Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5624048 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/389,458
Publication dateApr 29, 1997
Filing dateFeb 16, 1995
Priority dateNov 1, 1994
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asEP0710608A1
Publication number08389458, 389458, US 5624048 A, US 5624048A, US-A-5624048, US5624048 A, US5624048A
InventorsRonen Sander, Leor Seef
Original AssigneeSander; Ronen, Seef; Leor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulated carrying container
US 5624048 A
Abstract
The disclosure of the present invention describes a thermally insulated container formed of multiwall flexible plastic heat sealed to define a multiplicity of sealed air bubbles and being formed with a radiation reflective coating. The container includes an integrally formed carrying handle.
Images(11)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(4)
We claim:
1. A thermally insulated container for a bottle, said container being formed of multiwall flexible plastic heat sealed to define a multiplicity of air bubbles, said container defining a pair of carrying handles and a pair of attachment flaps for retaining said container in engagement with said bottle, each of said attachment flaps having a central aperture, each of said flaps being separated from a corresponding handle by a cut.
2. A container according to claim 1 and wherein said container being formed with a radiation reflective coating.
3. A container according to claim 1 having an overall tube shape being configured to generally tightly surround a bottle.
4. A container according to claim 1 and wherein said pair of attachment flaps are arranged to be folded one over the other in engagement with the mouth of a bottle.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to containers and more particularly to insulated carrying containers for beverages and the like.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Various types of insulated containers are known. U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,939,677 and 4,197,890 describe examples of known insulated containers.

Bubble packaging is also known in the art, normally for preventing impact damage to goods wrapped therein. The following U.S. patents describe various structures of bubble packaging and certain applications thereof: U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,088,686; 4,894,265; 5,271,980; 5,340,632; 5,084,324; 4,825,089; 4,921,746 and 4,868,025.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention seeks to provide an improved, relatively low cost insulated container.

There is thus provided in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention a thermally insulated container formed of multiwall flexible plastic heat sealed to define a multiplicity of sealed air bubbles.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the container includes an integrally formed carrying handle.

Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the container has printed on at least one of the walls thereof an advertising message.

Additionally in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the container is formed with a radiation reflective coating.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, the container has an overall tube shape and is configured to generally tightly surround a bottle.

In accordance with one preferred embodiment of the invention, the container has integrally formed therewith at least one bottle opening engagement flap for retaining the cover in surrounding relationship with the bottle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will be understood and appreciated more fully from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a simplified illustration of a bottle and an insulated container therefor, constructed and operative in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional illustration of part of the container shown in FIG. 1, along line II--II of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a pictorial illustration of a first step in closing the container over the bottle of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a top view illustration of the container after completion of the first step;

FIG. 5 is a pictorial illustration of a final step in closing the container over the bottle of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a top view illustration of the container after completion of the final step;

FIG. 7 is a pictorial illustration of the container of FIGS. 1-6, fully closed over a bottle and held by a user;

FIG. 8 is a simplified illustration of a bottle and an insulated container therefor, constructed and operative in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 9 is a pictorial illustration of a first step in closing the container over the bottle of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a top view illustration of the container of FIG. 8, in direction of the arrow X of FIG. 9, following completion of the first step;

FIG. 11 is a pictorial illustration of a final step in closing the container over the bottle of FIG. 8;

FIG. 12 is a top view illustration of the container, in direction of arrow XII of FIG. 11, after completion of the final step;

FIG. 13 is a pictorial illustration of the container of FIGS. 8-12, fully closed over a bottle and held by a user;

FIG. 14 is a simplified pictorial illustration of a container and a bottle, the container being constructed and operative in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 15A and 15B are two side view illustrations of a container constructed and operative in accordance with a further alternative embodiment of the invention, where FIG. 15B is in the direction of arrow 15B of FIG. 15A; and

FIGS. 16A and 16B are two side view illustrations of the container of FIGS. 15A and 15B respectively upon insertion of a bottle thereinto and following insertion, where FIG. 15B is in the direction of arrow 16B of FIG. 16A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Reference is now made to FIGS. 1-7, which illustrate a thermally insulative container 10 which is configured in a generally tubular configuration so as to accommodate a bottle 12, such as a conventional 1.5 liter soft drink bottle.

Referring specifically to FIG. 2, it is seen that most or all of container 10 is formed of a multi-ply sealed-bubble flexible plastic material, which is conventionally available from various vendors in the U.S.A. and elsewhere. The multi-ply sealed-bubble material typically comprises at least three plies of plastic which are sealed together in such a manner as to trap air bubbles at a multiplicity of predetermined locations therein.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the container 10 bears printed advertising material on at least one ply thereof, which need not necessarily be the outer ply thereof.

Further in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the container is formed on the outer surface thereof with a radiation reflective surface, such as a silvered or white surface, which may be coated over one of the plies of the sealed-bubble material or alternatively added as an additional ply and sealed thereto.

It is seen that the container defines a two-ply carrying handle portion 14 and a pair of attachment flaps 16, each of which has a central aperture 18 and which is separated from the handle portion 14 by a cut 19.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the attachment flaps 16 are sequentially folded over the mouth 20 of the bottle 12, so as to secure the container tightly over the bottle, for maximum thermal insulation efficiency. FIG. 3 shows folding of a first flap, here indicated by reference numeral 22, over the mouth 20 of the bottle, such that the mouth extends through aperture 18, as seen in FIG. 4. FIG. 5 shows folding of a second flap, here indicated by reference numeral 24, over the first flap 22 and over the mouth 20 of the bottle, such that the mouth extends through aperture 18, as seen in FIG. 6.

FIG. 7 illustrates a pictorial illustration of the container of FIGS. 1-6, fully closed over a bottle and held by a user.

Reference is now made to FIG. 8-13, which illustrate a thermally insulative container 50, constructed and operative in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present invention, which is configured in a generally tubular configuration so as to accommodate a bottle 52, such as a conventional 1.5 liter soft drink bottle.

The structure of the container may be identical with that described hereinabove with reference to FIG. 2. Similar to the container of FIGS. 1-7, the container may bear advertising material and may have an outer reflective surface.

It is seen that the container defines a pair of attachment flaps 56, each of which has a central aperture 58.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the attachment flaps 56 are sequentially folded over the mouth 60 of the bottle 52, so as to secure the container tightly over the bottle, for maximum thermal insulation efficiency. FIG. 9 shows folding of a first flap, here indicated by reference numeral 62, over the mouth 60 of the bottle, such that the mouth extends through aperture 58, as seen in FIG. 10. FIG. 11 shows folding of a second flap, here indicated by reference numeral 64, over the first flap 62 and over the mouth 60 of the bottle, such that the mouth extends through aperture 58, as seen in FIG. 12.

FIG. 13 illustrates a pictorial illustration of the container of FIGS. 8-12, fully closed over a bottle and held by a user.

Reference is now made to FIG. 14, which is a simplified pictorial illustration of a container and a bottle, the container being constructed and operative in accordance with yet another preferred embodiment of the present invention. Here the handle is formed on the side of the bottle, but the closing the container over the bottle employing flaps, may be identical to that in the embodiment of FIGS. 8-13.

Reference is now made to FIGS. 15A-16B, which illustrate a container 80 constructed and operative in accordance with a further alternative embodiment of the invention. Here the container 80 is formed with an resilient elastic neck portion 82, which normally does not include sealed bubbles, but serves to retain the container on the bottle. The container is formed with a pair of carrying handles 84.

