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Publication numberUS563922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 14, 1896
Filing dateFeb 19, 1896
Publication numberUS 563922 A, US 563922A, US-A-563922, US563922 A, US563922A
InventorsWilmer D. Gridley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric-lamp stand
US 563922 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

W. D. GRIDLEY. ELECTRIC LAMP STAND.

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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

IVILMER D. GRIDLEY, OF BROOKLYN, NEWV YORK.

ELECTRIC-LAM P STAN D.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 563,922, dated July 14, 1896.

Application filed February 19, 1896. $erial No. 679,881. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, WVILMER D. GRIDLEY, of Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Electric-Lamp Stands, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to an improvement in electric-lamp stands in which one or more lamp -supportin g plates may be sustained upon superimposed standard-sections and provide for the housing of the electric conductor, and at the same time for supporting, in different radial. adjustments, bracket-arms for supporting flower-pots and such other articles of ornament and furnishing as may be desired.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 represents a standard having two of the lampsupporting plates interposed between superimposed sections of the standard, the standand itself being represented in elevation and provided with an exterior of rustic design. Fig. 2 is an enlarged top plan view of the upper section of one of the lamp-supporting plates. Fig. 3is an enlarged top plan View of the under section of one of the lamp-supporting plates. Fig. 4; is a vertical central section through the assembled sections of one of the lamp-supporting plates. Fig. 5 is a View in detail in side elevation of one of the lamp-supporting plates, the plate being partially broken away to show the connection between it and the standard. Fig. 6 is a sectional view in detail of one of the connectionpieces between two standard-sections. Fig. 7 is an enlarged View in detail, in side elevation, of the bottom of one of the lamp-supporting plates and a portion of the standard adjacent thereto, showing the plate locked to the standard against rotary movement; and Fig. 8 is a similar view showing the plate released to permit it to complete nearly a full turn on its vertical axis.

In the views which I have shown in detail the rustic feature is omitted.

The base-section of the standard is denoted by A, the next in order by A, and the top section by A The sections A and A are connected by means of a short tubular connection a, (shown in detail in Fig. 6,) which receives within its upper end, by means of a screwthreaded connection, the lower end of the section A, and which at its lower end screws into the upper portion of the lam ti-supporting plate B. The upper end of the lower standard-section A screws into the under side of the lamp supporting plate B, and intermediate of the lower end of the connecting-piece a and the upper end of section A, I locate an annular ring 0, of india rubber or other suitable insulating material, for the purpose of holding the electric-light wires away from the metallic walls of the standard as they extend up within it. The location. of the ring of insulating material is clearly shown in Fig. 4:.

The standard may be continued to any height desired by introducing a plurality of intermediate sections similar to A, with their respective plates and interposing connectingpieces a, between each two successive standard-sections. The standard-section A which completes the height of the standard above the upper lamp-supporting plate is made to screw into the top of the upper lamp-supporting plate in a manner quite similar to that in which the connecting-piece a, hereinabove referred to, screws into it.

As the several lamp-supporting plates are counterparts of one another in their structure and arrangement, aparticular description of one will answer for all.

The lamp-supporting plate 13 is preferably formed of two half-sections, the upper of the two half-sections being denoted by b and the lower half-section by Z). Their outer edges, when they are brought together as shown in Fig. 4, are made to open apart from each other, leavingbetween them an annular groove b for the reception of the electric-light wire, as will be hereinafter more particularly explained. The faces of the upper and lower sections b b are further provided with oppositely-arranged recesses 11 b at suitable intervals near their edges, which together form a socket for the reception of the T-shaped end of a bracket-arm D, which is intended to extend radially from the plate, as represented in Fig. 1, for the purpose of supporting a flower-pot, bird cage, or other desired article. In' the present instance I have shown the lamp-supporting plate B as provided with five bracketarm sockets, and midway intermediate of these bracket-arm sockets I have provided the lowersection h with screw-threaded sockets b for the reception of short tubular screwthreaded nipples b on which the ordinary incandescent lamp E may be screwed into position. (Represented in Fig. 1.) It is intended that the upper and lower sections 17 b of the lamp-supporting plate shall be permanently secured together, and to this end I provide at intervals rivets If. The object in forming the plate B inhalf-sections is for convenience in casting. The upper plate-section b is provided with an auxiliary removable section or cap-plate B, which may be fastened to the cap-plate B by one or more screws b and serves, when in assembled position, to lock the ends of the bracket-armsin the sock ets, the arrangement being such that the end of the bracket-arm can only be inserted and removed from the socket when there is an opening left at the back of the socket by the removal of the cap-plate B.

The connecting-piece a (see Fig. 6) is provided with an opening a through its wall near the top of the cap-plate B, and the lower portion of the top standard-section A is simi larly provided with an opening in its side near its base and for a like purpose, which will hereinafter appear.

The plate B, with the lamps and whatever may be supported thereon, is constructed to turn on its threaded connection with the standard to bring any part of its margin to the front, as may be desired, by the following means:

From the bottom of the plate B, in proximity to the screw-threaded central socket b, there depends a lug 6 (see Figs. 5, 7, and 8) and a lug Z7 shorter than the lug Z9 a short distance therefrom. Intermediate of the two lugs Z9 Z2 and slightly below the end of the lug b there is seated a screw F in the wall of the standard A, the head of the screw being of sufficient diameter to extend nearer the bottom of the plate B than the lower end of the lug Z).

