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Publication numberUS576523 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1897
Filing dateSep 17, 1896
Publication numberUS 576523 A, US 576523A, US-A-576523, US576523 A, US576523A
Original AssigneeJ
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Petroleum incandescent burner
US 576523 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 G. WASHINGTON.

PETROLEUM INGANDESGBNT BURNER.

Patented Feb. 2, 1897.

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 2. G. WASHINGTON.

PETROLEUM INGANDESOENT BURNER. No. 576,523. Patented Feb. 2, 1897.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

GEORGE IVASHINGTON, OF BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, ASSIGNOR TO J. WVESLEY ALLISON, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

PETROLEUM INCANDESCENT BURNER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 576,523, dated February 2, 1897.

Application filed September 17, 1896. Serial No. 606,164. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern..-

Be it .known that I, GEORGE WASHINGTON, a subject of the Queen of England, residing at Brussels, in the Kingdom of Belgium, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Petroleum Incandescent Burners, of which the following isa specification.

This invention relates to a new burner for incandescent petroleum-lighting, having a vaporizing element of special form, provided with appropriate regulators, in combination with a special mixture-chamber, and giving a flame equal to the Bunsen burner, and intended to bring to incandescence a mantle analogous to those used for incandescent gaslights.

In the annexed drawings, Figure-1 is a vertical section of the vaporizing element provided with means for the regulation of the admission of the petroleum and of the escape of the vapors produced. Fig. 2 is a vertical section of a mixture-chamber in which is produced the intimate mixture of the vapors with the air necessary for obtaining a Bunsen flame. Fig. 2 is a modification of the mixture-chamber shown in Fig. Figs. 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 are different types of burners 'for incandescent petroleum-light realized by the combination of the elements shown separately by Figs. 1 and 2.

In order to avoid the inconveniences the vaporization of the petroleum causes in the use of capillary tubes, serpentine pipes, or any other vaporizing-tubes of small diameter, such as those hitherto used, which are soon obstructed and put out of use by the carbon and other deposits which are formed in these tubes, I use an evaporizing element of a special form, constituted by a straight tube 0, Fig. 1, which can be easily cleaned, of a relatively large diameter, provided at the end where the vapors pass out with a dismountable nozzle B, provided with an escape-h ole O, the opening of which can be regulated by means of a pin A, operated by a lever L or by other appropriate arrangement mounted upon the joint R, upon which the tube 0 is fixed and by which the admission of petroleum to the burner is effected.

The operation of the pin A can in no way be influenced by the high temperature of the orifices of the tube 1.

burner, the parts submitted to friction being placed in the cold part of the vaporizer constituted by the joint R.

The admission of the petroleum to the vaporizing-tube O is regulated by means of a lever L,,provided with an eccentric e, operating upon a valve. In the position indicated on the drawings the eccentric e, the lever L being lifted, presses upon a diaphragm d, which operates upon a valve .9 and keeps the tube r, through which the petroleum pene trates into the vaporizer 0, closed. When the lever L is lowered, the eccentric e leaves the diaphragm cl and the valve 3, pushed back by the springiness of the diaphragm, leaves the The petroleum then rises in the tube 0 and is vaporized in this apparatus, as described hereinafter. The

vapor produced escapes through the orifice o of the nozzle B, the regulating-pin A having been previously withdrawn more or less from this opening.

The petroleum vapors leaving the tube C can be utilized in order to bring to incandescence a mantle analogous to those in use for incandescent gas-lights. However, the mixture of these vapors must be previously operated with the necessary quantity'of air for obtaininga Bunsen flame. This mixture is effected by means of a-special chamber. (Represented separately in Fig. 2.) This chamber is preferablycomposed of a metal cylinder F, with which is connected eit her directly or indirectly, a metallic gauze M, and isprovided interiorly with a pipe H, communicating with the exterior by means of one or more branch tubes U.

In the example represented in Fig. 2 the tubes U are-exterior to the metallic cylinder F, and the metallic gauze M is omitted, the mixture formed in the chamber being then conducted to the burner by one or more tubes K in place of through the gauze M.

