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Publication numberUS5645876 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/656,596
Publication dateJul 8, 1997
Filing dateMay 31, 1996
Priority dateJan 14, 1994
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asDE19500730A1, DE69518991D1, EP0663152A1, EP0663152B1
Publication number08656596, 656596, US 5645876 A, US 5645876A, US-A-5645876, US5645876 A, US5645876A
InventorsPersis Jebakumari Subramaniam, Sylvia Anna Jones, Iain Cunningham Mutter Dea
Original AssigneeCpc International Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Holding for time/temperature to activate endogenous pectinmethylesterase, blanching, drying; soups, processed foods
US 5645876 A
Abstract
Dehydrated vegetables are prepared by preparing the vegetables, holding them for a time and at a temperature to activate the endogenous pectinmethylesterase, blanching and drying.
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Claims(17)
What is claimed is:
1. A method for producing dehydrated vegetables comprising preparing the vegetables, holding the prepared vegetables for a time and at a temperature to activate endogenous pectinmethylesterase, blanching and drying, wherein the prepared vegetables are held at from 45° to 70° C. for from 10 to 60 minutes.
2. A method as claimed in claim 1 further comprising infusing the prepared vegetables before, during or after the holding treatment in an aqueous infusion solution comprising from 20 to 70% of one or more carbohydrates.
3. A method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the infusion solution contains up to 5.0% of a calcium salt.
4. A method as claimed in claim 3 wherein the infusion solution comprises up to 10% sodium chloride.
5. A method as claimed in claim 3 wherein the carbohydrates are selected from the group consisting of glucose, sucrose and fructose.
6. A method as claimed in claim 3 wherein the calcium salt is calcium chloride, calcium lactate or mixtures thereof.
7. A method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the infusion solution comprises up to 10% sodium chloride.
8. A method as claimed in claim 7 wherein the carbohydrates are selected from the group consisting of glucose, sucrose and fructose.
9. A method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the carbohydrates are selected from the group consisting of glucose, sucrose and fructose.
10. A method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the holding treatment is carried out in the aqueous solution to effect, at least partially, the infusion of the prepared vegetables.
11. A method as claimed in claim 10 wherein the infusion is carried out before or after the holding treatment by vacuum infusion.
12. A method as claimed in claim 11 wherein the vegetables are subjected to a vacuum of from 20 to 40 mmHg for from 1 to 10 minutes.
13. A method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the holding treatment is carried out in water and is followed by the infusion step.
14. The method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the vegetable is selected from the group consisting of carrot, celery, bell pepper and tomato.
15. Dehydrated vegetable matter obtainable by the method of claim 1.
16. A dried food product reconstitutable with aqueous liquids comprising the dehydrated vegetable matter of claim 15.
17. A comestible product comprising the dehydrated vegetable matter of claim 15 in rehydrated form.
Description

This Application is a Continuation of U.S. Ser. No. 08/359,173, filed Dec. 19, 1994 now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to dehydrated vegetables, to methods for their production and to comestible products containing dehydrated vegetables.

2. Description of Related Art

Dehydrated vegetables are used widely in products such as soups and other processed foods often in dehydrated, diced form. The major problem associated with dehydrated vegetables is that on rehydration they often remain collapsed and shrunk giving rise to a product of poor texture relative to the textural quality of the fresh or minimally processed vegetables. The irreversible shrinkage that occurs during drying is due to the collapse of the cell-wall structure.

Pectin is a major component of vegetable cell walls and as such makes a major contribution to the structural integrity and strength of vegetables and vegetable pieces. Native pectin is, generally, high methoxyl in structure and, as a result, is susceptible to degradation on heating under neutral pH conditions. This form of degradation occurs during cooking and is the major reason for unwanted textural softening of vegetables on heat processing. During forced-air drying of vegetable pieces, water is removed, thus releasing the turgor pressure and causing the cell wall structure to collapse. The collapse can be irreversible, if the moisture content of the materials is very high or if the cell wall structure is weak. In these cases, rehydration only causes the absorption of water into the intercellular spaces, thus leading to poor rehydratability of the dehydrated material and poor texture on rehydration.

Vegetables contain pectinmethylesterase (PME) in their cell walls. This endogenous enzyme can be activated by mild heat treatment under specific conditions of pH and ionic strength and, when activated, leads to demethoxylation of the native pectin. The resulting demethoxylated pectin has a structure that is more stable against degradation on heating at neutral pH and that more effectively cross-links in the presence of calcium ions. Both of these factors lead to the strengthening of the cell wall structure and pretreatments that activate the PME enzyme in vegetables have been shown to give improved texture after freezing and canning.

EP-A-0337621 discloses a method for producing dried fruit which involves stabilizing the color and flavor of the fruit by infusing it in a 10 to 70% carbohydrate solution prior to drying.

EP-A-0404543 also describes a process for preparing dried fruit which includes infusion in an aqueous carbohydrate solution. This document teaches that the fruit must be soaked under conditions which deactivate the enzymes and also soften the fruit before deaeration is carried out.

The present invention relates to the production of dehydrated vegetables which have improved textural qualities on rehydration. It has been found that improved texture in the rehydrated product may be achieved by preservation of the cell wall structure of vegetables on dehydration by activating the endogenous pectinmethylesterase enzyme.

According to the present invention, there is provided a method for producing dehydrated vegetables comprising preparing the vegetables, holding the prepared vegetables for a time and at a temperature to activate endogenous pectinmethylesterase, blanching and drying.

Preferably, the method of the invention comprises infusing the prepared vegetables before, during or after the holding treatment in an aqueous solution comprising from 20 to 70% of one or more carbohydrates and, optionally, up to 5.0% of a calcium salt.

Plant material such as vegetables containing pectinmethylesterase may be used in the invention and, particularly, include carrot, tomato, celery and bell pepper. Activation of the endogenous pectinmethylesterase is preferably carried out by holding the vegetable matter under specific pH conditions at an elevated temperature. The pH conditions, the temperature range and the time for which the material is held in that range to effect activation varies with the vegetable used and the optimum conditions required in each specific case may be determined if the optimal conditions to promote PME activity in the vegetable is known. The conditions and/or the methods for their determination will be well-known to those skilled in the art. Generally, the vegetable pieces are held in water or an aqueous solution at a pH of from 6 to 8 at a temperature of from 45° to 70° C. for from 10 to 60 minutes. For carrot, bell pepper, celery and tomato, the optimum conditions are about 60° C. for 40 minutes, about 60° for 30 minutes, about 60° C. for 15 minutes and about 50° C. for 15 minutes, respectively.

The vegetables used in the present invention may be the whole or any part of the whole vegetable and are prepared in conventional ways well-known in the art. The vegetables may be treated by cutting to any given size as required by their end use. Preferably, the vegetables are diced and have dimensions of from 0.5 to 1.5 mm. Typically, the vegetables may be prepared by washing, peeling and dicing the fresh vegetables.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the vegetables are infused with an aqueous infusion solution comprising from 20 to 70% by weight of one or more carbohydrates and, optionally, up to 5.0% by weight of a calcium salt (e.g., from 0.5% to 5.0%). The infusion may be carried out before, during or after the holding treatment but is preferably carried out either after the holding treatment or during the holding treatment by carrying out the holding treatment in the infusion solution. The infusion treatment causes osmotic dehydration and, therefore, aids drying. The carbohydrates are preferably monosaccharides or disaccharides since it is preferred that they have a relatively low molecular weight to permit ready infusion into the vegetable tissue. The most preferred carbohydrates are glucose, sucrose, fructose and mixtures thereof. Any edible calcium salt having a sufficiently high solubility to provide a 0.5 to 5.0% solution of the salt in the infusion solution may be used in the invention. Suitable salts include calcium chloride, calcium lactate and mixtures thereof. The infusion solution may include other substances, such as sodium chloride (up to 10%) that promote osmotic dehydration, and other flavorants or preservatives that do not affect the performance of the invention.