In practice the plate B, having been screwed onto the standard A until the lower end of the lug b is in proximity to the shank of the screw F, the latter may be locked in position by giving the screw F a turn to force its head inwardly between the two lugs b b, and when it is desired to rotate the plate B the screw may be again given one or more turns to carry its head away from the standard sufficiently to permit the short lug b to pass over its shank. This will permit the plate B to be turned from its position with the lug b in contact with one side of the screw F to a position with the lug Z9 in contact with the opposite side of the screw F, or nearly a complete turn. This arrangement, while permitting the presentation of the plate B with any portion of its periphery to the front, or nearly so, provides at the same time for locking the plate against unintentional turning sufficient to unscrew it from the standard and also for locking it to the standard 'against any rotary movement, when so desired.

The electric-light wires are arranged as follows: One of the wires G (see Fig. 5) extends up through the several sections of the stand ard and through their connecting-pieces a to the base of the top section A and then passes out through the opening a, (see Fig. 5,) along the upper face of the plate B, to a small opening gnear the outer edge of the plate, (see Fig. 2,) through which it passes into the groove 79 between the margin of the upper and lower plate-sections b b. It extends along the groove Z2 to the first of the tubular nipples b and through it to one pole of an electric lamp E, thence back through the nipple I) from the opposite pole of the lamp to the groove b thence along the groove 11 to the bracket-arm, underneath the bracket-arm to the groove 17 upon the opposite side of the bracket-arm,thence to the next tubular nipple I), where it connects with poles of the lamp, as before, and so on around the plate B to the small opening g (seeFig. 2) at the opposite side of the bracket-socket from the open ing g, thence back along the top of the plate B to the opening a, through which it passes into the interior of the standard and thence downwardly to the opening a at the next succeeding lamp-supporting plate, where it again emerges through the opening a and passes to the groove or recess 12 at the periphery of the-plate connecting with the several lamps supported thereon, as hereinabove described, and finally is returned to the interior of the standard, and after having made its connections with the several lamps supported by the lowermost ofthe plates B it passes down through the base-section A and away to the source of electric supply.

What I claim is- 7 V 1. An electric-lamp stand, comprising a sectional tubular standard, a lamp-supporting plate interposed between two successive sections of the standard in rotary adjustment and provided with a centrally-located opening adapted to receive the ends of the standardsections the center of the opening in the lamp-supporting plate being in alinement with the longitudinal axis of the tubular standardsections and means for securing electric lamps to the said plate, the said tubu lar standard-sections being provided with one or more openings through their wall for passing an electric wire from within the stand ard to the several lamps, substantially as set forth.

2. An electric-lamp stand, comprising a sec tional standard, a lamp-supporting plate interposed between successive sections of the standard in rotary adjustment and provided with a groove along its periphery-for the reception of an electric conductor, lamps supported on said plate with their poles in communication with the electric conductor in the said peripheral groove, the said standard being provided with an opening through its Wall in proximity to the lamp-supporting plate for the passage of the electric conductor from its interior to the periphery of the plate, substantially as set forth.

3. The electric-lamp stand, comprising a sectional standard, a lamp-supporting plate interposed between successive sections of the standard, said lamp-supporting plate being provided with a groove around its periphery for the reception of an electric conductor and hollow screw-threaded nipples engaged with the lower wall of the said peripheral groove for the attachment thereto of ordinary electric lamps, the said standard being provided with an opening in the wall in proximity to the plate for the passage of an electric conductor to the groove at the periphery of the plate, substantially as set forth.

4.. The electric-lamp stand, comprising a sectional standard, a lamp-supporting plate interposed between successive sections of the standard and provided with a screw-threaded socket for the reception of the adjacent ends of the standard-sections and an insulatingring interposed between the ends of said standard-sections within the socket and projecting inwardly from the inner walls of the standard-sections, substantially as set forth.

5. The electric-lamp stand, comprising a sectional standard, a lamp-supporting plate provided with a screw threaded socket for the reception of the adjacent ends of two standard-sections, the said lamp-supporting plate being formed of upper and lower half-sections and means for securing the said sections permanently together, substantially as set forth.

6. The electric-la1np stand, comprising a sectional tubular standard, a tubular connecting-pieoe interposed between two main standard-sections, a lamp-supporting plate interposed between the said connecting-piece and one of the standard-sections and forming a continuation of the tubular standard and means for connecting electric lamps with the said plate, the said tubular connecting-piece being provided with an opening in its wall for passing an electric wire from within the tubular standard to the electric lamps, substantially as set forth.

7. The electric-lamp stand, comprising a suitable standard, a lamp-supporting plate having a rotary engagement with the standard and provided with dependinglugs in proximity to the standard, one of the lugs being longer than the other and separated from each other and a stop having a longitudinal adjustment with relation to the standard and located in proximity to the said lugs, the said stop having a portion of lesser diameter to permit the free passage of the shorter lug when it is adjusted away from the standard and a portion of greater diameter to prevent the rotary movement of the lampsupporting plate when the stop is adjusted toward the standard, substantially as set forth.

WILMER 1). GRIDLEY.

Viitnesses FREDK. HAYNES, GEORGE BARRY, Jr.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2456179 *Jun 10, 1944Dec 14, 1948Masts LtdStreet lighting standard
US4720773 *May 27, 1986Jan 19, 1988Ahroni Joseph MDecorative light assembly
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationH05K7/183