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Publication numberUS571787 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1896
Filing dateJun 15, 1893
Publication numberUS 571787 A, US 571787A, US-A-571787, US571787 A, US571787A
InventorsAndrew G. Paul
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Andrew g
US 571787 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 2 SheetsSheet l A.-G. PAUL & H. A. JOSLIN.

PAPER DRIER.

No. 571,787. Patented Nov. 24, 1896.

(No Model) 2 sheets sheet 2.

A. G. PAUL & H. A. JUSLIN. PAPER DRIER. No. 571,787. Patented Nov. 24, 1896.

yyggago. SVI/UQVI/tOTAS 75 mm 9mm C77 553% flmm samba QMRMMRX wm UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

AN DRE'W G. PAUL AND HERBERT A. JOSLIN, OF BOSTON, MASSACIIUSETTS; SAID .TOSTJN ASSIGNOR T0 SAID PAUL.

PAPER-DRIER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 571,787, dated November 24, 1896. Application filed June 15,1893. Serial No. 477,634, (No model.

To 117/- 11-71mm it "nu/y concern:

le it known that we, ANDREW G. PAUL and ileum-211T A. Josmn, citizens of the United States, residing in Boston, in the county of Sullollc and State of lllassachuset-ts, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Apparatus 'l'or Drying Paper, Cloth, and other Articles of a Similar Nature, of which the following is a specification.

This invention is applicable to drying-machines in which the paper or other material to be dried is passed over the surfaces of revolving cylinders, which are heated in any suitable way, as by steam, and in which the material to be dried is pressed against the drying-cylinders by means of a suitable ironer, such as an endless belt of canvas or felt or other suitable material, the ironer being caused to move with the paper and to hold the paper in close contact with the cylinder, thereby becoming an ironcr for the paper and also preventing the air from getting in between the paper and the d rying-cylimler, and in which the material to be dried and the lroner are separated between the cylinders and are fed from one cylinder to another on separate feeding or supporting devices.

In such dlying-machineswhen the material to be dried is brought into contact with the drying-cylimlor and forced against that cylinder by the ironing-belt some of the moisture which is expelled from the material is absorbed by the ironing-belt. The ironing-belt is thus more or less wet when it passes away from the first few cylinders. Between the successive drying-cylimlers the ironing-belt is run over intermediate rollers. The paper or material to be dried is also passed over other intermediate rollers upon its way from one. drying-cylinder to the next drying-cylindcr. These intermediate rollers have been so arranged that the rollers for the ironingbelt have been mounted below the rollers for the material to be dried. In passing over these intermediate rollers on its way from one drying-cylinder to another the ironing-belt has thus been underneath the material to be dried. As a result of this arrangement the vapor which rises from the ironing-belt while it is passing over and between the intermedia-te rollers rises directly up to the paper or other material which is passing over the upper rollers and is absorbed by tha-tmaterial or is deposited on its surface as a coating. This not only retards the drying of the material, but it is apt also to prevent the drying of the same from being uni form and may cause curling of the material.

The object of our invention is to prevent any moisture that passes from the ironingbclt at this stage from coming into contact with the material to be dried, and thus to secure a more rapid and uniform drying.

Our-invention consists in suitable means, such as are hereinafter described, for controlling and directing the currents of vapor or moisture that pass oil from the ironing-belt in a drying-machine, whereby this vapor or moisture is prevented from coming into contact with or being deposited upon or absorbed by the material which is being dried in the machine.

Our invention is fully illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a [rout elevation view of a drying-machine embodying our im 'n-ovement. Fig. 23 is atop or plan view of the same, showing the paper or other material as broken away between the intermediate supportingrollers. Fig. 3 is a. vertical sectional view on the line 3 3 of Fig. 2. Fig. 4 shows a modilied formof the diaphragm.

Similar letters denote similar parts in the ditferent figures.

Referring to the drawings, n represents the framework of the machine.

I), c, d, and c are our successive dryingcylinders constructed and mounted in the usual way. The cylinders Z) and e are shown only in part. These machines usually contain a larger numberof cylinders, but as the construction of such machines is well known only a few cylinders are represented in the drawings, as they are sullieicnt to clearlv show the improvement herein described.

fis the paper or other material which is being dried in the machine.

g is the ironer, and consists of an endless belt or apron made of felt or canvas or other suit-able substance.

UNITED STATES PATENT Orricn.

AN Dlllfll' G. PAUL AND HERBERT A. JOSLIN, OF BOSTON, lll'ASSiidClIUSETTS;

SAID JOSTJN ASSIGNOR 'lO SAID PAUL.

PAPER-DRIER.

To (17! [1'72 one it may (.UIMBOI'IL.

lie it known that we, ANDREW G. PAUL and linnnnnr A. JOSLIN, citizens of the United States, residing in Boston, in the county of 5 Suliollc and State of Massachusetts, have in vented a new and useful Improvement in Apparatus for Drying Paper, Cloth, and other Articles of a Similar Nature, of which the following is a specification.

: This invention is applicable to drying-niachiues in which the paper or other material to be d ricd is passed over the surfaces of revolving cylinders, which are heated in any suitable way, as by steam, and in which the I I material to be dried is pressed against the drying-cylinders by means of a suitable ironer,

such as an endless belt of canvas or feltor other suit-able material, the ironer being caused to move with the paper and to hold so the paper in close contact with the cylinder,

thereby becoming an ironer for the paper and also preventing the air from getting in between the paper and the drying-cyliiulcr, and

in which the material to be dried and the ironer are separated between the cylinders and are fed from one cylinder to another on separate feeding or supporting devices.

In such drying-machineswhen the material to be dried is brought into contact with the drying-cylinder and forced against that cylindcr by the ironing-belt some of the moisture which is expelled from the material is absorbed by the ironing-belt. The ironing-belt is thus more or less wet when it passes away 5 from the first few cylinders. Between the successive drying-cylimlers the ironing-belt is run over intermediate rollers. The paper or material to be dried is also passed over other intermediate rollers upon its way from 40 one drying-cylimier to the next drying-cylinder. These intermediate rollers have been so arranged that the rollers for the ironingbclt have been mounted below the rollers for the material to be dried. In passing over these intermediate rollers on its way from one drying-cylinder to another the ironing-belt has thus been underneath the material to be dried. As a result of this arrangement the Vapor which rises from the ironing-belt while it is passing over and between the intermeses dir passing over the upd is a surface as a coating. i s the dryingof thematclso to prevent the drying diate lOllOrS per rollers or is dcposi This not 01 rial, but it ofthesamc curling of our invention is to prevent any moist fiat passes from the ironingbelt at t 7 go from coming into contact rial to be dried, and thus to seapid and uniform drying.

iachinc, whereby this vapor or revcntcd from coming into eoning deposited upon or absorbed nateial which is being dried in the rout elevation view of a drybodying our improvement. 2 is atop or.v lan view of the same, showin the paper other material as broken a a y between th .interlnediate supporting- Fig. i] is vertical sectional view on 0 line 3 3 of Fig. Fig. 4 shows a modiii d form of the diaphragm.

Similar letters denote similar parts in the different figures.

Referring to the drawings, it represents the framework of the machine.

I), c, (I, and c are four successivc dryingcylinders constructed and mounted in the usual way. The cylinders Z) and e are shown only in part. These machines usually contain a larger number of cylinders, but as the construction of such machines is well known only a few cylinders are represented in the drawings, as they are suilicient to clearly show the improvement herein described.

fis the paper or other material which is being dried in the machine.

g is the ironer, and consists of an endless .belt or apron made of felt-or canvas or other suitable substance.

of the heat from the ironer and the vapor is transmitted to the material to be dried, all

whereby the vapor which rises from the ironer is prevented from coming into contact with 1 the material to be dried, and the moisture deii i posited on the diaphragm is caused to run oif I 5 through the drains, substantially as and for the purposes set forth.

ANDREW G. PAUL. HERBERT A. JOSLIN. Witnesses I. R. CLARK, A. E. LITTLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3868780 *Nov 2, 1973Mar 4, 1975Valmet OyGroup of drying cylinders in a multiple cylinder dryer for a material web, in particular for paper
US4483083 *Aug 18, 1982Nov 20, 1984Beloit CorporationDrying and runnability for high speed paper machines
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF26B11/04, D06F58/22