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Publication numberUS574387 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1897
Publication numberUS 574387 A, US 574387A, US-A-574387, US574387 A, US574387A
InventorsJames Buckler
Original AssigneeBy Mesne assignments
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Woven multiple-ply fabric
US 574387 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'- (Specimens.) I v u 7 J. BUCKLER.

WOVEN MULTIPLE-FLY FABRIC.

170,574,387. Patented Jan. 5, 1897.

ouvc' (I1) WHITE 0 WHITE 2 BLACK O BLACK Witnesses. Inventor.

v MvQWW I Attorney;

YHI norms PETERS 00 whotaurna, wAsumsrou, D c.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JAMES BUCKLER, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGN OR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO JOHN M. RUSSELL, OF WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS.

WOVEN M ULT|PLE PLY FABRIC.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 574,387, dated January 5, 1897. Application filed November 20, 1895. Serial No. 569/l83. (Speoimena) T aZZ whom it may concern.-

Be it known that 1, JAMES BUOKLER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Philadelphia, in the county of Philadelphia and State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Woven Multiple- Ply Fabrics, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification.

This invention relates to woven multipleply fabrics, having reference more especially to two-ply ingrain carpet, my object being to produce a thoroughly-bound fabric free from pockets or unbound portions between the plies and in which the threads of one ply shall not appear on the face of the other, excepting when such threads are thrown thereto in the formation of a figure; This result is attained by the crossing, in the interior of the fabric, of the warp-threads of the respective plies, as will hereinafter appear.

In the accompanying drawings, illustrating my improved woven two-ply fabric, Figure 1 is a diagram showing the binding, by means of a single warp, of each opposite ply or face. Fig. 2 is a like view in which the binding is effected by means of both warps in each ply crossing each other in alternate succession.

Fig. 3 is a modification in which a supplemental weft-thread is employed. Fig. d is a diagrammatic sectional View of the four warpthreads, and showing also the weft-threads, whereby the disposition of these threads in the fabric illustrated in the other figures may be more readily understood.

In the ordinary mode of weaving two-ply fabrics, such as carpets, the pair of figurewefts are mated with the opposite pair of 0 ground-wefts, and owing to the manner in which the warps are usually operated a figureweft always appears upon one face of the fabric, while its ground-weft mate always appears upon the opposite face, and thus the fabric is usually woven with the mate wefts opposite each other, or, in other words, with the pair of figure-wefts side by side on one face or ply of the fabric and the groundwefts side by side on the other ply or back of the fabric, the only variation possible being an alternative of this order due to what is well known as a shot-about effect. In this usual mode of weaving two-ply fabrics, and in all other modes, as far as I know, each figure-weft is always bound by a warp-thread 5 5 of its own color, the four warps and the four wefts being usually of the same colors, and the warp-threads are so operated that they directly bind together opposite weft-threads, figure-wefts to figure-wefts and ground-wefts to ground-wefts, by warp-threads correspond ing thereto in ground or figure colors; and this binding is not opposite each pair or each alternate pair of weft mates, but usually at long intervals, thereby forming pockets or spaces, being the faces of the fabric not bound or united together.

In carrying out my invention in one form thereof the four warp-threads are so disposed in the weaving that the pair of warp-threads of each ply or face binds only its own pair of weft-threads on each face, one of the binding or warp threads of one ply crossing the corresponding thread of the other ply in the interior of the fabric at points directly intermediate opposite wefts of the respective plies, thereby effecting a uniform binding together of the two plies throughout the length and breadth of the fabric. A fabric thus constructed is not only free from pockets or unbound portions between the plies, but the threads of one ply do not appear on the face of the opposite ply. Such a fabric is represented in Fig. 1 of the drawings, wherein A B represent the respective plies, a a being the warp-threads and a a the weft-threads of the upper ply and b b being the warpthreads and b b the weft threads of the lower ply.

It will be observed that the warp-threads a and b of the respective plies are crossed upon each other in the interior of the fabric with the effect stated. This is attained by moving the threads at and b laterally in opposite directions during the weaving of the fabric, one set 5 of threads (4 being up and the other, 5, down. The threads at are then let down below the threads I), whereupon the threads I) are lifted, which latter threads thus pass under the threads to, and in consequence the warp- 10o struction.

threads are crossed. The weft-threads are shot into the succeeding sheds in the usual manner.

A loom designed to handle the threads in the manner just described forms the subject of an application for Letters Patent of the United States filed by me Februar r 3, 1896, Serial No. 577,856.

111 Fig. 2 is represented a fabric in which the binding is effected by the crossing of both pairs of opposite warp-threads, one thread of one pair with one thread of the opposite pair, in alternate succession. This is attained by moving both pairs a b and a b similarly to the single pair a b in the first-described con- If it be desired to use an additional weftthread 0, that is to say, a thread differing in color from the other wefts in the fabric, the same may be run or floated between the crossing or tying points of the opposite warpthreads and thrown to either face of the fabric at any desired point or points thereon. (See Fig. 3.)

The invention above described is particularly applicable to plain or unfigured two-ply fabrics with different-colored faces, say one red and the other green, in view of the fact that the warp of one ply will not appear on the face of the opposite ply, which result, so far as I am aware, has never heretofore been attained.

In the weaving of a figured fabric wherein the warp-threads of the respective plies are crossed and bound together in the manner described the figuring-warp of one ply is thrown onto the face of the opposite ply so as to effect the weaving of the desired pattern, but such figuring-warp at no other time appears upon the opposite face of the fabric.

llavin g thus described my invention, what I claim as new, Patent, is-

1. A woven multiple-ply fabric wherein the weft-threads of each ply are bound into the fabric by their warp-threads, warp-threads of one ply being crossed with those of another ply at points directlyintermediate opposite wefts of the respective plies, substantially as described.

2. A multiple-ply fabric wherein the Weftthreads of each ply are bound into the fabric by their warp-threads, one of the pair of warpthreads of one ply being tied or bound into the fabric by the crossing thereon of one of the warp-threads of the opposite ply at points directly intermediate opposite wefts of the re spective plies, substantially as described.

3. A woven m ultiple-pl y fabric wherein the weft-threads of each ply are bound into the fabric by their warp-threads, the warp-threads of one ply being crossed with those of another ply at points directly intermediate opposite wefts of the respective plies, and a supple mental weft-thread run into the fabric, substan tially as described.

4:. A multiple-ply fabric in which the weftthreads of each ply are bound into the fabric by their warpfihreads, one of the pairbf warpthreads of one ply being tied or bound into the fabric by the crossing thereon of one of the warp-threads of the opposite ply or face, and

a supplemental weft-thread run into the fab ric, between the faces thereof, as described.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto affixed mysignature this 18th day of November, A. D. 1895.

substantially JAMES B l .OKLER. \Vitnesscs:

T. W. MoCANN, II. T. FENTON.

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Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD03D11/00