Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5584149 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/500,523
Publication dateDec 17, 1996
Filing dateJul 11, 1995
Priority dateJul 11, 1995
Fee statusPaid
Also published asCA2226557A1, EP0837741A1, US5819481, WO1997002902A1
Publication number08500523, 500523, US 5584149 A, US 5584149A, US-A-5584149, US5584149 A, US5584149A
InventorsRoger D. Wilson
Original AssigneeWilson; Roger D.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall and molding protector for carpet installation
US 5584149 A
Abstract
A carpet layer's aid for protecting floor baseboards or walls during carpet installation comprising an elongated strip with a separating means. The elongated strip is divided by the separating into an edge portion, which is used to anchor the elongated strip, and a central portion, which is used to shield the baseboard or wall. The separating means is integral with the elongated strip and allows the central portion to be detached from the edge portion of the elongated strip upon completing the carpet installation. The edge portion of the elongated strip is left behind under the tack strip and carpet.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(8)
What is claimed is:
1. A system for protecting a building surface during installation of carpet, the system comprising:
a. a carpet having a top surface, a bottom surface for placement toward a first area of the building surface, and a carpet edge;
b. an elongated strip of sheet material extending generally parallel to the carpet edge, the elongated strip having an anchor portion and a shield portion, the anchor portion being secured between the carpet bottom surface and said first area of the building surface and the shield portion extending out from under the carpet edge for covering and protecting a second area of the building surface; and,
c. a means, integral with said elongated strip, for separating said elongated strip into two pieces, said shield portion from said edge portion, and leaving said anchor portion of said elongated strip under said carpet upon completion of said carpet installation.
2. A carpet layer's aid, as recited in claim 1, wherein the first area of the building surface is a floor and a second area of the building surface is a wall or baseboard, and wherein:
said elongated strip is generally L-shaped so that said anchor portion extends horizontally outward from said baseboard or wall and extends underneath said carpet, and said shield portion is upwardly extending and moveably contacting said baseboard or wall.
3. A system, as recited in claim 1, further comprising a tack strip which is attached to the bottom surface of said carpet, connected to said first area of the building surface, and connected to said anchor portion of the elongated strip.
4. A system, as recited in claim 3, wherein the said tack strip is connected to said anchor portion by means of the anchor portion being frictionally engaged by the tack strip and held between the tack strip and said first area of the building surface.
5. A system, as recited in claim 3, wherein the said anchor portion lies between the tack strip and the said first area of building surface, and the system further comprises fasteners extending through the tack strip, the anchor portion, and into the first area of the building surface.
6. A system for protecting a building surface during installation of carpet, the system comprising:
a. a carpet having a top and bottom surface;
b. a tack strip, said tack strip attached to said bottom surface of said carpet, and;
c. an elongated strip of sheet material said elongated strip having longitudinal edges and being connected to said tack strip, said enlongated strip also having a means integral with said elongated strip and generally parallel to said longitudinal edged for separating said longitudinal strip, and said elongated strip being covered by said carpeting.
7. A method for protecting a building surface while installing a carpet, the method comprising:
securing a longitudinal anchor portion of an elongated strip of sheet material having longitudinal edges and being under an edge of the carpet so that a longitudinal shield portion of the elongated strip, which is adjacent to and extends from the said anchor portion, extends out from under the carpet to protect the building surface adjacent to the carpet; and separating said longitudinal shield from said anchor portion at a means, integral with said elongated strip.
8. A method, as recited in claim 7, further comprising and leaving the anchor portion underneath the carpet.
Description
BACKGROUND

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates generally to protecting floor baseboards or walls from damage during the installation of wall-to-wall carpet. More specifically, this invention relates to a temporary baseboard or wall protector which is easily and quickly removable after the carpet is installed.

