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Publication numberUS565255 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1896
Filing dateJun 18, 1896
Publication numberUS 565255 A, US 565255A, US-A-565255, US565255 A, US565255A
InventorsHenry A. Belden
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hair-pin
US 565255 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

"(No Model.)

H. A. BELDEN.

HAIR PIN. No. 565,255. Patented Aug. 4, 1896.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY A. BELDEN, oE BROOKLYN, NEw YoRK.

HAIR-PIN.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 565,255, dated August 4, 1896,

Application filed Tune 18, 1896.

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, HENRY A. BELDEN, of the city of Brooklyn, county of Kings, and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Hair-Pins; and I declare that the following specification, taken in connection with the drawings annexed to and forming part of the same, furnishes a full and clear description thereof, sufficient to enable those skilled in the art to which it pertains to make and operate the same.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view of my improved pin when closed; Fig. 2, a plan view of the pin while open for insertion; Fig. 3, a side view, and Fig. 4 a view in perspective.

The object of my invention is to provide a hair-pin which, without the aid of flattened ends or points, will remain in position when placed in the hair, and not only hold down the hair at the head end of the pin, but also retain its place within the hair by the hold exerted by the prongs closing in upon the latter.

Prior to my invention, so-callec safety hair-pins had been made with converging points, and also hair-pins with double springs at the head end in the same plane as the prongs, and pins with convolutions to engage the hair or lap over it by being turned around. Pins made in that manner are often difficult to insert, and when once inserted, if they are turned so as to hold, are apt to become entangled in the hair and often require much longer time to remove than to insert. If made with straight prongs, the hold which they obtain on the hair is too slight to accomplish the object for which they are constructed.

In my improvement I first construct the hair-pin in the ordinary manner from steel wire, but tempered so as to have a good spring in the curve at the head of the pin and a firmness in the prongs.

The prongs a a are each curved toward the other so as to meet at their points I) I). They are also curved upward in their common plane. The head of the pin where the prongs join each other is then bent over toward the concave side of the prongs a a, so that the spring-curve c on the head of the pin as originally formed will come within a short distance of and stand approximately parallel with the body of the prongs a a, thus affording two projections or levers d cl beyond this Serial No. 596,026. (No model.)

curve, which, when approximated by the pressure of the fingers, will cause the points I) b of the pin to open for insertion in the hair, and the release of which will allow the spring at c to close the prongs a a in the hair. The two hooks in the body of the pin, on the inside of the levers 61 (Z, caused by bending over this head, afford a substantial fastening to keep the outer hair down in place, while the peculiar form of the prongs a a (which curve toward each other, the two together curving to conform somewhat to the convexity of the head) affords a hold upon the hair and tends by pressure to draw the pin toward the head rather than to let it slip in a contrary direction.

I am aware that so-called hair-pins and safety-pins for other purposes have been made with prongs which spring apart and are held together by a hook or loop at the end of the prongs, and also pins with straight prongs springing together and having in the same plane angular or straight arms to open the pin for insertion. features; but

What I do claim as my invention, and de- I sire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. A hair-pin constructed of a single piece of wire consisting of two prongs a a curving in their common plane and meeting in a curved spring-head c which is bent back over and approximately parallel with the concave side of said prongs so as to form a hook to hold the outer hair in place, thus affording two levers or arms d d projecting beyond the hook c and by which the prongs may be separated, substantially as and for the purpose described.

2. The herein-described hair-pin, the same consisting of a single piece of wire comprising two prongs a a curving toward each otherto hold the pin in the hair and also curving in a common plane and meeting in a curved spring-head c bent back over the concave side of said prongs to form a hook to hold the outer hair in position, thus providing two arms or levers d d projecting beyond the hook and by approximating which the other ends of the prongs may be separated, as and for the purpose set forth.

HENRY A. BELDEN.

Witnesses:

HENRY M. WELLS, FREDERICK W. TAYLOR,

I do not claim any of these'\

Referenced by
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US5411522 *Aug 25, 1993May 2, 1995Linvatec CorporationUnitary anchor for soft tissue fixation
US5501696 *Dec 28, 1994Mar 26, 1996Linvatec CorporationUnitary anchor for soft tissue fixation
US7037308 *Feb 11, 2002May 2, 2006Medoff Robert JImplant device for applying compression across a fracture site
US7811286Mar 16, 2006Oct 12, 2010Robert J. MedoffImplant device for applying compression across a fracture site
US8287543 *Apr 9, 2004Oct 16, 2012Robert J. MedoffFracture fixation system including buttress pin and post washer
US8608783May 8, 2008Dec 17, 2013The Cleveland Clinic FoundationBone plate with flange member and methods of use thereof
US8628533May 8, 2008Jan 14, 2014The Cleveland Clinic FoundationBone plate with reduction aids and methods of use thereof
US8652179May 2, 2008Feb 18, 2014The Cleveland Clinic FoundationBone plate extender and extension system for bone restoration and methods of use thereof
US8915918May 2, 2008Dec 23, 2014Thomas James GrahamBone plate system for bone restoration and methods of use thereof
US8992528 *Jun 14, 2012Mar 31, 2015Amit GuptaIntramedullary system for managing a bone fracture
US20020143339 *Feb 11, 2002Oct 3, 2002Medoff Robert J.Implant device for applying compression across a fracture site
US20050010228 *Apr 9, 2004Jan 13, 2005Medoff Robert J.Fracture fixation system including buttress pin and post washer
US20060189992 *Mar 16, 2006Aug 24, 2006Medoff Robert JImplant device for applying compression across a fracture site
US20090275947 *May 2, 2008Nov 5, 2009Thomas James GrahamBone plate system for bone restoration and methods of use thereof
US20090275987 *May 2, 2008Nov 5, 2009Thomas James GrahamBone plate extender and extension system for bone restoration and methods of use thereof
US20090281577 *May 8, 2008Nov 12, 2009Thomas James GrahamBone plate with reduction aids and methods of use thereof
US20110054501 *Apr 3, 2008Mar 3, 2011Amj B.V.Securing device and assembly comprising such a securing device
US20110106081 *May 8, 2008May 5, 2011Thomas James GrahamBone Plate with Flange Member and Methods of Use Thereof
US20130197518 *Jun 14, 2012Aug 1, 2013Amit GuptaIntramedullary system for managing a bone fracture
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA45D8/06