It will be appreciated by persons skilled in the art that the present invention is not limited by what has been particularly shown and described hereinabove. Rather the scope of the present invention is defined only by the claims which follow:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1116932 *Jul 25, 1914Nov 10, 1914John J SchwartzJacket for hot bottles.
US1228258 *Jun 24, 1916May 29, 1917Universal Patents CompanyCarrier or cover for canteens or water-bottles, &c.
US1939677 *May 4, 1932Dec 19, 1933Bernard E FleischakerLimb joint for dolls and the like
US2756922 *Apr 13, 1953Jul 31, 1956Adams Richard EProduce bag
US3349990 *Mar 1, 1967Oct 31, 1967Arkell And SmithsMulti-wall mailing container
US4059222 *Jul 14, 1976Nov 22, 1977Bruce GambleNewspaper recycling apparatus and method
US4197890 *Dec 18, 1978Apr 15, 1980Simko James FInsulating jacket for bottles
US4282279 *Oct 16, 1979Aug 4, 1981Rip 'n Rap, Inc.Formable removable insulating enclosure for a container
US4796937 *Oct 6, 1987Jan 10, 1989Andrea Douglas JInsulating shell and pouring aid for container and method of making same
US4825089 *Jul 13, 1987Apr 25, 1989Lindsay Brad HRadiant barrier apparatus
US4854736 *Jul 1, 1987Aug 8, 1989Mcveigh Martin LInsulated carry bag
US4868025 *Aug 28, 1987Sep 19, 1989Packaging Industries Group, Inc.Cushioned bag and apparatus and method of making a cushioned bag
US4872766 *Nov 18, 1988Oct 10, 1989Sonoco Products CompanyTwo-compartment plastic bag
US4894265 *Jan 15, 1988Jan 16, 1990Free-Flow Packaging CorporationBubble-type cushioning and packaging sheet and method of manufacture
US4921746 *Apr 20, 1988May 1, 1990Patriksson Inventing AbCellular, multi-layer material for forming a heat-insulating bag
US5084324 *Apr 6, 1990Jan 28, 1992W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.Micro-bubble laminate with perforated substrate
US5088686 *May 6, 1991Feb 18, 1992Magneco/Metrel, Inc.Bubble pack plastic films as patterns for producing dimpled effects in cast ceramic pieces
US5102036 *Jun 19, 1990Apr 7, 1992Orr Joseph AFormable reusable enclosure
US5271980 *Jul 19, 1991Dec 21, 1993Bell Dennis JFlexible evacuated insulating panel
US5282686 *Oct 2, 1992Feb 1, 1994Haber Terry MShopping bag having closure means
US5340632 *Apr 19, 1992Aug 23, 1994Michel ChappuisPadding element for the packing of objects and device for the manufacturing of the same
BE903153A2 * Title not available
DE4227659A1 *Aug 21, 1992Feb 24, 1994Joachim PetersReusable insulated packing bag - is made from several layers of air cushion foils with sealed edges
DE9002034U1 *Feb 21, 1990Apr 26, 1990Fabritz, Gerhard, 4150 Krefeld, DeTitle not available
EP0085534A1 *Jan 26, 1983Aug 10, 1983The British Petroleum Company p.l.c.Insulating container, especially insulating carrier or insulating bag
EP0174159A2 *Aug 29, 1985Mar 12, 1986Douglas Kitchener GatwardInsulated carrier bag
EP0301148A1 *Sep 17, 1987Feb 1, 1989Luigi FrateschiInsulated bag
FR89099E * Title not available
FR2309419A1 * Title not available
FR2415943A7 * Title not available
GB455944A * Title not available
GB2174361A * Title not available
JPH024666A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6012411 *Jul 25, 1997Jan 11, 2000Hochbrueckner; KennethPropane tank cover
US7219814Apr 2, 2004May 22, 2007Built Ny, Inc.Totes for bottles
US7467729Feb 20, 2007Dec 23, 2008Built Ny, Inc.Totes for bottles
US7595375Jun 6, 2002Sep 29, 2009RikenFluorescent protein
US7981658Sep 29, 2009Jul 19, 2011RikenNucleic acid molecules, vectors, and host cells encoding fluorescent protein
US8070359 *Jul 10, 2007Dec 6, 2011Thunderbird Global Enterprises, LlcPlastic bag with pour spout and reinforced bottom end
US8132683 *May 13, 2009Mar 13, 2012Evenflo Company, Inc.Protective bottle sling
US8231029Feb 25, 2010Jul 31, 2012Smart Bottle Inc.Flexible container having flexible handles
US8348509Sep 23, 2009Jan 8, 2013Smart Bottle, Inc.Flexible container with fitment and handle
US8636412 *Mar 31, 2011Jan 28, 2014Alexander Wang IncorporatedShopper bag
US20030017538 *Jun 6, 2002Jan 23, 2003RikenFluorescent protein
US20040028296 *Oct 24, 2001Feb 12, 2004Andrea MeliIsothermal pocket bag for bottles and foodstuffs
US20040252919 *Jun 10, 2003Dec 16, 2004James WelchInsulated bag
US20050150800 *Apr 2, 2004Jul 14, 2005Aaron LownTotes for bottles
US20060151507 *Jan 9, 2006Jul 13, 2006Swartz John RSnap top tote apparatus
US20070141876 *Feb 20, 2007Jun 21, 2007Aaron LownTotes for bottles
US20070175787 *Sep 19, 2006Aug 2, 2007Aaron LownMulti-Pack Tote Apparatus
US20080116101 *Aug 24, 2007May 22, 2008From The Source, LlcArticle for safely transporting wine and spirit glass bottles and the like
US20080285897 *Jul 10, 2007Nov 20, 2008Nossi TaheriPlastic bag with pour spout and reinforced bottom end
US20100184116 *Sep 29, 2009Jul 22, 2010RikenFluorescent protein
US20100288719 *May 13, 2009Nov 18, 2010Derek Berton RundProtective bottle sling
US20110056965 *Feb 25, 2010Mar 10, 2011Smart Bottle Inc.Flexible Container Having Flexible Handles
US20110069908 *Sep 23, 2009Mar 24, 2011Wilkes Kenneth RFlexible Container with Fitment and Handle
US20120251017 *Mar 31, 2011Oct 4, 2012Alexander Wang IncorporatedShopper bag with collar
USD616199Nov 12, 2009May 25, 2010Built Ny, IncCamera case
USD619861Nov 12, 2009Jul 20, 2010Built Ny, Inc.Girls lunch bag
USD626798Nov 12, 2009Nov 9, 2010Built Ny, Inc.Boys lunch bag
USD627613Nov 12, 2009Nov 23, 2010Built Ny, Inc.Shoulder lunch tote
USD657631 *Jul 22, 2010Apr 17, 2012Built Ny, Inc.Sleeve
USD740617 *Jul 14, 2014Oct 13, 2015Violet HansonCombined cup holder and carrier with cut-out handles
WO2004067391A2 *Jan 30, 2004Aug 12, 2004Luis Gerardo AguayoA protective bag for necked bottles
WO2004067391A3 *Jan 30, 2004Nov 25, 2004Luis Gerardo AguayoA protective bag for necked bottles
WO2016006504A1 *Jun 30, 2015Jan 14, 2016株式会社ガルツCup transportation bag and method for producing same
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/395, 383/10, 229/89, 220/903, 383/110, 215/13.1, 150/901, 229/91, 383/99
International ClassificationB65D81/38
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/3893, Y10S150/901, Y10S220/903
European ClassificationB65D81/38L2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 20, 2000FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Nov 17, 2004REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Apr 29, 2005LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Jun 28, 2005FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20050429