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Publication numberUS556825 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1896
Filing dateDec 9, 1895
Publication numberUS 556825 A, US 556825A, US-A-556825, US556825 A, US556825A
InventorsJohn Staunton King
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
John staunton king
US 556825 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

J. S. KING. VBNTILATED BOOT.

No. 556,825. Patented Mar. 2Q, 1896.

ANDREW B GRAMM moroumorwnsnmmuwnc.

UNITED STATES PAT NT rricE.

.lOllN STAUNTON KING, OF TORONTO, CANADA.

VENTILATED BOOT.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 556,825, dated March 24:, 1896.

Application filed December 9, 1895. Serial No. 571,580. (No model.)

T 0 aZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, JOHN STAUNTON KING, of the city of Toronto, in the county of York, in the Province of Ontario, Canada, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Ventilated Boots, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in ventilated boots and shoes; and the object of the invention is to provide an improved means whereby the shoe may not only be thoroughly ventilated ,but also prevented from squeakin g without deleteriously affecting the external appearance or internal construction of the boot or shoe; and it consists essentially in making merely a central passage-way proidded with perforations underneath the inner sole and through the center of the filling, the forward end of the passage-way being bounded by narrow strips and having a soft filling of a composition of rubber and ground leather at each side of these strips, while the rear end of the passage-way is connected to a concaveconvex outwardly and upwardly flaring casing provided with a bent lower end and a recessed rib forming two passage-ways, the ends of the passage-ways being connected to the outer air by two eyelet-holes, one on each side of the central seam, as hereinafter more particularly explained.

Figure 1 is a perspective bottom view of a boot constructed in accordancewith my in vention, the sole and heel being removed and portions of the boot being broken away to exhibit the construction. Fig. 2 is an end view of the back of the boot, showing the position of my ventilatingcasing in d otted lines. Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section through, the boot through the zigzag lines {U as y g 3 Fig. 2. Fig. 4 is a cross-section from the vamp and sole. Fig. 5 is a detail of the ventilating heelcasing. Fig. 6 is another view of this casing.

In the drawings like letters of reference indicate corresponding parts in each figure.

A is the upper of the boot, which is turned inwardly upon the inner sole at a and has the welt B sewed around the edge, as shown.

C G is the filling next the heel, which is formed in two parts, divided so as to form a channel D. The channel D extends from the filling forwardly to the toe of the shoe, being bounded from the front end of the filling G O by the side strips 0 C Between the strips 0 O and the welt B on both sides of the. channel D I provide a soft moist filling C of a mixture of rubber cement and ground leather. \Vhen the sole is put on, this mixture is kept in a moist condition. Heretofore in boots pro vided with a ventilating-channel the great difficulty has been the squeakin g of the boots 3 but by providing this soft filling between the side strips of the channel and the welt the squeaking is entirely prevented.

The channel D is provided with a series of perforations d, which are made larger toward the heel of the boot and smaller toward the toe, with no perforations at all underneath the portion where the ball of the foot would rest. Formerly the perforations were arranged continuously along the channel, and upon the bending of the foot the ball of the foot would press against the perforations, and the edge of the perforations would make the boot uncomfortable for walking. By leaving the perforations out at this point and making them smaller toward the toe no inconvenience in this way is experienced.

E is a casing, preferably of metal, formed of the front plate, E, and the rear plate, E both of which are substantially concavo-convex. The casing E is arranged behind the counter F of the shoe, between such counter and the outer leather or upper. The lower ends of the portions E and l are bent forwardly, and the portions are suitably connected together around their edges. The rear plate, E, has a grooved rib 6 extending from the top to the bottom, where it gradually merges into the concavo-convex form. This rib serves to divide the passage-way into two halves, and also, being grooved, provides for the reception of the back sealn of the upper, so that the outer side of the scam is maintained even with the contour of the heel. The upper end of the plate E is beveled downwardly, as shown, so as to provide for the insertion of the eyelets G, one on each side of the seam, so as to provide for the passage of the air into the channel. Above the eyelets, between the lining and the upper, I provide a filling-strip a, so as to preserve the contour of the heel portion. I also provide a strip a beneath the bottom of the casing E and between it and the outer leather or upper.