The infusion of the vegetables may take place at ambient pressure but is preferably carried out under vacuum. Vacuum infusion methods of the type used in the invention are well-known to those skilled in the art. Preferably, vacuum infusion is carried out by subjecting the vegetable matter in the infusion solution to a vacuum of from 2.67 to 5.33 MPa (20 to 40 mmHg) for a period of from 1 to 10 minutes. A typical vacuum infusion process involves holding the vegetable matter in the infusion solution, applying a vacuum of 20 mmHg for 5 minutes, slowly releasing the vacuum and holding for a further 5 minutes.

Blanching of the treated vegetable matter may be carried out by the standard commercial treatments which are used prior to dehydration in order to deactivate enzymes that are known to cause deterioration in the quality of the dried products. Suitable blanching treatments include immersion of the vegetable matter in water or an aqueous solution (e.g., a dilute sodium bicarbonate solution) at about 100° C. for from 1 to 5 minutes. Preferably, blanching is carried out in the infusion solution. The skilled person will be aware of the blanching conditions which are suitable in any given case.

Drying of the blanched material may be carried out by conventional methods such as vacuum drying or forced air drying. The treated vegetables may, for example, be dried by forced air drying at a temperature of from 75° to 95° C. with an air velocity of 3 m/s.

The present invention will now be described with reference to the following examples.

EXAMPLES Example 1

Raw carrots were peeled and then cubed to a size of about 10 mm×10 mm×10 mm. The resulting cubed carrot was held at a temperature of 60° C. in a thermostat-controlled water bath for a predetermined length of time. Where the vegetables were subjected to vacuum infusion, this was carried out in a Jacketed vessel at a reduced pressure of about 20 mmHg for about 5 minutes followed by a slow return to atmospheric pressure and holding in the solution for 5 minutes. Blanching of the treated vegetables was carried out using conditions similar to those of standard commercial treatments (1000° C. for 4 minutes in water). Drying was carried out by forced air drying at about 930° C. with an air velocity of 3 m/s. The moisture level of the samples was determined by monitoring the loss in weight and drying was terminated when a moisture level of approximately 4% was obtained.

Product assessment--Dehydrated products were assessed for rehydration and textural characteristics.

Moisture determination--The actual moisture content of the dried pieces was measured by drying 5 g of the samples to constant weight in a vacuum oven at 70° C.

Rehydration characteristics--To assess the performance of dehydrated pieces in finished products, the samples were rehydrated in boiling water. 50 ml of boiling water was added to 5 g of the sample and left for 5 minutes. The pieces were then strained and weighed to determine the rehydration ratio which is the ratio of the weight of the reconstituted sample to that of the dry sample.

Organoleptic assessment--All samples were informally assessed for organoleptic quality by a few experienced assessors, who examined the pieces for color, texture and flavor. The results are shown in Table 1.

                                  TABLE 1__________________________________________________________________________FORMATION OF DEHYDRATED CARROT BY THE PRESENT INVENTION      Drying          Rehydration                Shrinkage on                          OrganolepticPretreatment      time (h)          ratio rehydration                          quality__________________________________________________________________________60° C./40 min then      3.80          1.46  Very slightly                          Crunchy; sweetinfusion of 1% calcium                shrunk    soft outside and alactate + 60% glucose                7-9 mm × 7 mm ×                          hard crisp center                7 mm60° C./40 min in 60%      2.50          2.03  Very slightly                          Crunchy; slightlysucrose + 10% NaCl   shrunk    crispy; good                9-7 mm × 7-5 mm ×                          flavor but salty                7-8 mm60° C./40 min in 60%      2.50          2.07  Quite shrunk                          Crunch with hardsucrose              8-9 mm × 8-5 mm ×                          core; sweet;                10-5 mm   slight loss of                          color; quite good                          flavor__________________________________________________________________________
Example 2

The method described in EXAMPLE 1 was applied to the production of dehydrated celery. Celery pieces were produced by cutting fresh celery lengthwise into 10 mm wide strips and then slicing into 10 mm segments. The thinner, greener part of the celery stalk was used in preference to the wider, whiter part in order to obtain appropriately sized pieces.