2. Description of the Related Art

U.S. Pat. No. 4,263,355 (Sarkisian) discloses an elongated plastic, L-shaped paint shield for protecting the edge of a carpet or floor while painting walls. This shield was intended to protect carpeting already in place prior to painting the wall. In addition, the paint shield is completely removed upon completing the painting.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,633,542 (Read et al.) discloses a plastic paint shield having a curved longitudinal edge that is inserted between the edge of the carpet and the baseboard during painting. The Read et al. shield also has a longitudinal central portion for covering and protecting the edge and the top surface of the carpet from paint damage. This shield is also intended to be completely removed when the painting is complete.

The disclosed invention fulfills a previously unmet need by allowing carpet to be installed easily and quickly without damaging walls or existing baseboards. Neither the Sarkisian nor the Read et al. patents contemplated a use other than protecting existing carpet or flooring from paint. In addition, upon completing the carpet installation, a small portion of the disclosed invention is left behind under the carpet, unlike the prior art devices which are completely removed.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The present invention is a carpet layer's aid for protecting floor baseboards, walls, of other building surfaces during carpet installation. The protector comprises an elongated strip of sheet material with a separating means. The elongated strip is generally flat and is divided into a shield portion and an anchor portion by the separating means, which may be an elongated perforation. The separating means is integral with the elongated strip and allows the shield portion to be separated from the anchor portion of the elongated strip upon completion of the carpet installation. In use, the elongated strip is folded along the separating means into a general L shape. The shield portion of the elongated strip extends upwardly protecting the baseboard or wall. At the same time, the anchor portion of the elongated strip extends horizontally outward from the baseboard or wall. After carpet installation, the anchor portion is left behind under the tack strip and carpet after the shield portion is removed using the separating means. The anchor portion is hidden by the carpet and remains in place until the carpet is replaced.

During the installation of a carpet, the elongated strip provides an economical and convenient way of protecting the building surfaces that are adjacent to the edge of the carpet. Because the anchor portion is secured under the carpet, and preferably under the tack strip, and the shield portion extends out from the carpet and over the building surface adjacent to the carpet, the building surface is protected from scratches and gouges that can otherwise result from the stretching, cutting, and tucking of the carpet.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a partial top view of an embodiment of the invention having an elongated perforation as the separating means.

FIG. 2 is a partial top view of an alternative embodiment having multiple perforations along only one longitudinal edge, which allow the protector to be refused.

FIG. 3 is a partial top view of an alternative embodiment having multiple perforations along both longitudinal edges.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment having a tack strip integral with the elongated strip.

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view of the embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1 in use before the carpet is trimmed.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1, wherein the central portion of the carpet layer's aid is being removed after installation of the carpet is complete.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The disclosed invention is a carpet layer's aid for protecting floor baseboards or walls during carpet installation. The aid comprises a generally flat, elongated strip (1) of sheet material, for example fiberboard or cardboard, having approximately a 90 or 120 pound weight. The specific type of sheet material used is not important. The sheet material must be thick enough to protect the baseboard or wall from accidental marks, and thin enough to be folded and separated using the separating means (2). The elongated strip (1)is preferably 5 to 9 inches wide and about 48 inches long, for convenience of installation and to match the length of the typical tack strip (6). Preferably, the elongated strip has greater than a 5/1 ratio of length to width. Other sizes of elongated strip (1) may be used, however, the elongated strip (1) must be sufficiently wide, so that, when it is folded at the separating means (2), the upwardly extending shield portion (7) is tall enough to protect the baseboard or bottom of the wall while carpet is being laid. An alternative embodiment may be of the same width as the precut embodiments, but in bulk roll lengths.

Integral with the elongated strip (1) is a separating means (2) formed by a series of perforations generally parallel to and near at least one longitudinal edge (5, 5') of the elongated strip (1). (See FIGS. 1-3) Multiple separating means (2) allow this invention to be reused until it is no longer a sufficient width to protect the baseboard or wall. All of the separating means may be located along one longitudinal edge (5) (See FIG. 2) or the separating means may be divided between the two longitudinal edges (5, 5') of the elongated strip (See FIG. 3). Locating the multiple separating means along one longitudinal edge or another does not effect the function of the protector.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 5, and 6, the separating means (2) divides the elongated strip (1) into a central portion (3) and one edge portion (4), which in this embodiment are the shield portion (7) and anchor portion (8), respectively. The separating means (2) also provides a way for the elongated strip (1) to be folded into a generally L-shaped configuration. After folding along the separating means (2), the edge portion (4) is placed on the floor and extends horizontally outward from the baseboard or wall until it is under the tack strip (6). At the same time, the central portion (3) extends vertically upward and protects the baseboard or wall. (See FIG. 5).

