyrosine phosphatases.

Coordination of the activities of kinases and phosphatases may occur through the SH2 domains. Specific regulatory proteins may coregulate specific kinases and phosphatases to regulate processes of the cell cycle. In addition, an SH2 domain of a selected tyrosine phosphatase may interact with a selected tyrosine kinase to regulate kinase function. Such interaction could occur at a site of auto-phosphorylation on the tyrosine kinase, for example. In megakaryocytes, such regulation could be essential to the control of megakaryocytopoiesis and the unique cell cycle.

Uses of the Present Invention

The strategies outlined herein can be used to isolate other PTPs. Other degenerate probes may be designed based on the conserved sequences present in SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 5), or SH-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO.: 11), for example. In addition, the cloned M1PTP, M2PTP, SH-PTP1, 3B4-15, and SH-PTP2 genes, or portions of each of the foregoing, can be used as probes to isolate additional PTPs. A "portion" of a gene, as used herein, indicates a part of the gene encoding conserved sequences in the M1PTP, SH-PTP1, 3B4-15, and SH-PTP2 genes. The SH2 domains of these genes are of particular interest as possible probes for PTPs or other proteins with one or more SH2 homology regions. Possibly, specific SH2 regions will be found in association with coregulated tyrosine phosphatases and tyrosine kinases. To obtain other PTPs, stringency conditions should be tailored to eliminate hybridization of the probes to extraneous DNA sequences (see Sambrook et al. (eds), Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual (2nd ed.) V.2, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories Press (1989), particularly ch. 11.45).

Novel PTP genes or nucleotide sequences which can be isolated using M1PTP (see SEQ ID NO.: 1), M2PTP (see SEQ ID NO.: 3), SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 5), or portions thereof, under conditions which result in the isolation of M1PTP, M2PTP, or SH-PTP1, and which encode at least one SH2 domain, are designated "MPTP homologs". SH-PTP1 itself is an example of an MPTP homolog. If less stringent conditions than those used to isolate M1PTP, M2PTP and SH-PTP1 are used, the isolated genes will be termed "MPTP related". Novel PTP genes or nucleotide sequences which can be isolated using 3B4-15(SEQ ID NO.: 9), SH-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO.: 11), or portions thereof, under conditions which result in the isolation of SH-PTP2 and which encode of least one SH2 domain, are designated "3B4-15 homologs". SH-PTP2 is an example of a 3B4 -15 homolog. If less stringent conditions are used, the isolated genes will be termed "3B4-15 related."

Use of an SH2 region as a probe could lead to the isolation of genes for tyrosine kinases, and further, for signal transduction proteins. For example, by analogy to phospholipase C-γ, signal transduction proteins which mediate megakaryocyte responses to a growth factor may contain SH2 domains. Species such as these do not contain PTP homology domains, but can be isolated using SH2 domains as probes. If isolated under conditions which lead to isolation of M1PTP, M2PTP, SH-PTP1, 3B4-15, or SH-PTP2 these species would be termed "SH2 homologs". If less stringent conditions are used, the isolated genes or nucleic acid sequences are termed "SH2 related".

The cloned genes can be used to produce proteins or peptides encoded by the nucleotide sequences (see e.g., SEQ ID NO.: 2, NO.: 4, NO.: 6, NO.: 10, and NO.: 12). The isolation and characterization of additional PTPs encoded by homologs can provide information regarding the regulation of pathways controlled by tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

(a) Uses of MPTP Homologs and MPTP-Related Genes

By overexpressing or interfering with the function of megakaryocyte PTPs or MPTP homologs, one can alter megakaryocyte and/or platelet function. PTPs may have a role in controlling the differentiation of stem cells into megakaryocytes (megakaryocytopoiesis) and the megakaryocyte cell cycle. As used herein, megakaryocytopoiesis refers to the differentiation of megakaryocytes from stem or progenitor cells, as well as to the endoreduplication process which generates polyploid megakaryocytes. Fragmentation of megakaryocytes generates small nucleate platelets, which are required for normal hemostasis. Thus, alteration of megakaryocyte function, in turn will influence platelet function.

A number of clinical disorders of megakaryocytopoiesis are known, such as congenital megakaryocyte hypoplasia,-acquired a megakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura, and megakaryoblastic leukemia (Gewirtz, A. M. and Hoffman, R., Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America 4(1):43-64 (1990)). Increases in bone marrow megakaryocytes and thrombocytosis are frequently observed in myeloproliferative disorders. In addition, megakaryocyte hyperplasia and increased platelet counts have been observed in association with a variety of disease states, including infection and cancer (solid tumors). Platelets play a role in pathological processes, such as thrombosis, atherogenesis, and cancer cell metastasis. Platelets are also important in wound healing. Thus, pathogenic states are associated with both increases and decreases in megakaryocyte and platelet function.

Increasing or decreasing MPTP activity (e.g., tyrosine phosphorylation) to alter (i.e., increase or decrease) megakaryocyte function (e.g., megakaryocytopoiesis) may have therapeutic value in treating disorders and pathological processes in which megakaryocytes and platelets are involved, such as those described above. For example, the SH-PTP1 gene can be inserted into an appropriate retroviral expression vector and introduced into bone marrow stem cells to alter megakaryocyte and/or platelet function. Expression of a fragment of the SH-PTP1 gene or a mutated version (e.g., dominant negative mutant) may lead to interference with SH-PTP1 function, and a desired alteration in activity. In one embodiment, expression of a fragment of SH-PTP1 comprising an SH2 domain can lead to modulation of SH-PTP1 activity.

In another embodiment, a mutant which is inactive as a phosphatase is designed and introduced into a cell. Cellular (e.g., megakaryocyte) proteins which normally interact with a PTP via its SH2 domain can interact with the sH2 domain of the inactive mutant PTP, rather than with the corresponding cellular PTP. In effect, such an inactive mutant PTP acts as a decoy, and can be used to modulate PTP function in the cell, thereby altering cell function. Such mutants are also useful for studying SH-PTPase function. A mutant lacking phosphatase activity is described in Example 1.

Interestingly, one of the clones isolated from the HEL cell line contains a two-base deletion (SEQ ID NO.: 7) relative to the SH-PTP1 sequence (SEQ ID NO.: 5). This deletion (AG at position 1868-1869) results in a change in reading frame and is predicted to generate a variant protein with an altered and extended C-terminus (see SEQ ID NO.: 8) relative to that encoded by SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 5 and NO.: 6). It is possible that, in addition to the version designated SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 5), the HEL cell line encodes an altered version of SH-PTP1 (a variant SH-PTP1; SEQ ID NO.: 7). cDNAs corresponding to the variant SH-PTP1 and to SH-PTP1 were isolated from the HEL line library, while only SH-PTP1 was isolated from the lung library. Possibly, the variant form arises from use of a cryptic splice acceptor site. Alternatively, the variant may have altered activity which has contributed to transformation of the cell line.

The localization of SH-PTP1 at 12p13 is also of interest (Example 2), since the distal short arm of chromosome 12 is involved in chromosomal abnormalities in several forms of leukemia. Approximately 10% of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases display abnormalities in the 12p12-13 region; these include interstitial and terminal deletions and trans-locations (Raimondi et al., Blood 68:69-75 (1986); Carroll et al., Blood 70:1962-1965 (1987)). Several different chromosomes participate with 12p in these translocations, suggesting that a 12p gene(s) is the target for these rearrangements. An intriguing exception to this theme is the dicentric translocation [tdic (9;12) (p11;p12)] found in about 1% of pediatric ALLs (Carroll et al., Blood 70:1962-1965 (1987)). Deletions of the 9p11 region are found independently in ALL (Pellet et al., Leukemia 5:468-472 (1991)), raising the tantalizing possibility that the dicentric translocation simultaneously targets 9p and 12p genes. Adult leukemias, of both lymphoid and myeloid origin, also display 12p abnormalities, although at much lower frequency (Zaccaria et al., Cancer Genet. Cytogenet. 15:309-314 (1985); Wilmoth et al., Cancer Genet. Cytogenet. 15:95-98 (1985 ); Berger et al., Cancer Genet. Cytogenet. 29:9-21 (1987); Keene et al., Br. J. Haematol. 67:25-31 (1987)). Such abnormalities may be particularly common in leukemias associated with eosinophilia (Keene et al., Br. J. Haematol. 67:25-31 (1987). Involvement of 12p12 has been implicated in some studies and 12p13 in others. However, given the difficulty of precisely specifying chromosomal breakpoints in clinical specimens, it is possible that all of these leukemia-associated 12p abnormalities are targeting a single gene, an SH-PTP, at 12p.

The ubiquitous expression in hematopoietic cells of all lineages and differentiation stages suggests that SHPTP1 plays an important role in hematopoietic cell signal transduction. This notion is further supported by data indicating that SH-PTP1 expression is induced at an early stage of hematopoietic cell differentiation (not shown). Mutations in an SH2-containing PTP could perturb normal hematopoietic growth or differentiation. Thus, SH-PTP1 is a good candidate for the gene targeted by leukemia-associated 12p chromosome abnormalities. As such, an SHPTP1 sequence can be used in the diagnosis of neoplastic disease. Sequences of SH-PTP1 can be particularly useful for diagnosis of neoplasias associated with chromosome 12p abnormalities (e.g., translocations, inversions, deletions, mutations) and of 12p13 abnormalities, for confirmation of such a diagnosis, for monitoring the progression of treatment, and/or for detection of minimal residual disease. In addition, other sequences capable of hybridizing with SH-PTP1 (e.g., other SH-PTPs) can also be used for diagnosis of chromosome 12p-related neoplasia. For instance, SH-PTP1 can be as useful in the diagnosis of leukemia of lymphoid or myeloid origin in an individual, such as acute leukemia (e.g., adult or pediatric acute lympho-blastic leukemia). Other SH-PTPs may be similarly associated with neoplasia and can be useful for detecting abnormalities which are indicative of the presence of those diseases.

For example, it is possible to detect chromosome 12p abnormalities using as a probe a nucleotide sequence which is complementary to all or a portion of either strand of the SH-PTP1 gene (e.g., an SH-PTP1 sequence) and, particularly, a portion which includes the abnormality or abnormal region to be detected. A sample, such as a tumor or blood sample, is obtained from an individual. The sample is processed in a manner appropriate for rendering the nucleic acids (RNA and/or DNA) present in the sample available for hybridization. The processed sample is combined with the probe under conditions appropriate for hybridization to occur between the probe and a nucleic acid present in the sample. Hybridization can be detected using known techniques, for example, by use of a labeled probe or by detecting the probe in a second step (e.g., by enzymatic amplification). Suitable labels include, but are not limited to, radioisotopes, enzymes, and fluorescent labels.

Probes useful in this method include those which are sufficiently complementary to all or a portion of the SH-PTP1 gene to hybridize to the target region in 12p and be detected under the conditions used. A probe can be complementary to a region of a chromosome (e.g., 12p) or a gene (e.g., SH-PTP1) which includes the abnormal region or abnormality to be detected. For example, a probe can be complementary to a specific mutation(s) or alteration(s), the presence of which is associated with neoplastic disease. Hybridization with nucleic acids in a sample can be indicative of the presence of the mutation(s) or alteration(s) and of the neoplastic disease. The presence of an abnormality in a sample can also be revealed by a hybridization pattern which is different from that obtained from a normal sample.

Similar methods can also be used to detect alterations in the SH-PTP1 gene. Alternatively, it is possible to detect abnormalities in the SH-PTP1 gene using methods such as those described in Example 5. For example, single strand conformational polymorphism analysis (SSCP) or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) can be used to examine the SH-PTP1 gene in DNA from a patient suspected of having an altered gene, such as an ALL patient, to determine whether a deletion or alteration of the SH-PTP1 gene exists. Primers such as those shown in FIG. 9 (SEQ ID NO.: 41-54) can be used to amplify regions of the SH-PTP1 gene. Alternatively, Western blot analysis can be conducted to determine whether an alteration in the expression or structure of the SH-PTP1 protein exists.

(b) Uses of 3B4-15 Homologs and 3B4-15-Related Genes

The similarity between SH-PTP2 and csw has interesting implications for SH-PTP2's role in signal transduction. Anterior and posterior structures in the developing Drosophila embryo are dependent upon the localized activation of the transmembrane tyrosine kinase torso, which ultimately activates transcription of the tailless and huckebein transcription factors (Bronner, G., et al., Mech. of Devel. 35:205-211 (1991), Pignoni, F., et al., Cell 62:151-163 (1990)). The torso signal is thought to be conducted via a phosphorylation cascade, at least one component of which is D-raf (reviewed in St. Johnston, D., et al., Cell 68:201-219 (1992)). csw functions to potentiate the D-raf signal (Perkins, L. A., et al., Cell 70:225-236 (1992)).

Analogously, in mammalian cells, the signal generated by many, if not all, GFs appears to be transmitted from receptgr tyrosine kinases to the nucleus via a pathway(s) dependent on c-Raf (and perhaps other Raf family members) (Rapp, U.R., Oncogene 6:495-500 (1991), Li, P., et al., Cell 64:479-482 (1991)). If SH-PTP2 is the mammalian csw homolog, it likely acts in proximity to Raf in signal transduction. Some workers have reported a direct interaction between Raf and activated GF receptors and/or that Raf is a substrate of receptor tyrosine kinases (App, H., et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:913-919 (1991); Baccarini, M., et al., EMBO J. 9:3649-3657 (1990); Morrison, D. K., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:8855-8859 (1988); Morrison, D. K., et al., Cell 58:648-657, (1989)). However, the extent to which Raf is found phosphorylated by and/or associated with different activated GF receptors varies substantially in different systems and in reports from different laboratories (reviewed in Rapp, U. R., Oncogene 6:495-500 (1991), Li, P., et al., Cell 64:479-82 (1991)). Moreover, unlike all other proteins that interact with activated GF receptors, Raf lacks SH2 domains.

One appealing hypothesis, based upon the genetic relationship between csw and D-raf, is that SH-PTP2 and Raf physically interact. SH-PTP2 could then act, at least in part, as an adapter molecule, bringing Raf to activated receptors. Since SH-PTP2 is a tyrosine phosphatase, such a model might account for the variability seen in Raf tyrosine phosphorylation and receptor association: slight variations in conditions could lead to variable tyrosyl dephosphorylation of Raf during extraction. SH-PTP2 might simultaneously function to dephosphorylate the activated receptor, thus terminating the GF signal. Alternative explanations are also possible. For example, there could be one or more other intervening signaling molecules between SH-PTP2 and Raf. Alternatively, the reported genetic interaction between csw and D-raf (Perkins, L. A., et al., Cell 70:225-236 (1992)) could imply that SH-PTP2 is a substrate for Raf and/or vice-versa.

Any model proposing an SH-PTP2/Raf interaction relies on the proposition that SH-PTP2 is the mammalian csw homolog. Despite their striking similarity, SH-PTP2 does differ from csw in its lack of an insert in its phosphatase domain. Although Perkins, et al. (Cell 70:225-236 (1992)) speculate that it may have a regulatory role, the function of the csw insert is unknown. Several csw transcripts exist, and their relative abundance varies at different stages of development (Perkins, L. A., et al., Cell 70:225-236 (1992)). These transcripts probably arise as a consequence of alternative splicing, but their precise genetic content has not yet been defined. It will be interesting to see whether all csw isoforms have a phosphatase insert. Similarly, it will be important to determine whether insert-containing isoforms of SH-PTP2 exist. The methods described herein can be used to isolate such isoforms; for example, SH-PTP2 or antibodies to its encoded protein can be used as probes. Even if SH-PTP2 is not the true csw homolog, the sequence features of the SH2-containing PTPs allow the definition of a consensus sequence for SH2 domains associated with PTPs (FIG. 7) and suggest straightforward PCR approaches towards the isolation of other SH2-containing PTPs.