Pretreatments were carried out at 60° C. and blanching in 0.5% sodium bicarbonate solution. The results are given in Table 2.

                                  TABLE 2__________________________________________________________________________FORMATION OF DEHYDRATED CELERY BY THE PRESENT INVENTION    Drying        Moisture              Rehydration                    Shrinkage on                             OrganolepticPretreatment    time (h)        content (%)              ratio rehydration                             quality__________________________________________________________________________10% NaCl + 60%    8.00        0.58  1.36  Slightly shrunk;                             Bright color;sucrose vacuum           no collapse 9-                             some celeryinfusion 60° C./15                    10 mm    odor; verymin + blanch in                   crunchy, likesame                              raw, very salty10 NaCl 60%    8.00        0.77  1.77  As above 9-10 mm                             Some typicalsucrose 60° C./15          aroma; crunchy;min + blanch in                   more flesh;same                              salty__________________________________________________________________________
Example 3

The method of EXAMPLE 1 was applied to the production of dehydrated tomato from 10 mm×10 mm×10 mm tomato pieces obtained by cutting the tomato in half, removing the seeds and dicing the resulting "shells".

Pretreatments were carried out at 50° C. and the treated vegetable blanched in water at 100° C. for 1 minute. The results are presented in Table 3.

                                  TABLE 3__________________________________________________________________________FORMATION OF DEHYDRATED TOMATO BY METHOD OF THEPRESENT INVENTION      Drying          Rehydration                Shrinkage on                      OrganolepticPretreatment      time (h)          ratio rehydration                      quality__________________________________________________________________________50° C./15 min in 60%      11.25          1.90  Flesh intact                      Soft flesh; crispysucrose                    center; sweet; good                      flavorVacuum infuse 60%      19.00          1.17  Slightly                      Soft outer; slightsucrose + 2% CaCl2 and                shrunk                      crisp center; flavorhold (50° C./15 min)                      quite sweet; good                      fleshVacuum infuse 60%      19.00          1.13  Slightly                      Bright color; flesh asglucose + 2% CaCl2 and                shrunk                      in fresh; crisphold (50° C./15 min)                      center; sweet but                      salty50°/15 min in 60%      11.25          1.61  Flesh intact                      Very birght color;sucrose + 10% NaCl         slight crisp center;                      good flavor; salty;                      flesh similar to fresh__________________________________________________________________________
Example 4

The method of EXAMPLE 1 was applied to the production of dehydrated bell pepper (CAPSICUM ANNUM L.) from 10 mm×10 mm pepper pieces obtained by cutting the pepper in half, removing the seeds and then cutting the resulting "shells" into squares.

Pretreatments were carried out at 60° C. and the treated vegetable blanched in either water or test solution at 100° C. for 2 minutes. The result are presented in Table 4.

                                  TABLE 4__________________________________________________________________________FORMATION OF DEHYDRATED BELL PEPPER BY THEPRESENT INVENTION      Drying           Rehydration                 Shrinkage on                        OrganolepticPretreatment      Time (h)           ratio rehydration                        quality__________________________________________________________________________60° C./30 min in      7    1.9   Quite  Mild pepperya 30% sucrose/        fleshy odor;4% NaCl followed by          crunchy texture;vacuum infusion and          sweet; goodblanching in                 flavorthe same solution60° C./30 min in      7    1.9   Slightly                        Mild peppery2% calcium lactate    fleshy firm texture;followed by infusion of      salty flavor30% sucrose/4%NaCl then blanchingin the same solution__________________________________________________________________________
Example 5

Dehydrated carrot and bell pepper prepared by the method of the present invention were rehydrated by the following methods:

a) soaking in boiling water for 5 minutes;

b) microwaving in water for 2 minutes at full power; and

c) soaking in cold water for 2, 4 and 22 hours.

The carrot samples used in this example were as follows:

1. standard blanched carrot (100° C./4 minutes) without pretreatment--used as a control;

2. 60° C./40 minutes in deionized water, vacuum infusion of 1% calcium lactate/60% glucose and blanch in same;

3. 60° C./40 minutes in deionized water, blanch in deionized water, vacuum infusion of 1% calcium lactate/60% glucose;

4. 60° C./40 minutes in 60% sucrose/10% sodium chloride and blanch in same.

The results of the tests are given in Tables 5, 6 and 7.

The pepper samples used in this example were as follows:

1. Control, standard blanch 2 minutes at 100° C. in deionized water.

2. Holding at 60° C. for 3 minutes in deionized water, then blanching as the control.

3. Holding at 60° C. for 30 minutes in 30% sucrose/4% NaCl solution, followed by vacuum infusing for 10 minutes, then blanching in the same way as the control.

4. Holding at 60° C. for 30 minutes in 30% sucrose/4% NaCl solution, followed by vacuum infusing for 10 minutes, then blanching in the same way as the control.

5. Holding at 60° C. for 30 minutes in 2% calcium lactate solution, followed by vacuum infusing for 10 minutes in 30% sucrose/4% NaCl solution, then blanching in 30% sucrose 4% NaCl solution, as the control.

The result of the tests involving pepper are given in Tables 8, 9 and 10.

                                  TABLE 5__________________________________________________________________________REHYDRATION OF CARROT SAMPLES WITH BOILING WATERSample No.   1      2      3      4__________________________________________________________________________Rehydration (RR)   1.87   1.57   1.58   1.45Dimensions after   5 × 6 × 5          7 × 7 × 7                 7 × 7 × 7                        7 × 6 × 6rehydration (mm)   5 × 6 × 5          7 × 6 × 5                 7 × 5 × 5                        6 × 10 × 6   7 × 6 × 6          8 × 6 × 6                 7 × 6 × 5                        9 × 7 × 6Shrinkage on   Quite shrunk &          Slightly                 Very slightly                        Best so far;rehydration   collapsed          collapsed &                 more shrunk                        hardly any          shrunk than 2 shrinkageOdor    Carroty          Not much odor                 Not much odor                        Not much odorColor   Orange; bright          Orange; bright                 Dark color                        Orange; slightly          slightly less duller than 1          color than 1Texture Slight crunch,          Very crunchy;                 Crunchy; but                        Softer than 2 &   but quite soft          slightly hard                 not as crunchy                        3, but crunchier          center; like                 as 2; not fully                        than 1; hard          fresh  hydrated; hard                        center                 centerFlavor  Only a slight          More flavor                 Same as for 2                        Too salty;   carrot flavor          than 1, but                 except sweet                        carroty          still quite          bland__________________________________________________________________________

                                  TABLE 6__________________________________________________________________________REHYDRATION OF CARROT SAMPLES IN THE MICROWAVESample No.   1       2       3       4__________________________________________________________________________Rehydration   1.83    1.48    1.48    1.43ratio (RR)Dimensions after   5 × 5 × 6           5 × 6 × 6                   7 × 6 × 5                           8 × 6 × 6rehydration (mm)   5 × 5 × 6           4 × 6 × 6                   7 × 5 × 5                           7 × 6 × 6   7 × 6 × 6           5 × 5 × 5                   7 × 5 × 5                           8 × 6 × 6Shrinkage on   Shrinkage worse           Similar to                   Similar to                           Similar torehydration   than with           boiling water                   boiling water                           boiling water   boiling water           rehydration                   rehydration                           rehydration   rehydrationOdor    Similar to boiling water rehydrated productsTexture Drier than           Very crunchy;                   Slightly                           Soft outer and   boiling water           hard center; not                   crunchy; quite                           hard center   rehydrated           as rehydrated as                   hard center; not   samples; soft;           boiling water                   as rehydrated as   rubbery samples boiling water                   samplesFlavor  Bland; slight           Strong carrot                   Some carrot                           Not as salty as   carrot flavor           flavor  flavor present                           rehydrating in                           boiling water                           good carrot                           flavor__________________________________________________________________________