Again referring to FIGS. 1, 5 and 6, the invention provides protection during the carpet installation by allowing the carpet layer to stretch, trim, and tuck the carpet along the baseboard or wall without damaging the finish. After the carpet is installed, the carpet layer can pull on the vertical central portion (3) of the elongated strip (1), causing the folded separating means (2) to allow the central portion (3) to be pulled free and separate from the horizontal edge portion (4). The horizontal edge portion (4), after separation from central portion (3), is left behind out of sight under the tack strip and newly installed carpet and remains in place until the carpet is replaced.

The separating means (2) may comprise a series of perforations. The size of the perforations and exact pattern is not critical. The important characteristic is that the separating means (2) allows the central portion (3) to be separated from the horizontal edge portion (4) of the elongated strip (1). The perforations are generally parallel to the elongated strip's (1)longitudinal axis. (See FIGS. 1-3) Each separating means (2) is approximately 1-3 inches from a longitudinal edge of the elongated strip (1). The only requirements the separating means (2) must meet are that it define an edge portion large enough to extend horizontally from the baseboard or wall to beneath the tack strip, and that it allow the central portion (3) to extend vertically past the top of the baseboard during use, and, after use, to be pulled free of the horizontal edge portion (4) without displacing the newly installed carpet. (See FIG. 6)

An alternate embodiment utilizes a separating means comprising an adhesive. In such an embodiment, the edge portion (4) and central portion (3) are separate pieces of sheet material that overlap slightly and are temporarily held together by adhesive. The adhesive is designed to allow the central portion (3) to be detached from the edge portion (4) with moderate force and without tearing of the sheet material, after the carpet installation is completed.

Embodiments of the elongated strip (1) that have a plurality of edge portions (4) and a plurality of separating means (2), are also used by the method shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. For these embodiments, a single, outermost edge portion (4) typically is secured under the tack strip (6) and the elongated strip (1) is folded into an L-shape at the corresponding outermost separating means (2), so that the outermost edge portion becomes the horizontal anchoring portion (8) and the remaining edge portions and the central portion (3) become the vertical shield portion (7). After the first use, the embodiments in FIG. 2 and 3 have one fewer edge portion (4), and, for the next use, a new fold is made at the new outermost separating means (2) to make the new outermost edge portion (4) the anchoring portion (8). Thus, the embodiment of FIG. 2 may be used three times and the embodiment of FIG. 3 may be used four times, corresponding to the three and four edge portions (4) of the embodiments, respectively.

This invention can be used with existing tack strips or when installing new tack strips. Where new tack strips are being used, the tack strips (6) can be nailed directly onto the horizontal edge portion (4) of the elongated strip (1), as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. When existing tack strips are being used, the tack strips may be lifted or pried up enough to slide the elongated strip underneath the tack strip, and the tack strip may be retightened by pounding the existing nails (9) or, preferably, by pounding in new nails through the existing tack strip and the elongated strip (1). Preferably, the elongated strip (1) is secured between the tack strip and the floor or other building surface by frictional engagement and by nails or other fasteners extending through the tack strip, elongated strip, and into the floor. Optionally, the elongated strip (1) may be secured under the tack strip only by frictional engagement. The invented strip (1) and method of using the strip (1) also include any embodiments in which the strip (1) is secured underneath the carpet by a variety of means, even those which do not include the use of a tack strip.

An alternate embodiment of this invention includes a tack strip integral with the elongated strip (1). (See FIG. 4). This embodiment utilizes a similar elongated strip and separating means as previously discussed. However, in this embodiment the outermost horizontal edge portion (4) is secured to the tack strip by being integral with the tack strip. For example, a thin plastic strip (1) may extend integrally from a plastic tack strip, or a fiberboard strip (1) may extend from a thick fiberboard tack strip. Or, an elongated strip (1) may be glued around the tack strip (6) during manufacture. The resulting tack strip--elongated strip combination (10) is easy to handle and use.

