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Publication numberUS559161 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 28, 1896
Publication numberUS 559161 A, US 559161A, US-A-559161, US559161 A, US559161A
InventorsBloomfjeld Brower
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bloomfjeld brower
US 559161 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v(No Model.) l

' -B.` BROWBR.

BEVOLVING BOOKGASE.

* No. 559,161'. Y PanenteaApr. 28, 1896.

AN DREW EGRAHAM. PHOTO-UTNDJNASHI NGTDILD C.

l UNrrED STATES- PATENT OFFICE.

BLOOMFIELD BROVER, OF NEWT YORK, N. Y.

REVOLVING BOOKCAS E.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 559,161, dated April 28, 1896. Application filed October 13, 1894. Serial No. 525,792. (No model.)

T0 @ZZ whom t may concern:

Beit known that I, BLOOMEIELD Baownn, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York, county of New York, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Revolving Bookcases, fully described and represented in the following specification and the accompanying drawings,

.forming a part'of the same.

This invention relates to improvements in bookcase and its supporting-base provided with the improvements constituting the present invention in their preferred form. Fig. 2 is a central vertical section of the same, taken on the line 2 2 of Fig. 3. tal section on the line 3 3 of Fig. l.

In said drawings, A represents a revolving bookcase, and B its supporting-base, the case A being provided with a central standard a, entering a corresponding central opening I) in the supporting-base B. The supporting-base is provided with the usual casters or rollers, as shown; but this is immaterial to the present invention.

The general construction of revolving bookcases as thus far described is a familiar one. In such constructions, as heretofore most commonly used, the standard d has in some cases formed the sole support for the bookcase,

which is sustained by the standard out of contact with the supporting-base, and in other cases the standard merely acts as the pivot for the bookcase, the hub of which then rests upon a central hub inthe supporting-base, with which it contacts as it is revolved.

The hrst construction referred to is objec tionable because u n der heavy weight or an un-M `near the edge of the bookcase.

Fig. 3 is a horizonequal distribution of weight the bookcase tilts and the standard binds against the sides of its opening and thus increases the friction 55 and renders' the revolution of the bookcase on its base difficult, and in some cases, particularly if the supporting-base be long and slender, the standard is liable to become bent and to thus throw the bookcase out of true 6o vertical position.

In the second case referred to, where the bookcase rests upon the supporting-base and 'makes contact therewith as it is revolved7 the sameobjections exist as in the first case,

though possibly not to the same extent, and it is otherwise objectionable7 as, because of the contact of the case and base, the friction between the two is always great. Some at-4 4tenipts have heretofore been made to over- 7o c, grouped about the standard at some distance therefrom and preferably, as shown, The balls are held in position and maintained equidistant `from each other by a holder ci, loosely mounted upon the standard d, so as to oscillate freely 8o as the bookcase is revolved, and provided with openings e for containing the balls. The balls are of such diameter that when in position between the case and base they will sustain the case out of contact with the holder, 8 5

so that the latter will thus be perfectly free. The balls c will preferably be of glass, and to provide. against possible wear of the bookcase or base by the balls those parts of the case and base with which the-balls contact go are provided, preferably, with circular waysf, of compressed fiber or other suitable material capable of withstanding considerable pressure. SiX balls c `are preferably employed; but the number may be varied as desired.

From the foregoing it will be observed that the bookcase being maintained out of contact with the base all friction between these part-s is avoided, and that the balls c being equidistant the bookcase is equally supported on all roo sides, and any tendency on thel part of the case to tilt, and thus cause the standard u, to

bind against the walls` of its opening b,is prevented. The only points at which friction can occur, therefore, are between the balls and the case and base, and, as the balls are loosely mounted in their holder d and the latter is in turn loosely mounted on the standard, such friction will be but very slight.

Vhat is claimed is- 1. The combination with a bookcase or the like and a supporting-base upon which the case is mounted to revolve, of a loosely-j ournaled holder oscillating horizontally between the base and case and provided with a plurality of openings each provided with a ball loose within the opening and disconnected from the holder, said balls forming bearings for the case and base, substantially as described.

2. The combination with a bookcase or the like and a supporting-base upon which the case is mounted to revolve by means of a vertical standard upon the one member entering a corresponding opening in the other member, of a holder between the case and base journaled loosely upon the stan dard and provided with a plurality of openings, each provided with a ball loose within the openingand disconnected from the holder, said balls forming bearings for the case and base, substantially as described.

3. The combination with a bookcase or the like and a supporting-base upon which the case is mounted to revolve by means of a vertical standard upon the one member entering a corresponding opening in the other member, of a holder between the case and base jour naled loosely upon the standard and provided with a plurality of openings, each provided with a ball loose within the opening` and disconnected from the holder, said balls forming bearings for the case and base, the faces of the ease and base which bear against the balls being plain, substantially as described.

In testimony whereoi:` I have hereunto set my hand in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

BLOOMFIELD BROWER. lVitn esses:

J. J'. KENNEDY, T. F. KEHOE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3844230 *Feb 20, 1973Oct 29, 1974Gaylord Bros IncDisplayer for paperback books
US4117627 *Jun 3, 1977Oct 3, 1978Slingerland Jr Henry HRotatable stand
US4485997 *Sep 21, 1983Dec 4, 1984Frank PotterRotatable base unit support for a file cabinet
US4526336 *Nov 10, 1983Jul 2, 1985NadellaOrientable pivot in particular for a television set
US8276871Jan 14, 2010Oct 2, 2012Derienzo Vincent JamesUniversal turntable for christmas tree stands
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47B49/00