If the mixture-chamber represented in Fig. 2'or 2 is combined with the already-described vaporizing element, so that the vapors leaving the orifice 0 of the vaporizer are directed into the inner pipe H, these vapors penetrat ing with force into said pipe provoke an aspiration of air through the tubes II. This air is mixed with the petroleum vapors and Lll is driven with these vapors against the closed end of the chamber F. The eddy effected by the shock of the vapors and of the air against the bottom of this chamber assures the intimate mixture of the air and of the vapors. This mixture then turns back and escapes from the apparatus, lcaving'through the metallic gauze M or the pipe K, outside of which it can be lighted and utilized for the production of the incandescent light.

The two essential elements, the vaporizer and the mixture-chamber, can be combined for this effect in different ways. As shown in Fig. 3, the mixture-chamber F could be arranged simply above the vaporizer O, the flame bringing the inverted mantle M to incandescence and causing simultaneously the vaporizing of the petroleum in the vaporizing-tube O, placed in the center of this flame.

One might equally adopt the arrangement of Fig. 4, based upon the same combination of the two elements, but in which the flame bringingthe mantle M to incandesce'nce is directed from below upward, the combustible mixture of petroleum-vapors and of air being conducted for this purpose through the tube K.

Fig. 5 shows as an example a combination of the mixture-cham ber and of the vaporizer allowing of using an ordinary Bunsen gasburner. In this combination the mixturechamber is arranged over the Vaporizer and constituted by the usual gas-burner. In this case the evaporation of the petroleum is caused by an auxiliary flame burning round the vaporizer O and fed through a tube 25 with a small part of the combustible mixture.

Fig. 6 represents a combination of mixturechamber and vaporizer allowing the simul taneous feeding of several incandescent burners by means of only one vaporizer. In this arrangement the vaporizer, surmounted by the mixture-chamber F, is mounted upon a joint R, whence bran ch different pipes conducting the combustible mixture to an equivalent number of burners I. However, in this case the utilizing of the mixture being made at a relatively great distance from the flame causing the evaporation, it is convenient to incline a little theadmission-pipes of the mixture to the burners I, in order to favor the running back of petroleum (which might be the result of a partial condensation in these pipes) toward the joint R, where the metallic parts are brought by the flame causing the evaporation to a sufficient temperature in order to assure the reevaporation of this liquid.

Fig. 7 represents a combination of the vaporizer and of the mixture-chamber in which the vaporizer is inverted over the mixturechamber, the admission of the petroleum being made from above, which arrangement will be advantageousin certain cases. In this example the vaporizing-tube O is provided interiorly with a second tube O, serving for the escape of the vapor. This arrangement is indispensable, in order to avoid the flow of liquid petroleum through the orifice of escape of the petroleum-vapor.

One feature of importance in the construction and operation of my invention as en1- bodied in Figs. 3 and 4 is that the vaporizing tube and also the mixed air and vapor are directly heated by the' radiated heat of the incandescent burner, and thus brought to and maintained at a high temperature, and consequently a more intimate mixture of the vapor and air is secured thanwould be possible in a structure wherein the mixture of vapor and air is heated solely by the heat conducted downwardly to the mixing-chamber through the metallic tube which supports the burner. One could thus by means of the e'vaporizing element and the before-described mixturechamber realize a large number of combinations presenting all the same advantages, that is to say, first, facility of heating and cleaning the vaporizing element; second, non-liability of obstruction or of putting out of action of the apparatus in consequence of carbon or other deposits; third, absence of injurious condensation of the petroleum-vapors in the vaporizer in consequence of a long passage in pipes in contact with cold walls; fourth, easy regulation of the intensity of the flame by means of a pin, reducing at pleasure the section of the escape-orifice in order to allow even of obtaining a continually-burningpilotflame, obviating the relighting of the burner; fifth, intimate mixture of air and petroleum vapor; sixth, diminution of the velocity of out-flow of this mixture in consequence of its passage into a special chamber and therefore economy of mantles which will not be broken, as before, by excessive pressure of the combustible mixture; seventh, continual rcevaporation of the slight condensations which might be produced in the mixture-cl1amber, the latter being directly submitted to the calorific action of the flame.

Having now particularly described my invention, I declare that What I claim is 1. In a hydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a vaporizing-tube having an oil-su pply-regulatin g valve at one end and a vapor-discharge nozzle at its other end, and an adjustable needle valve extending throughout the length of the vaporizing-tube and engaging within the discharge-nozzle, of a mixing-chamber and air-inlets arranged to receive and mix the vaporized hydrocarbon and outer air, and an incandescent burner arranged to impart its heat directlyto the vaporizing-tube, substantially as set forth.