In order to hold the underturned portion of the upper down flat beneath the bent end 6, I provide a thread or cord H, which I pass through the abutting edges of the bottom seam, so as to bind them together and hold them down and pass the ends of the threads or cords through the inner sole A, the ends of these threads being held in said sole by the contraction of the same about the threads when the needle by which the threads are passed through the sole is withdrawn. (See Figs. 1 and 3.) These threads or cords are provided, as no nails could be passed into the edge, as the bent end 6 would interfere. The sole A and heel A are sec ured on the outside of the welt and heel portion in the usual man ner.

By the construction such as I have described the outside portion of the boot is not deleteriously affected, as the eyelet-holes are very neat, being placed one on each side of the seam. The seam is also preserved flat, so as to conform to the contour of the back of the heel, and the squeaking is effectually prevented.

\Vhat I claim as my invention is 1. In a ventilated boot or shoe the combination with the sole and heel and inner sole and filling, of a central channel in the filling extending from the toe to the heel and pro vided with perforations extending through the inner sole and a back casing comprising substantially concavoconvex outwardly and upwardly flaring plates suitably connected together and having bent forward ends to connect with the channel, the back plate being beveled downwardly, and eyelet-holes made in the heel portion on each side of the seam as and for the purpose specified.

2. In a ventilated boot or shoe the combination with the sole and heel and inner sole and filling, of a central channel in the filling extending from the toe to the heel and provided with perforations extending through the inner sole, and a back casing comprising.

substantially concavo-convex outwardly and upwardly flaring plates suitably connected together and having bent forward ends to connect with the channel, the back plate being beveled downwardly, and a grooved rib dividing the casing centrally into two passage-ways and forming a seat for the seam. and eyelet-holes one on each side of the beer as and for the purpose specified.

3. In a ventilated boot or shoe the combination with the sole and heel and inner sole and filling, of a central channel in the filling extending from the toe to the heel and pro Vided with perforations extending through the inner sole and a back casing comprising substantially concavo-convex outwardly and upwardly flaring plates suitably connected together and having bent forward ends to connect with the channel, the back plate being beveled downwardly and eyelet-holes made in the heel portion on each side of the seam and a filling above the eyelet-holes between the lining and the outer leather as and for the purpose specified.

4. In a Ventilated boot or shoe the combination with the sole and heel and inner sole and filling, of a central channel in the filling arranged as specifi ed, an end casing connected with the channel and a thread H extending through the bottom turned-in edges of the abutting seam, and the inner sole as and for the purpose specified.

5. In a ventilated boot or shoe the combination with the sole and heel and inner sole and filling of the back divided solid filling forming one portion of the channel and the side strips extending forwardly from the front end of the solid divided filling and forming the toe portion of the channel and the soft moist flexible filling extending between the side strips of the toe portion of the channel and the welt as and for the purpose specified.

JOHN STAUNTON KING.

*itnesses B. BOYD, E. R. CASE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4587749 *Nov 28, 1984May 13, 1986Remo BerleseVented motorcycle boot
US6817112Jul 25, 2001Nov 16, 2004Adidas International B.V.Climate configurable sole and shoe
US7210248Nov 12, 2003May 1, 2007adidas I{umlaut over (n)}ternational Marketing B.V.Shoe ventilation system
US7487602Jun 17, 2004Feb 10, 2009Adidas International B.V.Climate configurable sole and shoe
US7610694 *Feb 17, 2005Nov 3, 2009General Building SASShoe with upper and heel developed ventilation
US7716852Dec 22, 2008May 18, 2010Adidas International Marketing B.V.Climate configurable sole and shoe
US7918041Apr 5, 2011Nike, Inc.Footwear cooling system
US8191284Jan 7, 2011Jun 5, 2012Nike, Inc.Footwear cooling system
US8327559Mar 18, 2010Dec 11, 2012Adidas International Marketing B.V.Climate configurable sole and shoe
US20020017036 *Jul 25, 2001Feb 14, 2002Christoph BergerClimate configurable sole and shoe
US20040111918 *Nov 12, 2003Jun 17, 2004Adidas International Marketing B.V.Shoe ventilation system
US20070039202 *Feb 17, 2005Feb 22, 2007Giancarlo De GiacomiShoe with upper and heel developed ventilation
US20090107013 *Dec 22, 2008Apr 30, 2009Christoph BergerClimate Configurable Sole and Shoe
US20100229430 *Sep 16, 2010Christoph BergerClimate Configurable Sole and Shoe
WO2012156534A1 *May 21, 2012Nov 22, 2012Grimmeisen TheodoreVentilated shoe having an air inlet in the upper portion
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/06