                                  TABLE 7__________________________________________________________________________REHYDRATION OF CARROT PIECES IN COLD WATER       Soaking time (h)Sample No.  2      4        22__________________________________________________________________________Rehydration 1     2.94   3.38     4.09ratio (RR) 2     2.47   2.98     3.27 3     2.34   2.85     3.24 4     2.15   2.59     2.85Shrinkage on 1     Slightly shrunk              Very slightly shrunk                       Very slightly shrunkrehydration 2     No shrinkage              No shrinkage                       No shrinkage 3     Slightly shrunk              No Shrinkage                       No shrinkage 4     No shrinkage              No shrinkage                       No shrinkageTexture 1     --     --       Slightly soft; slight crunch 2     --     --       Like raw carrot 3     --     --       Quite crunchy 4     --     --       Slightly crunchy but slightly                       softFlavor 1     --     --       Good carrot flavor 2     --     --       Slight carrot flavor; slightly                       sweet 3     --     --       Quite crunchy; sweet 4     --     --       Salty; slight carrot flavor__________________________________________________________________________

              TABLE 8______________________________________REHYDRATION OF PEPPER SAMPLES WITH BOILED WATERSample No.   1          2       3     4       5______________________________________Rehydration   2.9        3.2     1.7   1.9     1.9ratioShrinkage on   Shrunk     Shrunk  Fleshy                            Most    Slightlyrehydration                      fleshy  fleshyOdor    Hay-like;  Grass   Slightly                            Mild;   Mild;   peppery            peppery                            peppery pepperyColor   Dark green Dark    Green Lighter Green              greenTexture Slimy      Skin/   Firm  Crunchy Firm              toughFlavor  Bitter     Bitter  Salty Sweet;  Salty   peppery                  best flavor______________________________________

              TABLE 9______________________________________REHYDRATION OF PEPPER SAMPLES IN THE MICROWAVESample No.   1       2         3       4      5______________________________________Rehydration   3.2     3.4       1.9     2.1    1.9ratioShrinkage on   Quite   Very shrunk                     Shrunk  Least  Shrunkrehydration   shrunk                    shrunkOdor    Dried   Hay-like  All 3 samples were mildly peppery   grassColor   Olive/  Olive     Olive   Bright Light   brown                     green  greenTexture Soft    Skin/     Crunchy Most   Firm           tough             crunchyFlavor  Bitter; Cabbage;  Sweet;  Too salty                                    Salty;   mild    bitter    mild           no                     pleasant       pepper                                    flavor______________________________________

                                  TABLE 10__________________________________________________________________________REHYDRATION OF PEPPER SAMPLES IN COLD WATERSample No.  1     2     3      4     5__________________________________________________________________________Rehydrationratio aftervarious soakingtimes2 h    5.0   5.3   2.8    3.3   2.84 h    5.7   6.1   3.3    3.8   3.422 h   7.0   7.6   4.4    4.8   4.1Shrinkage on  Slightly        Shrunk              Fleshy As raw                           Slightlyrehydration  shrunk                   fleshyOdor   Hay-like        Green grass              Pepper-like                     Peppery                           Some                           pepperyColor  Dark  Dark green              Pale/bright                     Bright green                           Green  green       greenTexture  Soft  Skin  Crunchy                     Very  Crunchy                     crunchy; as                     rawFlavor No flavor        Very little              Sweet, Best; Salt;        flavor              slightly                     peppery                           water;              peppery;     slightly              watery       peppery__________________________________________________________________________

The samples infused with glucose/calcium, before blanching, showed a lower amount of shrinkage than the samples infused after blanching, when rehydrated in boiling water (Table 5). The pieces held in sucrose/salt solution showed the least amount of shrinkage, but were slightly softer in texture compared with the glucose-infused samples. The samples infused with glucose solution after blanching were found to be too sweet and samples treated with sucrose/salt were too salty but had good carrot flavor. Soaking in boiling water for 5 minutes was not adequate to rehydrate any of the treated samples completely.

Rehydration of dried carrot pieces in the microwave was not as successful as in boiling water. The rehydration ratios of samples were lower when the microwave method was used. All the rehydrated products were drier in texture but only the control samples developed a rubbery texture.

Rehydration in cold water was investigated to determine whether dried samples could be rehydrated without heating in wet products. Although the samples soaked for 2 and 4 hours were not tasted, the rehydration results indicated that 2 hours would be adequate to rehydrate the dried pieces completely. After soaking for 2 hours, the pretreated samples showed little or no shrinkage, the samples from pretreatment 2 and 4 having a swollen appearance. After 22 hours no shrinkage was seen on any of the pretreated samples. On tasting, the samples infused with glucose/calcium (pretreatment 2) were said to be the best, with a raw carrot-like texture. The samples treated in sucrose/salt were slightly soft.

Example 6

Dehydrated carrot samples prepared by the method of the present invention and a control sample were tested for their rehydration properties in instant and simmered dried soup products.

In the instant soup (Knorr® low-calorie chicken noodle soup), the samples were assessed by adding approximately 3 g of dried pieces to the dried soup (about 10 g) and then rehydrating with 90 ml of boiling water and stirring.

Dried samples were assessed in the simmered soup (Knorr® cream of chicken soup) by preparing the soup according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the rehydrated pieces assessed for size and texture. The samples were prepared by adding approximately 5 g of dried pieces to 22.7 g of the dry soup, then 283 ml of cold water, bringing the mixture to boil and simmering for 5 minutes. The results are presented in Table 11.

                                  TABLE 11__________________________________________________________________________ASSESSMENT OF CARROT SAMPLES IN SOUPS               Instant soupPretreatment      Simmered soup               Assessed instantly                        Assessed after 5 mins__________________________________________________________________________Control    Carrot soft but not               Carroty taste                        Softer than 2;      soggy; good carrot               slightly soft;                        slightly hard      flavor   crunchy  center60° C./40 min then      Very crunchy; no               Crunchy especially                        Very crunchyinfusion of 1% calcium      hard center; good               in center; quite                        good carrotlactate + 60% glucose      flavor, especially               carroty taste                        flavor      the aftertaste60° C./40 min in 60%      Outside of pieces               Not fully hydrated;                        Not fullysucrose    very soft but hard               hard center; soft                        hydrated; hard      centers; softer than               outside  center; soft      2; did not taste too                        outside      salty__________________________________________________________________________

The pretreated samples did not hydrate completely in the instant soup after 5 minutes. Both pretreated samples had a firmer texture than the control samples but holding at 60° C. combined with infusion of glucose/calcium gave the best result.

When assessed in the simmered soup, the control and samples held at 60° C. and then infused with glucose/calcium (pretreatment 2) had hydrated completely and the latter had a very crunchy texture and good flavor. The sample treated in sucrose/NaCl did not hydrate adequately and had a softer texture.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6004590 *Jul 10, 1996Dec 21, 1999BestfoodsHolding cut vegetables for a preferential time and temperature to activate pectinmethylesterase and to reduce moisture content of the vegetable without deforming, blanching and drying by exposure to microwave radiation
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Classifications
U.S. Classification426/50, 426/639, 426/640
International ClassificationA23B7/155, A23B7/154, A23B7/005, A23B7/06, A23B7/08, A23B7/10, A23B7/022
Cooperative ClassificationA23B7/0053, A23B7/10, A23B7/08, A23B7/154, A23B7/022, A23B7/155, A23B7/005, A23B7/06
European ClassificationA23B7/005, A23B7/154, A23B7/005F, A23B7/10, A23B7/08, A23B7/022, A23B7/06, A23B7/155
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 6, 2005FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20050708
Jul 8, 2005LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Jan 2, 2001FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Aug 21, 1998ASAssignment
Owner name: BESTFOODS, NEW JERSEY
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:CPC INTERNATIONAL INC.;REEL/FRAME:009396/0275
Effective date: 19971124