2. In a hydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a vaporizing-tube provided with a discharge-nozzle, means for regulating the supply of oil to the tube, and a needlevalve for regulating and controlling the discharge of vapor, of a mixing-chamber and air-' inlets located to receive and mix the vapor and outer air, and an incandescent burner arranged to impart its heat directly to the IIO vaporizing-tube and also to the pipe through which mixed vapor and gas is conveyed to the burner, substantially as set forth.

3. In ahydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a vaporizing-tube provided with a discharge-nozzle; an adjustable needle-valve for regulating the discharge of Vapor, means for regulating the supply of oil to the vaporizing-tube, and a mixing-chamber provided with an air-inlet arranged to receive and mix the vapor and air, of an incandescent burner located below the mixing-chamber and arranged to impart its heat directly to the vaporizing-tube, and to heat the mixing-chamber and the air supplied thereto, substantially as set forth.

4:. In a hydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a vaporizing-tube provided with a nozzle and needle-valve for controlling the discharge of vapor and a mixing-chamber for receiving and mixing air and vapor, of an incandescent burner arranged and adapted to impart its radiated heat directly to the vaporizing-tube and also to the mixed air and vapor as it flows to the burner, substantially as set forth.

5. In a hydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a vaporizing tube or receptacle provided with a discharge-nozzle, and a needle-valve for controlling the discharge of vapor through the nozzle, of a mixing-chamber located over said nozzle and constructed to receive and mix air and the hydrocarbon vapor, an incandescent burner. located below the mixing-chamber and a pipe or conduit leading downwardly from the mixing-chamber to the incandescent burner, substantially as set forth.

6. In ahydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a tube provided at one end with a detachable nozzle, means for regulating the supply of oil to the opposite end of the tube, and an adjustable needle-valve extending through the entire length of the tube and adapted to regulate the discharge of vapor, of an incandescent burner arranged to impart its heat directly to the vaporizingtube, substantially as set forth.

7. In a hydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a vaporizing-tube provided with a detachable discharge-nozzle, a mixingchamber constructed and arranged to receive the jet of vaporized hydrocarbon, and mix air therewith, and an incandescent burner located below the mixing-chamber and adjacent to the vaporizing-tube, of a pipe or conduit for conveying the mixed air and vapor from the mixing-chamber, downwardly to the incandescent burner substantially as set forth.

8. In a hydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a vaporizing-tube provided at one end with a discharge-nozzle, a valve for regulating the discharge of the vapor, means for regulating the supply of oil to the tube, and a mixing-chamber for receiving and mixing vapor and air, of an incandescent burner arranged to impart its heat directly to the vaporizing-tube, and a pipe for conveying the mixed vapor and air from the mixing-chamber to the incandescent burner, substantially as set forth.

9. Inahydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a continuous straight vaporizing-tube provided at one end with a discharge-nozzle, a valve for regulating the discharge of vapor, and a mixing-chamber constructed and arranged to receive the jet of vapor and commingle air therewith, of anincandescent burner arranged to impart heat directly to the vaporizing-tube, and to the mixed air and vapor,substantially as set forth.

10. In a hydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with a vaporizing-tube provided with a needle-valve for regulating the discharge of vapor, a mixing-chamber constructed and arranged to receive the jet of vapor and commingle air therewith, and a supply-pipe for conveying the mixed vapor and oil to the burner, of an incandescent burner arranged to impart heat directly and mixing-chamber constructed to receive the jet of vaporized oil and draw into and mix therewith a supply of outer air, and then to heat said mixture on its passage to the burner, of an incandescent burner arranged throughout its length in close proximity to the vaporizing-tube whereby the oil therein is highly heated, substantially as set forth.

12. In a hydrocarbon incandescent lamp, the combination with avaporizing-tube, mixing-chamber provided with air-inlets, and a pipe for conveying mixed vapor and air to the burner, of an incandescent burner arranged to impart its heat directly to the vaporizing-tube, and to heat the mixing-chamber, the air supplied thereto, and the pipe through which the mixed oil and vapor is conveyed to the burner, substantially as set forth.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

Witnesses:

GEORGE BEDE, GREGORY 'PHELAN.

90 substantially throughout its entire length to

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF23D11/30