(c) Uses of SH2 Homologs and SH2-Related Genes

PTPs may also act as anti-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. As such, overexpression of the phosphatase activity could lead to resistance to transformation mediated by a protein tyrosine kinase such as src. Activation or expression of the PTP could also be expected to reverse the transformed phenotype of a cell by an oncogenic tyrosine kinase. Introduction of the SH-PTP1 or SH-PTP2 gene into cells, in a manner such that it is expressed or overexpressed, could lead to resistance to transformation or to reversal of the transformed phenotype of a transformed cell.

In addition, the deletion or inactivation of a PTP could cause enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to transformation. In this situation, the PTP would act as a recessive oncogene in a cell. Reintroduction of an operative PTP into such a cell could restore the cell to normal, reduce or reverse the transformation process.

The present invention will now be illustrated by the following Examples, which are not intended to be limiting in any way.

EXAMPLE 1 Cloning of SH-PTP1 and Related Sequences

One strategy for isolation of novel protein tyrosine phosphatases is summarized in FIG. 1. As described below in more detail, two cDNA clones encoding novel PTPs were isolated from a rat megakaryocyte cDNA library using the strategy shown in FIG. 1. One of these clones (M1PTP; SEQ ID NO.: 1) was used as a probe to isolate a series of overlapping human cDNA clones defining the SH-PTP1 gene (SEQ ID NO.:5).

Degenerate Oligonucleotide-Based PCR and Library Screening

In order to isolate clones with both structural and functional homology to PTPs, degenerate oligomers were designed corresponding to amino acid sequences spanning conserved cysteine residues. The nucleotide sequence of the 20 base pair (bp) sense primer (SEQ ID NO.: 13) (SEQ ID NO.: 14) was based on the conserved amino acid sequence KCAEYWP, and incorporated several possible conservative substitutions. In particular, the sequences coded for all possible combinations of the peptide sequence KC[A, D or H] [Q or E] YWP. The oligonucleotides designed had a degeneracy of 512 and included an EcoRI site on the 5'-end. In the nucleotide sequences below, X indicates A, G, C or T at that position. [T/C] indicates a T or a C at that position of the oligonucleotide, for example. ##STR1##

The 23 bp antisense primer (SEQ ID NO.: 14) was based on the non-coding strand corresponding to the conserved amino acid sequence VHCSAG[V/I] G. The set of oligonucleotides had a degeneracy of 8192, and a BamHI site on the 3'-end. (In the amino acid sequence below, the C-terminal residue is at the left.) ##STR2##

A rat megakaryocyte cDNA library was amplified via liquid lysis and the bacteriophage were isolated. The PCR protocol included the following conditions:

______________________________________900 ng of bacteriophage, 5 minutes at 100°______________________________________denaturation    1 minute at 94°annealing       1 minute at 45°extension       3 minutes at 720 for 30 cyclesfinal extension          10 minutes at 72°.______________________________________

PCR products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis on 1.0% agarose gels. Seven bands ranging in size from 100 to 1000 base pairs were consistently observed. The DNA in these bands was subcloned into vector pUC19 after digestion with EcoRI and BamHI, using standard techniques.

Consistent with the expected intraprimer distance of 300 bp, of all size inserts analyzed via sequencing, only inserts from the PCR products of 300 bp yielded clones with homology to PTPs. Twenty clones with 300 bp inserts were sequenced. Among these were 7 clones which had no homology to PTPs or other known cDNAs, 6 clones which were identified as rat CD45, and 1 clone which was subsequently reported as Leukocyte Common Antigen Related Phosphatase (LRP), a transmembrane PTP. Two additional clones of the twenty analyzed, M1PTP (3 isolates) and M2PTP (1 isolate), were identified as novel PTPs (see SEQ ID NO.: 2 and SEQ ID NO.: 4, respectively) based on sequence homology. The genes corresponding to the rat megakaryocyte M1PTP and M2PTP clones were initially termed M1PTP (see SEQ ID NO.: 1) and M2PTP (see SEQ ID NO.: 3), respectively.

The 300 bp fragments from M1PTP (see SEQ ID NO.: 1) and M2PTP (SEQ ID NO.: 3) were labeled and used as probes to screen a rat megakaryocyte cDNA library derived from elutriated megakaryocyte poly A RNA. A total of 1×106 plaques were screened for each clone, with subsequent isolates plaque purified and subcloned into pUC19. Rat cDNA clones obtained from the library using the M1PTP PCR probe were sequenced using λgt11 sequencing primers, as well as specific oligomers designed from sequence data from both 5' and 3' directions. The resulting sequence is designated SEQ ID NO.: 1.

Characterization of M1PTP and M2PTP

M1PTP and M2PTP were characterized according to message size; tissue expression in normal and busulfan-induced pancytopenic rats, to eliminate white blood cell/platelet contamination (tissues analyzed included: brain, lung, heart, kidney, adrenal, muscle, skeletal muscle, spleen, and liver); expression in the human erythroleukemia cell line (HEL), known for its megakaryocytic features; inducibility of message in response to a non-specific differentiating agent (DMSO) in HEL cells; PTP homology via computer analysis; and Southern blot analysis.

For Northern blot analysis, RNA was prepared from whole tissues via the cold phenol method, fractionated by electrophoresis on denaturing formaldehyde gels, transferred to Nytran membranes, and hybridized to a random-primer generated 32 P-labeled probes in Church-Gilbert buffer. The 32 P-labeled probes used to probe Northern blots include a 1745 bp fragment encompassing the coding sequence of M1PTP and a 300 bp fragment from the PTP homology region of M2PTP.

Of the two novel PTPs, the first, designated M1PTP, encodes a 3.0 kb message. Although M1PTP mRNA was detected in RNA isolated from other tissues (e.g., kidney, spleen, liver), M1PTP expression appeared to occur predominantly in the lung and megakaryocytes. M1PTP mRNA was also detected in RNA isolated from HEL cells, which have megakaryocyte features. Further, expression in HEL cells was shown to be inducible by treatment with DMSO. M1PTP displayed strong sequence similarity at the nucleotide level (56%) to rat and human LAR, LRP, LCA and PTP1B across the first phosphatase domain.

The second clone, M2PTP, encodes an 8.0 kb message, with expression largely restricted to megakaryocytes. It is possible that mRNA detected in RNA from other tissue samples is due to contamination by platelets, and that both M1PTP and M2PTP expression is highly tissue specific.

Isolation of Human M1PTP

The M1PTP rat cDNA clone isolated (SEQ ID NO.: 1) did not appear to be a full-length clone. The sequence ended in frame with no initiator methionine (see SEQ ID NO.: 1 and SEQ ID NO.: 2). Furthermore, the length of the messenger RNA detected on Northern blots indicated that the gene was larger than that encoded by the isolated clone. Because the M1PTP gene was highly expressed in lung and HEL cells as determined by Northern analysis, both human lung (λgt11 library; Clontech) and human erythroleukemia cell line (HEL; λgt11 library from Dr. M. Ponzc, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) cDNA libraries were probed from M1PTP clones.

Using a 1745 bp fragment (see SEQ ID NO.: 1) which spans the M1PTP coding sequence form the rat M1PTP cDNA clone as a probe, a total of five overlapping cDNA clones were isolated. Three of these clones were isolated from the lung library and 2 clones were isolated from the HEL library. The nucleotide sequence encoded by the clones from the two sources appear to be identical, and the sequence of the full-length composite gene is shown in FIG. 2. The human gene, which was isolated using the rat M1PTP gene fragment as a probe, is designated SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 5). An additional sequence was isolated from the library obtained from the HEL cell line. This variant form lacks the AG at positions 1868 and 1869 of SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 5) and was designated SEQ ID NO.: 7.

Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA was carried out using a fragment comprising the full-length human SH-PTP1 coding sequence as a probe. Although genomic DNA was digested with seven different restriction enzymes (PvuII, BglI, BglII, XbaI, DraI, PstI and EcoRI), hybridization to only one to approximately four bands was observed under stringent conditions. This analysis suggested that SH-PTP1 is a single-copy gene.

Total RNA was prepared from rat brain, heart, lung, liver, kidney platelets, and elutriated megakaryocytes (Berkow et al., J. Lab Clin. Med. 103:811 (1984)) by the guanidinium isothiocyanate method, electrophoresed on 1% agarose/2.2M formaldehyde gels, transferred to nylon membranes, and hybridized with randomly labeled SH-PTP probe. Hybridizations were carried out in Church-Gilbert buffer (Church and Gilbert, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81:1991 (1984)). Ethidium bromide staining of the gel revealed equal loading of RNA. The Northern analysis of total RNA revealed that SH-PTP1 is expressed at high levels in megakaryocytes and platelets, and also in lung. SH-PTP1 is also expressed in primary tracheobronchial epithelial cells. Expression in other tissues (e.g., rat brain, heart, liver, kidney) was substantially lower. Absent or low level signals were also observed in adrenal, stomach, diaphragm, and skeletal muscle. Further characterization of SH-PTP1 indicated that it is a phosphoprotein having a-molecular weight of 66,000.

Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity of SH-PTP1

(a) Preparation of Fusion Proteins.

The SH-PTP1 coding sequence was introduced into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-2T (Pharmacia; Smith and Johnson, Gene 67:31-40 (1988)). An SH-PTP1 EcoRI fragment was inserted into vector pGEX-2T which had been cleaved with EcoRI to generate a fusion protein. (The variant SH-PTP1 was used in this assay; SEQ ID NO.: 7). Several recombinant clones were obtained. The fusion protein consisted of glutathione S-transferase plus a 9 amino acid spacer fused to the complete SH-PTP1 protein sequence of SEQ ID NO.: 7, and is referred to as GEX-SH phosphatase (GEX-SH-PTP).

For expression of GEX fusion proteins, freshly diluted overnight cultures were induced at mid-log phase with 1 mM isopropyl β-thiogalactopyranoside. Lysates were prepared from 1 ml of induced culture, by resuspending in 150 μl of phosphate buffered saline containing 1% NP40 and sonicating (0° C.) for 3 minutes. Parallel cultures expressing the parental GEX-2T vector, which products glutathione S-transferase alone, were treated similarly.

(b) phosphatase Activity of GEX-Fusions.

Phosphatase activity against two model substrates, the synthetic peptide Raytide (FIG. 4A), and myelin basic protein (MBP; FIG. 4B), was determined. Raytide (Oncogene Sciences) and myelin basic protein (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, Mo.) were phosphorylated on their unique tyrosines using recombinant p43 v-ab1 protein (Oncogene Sciences) and γ32 P-ATP (200 mCi), and the product was precipitated and washed as described (Streuli, M. et al., EMBO J. 9:2399-2407 (1990)). Typical specific activities obtained were from 1 to 2×105 cpm/pmol, representing 1 to 2% incorporation (Raytide) and 5 to 10% incorporation (MBP).

Phosphatase assays (in 25 mM imidazole, pH 7.2, 1 mg/ml BSA, 10 mM dithiothreitol, 100 nM phosphorylated substrate, and bacterial protein) were incubated at 30° C. for the indicated times. Dephosphorylation was measured as described (Streuli, M. et al., EMBO J. 9:2399-2407 (1990)).

Equal amounts of total protein (500 ng for GEX and GEX-SH-PTP; 50 ng for "GEX-SH-PTP 1:10") isolated from E. coli expressing glutathione transferase (GEX) or the glutathione transferase-SH-PTP1 fusion (GEX-SH-PTP) were incubated with the indicated substrate. At the indicated times (FIG. 4), data points were taken in triplicate and assayed for release of 32 P using the charcoal binding assay. The mean ± SEM is indicated for each time point. Lysates from cells expressing GEX-SH phosphatase displayed substantially increased phosphatase activity against the two model substrates as compared with control lysates expressing glutathione-S-transferase from the parental GEX-2T vector (FIG. 4A and 4B). However, there was no significant activity against the serine phosphorylated model substrate Kemptide (data not shown), consistent with a specificity for tyrosine. Similar results were obtained with fusion proteins which were partially purified on glutathione-agarose beads (Pharmacia; Smith and Johnson, Gene 67:31-40 (1988)).

The effect of phosphatase inhibitors on GEX-SH-PTPase activity was also determined using the phosphatase assay (FIG. 5). Phosphatase assays were carried out as described above in the presence or absence of either sodium orthovanadate (200 mM) or sodium fluoride (50 mM). Phosphate release was measured after fifteen minutes of incubation. As predicted for a tyrosine phosphatase, GEX-SH-PTPase activity was strongly inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, but not by sodium fluoride (FIG. 5). In fact, sodium fluoride appeared to be moderately stimulatory.

An Inactive Mutant SH-PTP1

A cysteine residue located in the "VHCSAG" homology sequence of protein tyrosine phosphatases is located at the active site of the enzyme. A mutation of the cysteine to serine has been shown to abolish phosphatase activity in other PTPs. Using the polymerase chain reaction, SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 5) was mutated as follows: ##STR3## This nucleotide change replaces cysteine 453 (Cys) of SH-PTP1, located in the VHCSAG sequence of the encoded protein (bold letters in FIG. 2, with nucleotide sequence in capital letters), with serine 453 (Ser) to encode a VHSSAG sequence. The altered SH-PTP1 nucleotide sequence encoding the "VHSSAG mutant" is designated SH-PTP1 (S453) The resulting "VHSSAG mutant" an SH-PTP1 protein having a Cyc 453 to Ser 453 mutation, was then expressed as a fusion protein in bacteria as described above, and was found to be inactive as a phosphatase.

EXAMPLE 2 Chromosomal Localization of SH-PTP1

DNA was prepared from 32 somatic cell hybrids involving 15 unrelated human and 4 mouse cell lines (Shows et al., Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 21:99-104 (1978); Shows, et al., in: Advances in Human Genetics, Hattis, H and K. Hirschhorn, Eds., Vol. 12, (Plenum Press: New York, London), pp. 341-452 (1982); Shows et al., Somat. Cell Mol. Gen. 10:315-318 (1984)). The hybrids were characterized by karyotyping, and with mapped enzyme markers (Shows et al., Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 21:99-104 (1978); Shows et al. In: Advances in Human Genetics. Hattis, H and K. Hirschhorn, Eds., Vol. 12, (Plenum Press: New York, London), pp. 341-452 (1982); Shows, T. In: Isozymes: Current Topics in Biological and Medical Research, Rattazzi, M. C. et al., Eds Vol. 10, (A. R. Liss, New York) pp. 323-330 (1983)). The properties of the hybrids are summarized in Table 1. The chromosome content of each hybrid is indicated. A "t" in Table 1 indicates that only the translocation indicated in the column labelled "Translocations" is present, and that no intact chromosome is present.

Bands corresponding to human and mouse SH-PTP1 can easily be distinguished on Southern blots of EcoRI-digested DNA. Accordingly, hybrid cell DNA was digested with EcoRI, fractionated by agarose gel electrophoresis, and transferred to Nylon membranes for Southern blotting as described (Naylor et al., J. Exp. Med. 57:1020-1027 (1983)). The 2.2 kb full length SH-PTP1 cDNA was labelled with α32 P-dCTP using the random primers method (Feinberg and Vogelstein, Anal. Biochem. 132:6-13 (1983)) and hybridized to the blot. Each hybrid DNA was scored for the presence (+) or absence (-) or human SH-PTP1 bands. The results of this analysis were compared against the known presence or absence of specific human chromosomes in each hybrid. A 0% discordance indicates matched segregation of the probe with a particular chromosome. As shown in the Table, there was 0% discordance between the presence of human SH-PTP1 bands by Southern analysis and the presence of human chromosome 12 in a given hybrid. Thus, SH-PTP1 maps to chromosome 12 by somatic cell hybrid analysis.

                                  TABLE 1__________________________________________________________________________Segregation of SHPTP1 with Human Chromosomes in EcoRI DigestedHuman-Mouse Cell Hybrid DNA                                                      Trans-DNA#         Human Chromosomes                             lo-HYBRID  SHPTP1        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10                            11                              12                                13                                  14                                    15                                      16                                        17                                          18                                            19                                              20                                                21                                                  22                                                    X cations__________________________________________________________________________660 ATR-13   +    + + + + + + + + + + - + + + + + + + + - - + t 5/X233     -    - + - - - - + + - - - - + + - - +       -                                                -                                                -                                                - - -DUA-3BSAGA   -    - + - - - - + + - - - - + + - - +       -                                                -                                                -                                                - - -197     -    - - + - + - - - - - + - - + - - +       +                                                -                                                -                                                + - -DUA-5BSAGA859 DUA-6   -    - + - + + - - - - - - - - - + - -       +                                                +                                                -                                                - - +186 DUM-13   +    + + + - + + + - - + + + - + t + +       +                                                +                                                +                                                + + t X/15,                                                      15/X1185 GAR-1   +    - - + - + - - + - + - + + - + + -       -                                                -                                                +                                                - - +389 JSR-2   -    - - + + - - + - - - - - + + - - -       -                                                -                                                -                                                - - +402 JSR-14   +    - + + + + + - - - - - + + - - - +       -                                                -                                                +                                                + - +187 JWR-26C   +    t + + + + + + - + + + + - + + + +       +                                                -                                                +                                                + - + 1/2830 KER-3   -    - - - - - - - - - - + - + + - + -       -                                                -                                                -                                                - - +1146 NSL-9   +    - - - - + - - + t + - + + + + + +       +                                                -                                                +                                                + + - 17/9192 NSL-16   +    - - + + + - + + t + - + - + + + +       +                                                -                                                +                                                + - - 17/942 REW-11   +    - - - + - - + - - - + + + - + + -       -                                                -                                                +                                                + + +184     -    - - + - - - - - - + - - - + - - -       +                                                -                                                -                                                - - -REX-11BSAgB254     -    - - + - - - - - - + - - - + + - -       +                                                -                                                -                                                - t t 22/XREX-11BSHF394 REX-26   +    + + + + - - + + + + + + - + - + +       +                                                +                                                -                                                + t t 22/X1162 RSR-3   -    - - - + - - + - - + + - - + + + +       -                                                -                                                -                                                + - +390 SIR-11   -    - - - - - - + - - - - - + - - - -       -                                                -                                                -                                                + + +643 TSL-1   -    - + + + - - - - - + + - + - - + +       +                                                -                                                +                                                + - -644 TSL-2   +    - + t - + + - + - + - + - + - - t       +                                                -                                                +                                                + - + 17/3395 VTL-6   -    - + - - - + + + - + + - - - + - +       -                                                +                                                +                                                + + -407 VTL-17   -    - - - - + - + - - + + - + + + - +       -                                                -                                                +                                                + - -212 WIL-2   +    - - - - - - - + - + - + - - + - +       -                                                -                                                -                                                + - +425 WIL-6   -    - + - + + + + + - + + - - - - - +       -                                                +                                                +                                                + - +424 WIL-8X   +    - - + + + - + + - + + + - + - - +       +                                                +                                                +                                                + - +347 WIL-14   +    + - + - + - + + - + - + - + + - +       -                                                -                                                -                                                - - +25 WIL-15   +    - + + + - + + - - + + + + + + - +       +                                                -                                                +                                                + - +534 XOL-6   +    t - - - + + + - - + + + - + - - +       -                                                +                                                +                                                - + t 1/X555 XOL-13   +    t - - + + - + - - + + + - - - - +       -                                                -                                                +                                                - - + X/11107 XOL-21   +    - - + - - - t + + + + + - + - - +       +                                                -                                                +                                                - - + ISO7p332 XTR-2   +    - - t - + - - + - + - + + + - - -       +                                                -                                                +                                                + - t 3/X57      +    - - t - - - - - + t - + - - - - -       -                                                -                                                +                                                + - t 3/X,XTR-3BSAgB                                                 10q-Chromosome   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10                            11                              12                                13                                  14                                    15                                      16                                        17      18                                                19                                                20                                                21                                                  22                                                    XConcordant #   (+/+)        4 7 11              9 13                  7 11                      11                        5 16                            9 19                                7 13                                    10                                      8 14      11                                                5                                                15                                                13                                                  5 11of Hybrids   (-/-)        13          8 8 8 9 11                    6 10                        13                          6 6 13                                7 4 10                                      10                                        6       8                                                10                                                9                                                6 10                                                    6Discordant #   (+/-)        12          12            5 10                6 12                    7 8 12                          2 10                              0 12                                  6 8 11                                        4       8                                                14                                                4                                                6 13                                                    2of Hybrids   (-/+)        0 5 5 5 4 2 7 3 0 7 7 0 6 9 3 3 7       5                                                3                                                4                                                7 2 6% Discordancy        41          53            34              47                31                  44                    45                      34                        40                          29                            53                              0 56                                  47                                    35                                      44                                        35      41                                                53                                                25                                                41                                                  50                                                    32__________________________________________________________________________

To determine regional localization on chromosome 12, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on metaphase chromosomes. Chromosome spreads were prepared from 5-bromodeoxyuridine-synchronized lymphocyte cultures. Full length SH-PTP1 cDNA insert was biotinylated and hybridized to the chromosome spreads. Following appropriate washing, hybridization was detected by reaction with fluorescein-conjugated avidin (Vector Labs). Chromosome identification was achieved by means of Q banding (DAPI counterstaining) and R banding (propidium iodine counterstaining) (Cherif et al., Hum. Genet. 81:358-362 (1989); Fan et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:6223-6227 (1990)). Slides were evaluated using a Nikon fluorescence microscope.

Thirty metaphases were examined. A fluorescent signal was detected at 12p13 on both chromatids of at least a single chromosome 12 in 26 of the 30 metaphase spreads examined (86%; FIG. 6). In 2 of the 26 spreads, signals were detected at band p13 on both chromatids of both chromosomes 12, whereas 6 of the 26 spreads had an additional single signal on one chromatid of the other chromosome 12. No other chromosome displayed significant hybridization. These data clearly localize SH-PTP1 to 12p13.

EXAMPLE 3 Cloning of SH-PTP2 and Related Sequences Degenerate Oligonucleotide Based PCR and Library Screening

Brain contains numerous biochemically distinct tyrosine phosphatase activities (Jones, S. W. et al., J. Biol. Chem. 264:7747-7753 (1989)). For this reason, degenerate mixed oligonucleotides (sense, AA(A/G)TG(C/T) (C/G) (A/C)X(C/G)A(A/G)TA(C/T)TGGCC (SEQ ID NO.: 13); antisense, CCXA(C/T)XCCXGCXGA(A/G)CA(A/G)TGXAC (SEQ ID NO.: 14)) to conserved sequences in the catalytic domains of known PTPs, including SH-PTP1, were synthesized (Plutzky, J., et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. USA 89:1123-1127 (1992)). These oligonucleotides were used to prime PCRs in which 100 ng total bacteriophage DNA from a λgt11 rat brain cDNA library (D. Chikaraishi, Tufts University School of Medicine) were used as template. The conditions for amplification were as described previously (Plutzky, J., et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. USA 89:1123-1127 (1992)), except that primer annealing was carried out at 37° C. for three cycles followed by 50° C. for 27 cycles.

PCR fragments of approximately the same size (˜300 base pairs) as that generated using as template the non-transmembrane PTP, PTP-1B (Chernoff, J., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 87:2735-2739 (1990)), were excised and subcloned into Bam HI-EcoRI-linearized pBlueScript KS (Stratagene). Of the initial 42 clones sequenced, all were derived from the lambda phage vector or elongation factor 1α. Sequenced clones not containing protein sequences conserved among known PTPs were pooled, labeled by the random primers method (Feinberg, et al., Anal. Biochem. 132:6-13 (1983)), and used to negatively select the remaining clones by colony hybridization. Of the 48 clones that failed to hybridize to these pooled inserts, over 50% contained inserts with strong similarity to PTPs. Nearly all represented rat homologs of known PTPs, including LRP (Matthews, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:4444-4448 (1990)), LAR (Streuli, M., et al., J. Exp. Med. 168:1523-1530 (1988)), and HPTP∂ (Krueger. M. X., et al., EMBO J. 9:3241-3252 (1990)). However, one novel insert, 3B4-15, was obtained (SEQ. ID NO.: 9, SEQ ID NO.: 10). This fragment was excised, radiolabelled as above, and used to screen the rat brain cDNA library; however, all attempts to obtain a full length clone from this library were unsuccessful. Northern blotting of RNA from various rat tissues (data not shown) revealed widespread expression, including high levels of expression in lung and brain. Based on these results, we used a partial rat brain cDNA to screen a λgt11 human lung cDNA library (Clonetech). Again, full length cDNAs could not be obtained. A partial cDNA clone from the human lung library was used to screen a λZap II human fetal brain cDNA library (Stratagene). This library yielded several overlapping partial cDNA clones as well as one clone containing the complete coding region for a novel PTP gene, which was termed SH-PTP2. Positive clones were plaque-purified and cDNA inserts subcloned into plasmid vectors (for λgt11 clones) or rescued by single-strand helper phage (for λZap II clones). Rat and human cDNA clones corresponding to the initial 3B4-15 fragment, hereafter described as SH-PTP2 clones, included a partial rat brain cDNA, several partial human lung and fetal brain cDNAs, and one human fetal brain cDNA that contains the complete coding region of SH-PTP2.

Characterization of 3B4-15 and SH-PTP2

All phage inserts were sequenced on both strands using oligonucleotide primers by the dideoxy chain termination method (Sanger, F., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 74:5463-5467 (1977)) with Sequenase (USB) or with fluorescent dye technology and Taq polymerase on a 373A DNA Sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Inc.). DNA and deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed using BLAST (Altschul, S.F., et al., J. Mol. Biol. 215:403-410 (1990)) or the University of Wisconsin GCG programs (FASTA, TFASTA, GAP, BESTFIT, and PILEUP) (Devereux, J., et al., Nucl. Acids. Res. 12:387-395 (1984)).

FIG. 6B shows the nucleic acid and deduced amino acid sequence encompassing the coding region of human SH-PTP2 (SEQ. ID NO.: 11, 12). At nucleotide 114 is a good consensus sequence (AACATGA) for translation initiation (Kozak, M., Cell 44:283-292 (1986)); this sequence is preceded by in-frame stop codons, making it highly likely that this is the bona fide translational start site. This is followed by a single open reading frame which encodes a 593 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 68 kD, and is followed by a 3' untranslated region with stop codons in all three frames. The remainder of the large 5' and 3' untranslated regions have not yet been characterized.

Analyses of the predicted amino acid sequence reveal several interesting features. SH-PTP2, like other non-transmembrane PTPs, contains a single tyrosine phosphatase domain (aas 268-525). The cysteine (aa 459) previously shown to be essential for catalysis (Streuli, M., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:8698-8702 (1989)) and other residues common to all members of the PTP family are present (indicated by asterisks in FIG. 6A). N-terminal to the PTP domain are two SH2 domains (aas 6-105 and aas 112-218). Both possess the three invariant residues found in all SH2 domains (Koch, C., et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991)), indicated by • in FIG. 2. Only two of the three conserved basic amino acids believed to participate in interactions with phosphotyrosyl residues (Koch, C. et al., Science 252:668-674 (1991) are present (indicated by + in FIG. 7). Interestingly, this is also true for PTP1 and csw. SH-PTP2 has several potential phosphorylation sites for serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases (Kennelly, P. J., et al., J. Biol. Chem. 266:15555-15558 (1991), Kemp, B. E., et al., TIBS 15:342-346 (1990)). The absence of an apparent nuclear localization signal (Newport,, J., et al., Annu. Rev. Biochem. 56:535-565 (1987), Dingwall, C., et al., Annu. Rev. Cell Biol. 2:367-390 (1986)) and the lack of any significant hydrophobic region, as indicated by Kyte-Doolittle hydropathy analysis (Kyte, J., et al., J. Mol. Biol. 157:105- 132 (1982)) make it likely that SH-PTP2 is a cytosolic protein, like SH-PTP1.

Within the PTP family, human SH-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO.: 16) is most similar to Drosophila csw (SEQ ID NO.: 17) (FIG. 6A and Table 2). Unlike other PTP family members, csw contains an insert within its phosphatase domain (Perkins, L. A., et al., Cell 70:225-236 (1992)); SH-PTP2 lacks such an insert. When the PTP domain of SH-PTP2 is compared to csw without its insert, the two are 63% identical. Moreover, the three SH2-containing PTPs, human SH-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO.: 16), csw (SEQ ID NO.: 17), and SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 18), are substantially more similar to each other than to any other member of the PTP family (<45%), such as human RPTμ (SEQ ID NO.: 19), HPTPβ (SEQ ID NO.: 20), human LAR (SEQ ID NO.: 21), HPTPδ (SEQ ID NO.: 22), and DLAR (SEQ ID NO.: 23), suggesting the existence of a discrete subfamily of PTPs that contain SH2 domains.

There is also striking sequence similarity between the two SH2 domains of the SH2-containing PTPs (FIG. 7 (SEQ ID NO.: 24 and NO.: 27) and Table 2). As is the case for the phosphatase domain, the SH2 domains of SH-PTP2 (SEQ ID NO. 24 and NO.: 27) are more similar to csw (SEQ ID NO.: 25 and NO.: 28) (approximately 76%) than to SH-PTP1 (SEQ ID NO.: 26 and NO.: 29) (52-63%); they are much less similar to any other SH2-containing protein, such as human fer (SEQ ID NO.: 30), bovine GAP (SEQ ID NO.: 31), mouse fgr (SEQ ID NO.: 32 and NO.: 35), human Nck (SEQ ID NO.: 33 and NO.: 40), hydra stk (SEQ ID NO.: 34), chicken yes (SEQ ID NO.: 36), human fyn (SEQ ID NO.: 37), mouse lsk (SEQ ID NO.: 38), mouse blk (SEQ ID NO.: 39) (<40%). Taken together, these data suggest the existence of a discrete subfamily of SH2 domains found primarily in SH2-containing PTPs. Moreover, the similarity between SH-PTP2 and csw extends over the entire sequence of both molecules; overall, the protein sequences of SH-PTP2 and csw are 62% identical. This remarkable similarity between human SH-PTP2 and Drosophila csw strongly suggests that SH-PTP2 is the human csw homolog.

              TABLE 2______________________________________Sequence similarity between SH2-containing PTPfamily members.   SH-PTP2     csw    SH-PTP1______________________________________PTP domainSH-PTP2   --            62.5   60.8csw                     --     57.9SH-PTP1                        --N-terminal SH2 domainSH-PTP2   --            75.8   63.0csw       --            --     59.6SH-PTP1                        --C-terminal SH2 domainSH-PTP2   --            76.1   52.0csw                     --     46.1SH-PTP1                        --OverallSH-PTP2   --            63.2   54.7csw                     --     50.1SH-PTP1                        --______________________________________

The SH2 and phosphatase domains of each protein were compared to one another using GAP (Devereux, J. et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 12:387-395 (1984)), and the percent identity noted. Comparisons were made to csw without its phosphatase insert.

Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity of SH-PTP2 (a) Preparation of Fusion Proteins

To determine whether SH-PTP2 possesses protein tyrosine phosphatase activity when expressed in bacteria, a 1.6 kb partial SH-PTP2 cDNA was subcloned as an EcoRI fragment into pGEX-3X (Pharmacia). This construct encodes a 639 amino acid protein (GST-SHPTP2 ) in which glutathione-Stransferase sequences (GST) are fused to amino acids 186 to 593 of SH-PTP2 . This results in the expression of a fusion protein (GST-SHPTP2 ) with a molecular weight of approximately 70 kd (data not shown), which can be affinity purified on glutathione-agarose beads. Both GST and GST-SHPTP2 were introduced into DH5α hosts. For expression of these proteins, overnight cultures were diluted 1:50 and permitted to grow for one hour, at which time the cells were induced with 0.1 mM isopropyl β-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). After four hours, lysates were prepared from one ml of induced culture. Briefly, bacterial pellets were washed with 150 μL of STE (25 mM Tris, pH 8.0, 150 mM NaCl, 1 mM EDTA), lysed in 150 μl NP-40 lysis buffer (50 mM Tris, pH 8.0, 150 mM NaCl, 1% NP-40) with protease inhibitors (1 μg/ml antipain, 1 μg/ml aprotinin, 10 μg/ml leupeptin, 1 μg/ml pepstatin A, 20 μg/ml PMSF), and sonicated on ice for three minutes. Lysates were clarified by centrifugation at 10,000×g for five minutes at 4° C. before use. Protein concentrations were determined by BCA assay (Pierce). For affinity purification of GST and GST-SH-PTP2, 80 μl of the soluble lysate were adjusted to 2% Triton X-100 and incubated with 30 μl of a 50% (v/v) solution of glutathione agarose beads (Sigma) for 30 minutes at room temperature. Beads were washed three times with STE before use.

(b) Phosphatase Activity of GEX Fusions

Equal amounts of protein from the bacteria expressing GST-SHPT-P2 or GST alone were assayed for PTP activity using radiolabeled Raytide. Raytide (Oncogene Science) was phosphorylated by recombinant p43v-ab1 (Oncogene Science) on its unique tyrosine as described (Plutzky, J., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:1123-1127 (1992)), using 67 μCi of [γ32 P]-ATP were used per 10 μg Raytide. PTP assays were conducted on soluble lysates from induced bacteria expressing GST-SH-PTP2 or GST alone using conditions described previously (Plutzky, J., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:1123-1127 (1992)). Under these conditions, substantially more GST than GST-SH-PTP2 is expressed as a percentage of total bacterial protein. GST-SHPTP2-expressing lysates showed substantially greater PTP activity than lysates expressing GST alone (FIG. 8). PTP activity was linear over time and proportional to protein concentration. As expected for a tyrosine phosphatase, this activity was blocked by the addition of 100 uM sodium vanadate, a potent tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor (FIG. 8, closed triangle), but was not affected by the addition of 50 mM sodium fluoride, a serine phosphatase inhibitor (FIG. 8, open triangle). Similar results were obtained when the respective fusion proteins were affinity purified on glutathione-agarose beads (data not shown).

EXAMPLE 4 Expression of SH-PTP2

Human genomic DNA (15 μg) was digested overnight with Bam HI, Bgl II, Eco RI, Hind III or Pst I (200 U), electrophoresed on a 0.8% agarose gel, and transferred to a charged nylon membrane (Magnagraph/MSI) for Southern blotting. Hybridization and high stringency washing conditions were as described previously (Gebert, J. F., et al., Oncogene 6:1859-68 (1991)); a partial SH-PTP2 cDNA corresponding to nucleotides 599 to 1881 was used as probe.

Southern blots of human genomic DNA hybridized with an SH-PTP2 partial cDNA indicated a complex pattern of bands (data not shown). The large number of bands observed with such a small part of the SH-PTP2 cDNA suggests either that SH-PTP2 is a large gene containing multiple introns, or that a family of highly related genes or pseudogenes exists. Consistent with the strong similarity between SH-PTP2 and csw, Southern analysis of genomic DNA from several other species indicates that SH-PTP2 is highly conserved (FIG. 4b).

A Northern blot of 2 μg poly A+ RNA from multiple human tissues (Clontech) was hybridized and washed similarly. For identification of SH-PTP2-related sequences in other species, genomic DNAs (10 μg) from chicken, human, rat, and mouse were digested with Bam HI, electrophoresed, and immobilized onto Zetabind (AMF/Cuno). To avoid detecting other PTPs, the probe utilized in this hybridization was a fragment corresponding to nucleotides 1 to 344, which lacks sequences from the phosphatase domain of SH-PTP2 . Hybridization was for 18 hours at 65° C. as described (Gebert, J. F., et al., Oncogene 6:1859-68 (1991)). Reduced stringency washes were with 2×SSC, 0.2% SDS for 60 minutes at 40° C.

The Northern blot of RNA from various human tissues, including heart, brain, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney and pancreas, indicated that SH-PTP1 is expressed as a 6 kb transcript (data not shown). Unlike SH-PTP1, which is found almost exclusively in hematopoietic cells, SH-PTP2 is expressed nearly ubiquitously. Notably, SH-PTP2 is expressed in many hematopoietic ceils which also express SH-PTP1 (data not shown). Its ubiquitous expression, similar to csw (Perkins, L. A., et al., Cell 70:225-236 (1992)), is also consistent with the proposal that SH-PTP2 is the mammalian csw homolog.

EXAMPLE 5 Analysis of SH-PTP1 in Leukemia Patients

A primer set which amplifies the segment of DNA between nucleotides 500 and 730 of the SH-PTP1 cDNA was used to amplify the SH-PTP1 gene of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Representative primers which can be used to amplify regions of the SH-PTP1 gene are shown in FIG. 9 (SEQ ID NO.: 41 through 54). Standard SH-PTP1 cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase, using standard conditions and oligo dT priming of RNA isolated from the patient was used, followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the same set of primers. PCR was carried out under standard conditions, except that 32 PdCTP was included during the reaction to allow detection of the products by autoradiography. Following PCR, products were visualized by denaturing them at 94° C. and electrophoresis on a 5% non-denaturing acrylamide gel at 4° C. Detection revealed abnormalities consisting of significantly smaller bands.

Because of the abnormal bands, the entire SH-PTP1 cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) from the patient. Two products were noted: a normal product and a smaller product, the two differed by approximately 100 nucleotides on agarose gel electrophoresis. The ratio of the normal sized product to the smaller sized product was approximately 5:1. These products were cloned into a pGEM vector. Approximately 20% of the clones obtained contained the smaller (variant) product; the remaining clones were wild type in length. Both types of clone were subjected to sequence analysis using the primer set described above. The shorter clones were found to have a 117 nucleotide deletion compared to the wild type sequence. This deletion corresponded to nucleotides 537-653 of the SH-PTP1 cDNA sequence, which corresponds in the protein to roughly the second half of the second SH2 domain of SH-PTP1. The other clones were found to have wild type sequence.

To align the deleted sequence within the SH-PTP1 gene, the same primer set was used to prime a PCR reaction from the same patient's genomic DNA. This resulted in a product of approximately 600 nucleotides. This region was cloned into a plasmid vector and sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of three exons. The middle exon was 117 nucleotides in length and corresponded precisely to the deleted sequences in the shorter clones obtained above. Thus, these shorter clones, which represent at least 20% of the cDNAs from the patient, have sustained the loss of this exon.

Western blot analysis was used to investigate whether similar SH-PTP1 mutations occurred in other ALL patients. Approximately 5×106 cells from each of 30 patients were analyzed. Cells were pelleted and lysed in 1% NP40 buffer containing protease inhibitors and phosphatase inhibitors. Clarified lysates were boiled in SDS-PAGE sample buffer and electrophoresed on 10% SDS-PAGE gels. Proteins were immunoblotted onto Immobilon membranes and developed with anti-SH-PTP1 antibodies. To compare protein recovery between patients, the same immunoblot was probed with monoclonal anti-tubulin antibodies. The relative level of SH-PTP1 expression (as judged by the ratio of SH-PTP1/tubuline signal) was compared to the blast count (as assessed by FACS analysis for common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA=CD10)).

Two types of potential abnormality were discerned. First, several patients had markedly lower levels (at least 10×lower) of SH-PTP1 protein compared with the other patients. There was no clear or consistent correlation between the percent of blasts (assessed by CALLA) and SH-PTP1 proteins; therefore, these differences in expression of SH-PTP1 can probably not be explained by differentiation-stage-specific differences in SH-PTP1 protein levels. Second, four patients displayed additional, smaller immunoreactive species with anti-SH-PTP1 antibodies. It is unlikely that the shorter species arose by proteolysis because all of the samples were prepared at the same time, using the same product; the sizes of the variant immunoreactive bands are different in different samples; and there was no evidence of tubulin proteolysis.

Equivalents

Those skilled in the art will recognize or be able to ascertain, using no more than routine experimentation, many equivalents to the specific embodiments of the invention described herein. Such equivalents are intended to be encompassed by the following claims.

__________________________________________________________________________SEQUENCE LISTING(1) GENERAL INFORMATION:(iii) NUMBER OF SEQUENCES: 54(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:1:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 1747 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: double(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: cDNA(ix) FEATURE: (A) NAME/KEY: CDS(B) LOCATION: 2..1540(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:1:AATTCCGATCCTGCAGGACCGAGACGGCACCATCATCCACCTCAAG46IleProIleLeuGlnAspArgAspGlyThrIleIleHisLeuLys1 51015TACCCACTGAACTGCTCGGACCCCACCAGCGAGAGGTGGTATCATGGT94TyrProLeuAsnCysSerAspProThrSerGluArgTrpTyrHisGly 202530CACATGTCTGGAGGGCAGGCAGAGTCACTGCTGCAGGCCAAGGGCGAG142HisMetSerGlyGlyGlnAlaGluSerLeuLeuGlnAlaLysGlyGlu 354045CCCTGGACATTTCTTGTGCGTGAGAGTCTCAGCCAACCTGGTGATTTT190ProTrpThrPheLeuValArgGluSerLeuSerGlnProGlyAspPhe 505560GTGCTCTCTGTGCTCAATGACCAGCCCAAGGCTGGCCCGGGTTCCCCG238ValLeuSerValLeuAsnAspGlnProLysAlaGlyProGlySerPro 657075CTCAGGGTCACGCACATCAAGGTTATGTGTGAGGGTGGACGATACACT286LeuArgValThrHisIleLysValMetCysGluGlyGlyArgTyrThr80 859095GTGGGTGGCTCAGAGACATTCGATAGCCTCACAGACCTGGTGGAGCAC334ValGlyGlySerGluThrPheAspSerLeuThrAspLeuValGluHis 100105110TTCAAGAAGACGGGGATTGAGGAGGCCTCAGGTGCCTTTGTCTACCTG382PheLysLysThrGlyIleGluGluAlaSerGlyAlaPheValTyrLeu 115120125AGGCAGCCTTACTATGCCACTCGGGTAAATGCAGCAGACATTGAGAAC430ArgGlnProTyrTyrAlaThrArgValAsnAlaAlaAspIleGluAsn 130135140CGGGTCTTGGAACTGAACAAGAAGCAGGAGTCAGAGGACACAGCCAAG478ArgValLeuGluLeuAsnLysLysGlnGluSerGluAspThrAlaLys 145150155GCCGGCTTCTGGGAGGAGTTTGAGAGTCTGCAAAAGCAAGAGGTAAAG526AlaGlyPheTrpGluGluPheGluSerLeuGlnLysGlnGluValLys160 165170175AACTTGCACCAGCGTCTGGAAGGGCAGCGGCCGGAGAACAAGAGCAAG574AsnLeuHisGlnArgLeuGluGlyGlnArgProGluAsnLysSerLys 180185190AACCGCTACAAGAACATTCTTCCCTTTGACCACAGCCGAGTGATCCTG622AsnArgTyrLysAsnIleLeuProPheAspHisSerArgValIleLeu 195200205CAGGGACGTGACAGTAACATCCCAGGGTCTGATTACATCAATGCCAAC670GlnGlyArgAspSerAsnIleProGlySerAspTyrIleAsnAlaAsn 210215220TACGTTAAGAACCAGCTGCTAGGTCCGGATGAGAACTCTAAGACCTAC718TyrValLysAsnGlnLeuLeuGlyProAspGluAsnSerLysThrTyr 225230235ATCGCCAGTCAGGGCTGTCTGGACGCTACCGTCAATGACTTCTGGCAG766IleAlaSerGlnGlyCysLeuAspAlaThrValAsnAspPheTrpGln240 245250255ATGGCTCGGCAGGAGAACACTCGTGTCATCGTCATGACTACCAGAGAG814MetAlaArgGlnGluAsnThrArgValIleValMetThrThrArgGlu 260265270GTGGAGAAAGGCCGGAACAAATGTGTCCCATACTGGCCTGAGGTGGGC862ValGluLysGlyArgAsnLysCysValProTyrTrpProGluValGly 275280285ACTCAGCGCGTCTATGGGCTCTACTCTGTGACCAACTGTAAAGAGCAT910ThrGlnArgValTyrGlyLeuTyrSerValThrAsnCysLysGluHis 290295300GACACAGCAGAGTACAAACTTCGAACATTGCAGATCTCCCCACTGGAC958AspThrAlaGluTyrLysLeuArgThrLeuGlnIleSerProLeuAsp 305310315AATGGGGACCTGGTTCGGGAGATATGGCACTACCAGTACCTGAGCTGG1006AsnGlyAspLeuValArgGluIleTrpHisTyrGlnTyrLeuSerTrp320 325330335CCTGACCATGGGGTTCCCAGTGAGCCTGGGGGTGTCCTCGGCTTCCTG1054ProAspHisGlyValProSerGluProGlyGlyValLeuGlyPheLeu 340345350GATCAGATCAACCAGCGGCAGGAAAGTTTGCCTCACGCGGGGCCCATC1102AspGlnIleAsnGlnArgGlnGluSerLeuProHisAlaGlyProIle 355360365ATTGTGCATTGCAGCGCTGGCATCGGCCGCACGGGCACCATCATCGTC1150IleValHisCysSerAlaGlyIleGlyArgThrGlyThrIleIleVal 370375380ATTGATATGCTCATGGAGAGCGTTTCCACCAAGGGGCTAGACTGTGAC1198IleAspMetLeuMetGluSerValSerThrLysGlyLeuAspCysAsp 385390395ATTGACATCCAGAAGACCATCCAGATGGTACGGGCACAGCGCTCTGGC1246IleAspIleGlnLysThrIleGlnMetValArgAlaGlnArgSerGly400 405410415ATGGTGCAGACAGAGGCACAGTACAAGTTTATTTATGTGGCCATCGCC1294MetValGlnThrGluAlaGlnTyrLysPheIleTyrValAlaIleAla 420425430CAGTTCATCGAAACAACCAAGAAGAAACTGGAGATCATACAATCCCAG1342GlnPheIleGluThrThrLysLysLysLeuGluIleIleGlnSerGln 435440445AGGGGCCAGGAGTCGGAGTATGGGAACATCACCTACCCTCCGGCTTTG1390ArgGlyGlnGluSerGluTyrGlyAsnIleThrTyrProProAlaLeu 450455460AGGAGTGCCCACGCCAAAGCCTCCCGTACCTCCTCCAAACACAAGGAG1438ArgSerAlaHisAlaLysAlaSerArgThrSerSerLysHisLysGlu 465470475GAGGTGTACGAAAACGTGCATAGCAAGAACAAGAAGGAAGAGAAAGTA1486GluValTyrGluAsnValHisSerLysAsnLysLysGluGluLysVal480 485490495AAGAAGCAGCGATCGGCAGACAAGGAGAAGAACAAAGGTTCTCTCAAG1534LysLysGlnArgSerAlaAspLysGluLysAsnLysGlySerLeuLys 500505510AGGAAGTGAGCTGGCATCAGCCTTACTCCGTGCAGAGGCCTCCGCTGGGCAGACAG1590ArgLysAGACCTGTAGTCCACACCACCCCCATCTTGTTGTAATTTAAGTGACCGTG GTCCTCTGAA1650CCTGTATATGGCTCAGCAAGCCTCAGGGAGAGTCAGACCCTTCTCTTCTTGTAAATAAAG1710CCCCTGGACAACTGTGAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA1747(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:2:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 513 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:2:IleProIleLeuGlnAspArgAspGlyThrIleIleHisLeuLysTyr1510 15ProLeuAsnCysSerAspProThrSerGluArgTrpTyrHisGlyHis202530MetSerGlyGlyGlnAlaGluSerLeuLeuGlnAlaLysGlyG luPro354045TrpThrPheLeuValArgGluSerLeuSerGlnProGlyAspPheVal505560LeuSerValLeuAsn AspGlnProLysAlaGlyProGlySerProLeu65707580ArgValThrHisIleLysValMetCysGluGlyGlyArgTyrThrVal85 9095GlyGlySerGluThrPheAspSerLeuThrAspLeuValGluHisPhe100105110LysLysThrGlyIleGluGluAla SerGlyAlaPheValTyrLeuArg115120125GlnProTyrTyrAlaThrArgValAsnAlaAlaAspIleGluAsnArg1301351 40ValLeuGluLeuAsnLysLysGlnGluSerGluAspThrAlaLysAla145150155160GlyPheTrpGluGluPheGluSerLeuGlnLysGlnGluValLysA sn165170175LeuHisGlnArgLeuGluGlyGlnArgProGluAsnLysSerLysAsn180185190ArgTyr LysAsnIleLeuProPheAspHisSerArgValIleLeuGln195200205GlyArgAspSerAsnIleProGlySerAspTyrIleAsnAlaAsnTyr210 215220ValLysAsnGlnLeuLeuGlyProAspGluAsnSerLysThrTyrIle225230235240AlaSerGlnGlyCysLeuAspAlaThr ValAsnAspPheTrpGlnMet245250255AlaArgGlnGluAsnThrArgValIleValMetThrThrArgGluVal260265 270GluLysGlyArgAsnLysCysValProTyrTrpProGluValGlyThr275280285GlnArgValTyrGlyLeuTyrSerValThrAsnCysLysGluHisA sp290295300ThrAlaGluTyrLysLeuArgThrLeuGlnIleSerProLeuAspAsn305310315320GlyAspLeu ValArgGluIleTrpHisTyrGlnTyrLeuSerTrpPro325330335AspHisGlyValProSerGluProGlyGlyValLeuGlyPheLeuAsp340 345350GlnIleAsnGlnArgGlnGluSerLeuProHisAlaGlyProIleIle355360365ValHisCysSerAlaGlyIleGlyArg ThrGlyThrIleIleValIle370375380AspMetLeuMetGluSerValSerThrLysGlyLeuAspCysAspIle385390395 400AspIleGlnLysThrIleGlnMetValArgAlaGlnArgSerGlyMet405410415ValGlnThrGluAlaGlnTyrLysPheIleTyrValAlaIleA laGln420425430PheIleGluThrThrLysLysLysLeuGluIleIleGlnSerGlnArg435440445GlyGlnGlu SerGluTyrGlyAsnIleThrTyrProProAlaLeuArg450455460SerAlaHisAlaLysAlaSerArgThrSerSerLysHisLysGluGlu465470 475480ValTyrGluAsnValHisSerLysAsnLysLysGluGluLysValLys485490495LysGlnArgSerAlaAspLysGlu LysAsnLysGlySerLeuLysArg500505510Lys(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:3:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 285 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: double(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: cDNA(ix) FEATURE:(A) NAME/KEY: CDS(B) LOCATION: 1..285(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:3:AAATGCGCGGAATATTGGCCTTCCAAGCAGGCTCAGGACTACGGGGAC48LysCysAlaGluTyrTrpProSerLysGlnAl aGlnAspTyrGlyAsp151015ATAACTGTGGCAATGACATCAGAAGTTGTTCTTCCGGAATGGACCATC96IleThrValAlaMetThrSerGluValVa lLeuProGluTrpThrIle202530AGAGATTTTGTGGTGAAAAATATGCAGAGTAGTGAGAGTCATCCTCTG144ArgAspPheValValLysAsnMetGlnSe rSerGluSerHisProLeu354045CGGCAGTTCCATTTCACCTCCTGGCCTGACCATGGTGTTCCTGACACC192ArgGlnPheHisPheThrSerTrpProAspHi sGlyValProAspThr505560ACCGACCTGCTCATCAACTTTCGGTACCTGGTCCGGGATTACATGAAG240ThrAspLeuLeuIleAsnPheArgTyrLeuValArgAs pTyrMetLys65707580CAGATCCCCCCTGAGTCACCAATCCTGGTCCATTGTTCTGCCGGA285GlnIleProProGluSerProIleLeuValHi sCysSerAlaGly859095(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:4:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 95 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:4:L ysCysAlaGluTyrTrpProSerLysGlnAlaGlnAspTyrGlyAsp151015IleThrValAlaMetThrSerGluValValLeuProGluTrpThrIle 202530ArgAspPheValValLysAsnMetGlnSerSerGluSerHisProLeu354045ArgGlnPheHisPheThrSe rTrpProAspHisGlyValProAspThr505560ThrAspLeuLeuIleAsnPheArgTyrLeuValArgAspTyrMetLys657075 80GlnIleProProGluSerProIleLeuValHisCysSerAlaGly859095(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:5:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 2145 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: double(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: cDNA(ix) FEATURE:(A) NAME/KEY: CDS(B) LOCATION: 145..1929(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:5:CGGCAGAACTGGGACCACCGGGGGTGGTGAGGCGGCCCGGCACTGGGAGCTGCATCTGAG 60GCTTAGTCCCTGAGCTCTCTGCCTGCCCAGACTAGCTGCACCTCCTCATTCCCTGCGCCC120CCTTCCTCTCCGGAAGCCCCCAGGATGGTGAGGTGGTTTCACCGAGACCTC171MetValArgTr pPheHisArgAspLeu15AGTGGGCTGGATGCAGAGACCCTGCTCAAGGGCCGAGGTGTCCACGGT219SerGlyLeuAspAlaGluThrLeuLeuLysGlyArgGly ValHisGly10152025AGCTTCCTGGTCTGGCCCAGTCGCAAGAACCAGGGTGACTTCTCGCTC267SerPheLeuValTrpProSerArgLysAsnGln GlyAspPheSerLeu303540TCCGTCAGGGTGGGGGATCAGGTGACCCATATTCGGATCCAGAACTCA315SerValArgValGlyAspGlnValThrHis IleArgIleGlnAsnSer455055GGGGATTTCTATGACCTGTATGGAGGGGAGAAGTTTGCGACTCTGACA363GlyAspPheTyrAspLeuTyrGlyGlyGlu LysPheAlaThrLeuThr606570GAGCTGGTGGAGTACTACACTCAGCAGCAGGGTGTGGTGCAGGACCGC411GluLeuValGluTyrTyrThrGlnGlnGlnGly ValValGlnAspArg758085GACGGCACCATCATCCACCTCAAGTACCCGCTGAACTGCTCCGATCCC459AspGlyThrIleIleHisLeuLysTyrProLeuAsnCys SerAspPro9095100105ACTAGTGAGAGGTGGTACCATGGCCACATGTCTGGCGGGCAGGCAGAG507ThrSerGluArgTrpTyrHisGlyHisMetSer GlyGlyGlnAlaGlu110115120ACGCTGCTGCAGGCCAAGGGCGAGCCCTGGACGTTTCTTGTGCGTGAG555ThrLeuLeuGlnAlaLysGlyGluProTrp ThrPheLeuValArgGlu125130135AGCCTCAGCCAGCCTGGAGACTTCGTGCTTTCTGTGCTCAGTGACCAG603SerLeuSerGlnProGlyAspPheValLeu SerValLeuSerAspGln140145150CCCAAGGCTGGCCCAGGCTCCCCGCTCAGGGTCACCCACATCAAGGTC651ProLysAlaGlyProGlySerProLeuArgVal ThrHisIleLysVal155160165ATGTGCGAGGGTGGACGCTACACAGTGGGTGGTTTGGAGACCTTCGAC699MetCysGluGlyGlyArgTyrThrValGlyGlyLeuGlu ThrPheAsp170175180185AGCCTCACGGACCTGGTGGAGCATTTCAAGAAGACGGGGATTGAGGAG747SerLeuThrAspLeuValGluHisPheLysLys ThrGlyIleGluGlu190195200GCCTCAGGCGCCTTTGTCTACCTGCGGCAGCCGTACTATGCCACGAGG795AlaSerGlyAlaPheValTyrLeuArgGln ProTyrTyrAlaThrArg205210215GTGAATGCGGCTGACATTGAGAACCGAGTGTTGGAACTGAACAAGAAG843ValAsnAlaAlaAspIleGluAsnArgVal LeuGluLeuAsnLysLys220225230CAGGAGTCCGAGGATACAGCCAAGGCTGGCTTCTGGGAGGAGTTTGAG891GlnGluSerGluAspThrAlaLysAlaGlyPhe TrpGluGluPheGlu235240245AGTTTGCAGAAGCAGGAGGTGAAGAACTTGCACCAGCGTCTGGAAGGG939SerLeuGlnLysGlnGluValLysAsnLeuHisGlnArg LeuGluGly250255260265CAACGGCCAGAGAACAAGGGCAAGAACCGCTACAAGAACATTCTCCCC987GlnArgProGluAsnLysGlyLysAsnArgTyr LysAsnIleLeuPro270275280TTTGACCACAGCCGAGTGATCCTGCAGGGACGGGACAGTAACATCCCC1035PheAspHisSerArgValIleLeuGlnGly ArgAspSerAsnIlePro285290295GGGTCCGACTACATCAATGCCAACTACATCAAGAACCAGCTGCTAGGC1083GlySerAspTyrIleAsnAlaAsnTyrIle LysAsnGlnLeuLeuGly300305310CCTGATGAGAACGCTAAGACCTACATCGCCAGCCAGGGCTGTCTGGAG1131ProAspGluAsnAlaLysThrTyrIleAlaSer GlnGlyCysLeuGlu315320325GCCACAGTCAATGACTTCTGGCAGATGGCGTGGCAGGAGAACAGCCGT1179AlaThrValAsnAspPheTrpGlnMetAlaTrpGlnGlu AsnSerArg330335340345GTCATCGTCATGACCACCCGAGAGGTGGAGAAAGGCCGGAACAAATGC1227ValIleValMetThrThrArgGluValGluLys GlyArgAsnLysCys350355360GTCCCATACTGGCCCGAGGTGGGCATGCAGCGTGCTTATGGGCCCTAC1275ValProTyrTrpProGluValGlyMetGln ArgAlaTyrGlyProTyr365370375TCTGTGACCAACGTCGGGGAGCATGACACAACCGAATACAAACTCCGT1323SerValThrAsnValGlyGluHisAspThr ThrGluTyrLysLeuArg380385390ACCTTACAGGTCTCCCCGCTGGACAATGGAGACCTGATTCGGGAGATC1371ThrLeuGlnValSerProLeuAspAsnGlyAsp LeuIleArgGluIle395400405TGGCATTACCAGTACCTGAGCTGGCCCGACCATGGGGTCCCCAGTGAG1419TrpHisTyrGlnTyrLeuSerTrpProAspHisGlyVal ProSerGlu410415420425CCTGGGGGTGTCCTCAGCTTCCTGGACCAGATCAACCAGCGGCAGGAA1467ProGlyGlyValLeuSerPheLeuAspGlnIle AsnGlnArgGlnGlu430435440AGTCTGCCTCACGCAGGGCCCATCATCGTGCACTGCAGCGCCGGCATC1515SerLeuProHisAlaGlyProIleIleVal HisCysSerAlaGlyIle445450455GGCCGCACAGGCACCATCATTGTCATCGACATGCTCATGGAGAACATC1563GlyArgThrGlyThrIleIleValIleAsp MetLeuMetGluAsnIle460465470TCCACCAAGGGCCTGGACTGTGACATTGACATCCAGAAGACCATCCAG1611SerThrLysGlyLeuAspCysAspIleAspIle GlnLysThrIleGln475480485ATGGTGCGGGCGCAGCGCTCGGGCATGGTGCAGACGGAGGCGCAGTAC1659MetValArgAlaGlnArgSerGlyMetValGlnThrGlu AlaGlnTyr490495500505AAGTTCATCTACGTGGCCATCGCCCAGTTCATTGAAACCACTAAGAAG1707LysPheIleTyrValAlaIleAlaGlnPheIle GluThrThrLysLys510515520AAGCTGGAGGTCCTGCAGTCGCAGAAGGGCCAGGAGTCGGAGTACGGG1755LysLeuGluValLeuGlnSerGlnLysGly GlnGluSerGluTyrGly525530535AACATCACCTATCCCCCAGCCATGAAGAATGCCCATGCCAAGGCCTCC1803AsnIleThrTyrProProAlaMetLysAsn AlaHisAlaLysAlaSer540545550CGCACCTCGTCCAAACACAAGGAGGATGTGTATGAGAACCTGCACACT1851ArgThrSerSerLysHisLysGluAspValTyr GluAsnLeuHisThr555560565AAGAACAAGAGGGAGGAGAAAGTGAAGAAGCAGCGGTCAGCAGACAAG1899LysAsnLysArgGluGluLysValLysLysGlnArgSer AlaAspLys570575580585GAGAAGAGCAAGGGTTCCCTCAAGAGGAAGTGAGCGGTGCTGTCCTCAGG1949GluLysSerLysGlySerLeuLysArgLys 590595TGGCCATGCCTCAGCCCTGACCCTGTGGAAGCATTTCGCGATGGACAGACTCACAACCTG2009AACCTAGGAGTGCCCCATTCTTTTGTAATTTAAATGGCTGCATCCCCCCCACCTCTCCCT2069GACCCT GTATATAGCCCAGCCAGGCCCCAGGCAGGGCCAACCCTTCTCCTCTTGTAAATA2129AAGCCCTGGGATCACT2145(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:6:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 595 amino acids (B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:6:MetValArgTrpPheHisArgAspLeuSerGlyLeuAspAlaGluThr151015LeuLeuL ysGlyArgGlyValHisGlySerPheLeuValTrpProSer202530ArgLysAsnGlnGlyAspPheSerLeuSerValArgValGlyAspGln35 4045ValThrHisIleArgIleGlnAsnSerGlyAspPheTyrAspLeuTyr505560GlyGlyGluLysPheAlaThrLeuThrGluLeuVa lGluTyrTyrThr65707580GlnGlnGlnGlyValValGlnAspArgAspGlyThrIleIleHisLeu8590 95LysTyrProLeuAsnCysSerAspProThrSerGluArgTrpTyrHis100105110GlyHisMetSerGlyGlyGlnAlaGluThrLeuLeuGlnAlaLys Gly115120125GluProTrpThrPheLeuValArgGluSerLeuSerGlnProGlyAsp130135140PheValLeuSerValL euSerAspGlnProLysAlaGlyProGlySer145150155160ProLeuArgValThrHisIleLysValMetCysGluGlyGlyArgTyr165 170175ThrValGlyGlyLeuGluThrPheAspSerLeuThrAspLeuValGlu180185190HisPheLysLysThrGlyIleGluGl uAlaSerGlyAlaPheValTyr195200205LeuArgGlnProTyrTyrAlaThrArgValAsnAlaAlaAspIleGlu210215220AsnArgValLeuGluLeuAsnLysLysGlnGluSerGluAspThrAla225230235240LysAlaGlyPheTrpGluGluPheGluSerLeuGlnLysGlnGluVal245250255LysAsnLeuHisGlnArgLeuGluGlyGlnArgProGluAsnLysGly260265270LysAsnA rgTyrLysAsnIleLeuProPheAspHisSerArgValIle275280285LeuGlnGlyArgAspSerAsnIleProGlySerAspTyrIleAsnAla290 295300AsnTyrIleLysAsnGlnLeuLeuGlyProAspGluAsnAlaLysThr305310315320TyrIleAlaSerGlnGlyCysLeuGluAl aThrValAsnAspPheTrp325330335GlnMetAlaTrpGlnGluAsnSerArgValIleValMetThrThrArg340345 350GluValGluLysGlyArgAsnLysCysValProTyrTrpProGluVal355360365GlyMetGlnArgAlaTyrGlyProTyrSerValThrAsnValGlyGlu370375380HisAspThrThrGluTyrLysLeuArgThrLeuGlnValSerProLeu385390395400AspAsnGlyA spLeuIleArgGluIleTrpHisTyrGlnTyrLeuSer405410415TrpProAspHisGlyValProSerGluProGlyGlyValLeuSerPhe420 425430LeuAspGlnIleAsnGlnArgGlnGluSerLeuProHisAlaGlyPro435440445IleIleValHisCysSerAlaGlyIleGl yArgThrGlyThrIleIle450455460ValIleAspMetLeuMetGluAsnIleSerThrLysGlyLeuAspCys465470475 480AspIleAspIleGlnLysThrIleGlnMetValArgAlaGlnArgSer485490495GlyMetValGlnThrGluAlaGlnTyrLysPheIleTyrValAla Ile500505510AlaGlnPheIleGluThrThrLysLysLysLeuGluValLeuGlnSer515520525GlnLysGlyG lnGluSerGluTyrGlyAsnIleThrTyrProProAla530535540MetLysAsnAlaHisAlaLysAlaSerArgThrSerSerLysHisLys545550 555560GluAspValTyrGluAsnLeuHisThrLysAsnLysArgGluGluLys565570575ValLysLysGlnArgSerAlaAspLy sGluLysSerLysGlySerLeu580585590LysArgLys595(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:7:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 2143 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: double(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: cDNA(ix) FEATURE:(A) NAME/KEY: CDS(B) LOCATION: 145..2037(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:7:CGGCAGAACTGGGACCACCGGGGGTGGTGAGGCGGCCCGGCACTGGGAGCTGCATCTGAG60GCTTAGTCCCTGAGCTCTCT GCCTGCCCAGACTAGCTGCACCTCCTCATTCCCTGCGCCC120CCTTCCTCTCCGGAAGCCCCCAGGATGGTGAGGTGGTTTCACCGAGACCTC171MetValArgTrpPheHisArgAspLeu 15AGTGGGCTGGATGCAGAGACCCTGCTCAAGGGCCGAGGTGTCCACGGT219SerGlyLeuAspAlaGluThrLeuLeuLysGlyArgGlyValHisGly10 152025AGCTTCCTGGCTCGGCCCAGTCGCAAGAACCAGGGTGACTTCTCGCTC267SerPheLeuAlaArgProSerArgLysAsnGlnGlyAspPheSerLeu 303540TCCGTCAGGGTGGGGGATCAGGTGACCCATATTCGGATCCAGAACTCA315SerValArgValGlyAspGlnValThrHisIleArgIleGlnAsnSer 455055GGGGATTTCTATGACCTGTATGGAGGGGAGAAGTTTGCGACTCTGACA363GlyAspPheTyrAspLeuTyrGlyGlyGluLysPheAlaThrLeuThr 606570GAGCTGGTGGAGTACTACACTCAGCAGCAGGGTGTGGTGCAGGACCGC411GluLeuValGluTyrTyrThrGlnGlnGlnGlyValValGlnAspArg7 58085GACGGCACCATCATCCACCTCAAGTACCCGCTGAACTGCTCCGATCCC459AspGlyThrIleIleHisLeuLysTyrProLeuAsnCysSerAspPro90 95100105ACTAGTGAGAGGTGGTACCATGGCCACATGTCTGGCGGGCAGGCAGAG507ThrSerGluArgTrpTyrHisGlyHisMetSerGlyGlyGlnAlaGlu 110115120ACGCTGCTGCAGGCCAAGGGCGAGCCCTGGACGTTTCTTGTGCGTGAG555ThrLeuLeuGlnAlaLysGlyGluProTrpThrPheLeuValArgGlu 125130135AGCCTCAGCCAGCCTGGAGACTTCGTGCTTTCTGTGCTCAGTGACCAG603SerLeuSerGlnProGlyAspPheValLeuSerValLeuSerAspGln 140145150CCCAAGGCTGGCCCAGGCTCCCCGCTCAGGGTCACCCACATCAAGGTC651ProLysAlaGlyProGlySerProLeuArgValThrHisIleLysVal15 5160165ATGTGCGAGGGTGGACGCTACACAGTGGGTGGTTTGGAGACCTTCGAC699MetCysGluGlyGlyArgTyrThrValGlyGlyLeuGluThrPheAsp170 175180185AGCCTCACGGACCTGGTGGAGCATTTCAAGAAGACGGGGATTGAGGAG747SerLeuThrAspLeuValGluHisPheLysLysThrGlyIleGluGlu 190195200GCCTCAGGCGCCTTTGTCTACCTGCGGCAGCCGTACTATGCCACGAGG795AlaSerGlyAlaPheValTyrLeuArgGlnProTyrTyrAlaThrArg 205210215GTGAATGCGGCTGACATTGAGAACCGAGTGTTGGAACTGAACAAGAAG843ValAsnAlaAlaAspIleGluAsnArgValLeuGluLeuAsnLysLys 220225230CAGGAGTCCGAGGATACAGCCAAGGCTGGCTTCTGGGAGGAGTTTGAG891GlnGluSerGluAspThrAlaLysAlaGlyPheTrpGluGluPheGlu23 5240245AGTTTGCAGAAGCAGGAGGTGAAGAACTTGCACCAGCGTCTGGAAGGG939SerLeuGlnLysGlnGluValLysAsnLeuHisGlnArgLeuGluGly250 255260265CAACGGCCAGAGAACAAGGGCAAGAACCGCTACAAGAACATTCTCCCC987GlnArgProGluAsnLysGlyLysAsnArgTyrLysAsnIleLeuPro 270275280TTTGACCACAGCCGAGTGATCCTGCAGGGACGGGACAGTAACATCCCC1035PheAspHisSerArgValIleLeuGlnGlyArgAspSerAsnIlePro 285290295GGGTCCGACTACATCAATGCCAACTACATCAAGAACCAGCTGCTAGGC1083GlySerAspTyrIleAsnAlaAsnTyrIleLysAsnGlnLeuLeuGly 300305310CCTGATGAGAACGCTAAGACCTACATCGCCAGCCAGGGCTGTCTGGAG1131ProAspGluAsnAlaLysThrTyrIleAlaSerGlnGlyCysLeuGlu31 5320325GCCACGGTCAATGACTTCTGGCAGATGGCGTGGCAGGAGAACAGCCGT1179AlaThrValAsnAspPheTrpGlnMetAlaTrpGlnGluAsnSerArg330 335340345GTCATCGTCATGACCACCCGAGAGGTGGAGAAAGGCCGGAACAAATGC1227ValIleValMetThrThrArgGluValGluLysGlyArgAsnLysCysMF,300 350355360GTCCCATACTGGCCCGAGGTGGGCATGCAGCGTGCTTATGGGCCCTAC1275ValProTyrTrpProGluValGlyMetGlnArgAlaTyrGlyProTyr 365370375TCTGTGACCAACTGCGGGGAGCATGACACAACCGAATACAAACTCCGT1323SerValThrAsnCysGlyGluHisAspThrThrGluTyrLysLeuArg 380385390ACCTTACAGGTCTCCCCGCTGGACAATGGAGACCTGATTCGGGAGATC1371ThrLeuGlnValSerProLeuAspAsnGlyAspLeuIleArgGluIle39 5400405TGGCATTACCAGTACCTGAGCTGGCCCGACCATGGGGTCCCCAGTGAG1419TrpHisTyrGlnTyrLeuSerTrpProAspHisGlyValProSerGlu410 415420425CCTGGGGGTGTCCTCAGCTTCCTGGACCAGATCAACCAGCGGCAGGAA1467ProGlyGlyValLeuSerPheLeuAspGlnIleAsnGlnArgGlnGlu 430435440AGTCTGCCTCACGCAGGGCCCATCATCGTGCACTGCAGCGCCGGCATC1515SerLeuProHisAlaGlyProIleIleValHisCysSerAlaGlyIle 445450455GGCCGCACAGGCACCATCATTGTCATCGACATGCTCATGGAGAACATC1563GlyArgThrGlyThrIleIleValIleAspMetLeuMetGluAsnIle 460465470TCCACCAAGGGCCTGGACTGTGACATTGACATCCAGAAGACCATCCAG1611SerThrLysGlyLeuAspCysAspIleAspIleGlnLysThrIleGln47 5480485ATGGTGCGGGCGCAGCGCTCGGGCATGGTGCAGACGGAGGCGCAGTAC1659MetValArgAlaGlnArgSerGlyMetValGlnThrGluAlaGlnTyr490 495500505AAGTTCATCTACGTGGCCATCGCCCAGTTCATTGAAACCACTAAGAAG1707LysPheIleTyrValAlaIleAlaGlnPheIleGluThrThrLysLys 510515520AAGCTGGAGGTCCTGCAGTCGCAGAAGGGCCAGGAGTCGGAGTACGGG1755LysLeuGluValLeuGlnSerGlnLysGlyGlnGluSerGluTyrGly 525530535AACATCACCTATCCCCCAGCCATGAAGAATGCCCATGCCAAGGCCTCC1803AsnIleThrTyrProProAlaMetLysAsnAlaHisAlaLysAlaSer 540545550CGCACCTCGTCCAAACACAAGGAGGATGTGTATGAGAACCTGCACACT1851ArgThrSerSerLysHisLysGluAspValTyrGluAsnLeuHisThr55 5560565AAGAACAAGAGGGAGGAAAGTGAAGAAGCAGCGGTCAGCAGACAAGGA1899LysAsnLysArgGluGluSerGluGluAlaAlaValSerArgGlnGly570 575580585GAAGAGCAAGGGTTCCCTCAAGAGGAAGTGAGCGGTGCTGTCCTCAGG1947GluGluGlnGlyPheProGlnGluGluValSerGlyAlaValLeuArg 590595600TGGCCATGCCTCAGCCCTGACCCTGTGGAAGCATTTCGCGATGGACAG1995TrpProCysLeuSerProAspProValGluAlaPheArgAspGlyGln 605610615ACTCACAACCTGAACCTAGGAGTGCCCCATTCTTTTGTAATT2037ThrHisAsnLeuAsnLeuGlyValProHisSerPheValIle62 0625630TAAATGGCTGCATCCCCCCCACCTCTCCCTGACCCTGTATATAGCCCAGCCAGGCCCCAG2097GCAGGGCCAACCCTTCTCCTCTTGTAAATAAAGCCCTGGGATCACT2143(2 ) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:8:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 631 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:8:MetValArgTrpPheHisArgAspLeuSerGlyLeuAspAlaGluThr15 1015LeuLeuLysGlyArgGlyValHisGlySerPheLeuAlaArgProSer202530ArgLysAsnGlnGlyAspPheSerL euSerValArgValGlyAspGln354045ValThrHisIleArgIleGlnAsnSerGlyAspPheTyrAspLeuTyr50556 0GlyGlyGluLysPheAlaThrLeuThrGluLeuValGluTyrTyrThr65707580GlnGlnGlnGlyValValGlnAspArgAspGlyThrIleIleHisLe u859095LysTyrProLeuAsnCysSerAspProThrSerGluArgTrpTyrHis100105110GlyHis MetSerGlyGlyGlnAlaGluThrLeuLeuGlnAlaLysGly115120125GluProTrpThrPheLeuValArgGluSerLeuSerGlnProGlyAsp130 135140PheValLeuSerValLeuSerAspGlnProLysAlaGlyProGlySer145150155160ProLeuArgValThrHisIleLysValM etCysGluGlyGlyArgTyr165170175ThrValGlyGlyLeuGluThrPheAspSerLeuThrAspLeuValGlu180185 190HisPheLysLysThrGlyIleGluGluAlaSerGlyAlaPheValTyr195200205LeuArgGlnProTyrTyrAlaThrArgValAsnAlaAlaAspIleGl u210215220AsnArgValLeuGluLeuAsnLysLysGlnGluSerGluAspThrAla225230235240LysAlaGly PheTrpGluGluPheGluSerLeuGlnLysGlnGluVal245250255LysAsnLeuHisGlnArgLeuGluGlyGlnArgProGluAsnLysGly260 265270LysAsnArgTyrLysAsnIleLeuProPheAspHisSerArgValIle275280285LeuGlnGlyArgAspSerAsnIleProG lySerAspTyrIleAsnAla290295300AsnTyrIleLysAsnGlnLeuLeuGlyProAspGluAsnAlaLysThr305310315 320TyrIleAlaSerGlnGlyCysLeuGluAlaThrValAsnAspPheTrp325330335GlnMetAlaTrpGlnGluAsnSerArgValIleValMetThrTh rArg340345350GluValGluLysGlyArgAsnLysCysValProTyrTrpProGluVal355360365GlyMetGln ArgAlaTyrGlyProTyrSerValThrAsnCysGlyGlu370375380HisAspThrThrGluTyrLysLeuArgThrLeuGlnValSerProLeu385390 395400AspAsnGlyAspLeuIleArgGluIleTrpHisTyrGlnTyrLeuSer405410415TrpProAspHisGlyValProSerG luProGlyGlyValLeuSerPhe420425430LeuAspGlnIleAsnGlnArgGlnGluSerLeuProHisAlaGlyPro435440 445IleIleValHisCysSerAlaGlyIleGlyArgThrGlyThrIleIle450455460ValIleAspMetLeuMetGluAsnIleSerThrLysGlyLeuAspCys465 470475480AspIleAspIleGlnLysThrIleGlnMetValArgAlaGlnArgSer485490495GlyMet ValGlnThrGluAlaGlnTyrLysPheIleTyrValAlaIle500505510AlaGlnPheIleGluThrThrLysLysLysLeuGluValLeuGlnSer515 520525GlnLysGlyGlnGluSerGluTyrGlyAsnIleThrTyrProProAla530535540MetLysAsnAlaHisAlaLysAlaSerArgThrS erSerLysHisLys545550555560GluAspValTyrGluAsnLeuHisThrLysAsnLysArgGluGluSer565570 575GluGluAlaAlaValSerArgGlnGlyGluGluGlnGlyPheProGln580585590GluGluValSerGlyAlaValLeuArgTrpProCysLeuSerPr oAsp595600605ProValGluAlaPheArgAspGlyGlnThrHisAsnLeuAsnLeuGly610615620ValProHisSerPhe ValIle625630(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:9:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 380 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: double(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: cDNA(ix) FEATURE:(A) NAME/KEY: CDS(B) LOCATION: 1..380(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:9:AAATGTCCGCAATATTGGCCTGATGAGTGTGCACTCAAAGAGTATGGC48LysCysProGlnTyrTrpProAspGluCysAlaLeuLysGluTyrGly1510 15GTCATGCGTGTGAGGAACGTCAGAGAAAGTGCTGCGCATGACTACACC96ValMetArgValArgAsnValArgGluSerAlaAlaHisAspTyrThr2025 30TTACGAGAAGTGAAAGTGTGTAAGGTCGGACAAGGAAACACAGAGAGA144LeuArgGluValLysValCysLysValGlyGlnGlyAsnThrGluArg3540 45ACCGTCTGGCAGTACCACTTTCGGACCTGGCCAGACCACGGTGTGCCT192ThrValTrpGlnTyrHisPheArgThrTrpProAspHisGlyValPro5055 60AGTGACCCTGGAGGTGTGCTGGACTTGGTGGAGGAGGTCCACCACAAG240SerAspProGlyGlyValLeuAspLeuValGluGluValHisHisLys657075 80CAGGAGAGCATCGTGGATGCAGGCCCTGTCGTGGTTCACTGCAGTGCT288GlnGluSerIleValAspAlaGlyProValValValHisCysSerAla8590 95GGGATTGGCCGGACAGGAACGTTCATTGTGATTGATATCCTTATTGAC336GlyIleGlyArgThrGlyThrPheIleValIleAspIleLeuIleAsp100105 110ATCATCCGAGAGAAAGGTGTGGACTGTGACATCGACGTTCCTAA380IleIleArgGluLysGlyValAspCysAspIleAspValPro115120 125(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:10:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 126 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:10:LysCysProGlnTyrTrpProAspGluCysAlaLeuLysGluTyrGly1 51015ValMetArgValArgAsnValArgGluSerAlaAlaHisAspTyrThr202530LeuArgGluValLy sValCysLysValGlyGlnGlyAsnThrGluArg354045ThrValTrpGlnTyrHisPheArgThrTrpProAspHisGlyValPro5055 60SerAspProGlyGlyValLeuAspLeuValGluGluValHisHisLys65707580GlnGluSerIleValAspAlaGlyProValValVal HisCysSerAla859095GlyIleGlyArgThrGlyThrPheIleValIleAspIleLeuIleAsp100105 110IleIleArgGluLysGlyValAspCysAspIleAspValPro115120125(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:11:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 2276 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: double(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: cDNA(ix) FEATURE:(A) NAME/KEY: CDS(B) LOCATION: 114..1893(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:11:CTGCCCCGCGTCCGGTCCCGAGCGGGCCTCCCTCGGGCCAGCCCGATGTGACCGAGCCCA60GCGGAGCCTGAGCAAGGAGC GGGTCCGTCGCGGAGCCGGAGGGCGGGAGGAACATG116MetACATCGCGGAGA TGGTTTCACCCAAATATCACTGGTGTGGAGGCAGAA164ThrSerArgArgTrpPheHisProAsnIleThrGlyValGluAlaGlu51015AACCTACTGTTG ACAAGAGGAGTTGATGGCAGTTTTTTGGCAAGGCCT212AsnLeuLeuLeuThrArgGlyValAspGlySerPheLeuAlaArgPro202530AGTAAAAGTAACCCT GGAGACTTCACACTTTCCGTTAGAAGAAATGGA260SerLysSerAsnProGlyAspPheThrLeuSerValArgArgAsnGly354045GCTGTCACCCACATCAAGATT CAGAACACTGGTGATTACTATGACCTG308AlaValThrHisIleLysIleGlnAsnThrGlyAspTyrTyrAspLeu50556065TATGGAGGGGAGAAA TTTGCCACTTTGGCTGAGTTGGTCCAGTATTAC356TyrGlyGlyGluLysPheAlaThrLeuAlaGluLeuValGlnTyrTyr707580ATGGAACATCAC GGGCAATTAAAAGAGAAGAATGGAGATGTCATTGAG404MetGluHisHisGlyGlnLeuLysGluLysAsnGlyAspValIleGlu859095CTTAAATATCCT CTGAACTGTGCAGATCCTACCTCTGAAAGGTGGTTT452LeuLysTyrProLeuAsnCysAlaAspProThrSerGluArgTrpPhe100105110CATGGACATCTCTCT GGGAAAGAAGCAGAGAAATTATTAACTGAAAAA500HisGlyHisLeuSerGlyLysGluAlaGluLysLeuLeuThrGluLys115120125GGAAAACATGGTAGTTTTCTT GTACGAGAGAGCCAGAGCCACCCTGGA548GlyLysHisGlySerPheLeuValArgGluSerGlnSerHisProGly130135140145GATTTTGTTCTTTCT GTGCGCACTGGTGATGACAAAGGGGAGAGCAAT596AspPheValLeuSerValArgThrGlyAspAspLysGlyGluSerAsn150155160GACGGCAAGTCT AAAGTGACCCATGTTATGATTCGCTGTCAGGAACTG644AspGlyLysSerLysValThrHisValMetIleArgCysGlnGluLeu165170175AAATACGACGTT GGTGGAGGAGAACGGTTTGATTCTTTGACAGATCTT692LysTyrAspValGlyGlyGlyGluArgPheAspSerLeuThrAspLeu180185190GTGGAACATTATAAG AAGAATCCTATGGTGGAAACATTGGGTACAGTA740ValGluHisTyrLysLysAsnProMetValGluThrLeuGlyThrVal195200205CTACAACTCAAGCAGCCCCTT AACACGACTCGTATAAATGCTGCTGAA788LeuGlnLeuLysGlnProLeuAsnThrThrArgIleAsnAlaAlaGlu210215220225ATAGAAAGCAGAGTT CGAGAACTAAGCAAATTAGCTGAGACCACAGAT836IleGluSerArgValArgGluLeuSerLysLeuAlaGluThrThrAsp230235240AAAGTCAAACAA GGCTTTTGGGAAGAATTTGAGACACTACAACAACAG884LysValLysGlnGlyPheTrpGluGluPheGluThrLeuGlnGlnGln245250255GAGTGCAAACTT CTCTACAGCCGAAAAGAGGGTCAAAGGCAAGAAAAC932GluCysLysLeuLeuTyrSerArgLysGluGlyGlnArgGlnGluAsn260265270AAAAACAAAAATAGA TATAAAAACATCCTGCCCTTTGATCATACCAGG980LysAsnLysAsnArgTyrLysAsnIleLeuProPheAspHisThrArg275280285GTTGTCCTACACGATGGTGAT CCCAATGAGCCTGTTTCAGATTACATC1028ValValLeuHisAspGlyAspProAsnGluProValSerAspTyrIle290295300305AATGCAAATATCATC ATGCCTGAATTTGAAACCAAGTGCAACAATTCA1076AsnAlaAsnIleIleMetProGluPheGluThrLysCysAsnAsnSer310315320AAGCCCAAAAAG AGTTACATTGCCACACAAGGCTGCCTGCAAAACACG1124LysProLysLysSerTyrIleAlaThrGlnGlyCysLeuGlnAsnThr325330335GTGAATGACTTT TGGCGGATGGTGTTCCAAGAAAACTCCCGAGTGATT1172ValAsnAspPheTrpArgMetValPheGlnGluAsnSerArgValIle340345350GTCATGACAACGAAA GAAGTGGAGAGAGGAAAGAGTAAATGTGTCAAA1220ValMetThrThrLysGluValGluArgGlyLysSerLysCysValLys355360365TACTGGCCTGATGAGTATGCT CTAAAAGAATATGGCGTCATGCGTGTT1268TyrTrpProAspGluTyrAlaLeuLysGluTyrGlyValMetArgVal370375380385AGGAACGTCAAAGAA AGCGCCGCTCATGACTATACGCTAAGAGAACTT1316ArgAsnValLysGluSerAlaAlaHisAspTyrThrLeuArgGluLeu390395400AAACTTTCAAAG GTTGGACAAGGGAATACGGAGAGAACGGTCTGGCAA1364LysLeuSerLysValGlyGlnGlyAsnThrGluArgThrValTrpGln405410415TACCACTTTCGG ACCTGGCCGGACCACGGCGTGCCCAGCGACCCTGGG1412TyrHisPheArgThrTrpProAspHisGlyValProSerAspProGly420425430GGCGTGCTGGACTTC CTGGAGGAGGTGCACCATAAGCAGGAGAGCATC1460GlyValLeuAspPheLeuGluGluValHisHisLysGlnGluSerIle435440445ATGGATGCAGGGCCGGTCGTG GTGCACTGCAGTGCTGGAATTGGCCGG1508MetAspAlaGlyProValValValHisCysSerAlaGlyIleGlyArg450455460465ACAGGGACGTTCATT GTGATTGATATTCTTATTGACATCATCAGAGAG1556ThrGlyThrPheIleValIleAspIleLeuIleAspIleIleArgGlu470475480AAAGGTGTTGAC TGCGATATTGACGTTCCCAAAACCATCCAGATGGTG1604LysGlyValAspCysAspIleAspValProLysThrIleGlnMetVal485490495CGGTCTCAGAGG TCAGGGATGGTCCAGACAGAAGCACAGTACCGATTT1652ArgSerGlnArgSerGlyMetValGlnThrGluAlaGlnTyrArgPhe500505510ATCTATATGGCGGTC CAGCATTATATTGAAACACTACAGCGCAGGATT1700IleTyrMetAlaValGlnHisTyrIleGluThrLeuGlnArgArgIle515520525GAAGAAGAGCAGAAAAGCAAG AGGAAAGGGCACGAATATACAAATATT1748GluGluGluGlnLysSerLysArgLysGlyHisGluTyrThrAsnIle530535540545AAGTATTCTCTAGCG GACCAGACGAGTGGAGATCAGAGCCCTCTCCCG1796LysTyrSerLeuAlaAspGlnThrSerGlyAspGlnSerProLeuPro550555560CCTTGTACTCCA ACGCCACCCTGTGCAGAAATGAGAGAAGACAGTGCT1844ProCysThrProThrProProCysAlaGluMetArgGluAspSerAla565570575AGAGTCTATGAA AACGTGGGCCTGATGCAACAGCAGAAAAGTTTCAGAT1893ArgValTyrGluAsnValGlyLeuMetGlnGlnGlnLysSerPheArg580585590GAGAAAACCTGCCAAAAC TTCAGCACAGAAATAGATGTGGACTTTCACCCTCTCCCTAAA1953AAGATCAAGAACAGACGCAAGAAAGTTTATGTGAAGACAGAATTTGGATTTGGAAGGCTT2013GCAATGTGGTTGACTACCTTTTGATAAGCAAAATTTGAAACCATTTAAAGACCACTGTAT 2073TTTAACTCAACAATACCTGCTTCCCAATTACTCATTTCCTCAGATAAGAAGAAATCATCT2133CTACAATGTAGACAACATTATATTTTATAGAATTTGTTTGAAATTGAGGAAGCAGTTAAA2193TTGTGCGCTGTATTTTGCAGATTATGGGGATTCAAA TTCTAGTAATAGGCTTTTTTATTT2253TTATTTTTATACCCTTAACCAGG2276(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:12:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 593 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:12:MetThrSerArgArgTrpPheHisProAsnIleThrGlyValGluAla151015GluAsnLeuLeuLeuThrArgGlyValAspGl ySerPheLeuAlaArg202530ProSerLysSerAsnProGlyAspPheThrLeuSerValArgArgAsn354045GlyAlaValThrHisIleLysIleGlnAsnThrGlyAspTyrTyrAsp505560LeuTyrGlyGlyGluLysPheAlaThrLeuAlaGluLeuValGlnTyr65 707580TyrMetGluHisHisGlyGlnLeuLysGluLysAsnGlyAspValIle859095GluLeuLysTyrP roLeuAsnCysAlaAspProThrSerGluArgTrp100105110PheHisGlyHisLeuSerGlyLysGluAlaGluLysLeuLeuThrGlu115 120125LysGlyLysHisGlySerPheLeuValArgGluSerGlnSerHisPro130135140GlyAspPheValLeuSerValArgThrGlyAspAspLysGl yGluSer145150155160AsnAspGlyLysSerLysValThrHisValMetIleArgCysGlnGlu165170 175LeuLysTyrAspValGlyGlyGlyGluArgPheAspSerLeuThrAsp180185190LeuValGluHisTyrLysLysAsnProMetValGluThrLeuGlyThr 195200205ValLeuGlnLeuLysGlnProLeuAsnThrThrArgIleAsnAlaAla210215220GluIleGluSerArgValArgG luLeuSerLysLeuAlaGluThrThr225230235240AspLysValLysGlnGlyPheTrpGluGluPheGluThrLeuGlnGln245 250255GlnGluCysLysLeuLeuTyrSerArgLysGluGlyGlnArgGlnGlu260265270AsnLysAsnLysAsnArgTyrLysAsnIleLe uProPheAspHisThr275280285ArgValValLeuHisAspGlyAspProAsnGluProValSerAspTyr290295300Ile AsnAlaAsnIleIleMetProGluPheGluThrLysCysAsnAsn305310315320SerLysProLysLysSerTyrIleAlaThrGlnGlyCysLeuGlnAsn 325330335ThrValAsnAspPheTrpArgMetValPheGlnGluAsnSerArgVal340345350IleValMetThrT hrLysGluValGluArgGlyLysSerLysCysVal355360365LysTyrTrpProAspGluTyrAlaLeuLysGluTyrGlyValMetArg370375 380ValArgAsnValLysGluSerAlaAlaHisAspTyrThrLeuArgGlu385390395400LeuLysLeuSerLysValGlyGlnGlyAsnThrGl uArgThrValTrp405410415GlnTyrHisPheArgThrTrpProAspHisGlyValProSerAspPro420425 430GlyGlyValLeuAspPheLeuGluGluValHisHisLysGlnGluSer435440445IleMetAspAlaGlyProValValValHisCysSerAlaGlyIleGly4 50455460ArgThrGlyThrPheIleValIleAspIleLeuIleAspIleIleArg465470475480GluLysGlyValAspC ysAspIleAspValProLysThrIleGlnMet485490495ValArgSerGlnArgSerGlyMetValGlnThrGluAlaGlnTyrArg500 505510PheIleTyrMetAlaValGlnHisTyrIleGluThrLeuGlnArgArg515520525IleGluGluGluGlnLysSerLysArgLysGlyHi sGluTyrThrAsn530535540IleLysTyrSerLeuAlaAspGlnThrSerGlyAspGlnSerProLeu545550555560ProProCysThrProThrProProCysAlaGluMetArgGluAspSer565570575AlaArgValTyrGluAsnValGlyLeuMetGlnGlnGlnLysSerPhe 580585590Arg(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:13:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 20 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:13: AARTGYSMNSARTAYTGGCC20(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:14:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 23 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)(x i) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:14:CCNAYNCCNGCNGARCARTGNAC23(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:15:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 97 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:15:LysCysValLysTyrTrpProAspGluCysAlaLeuLysGluTyrGly151015ValMetArgValArgAsnValArgGluSerAlaAlaHisAs pTyrThr202530LeuArgGluValLysValCysLysValGlyGlnGlyAsnThrGluArg35404 5ThrValTrpGlnTyrHisPheArgThrTrpProAspHisGlyValPro505560SerAspProGlyGlyValLeuAspLeuValGluGluValHisHisLys65707580GlnGluSerIleValAspAlaGlyProValValValHisCysSerAla8590 95Gly(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:16:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 97 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:16:LysCysValLysTyrTrpProAspGluTyrAlaLeuLysGlu TyrGly151015ValMetArgValArgAsnValLysGluSerAlaAlaHisAspTyrThr2025 30LeuArgGluLeuLysLeuSerLysValGlyGlnGlyAsnThrGluArg354045ThrValTrpGlnTyrHisPheArgThrTrpProAspHisGl yValPro505560SerAspProGlyGlyValLeuAspPheLeuGluGluValHisHisLys657075 80GlnGluSerIleMetAspAlaGlyProValValValHisCysSerAla859095Gly(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:17:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 99 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:17:LysCysAlaArgTyrTrpProAspGluGlyArgSerGluGlnPheGly1510 15HisAlaArgIleGlnCysValSerGluAsnSerThrSerAspTyrThr202530LeuArgGluPheLeuValSerTrpArgAspGlnPro AlaArgArgIle354045PheHisTyrHisPheGlnValTrpProAspHisGlyValProAlaAsp505560ProGlyCysValLeuAsnPheLeuGlnAspValAsnThrArgGlnSer65707580HisLeuAlaGlnAlaGlyGluLysProGlyProIleCy sValHisCys859095SerAlaGly(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:18:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 97 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:18:LysCysValProTyrTrpProGluValGlyMetGlnArgAlaTyrGly151015ProTyrSerValThrAsnCysGlyGluHi sAspThrThrGluTyrLys202530LeuArgThrLeuGlnValSerProLeuAspAsnGlyAspLeuIleArg3540 45GluIleTrpHisTyrGlnTyrLeuSerTrpProAspHisGlyValPro505560SerGluProGlyGlyValLeuSerPheLeuAspGln IleAsnGlnArg65707580GlnGluSerLeuProHisAlaGlyProIleIleValHisCysSerAla85 9095Gly(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:19:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 99 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:19:LeuCysProGlnTyrTrpProGluAsnGly ValHisArgHisGlyPro151015IleGlnValGluPheValSerAlaAspLeuGluGluAspIleIleSer20 2530ArgIlePheArgIleTyrAsnAlaAlaArgProGlnAspGlyTyrArg354045MetValGlnGlnPheGlnPheLeuGlyTr pProMetTyrArgAspThr505560ProValSerLysArgSerPheLeuLysLeuIleArgGlnValAspLys65707 580TrpGlnGluGluTyrAsnGlyGlyGluGlyProThrValValHisCys859095LeuAsnGly(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:20: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 97 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:20:LysCysAspHisTyrTrpProAlaAspGlnAspSerLeuTyrTyrGly15 1015AspLeuIleLeuGlnMetLeuSerGluSerValLeuProGluTrpThr202530IleArgGluPheLysIle CysGlyGluGluGlnLeuAspAlaHisArg354045LeuIleArgHisPheHisTyrThrValTrpProAspHisGlyValPro50 5560GluThrThrGlnSerLeuIleGlnPheValArgThrValArgAspTyr65707580IleAsnArgSerProGlyAl aGlyProThrValValHisCysSerAla859095Gly(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:21:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 95 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:21:LysCysHisGlnTyrTrpProAlaGluArgSerAlaArgTyrGlnTyr151015PheValValAspProMe tAlaGluTyrAsnMetProGlnTyrIleLeu202530ArgGluPheLysValThrAspAlaArgAspGlyGlnSerArgThrIle35 4045ArgGlnPheGlnPheThrAspTrpProGluGlnGlyValProLysThr505560GlyGluGlyPheIleAspPheIle GlyGlnValHisLysThrLysGlu65707580GlnPheGlyGlnAspGlyProIleThrValHisCysSerAlaGly85 9095(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:22:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 95 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:22:LysCysHisGlnTyrTrpProAlaGluArg SerAlaArgTyrGlnTyr151015PheValValAspProMetAlaGluTyrAsnMetProGlnTyrIleLeu20 2530ArgGluPheLysValThrAspAlaArgAspGlyGlnSerArgThrVal354045ArgGlnPheGlnPheThrAspTrpProGl uGlnGlyValProLysSer505560GlyGluGlyPheIleAspPheIleGlyGlnValHisLysThrLysGlu65707 580GlnPheGlyGlnAspGlyProIleSerValHisCysSerAlaGly859095(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:23:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 95 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:23:LysCysPheGlnTyrTrpProHisGluArgSerValArgTyrGlnTyr1510 15TyrValValAspProIleAlaGluTyrAsnMetProGlnTyrLysLeu202530ArgGluPheLysValThrAspAlaArgAspGlySer SerArgThrVal354045ArgGlnPheGlnPheIleAspTrpProGluGlnGlyValProLysSer505560GlyGluGlyPheIleAspPheIleGlyGlnValHisLysThrLysGlu65707580GlnPheGlyGlnAspGlyProIleThrValHisCysSe rAlaGly859095(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:24:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 100 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:24: TrpPheHisProAsnIleThrGlyValGluAlaGluAsnLeuLeuLeu151015ThrArgGlyValAspGlySerPheLeuAlaArgProSerLysSerAs n202530ProGlyAspPheThrLeuSerValArgArgAsnGlyAlaValThrHis354045 IleLysIleGlnAsnThrGlyAspTyrTyrAspLeuTyrGlyGlyGlu505560LysPheAlaThrLeuAlaGluLeuValGlnTyrTyrMetGluHisHis6 5707580GlyGlnLeuLysGluLysAsnGlyAspValIleGluLeuLysTyrPro859095LeuAsnCysAla100(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:25:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 99 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:25:TrpPheHisProThrIleSerG lyIleGluAlaGluLysLeuLeuGln151015GluGlnGlyPheAspGlySerPheLeuAlaArgLeuSerSerSerAsn20 2530ProGlyAlaPheThrLeuSerValArgArgGlyAsnGluValThrHis354045IleLysIleGlnAsnAsnGly AspPhePheAspLeuTyrGlyGlyGlu505560LysPheAlaThrLeuProGluLeuValGlnTyrTyrMetGluAsnGly6570 7580GluLeuLysGluLysAsnGlyGlnAlaIleGluLeuLysGlnProLeu859095IleCysAla(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:26:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 100 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:26:TrpPheHisArgAspLeuSerGlyLeuAspAlaGluThrLeuLeuLys1 51015GlyArgGlyValHisGlySerPheLeuAlaArgProSerArgLysAsn202530GlnGlyAspP heSerLeuSerValArgValGlyAspGlnValThrHis354045IleArgIleGlnAsnSerGlyAspPheTyrAspLeuTyrGlyGlyGlu50 5560LysPheAlaThrLeuThrGluLeuValGluTyrTyrThrGlnGlnGln65707580GlyValValGln AspArgAspGlyThrIleIleHisLeuLysTyrPro859095LeuAsnCysSer100(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:27:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 102 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:27:TrpPheHisGlyHisLeuSerGlyLysGluAlaGluLysLeuLeuThr1510 15GluLysGlyLysHisGlySerPheLeuValArgGluSerGlnSerHis202530ProGlyAspPheValLeuSerValArgThrGl yAspAspLysGlyGlu354045SerAsnAspGlyLysSerLysValThrHisValMetIleArgCysGln5055 60GluLeuLysTyrAspValGlyGlyGlyGluArgPheAspSerLeuThr65707580AspLeuValGluHisTyrLysLysAsnProMet ValGluThrLeuGly859095ThrValLeuGlnLeuLys100(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:28:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 92 amino acids (B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:28:TrpPheHisGlyAsnLeuSerGlyLysGluAlaGluLysLeuIleLeu151015 GluArgGlyLysAsnGlySerPheLeuValArgGluSerGlnSerLys202530ProGlyAspPheValLeuSerValArgThrAspAspLysValThrHis354045ValMetIleArgTrpGlnAspLysLysTyrAspValGlyGlyGlyGlu505560SerPhe GlyThrLeuSerGluLeuIleAspHisTyrLysArgAsnPro65707580MetValGluThrCysGlyThrValValHisLeuArg 8590(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:29:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 100 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:29:TrpTyrHisGlyHisMetSerGlyGlyGlnAlaGlu ThrLeuLeuGln151015AlaLysGlyGluProTrpThrPheLeuValArgGluSerLeuSerGln2025 30ProGlyAspPheValLeuSerValLeuSerAspGlnProLysAlaGly354045ProGlySerProLeuArgValThrHisIleLysV alMetCysGluGly505560GlyArgTyrThrValGlyGlyLeuGluThrPheAspSerLeuThrAsp657075 80LeuValGluHisPheLysLysThrGlyIleGluGluAlaSerGlyAla859095PheValTyrLeu100(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:30:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 96 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:30:TrpTyrHisGlyAlaIleProArgIleGluAlaGlnGluLeuLeuLys1 51015LysGlnGlyAspPheLeuValArgGluSerHisGlyLysProGlyGlu202530Tyr ValLeuSerValTyrSerAspGlyGlnArgArgHisPheIleIle354045GlnTyrValAspAsnMetTyrArgPheGluGlyThrGlyPheSerAsn 505560IleProGlnLeuIleAspHisHisTyrThrThrLysGlnValIleThr65707580LysLy sSerGlyValValLeuLeuAsnProIleProLysAspLysLys859095(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:31:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 100 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid (D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:31:TrpPheHisGlyLysIleSerLysGlnGluAlaTyrAsnLeuLeuMet151015ThrValGlyGl nAlaCysSerPheLeuValArgProSerAspAsnThr202530ProGlyAspTyrSerLeuTyrPheArgThrSerGluAsnIleGlnArg3 54045PheLysIleCysProThrProAsnAsnGlnPheMetMetGlyGlyArg505560TyrTyrAsnSerIleGly AspIleIleAspHisTyrArgLysGluGln65707580IleValGluGlyTyrTyrLeuLysGluProValProMetGlnAspGln 859095GluGlnValLeu100(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:32:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 107 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein (xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:32:TrpTyrPheGlyLysIleSerArgLysAspAlaGluArgGlnLeuLeu151015SerSerGlyAsnProGlnGlyAlaPheLeuIle ArgGluSerGluThr202530ThrLysGlyAlaTyrSerLeuSerIleArgAspTrpAspGlnAsnArg3540 45GlyAspHisIleLysHisTyrLysIleArgLysLeuAspThrGlyGly505560TyrTyrIleThrThrArgAlaGlnPheAspSerIleGlnA spLeuVal65707580GlnHisTyrMetGluValAsnAspGlyLeuCysTyrLeuLeuThrAla8590 95ProCysThrThrThrLysProGlnThrLeuGly100105(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:33:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 96 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear (ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:33:TrpTyrTyrGlyLysValThrArgHisGlnAlaGluMetAlaLeuAsn151015GluArgGlyHisGluGly AspPheLeuIleArgAspSerGluSerSer202530ProAsnAspPheSerValSerLeuLysAlaGlnGlyLysAsnLysHis35 4045PheLysValGlnLeuLysGluThrValTyrCysIleGlyGlnArgLys505560PheSerThrMetGluGluLeuValGl uHisTyrLysLysAlaProIle65707580PheThrSerGluGlnGlyGluLysLeuTyrLeuValLysHisLeuSer85 9095(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:34:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 102 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:34:TrpTyrPheGlyAspValLysArgAlaLy sAlaGluLysArgLeuMet151015ValArgGlyLeuProSerGlyThrPheLeuIleArgLysAlaGluThr20 2530AlaValGlyAsnPheSerLeuSerValArgAspGlyAspSerValLys354045HisTyrArgValArgLysLeuAspThr GlyGlyTyrPheIleThrThr505560ArgAlaProPheAsnSerLeuTyrGluLeuValGlnHisTyrThrLys6570 7580AspAlaAspGlyLeuValCysAlaLeuThrLeuProCysProLysAsp859095LysProValThrGlyGly 100(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:35:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 99 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:35:TrpTyrPheGlyLysIleSerArgLysAspAlaGluArgGlnLeu Leu151015SerSerGlyAsnProGlnGlyAlaPheLeuIleArgGluSerGluThr2025 30ThrLysGlyAlaTyrSerLeuSerIleArgAspTrpAspGlnAsnArg354045GlyAspHisIleLysHisTyrLysIleArgLysLeuAspThrG lyGly505560TyrTyrIleThrThrArgAlaGlnPheAspSerIleGlnAspLeuVal657075 80GlnHisTyrMetGluValAsnAspGlyLeuCysTyrLeuLeuThrAla859095ProCysThr(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:36:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 99 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:36:TrpTyrPheGlyLysMetGlyArgLysAspAlaGluArgLeuLeuLeu1510 15AsnProGlyAsnGlnArgGlyIlePheLeuValArgGluSerGluThr202530ThrLysGlyAlaTyrSerLeuSerIleArgAsp TrpAspGluValArg354045GlyAspAsnValLysHisTyrLysIleArgLysLeuAspAsnGlyGly5055 60TyrTyrIleThrThrArgAlaGlnPheGluSerLeuGlnLysLeuVal65707580LysHisTyrArgGluHisAlaAspGlyLeuCysH isLysLeuThrThr859095ValCysPro(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:37:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 99 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:37:TrpTyrPheGlyLysLeuGlyArgLysAspAlaGluArgGlnLeuLeu151015SerPheGlyAsnProArgGlyThrP heLeuIleArgGluSerGluThr202530ThrLysGlyAlaTyrSerLeuSerIleArgAspTrpAspAspMetLys35 4045GlyAspHisValLysHisTyrLysIleArgLysLeuAspAsnGlyGly505560TyrTyrIleThrThrArgAlaGlnPheGluThr LeuGlnGlnLeuVal65707580GlnHisTyrSerGluArgAlaAlaGlyLeuCysCysArgLeuValVal85 9095ProCysHis(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:38:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 99 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:38:TrpPhePheLysAsnLeuSer ArgLysAspAlaGluArgGlnLeuLeu151015AlaProGlyAsnThrHisGlySerPheLeuIleArgGluSerGluSer20 2530ThrAlaGlySerPheSerLeuSerValArgAspPheAspGlnAsnGln354045GlyGluValValLysHisT yrLysIleArgAsnLeuAspAsnGlyGly505560PheTyrIleSerProArgIleThrPheProGlyLeuHisAspLeuVal6570 7580ArgHisTyrThrAsnAlaSerAspGlyLeuCysThrLysLeuSerArg859095ProCysGln(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:39:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 98 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:39:TrpPhePheArgThrIleSerArgLysAspAlaGluArgGlnLeuLeu1 51015AlaProMetAsnLysAlaGlySerPheLeuIleArgGluSerGluSer202530AsnLysGly AlaPheSerLeuSerValLysAspIleThrThrGlnGly354045GluValValLysHisTyrLysIleArgSerLeuAspAsnGlyGlyTyr50 5560TyrIleSerProArgIleThrPheProThrLeuGlnAlaLeuValGln65707580HisTyrSerL ysLysGlyAspGlyLeuCysGlnLysLeuThrLeuPro859095CysVal(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:40:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 91 amino acids(B) TYPE: amino acid (D) TOPOLOGY: linear(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:40:TrpTyrTyrGlyLysValThrArgHisGlnAlaGluMetAlaLeuAsn151015GluA rgGlyHisGluGlyAspPheLeuIleArgAspSerGluSerSer202530ProAsnAspPheSerValSerLeuLysAlaGlnGlyLysAsnLysHis 354045PheLysValGlnLeuLysGluThrValTyrCysIleGlyGlnArgLys505560PheSerThrMet GluGluLeuValGluHisTyrLysLysAlaProIle65707580PheThrSerGluGlnGlyGluLysLeuTyrLeu85 90(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:41:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:41:TCCACGGTAGCTTCCTGGCTC 21(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:42:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:42:AGTGGGATCGGAGCAGTTCAG 21(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:43:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 23 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:43:CCATCATCCACCTCAAGTACCCG2 3(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:44:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:44:CCACCCTCGCACATGACCTTG21 (2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:45:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:45:CCGCTCAGGGTCACCCACATC21(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:46:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 20 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:46:CTGTATCCTCGGACTCCTGC20(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:47:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:47:CGAGTGTTGGAACTGAACAAG21(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:48: (i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 22 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:48:GATGTAGTTGGCATTGATGTAG22(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:49:(i ) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:49:GACGGGACAGTAACATCCCCG21(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:50:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 20 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:50:CCATAAGCACGCTGCATGCC20(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:51:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:51:GAACAAATGCGTCCCATACTG21(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:52:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS: (A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:52:CTGCCGCTGGTTGATCTGGTC21(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:53:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 19 base pairs(B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:53:GGGTGTCCTCAGCTTCCTG19(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO:54:(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:(A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs (B) TYPE: nucleic acid(C) STRANDEDNESS: single(D) TOPOLOGY: linear(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO:54:CTTGTACTGCGCCTCCGTCTG21__________________________________________________________________________
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U.S. Classification435/6.13, 536/24.3, 536/24.31, 435/91.1, 435/91.2, 435/6.18
International ClassificationC12N9/16, C12Q1/68
Cooperative ClassificationC12Q1/68, C12N9/16
European ClassificationC12Q1/68, C12N9/16
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