An added feature that may be included in an alternate embodiment is a tack strip indexing means, for example, a notch or a mark, that is integral with the edge portion (4). An indexing means enables the carpet layer to consistently locate the tack strip at the preferred distance from the baseboard or wall.

Although the preferred use of the invented elongated strip (1) is for protecting vertical baseboards or walls during carpet installation, the invention also includes use of the strip (1) on any building surface and for installation of any floor covering. Thus, the invention includes any embodiment wherein the anchor portion is secured or connected to a first area of the building surface and the shield portion extends out from under the edge of the floor covering to protect an adjacent second area of the building surface.

Although this invention has been described above with reference to particular means, materials and embodiments, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to these disclosed particulars, but extends instead to all equivalents within the scope of the following claims.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3430402 *Jan 11, 1965Mar 4, 1969Gaiser KurtFloor with baseboard
US3514914 *Aug 22, 1968Jun 2, 1970Bergquist Erwin FCarpet cap strip
US3633542 *Jul 13, 1970Jan 11, 1972Read Harold HPaint shield for carpet edges
US3693589 *Feb 26, 1971Sep 26, 1972Knox Joseph WPaint shields, particularly for shielding carpets
US3752304 *Sep 7, 1971Aug 14, 1973P AlefMasking devices
US4051808 *Mar 11, 1977Oct 4, 1977William TruppPaint and stain shield
US4263355 *Sep 17, 1979Apr 21, 1981Ira SarkisianPaint shield roll
US4357898 *Mar 12, 1981Nov 9, 1982Fehrenbacher Daniel RCarpet shield
US4536913 *Jul 17, 1984Aug 27, 1985Janusz MorawskiPaint guard hand tool
US4564970 *Sep 10, 1984Jan 21, 1986Germain LatraverseDevice for carrying out a paint touch up in a corner
US4835026 *Nov 7, 1988May 30, 1989Nagoya Oilchemical Co., Ltd.Masking member
US5014486 *Jul 24, 1990May 14, 1991Mayle Robert LOne-piece self-covering termination bar
US5040346 *Apr 5, 1990Aug 20, 1991White Laurence EDust gap spacer for wall to wall carpeting
US5164238 *May 30, 1991Nov 17, 1992Nagoya Oilchemical Co., Ltd.Masking member
US5184445 *Dec 17, 1990Feb 9, 1993Step Loc CorporationMethod for installing flexible carpet base
US5230738 *Dec 18, 1991Jul 27, 1993Wheeler Robert AMasking device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5819481 *Dec 17, 1996Oct 13, 1998Wilson; Roger D.Wall and molding protector for carpet installation
US5848548 *May 22, 1997Dec 15, 1998Latour; Lawrence J.Method of forming at least two carpet fastener strips from a single sheet of sheet metal
US5930973 *Apr 19, 1996Aug 3, 1999Preece; John WilliamFor providing sealing at the edge of a fitted carpet
US5943829 *Jan 28, 1998Aug 31, 1999Wilson; Roger D.Wall and molding protector for carpet installation
US6233882Jun 7, 1999May 22, 2001Michael R. BreauxBaseboard saver tool and method of use
US7392626 *Apr 22, 2005Jul 1, 2008Blair FarrendFloor bracket
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/98, 52/287.1, 118/504, 118/505
International ClassificationA47G27/04, B05B15/04
Cooperative ClassificationB05B15/0475, B05B15/0456, A47G27/0462
European ClassificationB05B15/04G1, A47G27/04C2T, B05B15/04G5
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 17, 2008FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Dec 17, 2008SULPSurcharge for late payment
Year of fee payment: 11
Jun 23, 2008REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jun 11, 2004FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jul 27, 2000FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jul 27, 2000SULPSurcharge for late payment
Jul 11, 2000REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed