Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5708959 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/635,651
Publication dateJan 13, 1998
Filing dateApr 22, 1996
Priority dateJul 26, 1982
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asDE3379297D1, EP0100232A2, EP0100232A3, EP0100232B1, EP0100232B2, US5086333, US5099310, US5409864, US5525428, US5525428, US5563101
Publication number08635651, 635651, US 5708959 A, US 5708959A, US-A-5708959, US5708959 A, US5708959A
InventorsMituo Osada, Yoshinari Amano, Nobuo Ogasa, Akira Ohtsuka
Original AssigneeSumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Substrate for semiconductor apparatus
US 5708959 A
Abstract
This invention relates to a substrate for semiconductor apparatus loading a semiconductor chip in integrated circuit apparatus and is characterized in that a sintered compact containing copper of 2 to 30 wt. % in tungsten and/or molybdenum is used as the substrate having the heat radiation capable of efficiently radiating heat developed from the loaded semiconductor chip and thermal expansion coefficient similar to those of semiconductor chip and other enclosure material except for the substrate.
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(35)
What is claimed is:
1. A semiconductor package for a semiconductor chip, comprising:
(a) a first member consisting essentially of alumina and forming an enclosure material for said semiconductor package;
(b) a second member made by a powder metallurgical method, wherein the powder metallurgical method comprises one of the steps of:
(1) mixing only one of tungsten powder and molybdenum powder with copper powder, forming a mixed powder compact and sintering said mixed powder compact at a temperature higher than the melting point of copper, and
(2) forming only one of tungsten powder and molybdenum powder into a powder compact, sintering said powder compact to form a sintered compact, and infiltrating said sintered compact with molten copper;
wherein said second member has a copper content within the range of 5-20 percent by weight.
2. A semiconductor package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 1, wherein said second member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
3. A semiconductor package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 1, wherein said second member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
4. A package for a semiconductor chip comprising:
(a) an alumina member enclosing said semiconductor chip; and
(b) a heat radiation member comprising 80-90 percent by weight of preselected material selected from the group consisting essentially of only one of tungsten and molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact, and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, said heat radiation member being made by forming only one of tungsten powder and molybdenum powder into a powder compact, sintering said powder compact to form a sintered compact, and infiltrating said sintered compact with molten copper.
5. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 4, wherein the heat radiation member comprises 80-90 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.50 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 7.010-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
6. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 4, wherein the heat radiation member comprises 80-90 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.41 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 6.510-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
7. A package for a semiconductor chip, said package made by the process of:
(a) providing a first member consisting essentially of alumina;
(b) producing a second member by a powder metallurgical method, wherein the powder metallurgical method comprises one of the steps of:
(1) mixing only one of tungsten powder and molybdenum powder with copper powder, forming a mixed powder compact and sintering said mixed powder compact at a temperature higher than the melting point of copper, and
(2) forming only one of tungsten powder and molybdenum powder into a powder compact, sintering said powder compact to form a sintered compact, and infiltrating said sintered compact with molten copper;
(c) selecting a copper content within the range of 5-20 percent by weight; and
(d) packaging said integrated circuit with said first and second members.
8. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 7, wherein said second member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
9. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 7, wherein said second member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
10. A package for a semiconductor device, said package comprising a first member comprising alumina and a second member of composite material comprising by weight of about 5 to 30% of copper portion and from 95 to 70% of a preselected material selected from the group consisting essentially of only one of tungsten and molybdenum in the form of a porous block, said porous block having been impregnated with said copper portion from the molten state of said copper.
11. A package for a semiconductor device as recited in claim 10, wherein said second member comprises 70-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-30 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 9.710-6 /C.
12. A package for a semiconductor device as recited in claim 10, wherein said second member comprises 70-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-30 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 8.410-6 /C.
13. A package for a semiconductor device as recited in claim 10, wherein said second member comprises 80-90 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.50 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 7.010-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
14. A package for a semiconductor device as recited in claim 10, wherein said second member comprises 80-90 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.41 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 6.510-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
15. A package for a semiconductor chip comprising:
(a) an alumina member enclosing said semiconductor chip; and
(b) a heat radiation member comprising 70-95 percent by weight of preselected material selected from the group consisting essentially of only one of tungsten and molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact, and 5-30 percent by weight of copper.
16. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 15, wherein the heat radiation member comprises 70-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-30 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 9.710-6 /C.
17. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 15, wherein the heat radiation member comprises 70-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-30 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 8.410-6 /C.
18. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 15, wherein the heat radiation member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
19. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 15, wherein the heat radiation member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
20. A package for a semiconductor chip comprising:
(a) a first member consisting essentially of alumina and enclosing said semiconductor chip; and
(b) a second member comprising 80-95 percent by weight of preselected material selected from the group consisting essentially of only one of tungsten and molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact, and a copper content of 5-20 percent by weight.
21. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 20, wherein said second member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
22. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 20, wherein said second member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
23. A package for a semiconductor device, said package comprising a first member consisting essentially of alumina and a second member of composite material comprising by weight of about 5 to 30% of copper portion and from 95 to 70% of a preselected material selected from the group consisting essentially of only one of tungsten and molybdenum in the form of a porous block, said porous block having been impregnated with said copper portion from the molten state of said copper.
24. A package for a semiconductor device as recited in claim 23, wherein said second member comprises 70-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-30 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 9.710-6 /C.
25. A package for a semiconductor device as recited in claim 23, wherein said second member comprises 70-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-30 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 8.410-6 /C.
26. A package for a semiconductor device as recited in claim 23, wherein said second member comprises 80-90 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.50 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 7.010-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
27. A package for a semiconductor device as recited in claim 23, wherein said second member comprises 80-90 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.41 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 6.510-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
28. A package for a semiconductor chip comprising:
(a) an alumina member enclosing said semiconductor chip; and
(b) a heat dissipation member comprising 80-90 percent by weight of preselected material selected from the group consisting essentially of only one of tungsten and molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact, and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, said heat dissipation member being made by forming tungsten powder, molybdenum powder, or a mixture thereof into a powder compact, sintering said powder compact to form a sintered compact, and infiltrating said sintered compact with molten copper.
29. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 28, wherein the heat dissipation member comprises 80-90 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.50 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 7.010-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
30. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 28, wherein the heat dissipation member comprises 80-90 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 10-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.41 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 6.510-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
31. A package for a semiconductor chip comprising:
(a) an alumina member enclosing said semiconductor chip; and
(b) a heat dissipation member comprising 70-95 percent by weight of preselected material selected from the group consisting essentially of only one of tungsten and molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact, and 5-30 percent by weight of copper.
32. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 31, wherein the heat dissipation member comprises 70-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-30 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 9.710-6 /C.
33. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 31, wherein the heat dissipation member comprises 70-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-30 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 8.410-6 /C.
34. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 31, wherein the heat dissipation member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of tungsten in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.45 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.210-6 /C. and 8.310-6 /C.
35. A package for a semiconductor chip as recited in claim 31, wherein the heat dissipation member comprises 80-95 percent by weight of molybdenum in the form of a sintered compact and 5-20 percent by weight of copper, and has a thermal conductivity of at least 0.38 cal/cm. sec. C. and a thermal expansion coefficient between 5.910-6 /C. and 7.910-6 /C.
Description

This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 08/368,657, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,525,428 filed Jan. 4, 1995, which is a divisional of application Ser. No. 08/284,277, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,409,864 filed Aug. 2, 1994, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 08/082,812, filed Jun. 28, 1993, now abandoned, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 07/717,462, filed Jun. 17, 1991, now abandoned, which is a divisional of application Ser. No. 07/382,056, filed Jul. 13, 1989, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,086,333, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 07/090,392, filed Aug. 27, 1987, now abandoned, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 06/831,124, filed Feb. 21, 1986, now abandoned, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 06/515,890, filed Jul. 21, 1983, now abandoned.

This invention relates to a substrate for mounting a semiconductor chip used in an integrated circuit or the like. An object of the invention is to provide a superior substrate for mounting the semi-conductor chip, which is capable of efficiently radiating heat developed from the mounted semiconductor chip and the substrate having a thermal expansion coefficient similar to those of semiconductor chip and material of other materials surrounding the same.

Substrates for mounting semi-conductor chips have conventionally been made of a Ni alloy consisting of Kovar (29% Ni--17% Co--Fe), 42 alloy; etc, or ceramics, such as alumina, forsterite, etc. The conventional substrates have thermal expansion coefficients similar to that of the semiconductor chip, and when high heat radiation is also required, various Cu alloys have been used.

However, recent remarkable progress in the semi-conductor industry has promoted greater size of semi-conductor chips or increased amounts of heat generation and the demand for a substrate material to meet both the characteristics of thermal expansion coefficient and heat radiation has been on the increase.

Under such conditions, tungsten, molybdenum, beryllia, etc., have been proposed as materials to meet both of the above characteristics.

Beryllia, however, in fact is not usable from the standpoint of environmental pollution. Although the thermal expansion coefficient of tungsten or beryllia corresponds well to that of the semiconductor chip, it has a large difference from that of alumina often used as the enclosure material and also from that of GaAs which has been used in increasing amounts for semiconductor chips. Furthermore tungsten and molybdenum are inferior to beryllia in heat radiation so as to be largely restricted in the packaging design.

The inventors, after conducting research on elimination of the above defects in materials for conventional substrates for mounting semiconductor chips to thereby control a thermal expansion coefficient and obtain a substrate material of good heat conductivity, have arrived at the present invention.

In other words, the semiconductor chip bearing substrate has a thermal expansion coefficient similar to those of semiconductor chips and enclosure materials, and is superior in heat conductivity. It comprises a sintered compact containing copper at 2 to 30% and tungsten and/or molybdenum.

When electrical insulation is required, the substrate is given a thin-layer surface coating of a ceramic or organic insulator, instead of conventional ceramic.

In this invention, there is employed Cu in the amount of 2 to 30 wt. % and W and/or Mo to obtain a thermal expansion coefficient of the substrate as similar as possible to those of Si and GaAs or sintered alumina or other enclosure materials, thereby reducing, to the extent possible, the influence of stress caused by the mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of the substrate and semiconductor chip and enclosure material. Hence, a proper amount of Cu need only be selected in the above range corresponding to the formation and size of the package.

This inventive substrate containing Cu and W and/or Mo is produced by powder metallurgy, because the manufacture of the same by the melting method is difficult due to the melting point and specific gravity difference between Cu, W and Mo. Among the powder metallurgy methods, sintering and infiltration are preferable.

Also, it is possible to make the W and/or Mo skeleton by adding thereto an iron group element at 20 wt. % or less.

A preferable amount of iron group element to be added is below 5 wt. %, but even above that, up to 20 wt. %, will form the skeleton.

The addition of an amount over 20 wt. %, however, is not preferred because the sintered compact produced is defective in the thermal characteristics and thus will not attain the objects of the invention.

The amount of iron group element, even when added to both W and Mo, can be added to W or Mo independently.

As seen from the above, the substrate of the invention can meet the increasing demand for large and high density semiconductor chip and be applicable as a substrate for the GaAs chip which is being put into practical use together with an Si chip.

Next, embodiments of the invention will be detailed as follows.

EXAMPLE 1

A powder mixture of tungsten and an iron group element were compacted in the size of 1001005 mm respectively, and sintered under an H2 gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1000 to 1400 C., thereby obtaining an intermediate sintered compact with porosity of 1 to 50%. Cu was infiltrated into the sintered compact under the H2 gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1200 C. to produce Cu--W alloy of Cu content of 1 to 40 wt. %.

The Cu--W alloy thus produced was measured for thermal expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity to obtain the results in Table 1.

In addition, the thermal expansion coefficients of Al2 O3, Si, and GaAs were entered therein.

The marks * in Table 1 represent comparison examples outside the scope of the invention.

              TABLE 1______________________________________               Thermal               Expansion   Thermal               Coefficient ConductivityNo.  Alloy Composition               ( 10-6 /C.)                           (cal/cm.sec. C.)______________________________________1*   1 Cu--99 W     4.7         0.402    5 Cu--95 W     5.2         0.453    10 Cu--10 W    7.0         0.504    15 Cu--85 W    7.9         0.545    20 Cu--80 W    8.3         0.586    25 Cu--75 W    9.0         0.627    30 Cu--70 W    9.7         0.65.8*   35 Cu--65 W    11.0        0.699*   40 Cu--60 W    11.8        0.7310   10 Cu--89 W--1 Ni               7.0         0.4811   20 Cu--79.5 W--0.5 Ni               8.2         0.5712   5 Cu--50 W--15 Fe               7.9         0.4213   10 Cu--79 W--11 Co               8.1         0.4614*  Al2 O3               7.215*  Si             4.016*  GaAs           6.7______________________________________

In the above table, IC package using Cu--W alloy sintered compact (No. 3) of Cu content of 10 wt. % as the substrate material for mounting an Si chip produced no heat distortion due to a small difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of Si chip and other enclosure base materials of Al2 O3 during the mounting process and an extremely good heat radiation and the device could produce an IC longer in life span and of high reliability.

EXAMPLE 2

A powder mixture of molybdenum and iron group element were compacted in the size of 1001005 mm respectively, and then were sintered under an H2 gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1000 to 1400 C., thereby obtaining an intermediate sintered compact with a porosity of 1 to 50%.

Copper was infiltrated into the intermediate sintered compact under an H2 gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1200 C., thereby producing a Cu--Mo alloy of copper content of 1 to 50 wt. %.

The Cu--Mo alloy thus produced was measured for the thermal expansion coefficient and heat conductivity, thereby having obtained the results in Table 2.

In addition, the marks * show comparison examples outside the scope of the invention.

              TABLE 2______________________________________               Thermal               Expansion   Thermal               Coefficient ConductivityNo.  Alloy Composition               ( 10-6 /C.)                           (cal/cm.sec. C.)______________________________________1*   1 Cu--99 Mo    5.3         0.352    5 Cu--95 Mo    5.9         0.383    10 Cu--90 Mo   6.5         0.414    15 Cu--85 Mo   7.1         0.445    20 Cu--80 Mo   7.9         0.486    25 Cu--75 Mo   8.4         0.507    30 Cu--70 Mo   9.1         0.548*   35 Cu--65 Mo   9.7         0.579*   40 Cu--60 Mo   10.3        0.6010*  50 Cu--50 Mo   11.5        0.6611   10 Cu--89.5 Mo--0.5 Ni               6.5         0.3912   15 Cu--82.0 Mo--3.0 Ni               7.2         0.4113   5 Cu--78 Mo--17 Fe               8.2         0.3614   10 Cu--82 Mo--8 Co               7.8         0.40______________________________________

In the above table 2, an IC package using a Cu--Mo alloy sintered compact (No. 4) as the substrate base material for mounting an Si chip produced no heat distortion at all due to a small difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of the Si chip and other enclosure base materials of Al2 O3 during the mounting process and an extremely good heat radiation and the device could obtain an IC longer in life span and of high reliability.

EXAMPLE 3

Tungsten, molybdenum powder or tungsten--molybdenum alloy powder and the required amounts of copper powder and iron group powder were mixed as shown in Table 3, and the powder was mixed by an attrition mixer uniformly for three hours, compacted to the size of 30305 mm under pressure of 1 t/cm2, and then sintered under the H2 gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1450 C. for one hour.

The alloy thus produced was measured for thermal expansion coefficient and heat conductivity, with the results set forth in Table 3. In addition, in Table 3, the marks * represent comparative examples outside the scope of the invention.

              TABLE 3______________________________________               Thermal               Expansion   Thermal               Coefficient ConductivityNo.  Alloy Composition               ( 10-6 /C.)                           (cal/cm.sec. C.)______________________________________1    15 Cu--85 W    8.2         0.502    20 Cu--79 W--1 Ni               8.5         0.483    20 Cu--75 W--5 Co               8.7         0.474    30 Cu--68 W--2 Fe               9.9         0.505    20 Cu--70 W--10 Mo               8.5         0.54 6*  35 Cu--65 W    11.5        0.61______________________________________
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1552184 *Dec 31, 1924Sep 1, 1925Gen ElectricMetal composition and method of manufacture
US1848437 *Aug 26, 1925Mar 8, 1932Mallory & Co Inc P RMetal alloy
US1860793 *Jul 9, 1927May 31, 1932Mallory & Co Inc P RElectrical contacting element
US2179960 *Jun 23, 1937Nov 14, 1939Schwarzkopf PaulAgglomerated material in particular for electrical purposes and shaped bodies made therefrom
US2763822 *May 10, 1955Sep 18, 1956Westinghouse Electric CorpSilicon semiconductor devices
US2971251 *Jun 20, 1955Feb 14, 1961Philips CorpSemi-conductive device
US3097329 *Jun 16, 1961Jul 9, 1963Siemens AgSintered plate with graded concentration of metal to accommodate adjacent metals having unequal expansion coefficients
US3204158 *Jun 16, 1961Aug 31, 1965Siemens AgSemiconductor device
US3353931 *May 26, 1966Nov 21, 1967Mallory & Co Inc P RTungsten-indium powder bodies infiltrated with copper
US3409974 *Jul 7, 1967Nov 12, 1968Alloys Unltd IncProcess of making tungsten-based composite materials
US3423203 *Aug 21, 1967Jan 21, 1969Mallory & Co Inc P RTungsten-indium powder bodies infiltrated with copper
US3685134 *May 15, 1970Aug 22, 1972Mallory & Co Inc P RMethod of making electrical contact materials
US3969754 *Oct 21, 1974Jul 13, 1976Hitachi, Ltd.Semiconductor device having supporting electrode composite structure of metal containing fibers
US4025997 *Dec 23, 1975May 31, 1977International Telephone & Telegraph CorporationCeramic mounting and heat sink device
US4158719 *Jun 9, 1977Jun 19, 1979Carpenter Technology CorporationLow expansion low resistivity composite powder metallurgy member and method of making the same
US4196442 *May 31, 1978Apr 1, 1980Hitachi, Ltd.Semiconductor device
US4340090 *Aug 21, 1981Jul 20, 1982Toray Silicone Company, Ltd.Silicone compositions for the treatment of glass fibers and methods of treatment
US4427993 *Nov 21, 1980Jan 24, 1984General Electric CompanyThermal stress relieving bimetallic plate
US4451540 *Aug 30, 1982May 29, 1984Isotronics, Inc.System for packaging of electronic circuits
US4556899 *Jun 7, 1982Dec 3, 1985Hitachi, Ltd.Insulated type semiconductor devices
US4680618 *Sep 7, 1983Jul 14, 1987Narumi China CorporationPackage comprising a composite metal body brought into contact with a ceramic member
US5086333 *Jul 13, 1989Feb 4, 1992Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd.Substrate for semiconductor apparatus having a composite material
US5099310 *Jan 17, 1989Mar 24, 1992Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd.Substrate for semiconductor apparatus
US5409864 *Aug 2, 1994Apr 25, 1995Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd.Substrate for semiconductor apparatus
US5525428 *Jan 4, 1995Jun 11, 1996Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd.Substrate for semiconductor apparatus
DE1143588B *Sep 22, 1960Feb 14, 1963Siemens AgGesinterter Kontaktkoerper fuer Halbleiteranordnungen
DE2853951A1 *Dec 14, 1978Jul 3, 1980DemetronKontaktplatte fuer halbleiter-bauelemente
GB857569A * Title not available
GB931820A * Title not available
JPS492449A * Title not available
JPS5062776A * Title not available
JPS5259572A * Title not available
JPS5630092A * Title not available
JPS5867049A * Title not available
JPS52117075A * Title not available
JPS57152438A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1"Codification of Ceramic Material Techniques," 1979, pp. 344-345.
2 *Acrian Inc. Catalog , NPN Power Transistor, (Undated).
3Acrian Inc. Catalog, "NPN Power Transistor," (Undated).
4Agte et al., "Tungsten and Molybdenum," NASA Technical Translation F-135, 1963, pp. 118-119, 215, 260-267.
5 *Agte et al., Tungsten and Molybdenum, NASA Technical Translation F 135 , 1963, pp. 118 119, 215, 260 267.
6 *Benesovsky, Powder Metallurgy and Sintered Materials , Metallwerk Plansee AG & Co. KG, Germany, 1973, pp. 10 11, 146 156.
7Benesovsky, Powder Metallurgy and Sintered Materials, Metallwerk Plansee AG & Co. KG, Germany, 1973, pp. 10-11, 146-156.
8 *CMW Inc. Catalog , Elkonite Series 200, Oct. 1979, pp. 201:1 201:4, 205:1 205:4, 210:1 210:2, 215:1 215:2, 220:1 220:2, 225:1, 230:1, 235:1 235:3, 240:1 240:2.
9CMW Inc. Catalog, "Elkonite Series 200," Oct. 1979, pp. 201:1-201:4, 205:1-205:4, 210:1-210:2, 215:1-215:2, 220:1-220:2, 225:1, 230:1, 235:1-235:3, 240:1-240:2.
10 *Codification of Ceramic Material Techniques, 1979, pp. 344 345.
11Dance et al., "Clad Metal Circuit Board Substrates for Direct Mounting of Ceramic Chip Carriers," Electronic Packaging and Production, Jan. 1982, pp. 228-237.
12 *Dance et al., Clad Metal Circuit Board Substrates for Direct Mounting of Ceramic Chip Carriers, Electronic Packaging and Production , Jan. 1982, pp. 228 237.
13 *Elkonite Catalog , Contact Metals Welding Inc., Indianapolis, Ind. 1981, pp. 308 309.
14Elkonite Catalog, Contact Metals Welding Inc., Indianapolis, Ind. 1981, pp. 308-309.
15 *Elkonite Data Book , P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1941, pp. 1 30.
16Elkonite Data Book, P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1941, pp. 1-30.
17 *Elkonite Refractory Metal Composites Catalog , P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1962.
18 *Elkonite Refractory Metal Composites Catalog , P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1968.
19Elkonite Refractory Metal Composites Catalog, P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1962.
20Elkonite Refractory Metal Composites Catalog, P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1968.
21 *ELMET Contact Materials , Metallwerk Plansee AG & Co., Germany, 1977.
22ELMET Contact Materials, Metallwerk Plansee AG & Co., Germany, 1977.
23 *German, Liquid Phase Sintering , NY and London, 1985, pp. 160 163.
24German, Liquid Phase Sintering, NY and London, 1985, pp. 160-163.
25 *Goetzel, Treatise on Powder Metallurgy , vol. II, 1950, pp. 203 205.
26Goetzel, Treatise on Powder Metallurgy, vol. II, 1950, pp. 203-205.
27Hensel et al. "Physical Properties of Metal Compositions with a Refractory Metal Base," Powder Metallurgy, 1942, pp. 483-492.
28 *Hensel et al. Physical Properties of Metal Compositions with a Refractory Metal Base, Powder Metallurgy , 1942, pp. 483 492.
29 *Hirschhom, Introduction to Powder Metallurgy , NY, 1969, pp. 244 245.
30Hirschhom, Introduction to Powder Metallurgy, NY, 1969, pp. 244-245.
31 *Jones, Fundamental Principles of Power Metallurgy , London, 1960, pp. 504 509, 770 773.
32Jones, Fundamental Principles of Power Metallurgy, London, 1960, pp. 504-509, 770-773.
33Kosco, "New Low Expansion Alloys for Semiconductor Applications", Solid State Technology, Jan., 1969, pp. 47-49.
34 *Kosco, New Low Expansion Alloys for Semiconductor Applications , Solid State Technology , Jan., 1969, pp. 47 49.
35 *Mallory Catalog , P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1950, pp. 30 33.
36Mallory Catalog, P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1950, pp. 30-33.
37 *Mallory Product Guide , P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1962, p. 22.
38Mallory Product Guide, P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1962, p. 22.
39Meyer, "How to Select Electrical Contacts", Metal Progress, US, vol. 88, Jun. 1965-Dec. 1965, pp. 92-95.
40 *Meyer, How to Select Electrical Contacts , Metal Progress , US, vol. 88, Jun. 1965 Dec. 1965, pp. 92 95.
41Moon et al., "Sintering of W-Cu Contact Materials with Ni and Co Dopants," Powder Metallurgy International, vol. 9, No. 1, 1977, pp. 23-24.
42 *Moon et al., Sintering of W Cu Contact Materials with Ni and Co Dopants, Powder Metallurgy International , vol. 9, No. 1, 1977, pp. 23 24.
43Naidichi et al., "Densification in Liquid Phase Sintering Under Pressure in the System Tungsten-Copper", translated fro Porosbkovaya Metallurgiya, No. 1 (133) pp. 34-39, Jan. 1974.
44 *Naidichi et al., Densification in Liquid Phase Sintering Under Pressure in the System Tungsten Copper , translated fro Porosbkovaya Metallurgiya, No. 1 (133) pp. 34 39, Jan. 1974.
45Nikkan Kogyo, "Powder Metallurgy Application Product," Powder Metallurgy Technical Course No. 8, Jul. 1964, pp. 271.
46 *Nikkan Kogyo, Powder Metallurgy Application Product, Powder Metallurgy Technical Course No. 8 , Jul. 1964, pp. 271.
47 *Resistance Welding Data Book , P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1951, pp. 308 309.
48Resistance Welding Data Book, P. R. Mallory & Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 1951, pp. 308-309.
49Samsonov et al., "Activation of the Sintering of Tungsten by the Iron-Group Metals," Soviet Powder Metallurgy And Metal Ceramics, No. 10, Oct. 1969, pp. 804-808.
50 *Samsonov et al., Activation of the Sintering of Tungsten by the Iron Group Metals, Soviet Powder Metallurgy And Metal Ceramics , No. 10, Oct. 1969, pp. 804 808.
51 *Sands et al., Powder Metallurgy Practice and Applications , London, 1966, pp. 94 95.
52Sands et al., Powder Metallurgy Practice and Applications, London, 1966, pp. 94-95.
53Sebastian et al., "Densification in W-Cu Sintered Alloys Produced fro Coreduced Powders", Planseeberichte for Pulvemetallurgie, Bd. 25, No. 2, pp. 84-100, Jun. 1977.
54Sebastian et al., "Liquid Phase Sintering", Metallurgy International, vol. 11, No.2, pp. 62-64, 1979.
55 *Sebastian et al., Densification in W Cu Sintered Alloys Produced fro Coreduced Powders , Planseeberichte for Pulvemetallurgie, Bd. 25, No. 2, pp. 84 100, Jun. 1977.
56 *Sebastian et al., Liquid Phase Sintering , Metallurgy International, vol. 11, No.2, pp. 62 64, 1979.
57 *Shinbun, Powder Metallurgy and Sintered Materials , Japan, 1964, pp. 264 267.
58Shinbun, Powder Metallurgy and Sintered Materials, Japan, 1964, pp. 264-267.
59 *Smithells, Tungsten: A Treatise on Its Metallurgy, Properties and Applications, Third Edition, 1952, pp. 260 262.
60Smithells, Tungsten: A Treatise on Its Metallurgy, Properties and Applications, Third Edition, 1952, pp. 260-262.
61 *Thermkon Catalog , Contact Metals Welding Inc., Indianapolis, Inc., 1982 (Copyright Registration Sep. 27, 1982).
62 *Thermkon Catalog , Contact Metals Welding Inc., Indianapolis, Ind., 1987.
63Thermkon Catalog, Contact Metals Welding Inc., Indianapolis, Inc., 1982 (Copyright Registration Sep. 27, 1982).
64Thermkon Catalog, Contact Metals Welding Inc., Indianapolis, Ind., 1987.
65 *Thermkon Trademark Registration No. 1,354,948, Aug. 20, 1985.
66 *Yih and Wang, Tungsten, Sources, Metallurgy, Properties and Applications , New York and London, 1979, pp. 362 363.
67Yih and Wang, Tungsten, Sources, Metallurgy, Properties and Applications, New York and London, 1979, pp. 362-363.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6876075Mar 5, 2001Apr 5, 2005Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd.Aluminum-silicon carbide semiconductor substrate and method for producing the same
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 19, 2002FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20020113
Jan 14, 2002LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Aug 10, 2001REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed