Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5825241 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/574,095
Publication dateOct 20, 1998
Filing dateDec 11, 1995
Priority dateDec 11, 1995
Fee statusLapsed
Publication number08574095, 574095, US 5825241 A, US 5825241A, US-A-5825241, US5825241 A, US5825241A
InventorsTerrance Ralph Beale, Roger Alan McDanell
Original AssigneeDelco Electronics Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Differential demodulator
US 5825241 A
Abstract
A differential demodulator that is particularly suited for a digital audio broadcasting (DAB) system, and more particularly to the Eureka-147 (DAB) system, is disclosed. The differential demodulator of the present invention receives complex data components I and Q derived from a fast fourier transform operation and converts the data components I and Q into differential data components ΔI and ΔQ that are accepted by data demodulating elements of the Eureka-147 system so as to be reconstructed as digital data which, in turn, are converted into an analog form that is converted and reproduced into corresponding high quality sound. The conversion of I and Q data into ΔI and ΔQ data is accomplished via a network of four ROMs and one RAM, wherein the ROMs are time-shared between the multiple carriers of the Eureka-147 system.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(13)
The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:
1. A method of demodulating digital information defined by multiple adjacent carriers transmitted simultaneously over a predetermined frequency range, wherein each carrier is phase modulated over time, the method comprising the steps of:
(1) receiving the transmitted digital information;
(2) determining first magnitude and phase values for each of the multiple carriers from the transmitted digital information;
(3) determining second magnitude and phase values of each of the multiple carriers from the transmitted digital information a sample time period after determining the first magnitude and phase values;
(4) processing the first and second phase values of each of the multiple carriers and determining therefrom a differential phase value for each carrier corresponding to a phase value of the carrier during the sample time period; and
(5) converting the second magnitude and differential phase values for each of the multiple carriers into linear coordinate values and providing the linear coordinate values as demodulated digital information.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein step (1) includes the step of:
(a) performing a Fourier transform on the transmitted digital information.
3. The method of claim 2 wherein each of steps (2) and (3) include the step of:
(b) converting the transformed digital information to magnitude and phase values for each of the multiple carriers.
4. The method of claim 3 wherein the conversion of step (b) is performed via a lookup table.
5. The method of claim 2 wherein step (4) includes the step of:
(c) subtracting the second phase value from the first phase value for each of the multiple carriers to provide the corresponding differential phase values.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein step (5) includes the step of:
(d) providing the second magnitude value for each of the multiple carriers with a gain factor for adjusting the second magnitude value of the demodulated digital information.
7. A differential demodulator for use with a digital signal processing system receiving digital information defined by multiple adjacent carriers transmitted simultaneously over a predetermined frequency range, wherein each carrier is phase modulated over time, and wherein the digital information received by the demodulator is a frequency domain representation thereof, the demodulator comprising:
a first digital signal processing unit operable to receive the multiple carriers in a frequency domain format and provide magnitude data representative thereof;
a second digital signal processing unit operable to receive said multiple carriers in a frequency format and provide phase data representative thereof;
a third digital signal processing unit operable to receive first and second phase data values for each of the multiple carriers from said second digital signal processing unit, wherein each pair of said first and second phase data values are separated by a sample time period, and provide a differential phase value for each of the multiple carriers corresponding to phase values of the various multiple carriers over the sample time period; and
a fourth digital signal processing unit operable to receive said differential phase value for each of the multiple carriers from said third digital processing unit, and a magnitude data value for each of said multiple carriers, corresponding in time with said second phase data values, from said first digital signal processing unit, and provide linear representations of the multiple carriers corresponding to a demodulated representation of the digital information.
8. The differential demodulator of claim 7 wherein said first digital signal processing unit is a first memory unit operable to receive the multiple carriers and provide said magnitude data representative thereof in accordance with a lookup table included therein.
9. The differential demodulator of claim 8 wherein said second digital signal processing unit is a second memory unit operable to receive the multiple carriers and provide said phase data representative thereof in accordance with a lookup table included therein.
10. The differential demodulator of claim 9 wherein said third digital signal processing unit includes:
a third memory unit operable to receive said first phase data values for each of said multiple carriers from said second memory unit and store said first phase data values therein; and
a fourth memory unit operable to simultaneously receive said second phase data values for each of said multiple carriers from said second memory unit and said first phase data values from said third memory unit.
11. The differential demodulator of claim 10 wherein said third memory unit is operable to store said first phase data values at predetermined addresses therein;
and wherein said third digital signal processing unit further includes an address generator operable to direct said first phase data values for each of said multiple carriers to and from said third memory unit.
12. The differential demodulator of claim 10 wherein said fourth digital processing unit includes a fifth memory unit operable to receive said second magnitude data values and said differential phase values and provide said linear representations thereof in accordance with a lookup table included therein.
13. The differential demodulator of claim 12 wherein said fifth memory unit includes an adjustable gain value, said fifth memory unit receiving said second magnitude values from said first memory unit and multiplying said second magnitude values by said adjustable gain value.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED U.S. PATENT APPLICATIONS

The present application relates to U.S. patent application having Ser. Nos. 08/570,213, 08/570,456, and 08/574,096, all of which patent applications are related to a digital audio broadcasting (DAB) system.

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED U.S. PATENT APPLICATIONS

The present application relates to U.S. patent application having Ser. Nos. 08/570,213, 08/570,456, and 08/574,096, all of which patent applications are related to a digital audio broadcasting (DAB) system.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a differential demodulator that is particularly suited for digital signal processing systems. More particularly, the present invention relates to a differential demodulator that is particularly suited for a digital audio broadcasting (DAB) system that employs differential encoding of data compressed information contained in multiple carriers which are transmitted simultaneously. Specifically, the present invention relates to a differential demodulator that is particularly suited for a Eureka-147 system that differentially encodes, on a carrier-by-carrier basis, data compressed digital audio or data information.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Digital techniques for the transmission and receipt of sound information, sometimes referred to as digital audio broadcasting (DAB), have progressed over the past few years and are anticipated, on a world wide basis, to replace the present frequency modulation (FM) method of transmitting sound. Digital audio broadcasting (DAB) is not only anticipated to replace FM modulation, but also the quality of the sound reproduced by DAB will be greatly enhanced, making DAB's acceptance welcomed worldwide.

In order for the digital audio broadcasting (DAB) technology to be accepted by the broadcasting industry, as well as the industry that produces the associated electronic equipment, one system that acts as a standard must be chosen so that all participants will know the characteristics of the transmitted and received signals thereof. Some prominent foreign countries, including Western Europe and Canada, have already accepted a system known as the Eureka-147, proposed by a European consortium. The Eureka-147 system is thus becoming an international standard for DAB.

In order for any system, such as the Eureka-147 system, to serve as a standard, it must specify all of the requirements for its data handling, such as the manner in which digital information in the form of digital pulses representative of sound is compressed and how its data contents are coded, as well as the manner in which the data is transmitted and received. The Eureka-147 system employs multiple carriers transmitted at the same time in the form of a data frame, and formatted in a coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (COFDM) modulation scheme.

The transmitter in a Eureka-147 system thus utilizes a differential data encoding scheme to modulate each carrier of the multiple carrier data stream. A receiver of the data can therefore decode the data by converting the complex I and Q data of the multiple carrier system to a magnitude and phase. In an n-carrier system, where n may be any integer, the receiver must compare this information with the information contained in a previous data symbol. What is therefore needed is a differential decoding scheme, and implementation thereof, that efficiently decodes data in a multiple carrier system, and which may be easily integrated into a DAB system such as the Eureka-147.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The differential demodulator of the present invention addresses the needs and concerns set forth in the background section. In general, the differential demodulator of the present invention differentially decodes information between multiple adjacent carriers that are used by the Eureka-147 system as carriers for transmitting the digital data, including independently treated data compression symbols, representative of the sound or data information. The differential demodulation is accomplished in cooperation with fast fourier transform (FFT) algorithms for the decoding of received compressed data contained in multiple adjacent carriers, which was previously encoded by inverse fast fourier transform (IFFT) algorithms operating in the transmitter of the Eureka-147 system. The differential demodulator receives the fast fourier transform information in the form of complex data components I and Q, and converts such components into magnitude and phase quantities which are further processed into differential data components DI and DQ that are passed along to the remaining sections of the receiver so as to be reconstructed and reproduced into high quality sound information.

In one embodiment, the differential demodulator receives a stream of symbols contained in multiple-adjacent carriers each having a data symbol represented by complex data components I and Q generated by a fast fourier transform module. The differential demodulator comprises four read only memories (ROMs), each having a defined routine for obtaining a predetermined result, a random access memory (RAM) and an address generator that selects predefined locations in the RAM. The first ROM receives each of the complex data components I and Q of the adjacent carriers and performs an operation thereon that results in the generation of respective magnitude (Mi) signals therefrom. The second ROM also receives each of the complex data components I and Q of each of the carriers and performs an operation thereon that results in the generation of respective phase signals (φi,k) therefrom. The RAM, in cooperation with the address generator, receives each of the respective phase signals (φi,k) of the current symbol from the second ROM and temporarily stores the phase signals (φi,k) therein. The third ROM receives respective phase signals (φi,k) from the second ROM as well as respective phase signals (φi,k-1) of the previous symbol from the RAM and determines therefrom phase differential signals (Δφi) equal to the difference between each of the phase signals (φi,k) and (φi,k-1). The fourth ROM receives the respective differential phase signals (Δφi) and the respective magnitude (Mi,k) signals and combines them to determine the respective differential data components ΔI and ΔQ between the complex data components I and Q of the symbols contained in the adjacent-multiple carriers.

One object of the present invention to provide for a digital signal processing system, such as the Eureka-147 system, that does not employ synchronous techniques requiring precise conformity between the transmitting and receiving elements.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a digital signal processing system for handling digital sound information that does not require precise synchronizations between the transmitting and receiving elements, but rather employs a differential demodulation technique for the reception and decoding of the digital sound information.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a differential demodulator that may be implemented by means of read only memories (ROMs) to convert complex data components in a multiple carrier data system to differential data components.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a differential demodulator employing a random access memory (RAM) and associated address logic that allow the ROMs to be time shared by various carriers in a multiple carrier data system, such as the Eureka-147 system.

Other objects of the present invention, as well as advantages thereof over existing prior art forms, will be apparent in view of the following description accompanied by means hereinafter described and claimed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of the present invention particularly suited for the Eureka-147 system.

FIG. 2 is composed of FIGS. 2A and 2B and illustrates the frame structure of the digital information transmitted by the transmitter of FIG. 1 and received by the receiver front end of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of one embodiment of a differential demodulator of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles of the invention, reference will now be made to the embodiment illustrated in the drawings and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended, such alterations and further modifications in the illustrated device, and such further applications of the principles of the invention as illustrated therein being contemplated as would normally occur to one skilled in the art to which the invention relates.

Referring to the drawings, wherein like numbers designate like elements, there is shown in FIG. 1 a block diagram of a digital signal processing system 10 utilizing principles that are directly applicable to the Eureka-147 system discussed in the "Background" section. The Eureka-147 serves as at least one standard for the new digital broadcast technology known as digital audio broadcasting (DAB). The DAB is anticipated as replacing the FM modulation method for the transmission and reception of the sound information contained in a bandwidth that includes a range of sound frequencies from approximately 20 to 20,000 Hz.

The Eureka-147 employs a modulation technique known as coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (COFDM) that is described in the technical article "Digital Sound Broadcasting to Mobile Receivers" of B. LeFloch et al., published in the IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronic, Vol. 35, No. 3, August, 1989. The Eureka-147 system operates in three modes whose general definition is given in Table 1.

              TABLE 1______________________________________EUREKA-147 SYSTEM OF ABOUT 2 MHZ BANDWIDTH     MODE I   MODE II    MODE III______________________________________TF     96 ms      24 ms      24 msTNULL  1.297 ms   324 ms     168 msTS     1.246 ms   312 ms     156 msts     1 ms       250 ms     125 msD           246 ms     62 ms      31 msJ           76         76         153n           2048       512        256fmax   325 MHZ    1.5 Ghz    3.0 GhzActive Carriers       1536       384        192Virtual Carriers       512        128        64fsep   1 kHz      4 kHz      8 kHzTBW    1.536 MHZ  1.536 MHZ  1.536 MHZfsample       2.048 MHZ  2.048 MHZ  2.048 MHZ______________________________________ Referring to Table 1 TF is the overall data frame duration, TNULL is a null symbol duration, ts is the useful symbol duration, Δ is a guard interval duration Ts is the overall symbol duration; Ts = ts + Δ, J is the number of symbols per frame (the null symbol being excluded), n is the maximum number of carriers for the considered system bandwidth, fmax = highest carrier freguency for β = fmax * Ts < 0.08, Active Carriers = carriers of Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) signals that contain information, Virtual Carriers = carriers with no information, fsep = carrier separation, TBW = total actual signal bandwidth, and fsample = sample rate for a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) operation.

The Eureka-147 system utilizes multiple frequency domain carriers as vehicles for digital sound information, rather than a single-phase carrier having a high data rate as is known in the prior art. The use of the multiple carriers to transmit sound information in the form of digital pulses increases data symbol duration as to avoid intersymbol interference associated with delay spread of an RF channel. The wide band width reduces the effects of narrow band multipath interference. The digital information carried by each of the multiple carriers is π/4-differential quad-phase shift keyed (π/4 DQPSK) modulated. The Eureka system 147 employing the principles of the present invention thus utilizes a differential data encoding scheme. Such an encoding scheme permits use of a differential demodulator in the receiver section that does not require synchronous (both in time and carrier frequency/phase) demodulation. The differential demodulator, as will be described hereinafter, thus does not require knowledge of carrier phase and only requires approximate knowledge of carrier frequency.

Each carrier of the Eureka-147 system yields two bits of digital information via QPSK modulation. The carriers are arranged into an adjacent array by using a data compression inverse fast fourier transform (IFFT) algorithm which assigns complex phases to each frequency domain carrier. Further, the data carried by the carriers are differentially encoded between each individual carrier on successive symbols. Successive symbols are interrelated to the number of carriers employed by the signal processing system. For example, and with reference to Mode III of Table 1, wherein n is equal to a 256 carrier Eureka-147 system, the data information is transmitted on 3/4 of the total carriers, or 192 carriers. For such transmissions, carrier 1 will be phase rotated (+45, -45, +135, -135) degrees from the previous symbol's carrier 1, carrier 2 will be phase rotated (+45, -45, +135, -135) degrees from the previous symbol's carrier 2, and so on.

The system 10 of the present invention that transmits and receives digital information defined by the Eureka-147 system comprises a plurality of elements, as shown in FIG. 1 and generally described in Table 2.

              TABLE 2______________________________________REFERENCE NO.    ELEMENT______________________________________14               Receiving Antenna16               Receiver Front End18               Mixer20               A/D Converter22               Synchronization Means24Synchronization Network26Voltage/Numerically            Controlled Oscillator28Master Timer30               Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)            Demodulator32               Differential Demodulator34               Receiver Data Demodulator38De-Interleaver40Viterbi42Musicam44Output Stage46               D/A Converter48               Speaker______________________________________

The elements 38, 40 and 42 of Table 2 are only generally shown in FIG. 1 as comprising the receiver data demodulator 34 and may be arranged in a different manner so long as the differential data components ΔI and ΔQ, to be described hereinafter, produced by the differential demodulator 32 of the present invention are converted into digital quantities by the receiver data demodulator 34 which are then subsequently converted into analog information by the D/A converter 46 so as to be reconstructed and produced as high quality sound by the speaker 48. Transmitter 12 and the receiver front end 16, both of the system 10, are interconnected by communication link 50 that comprises coded information 52 which may be described in greater detail with reference to FIG. 2 composed of FIGS. 2A and 2B.

The digital information 52 depicted in FIG. 2A is defined by frames, such as frame 54, that includes groups of bits that make up symbols of data. Frame 54 defines a structure having a juxtaposition arrangement that includes synchronization symbols 56 which occur first in time in frame 54, followed by data 58 which is defined by time multiplexed digital sound information for subchannel 1, subchannel 2 . . . subchannel N shown respectively by blocks 60, 62, . . . 64. It is known that the information of subchannels 1, 2, . . . N, can represent audio or data information. As seen in FIG. 2A, each of the data sub-channels, such as sub-channel 1 (60), is further defined as containing multiple adjacent data symbols, which is represented in FIG. 2A as p such data symbols arranged in side-by-side relationship within sub-channel 1 (60), wherein p may be any integer.

Referring now to FIG. 2B, each data symbol within a particular sub-channel is composed of multiple adjacent carriers spread over a range of frequencies. For example, data symbol k (60k), where k is some number between 1 and p, is composed of n carriers of increasing frequency, wherein each carrier is represented as a complex phase (φ) having a frequency designation (1, 2 . . . n) and a time designation (k). Thus, φ2,k (602 k) represents the second carrier within a range of n discrete frequencies, of the kth data symbol within a range of p discrete data symbol times.

Each of the individual carriers within a sub-channel is differentially encoded, or phase modulated, over time. As previously described, φ1,k (601 k) (carrier 1 of data symbol k) will be phase rotated with respect to φ1, k-1 (601 k-1) (carrier 1 of data symbol k-1), φ2,k (602 k)(carrier 2 of data symbol k) will be phase rotated with respect to φ2, k-1 (602 k-1) (carrier 2 of data symbol k-1), and so on. In operation, each of the multiple adjacent carriers within a data symbol are thus transmitted simultaneously over a predetermined frequency range (defined by fmax as shown and described with respect to Table 1), wherein each carrier is phase modulated over time.

With reference to FIG. 1, the information 52, illustrated in FIGS. 2A and 2B, is encoded by the transmitter 12 and transmitted in data frames 54, wherein each of data frames 54 begins with synchronization symbols 56 followed by a data stream 58. Transmitter 12 of FIG. 1 differentially encodes the data symbols 60, 62, . . . 64, which are then transmitted by transmitter 12 and received by receiving antenna 14. Antenna 14 in turn routes the received information to the receiver front end 16.

The receiver front end 16 receives the digital information 52, and applies such information to a mixer 18 by way of the first input 68 of mixer 18. The mixer 18 generates, at its output 70, analog signals that are routed to A/D converter 20. The analog signals, applied to the A/D converter 20, are developed by mixer 18 in response to the mixing of the two input signals one of which is present at the first input 68 and the second of which is present on its second input 72, and which is developed by synchronization means 22 and applied to mixer 18 by way of signal path 74.

Synchronization means 22 comprises a synchronization network 24, a controlled oscillator 26, and a master timer 28. Synchronization network 24 receives synchronization symbols 56 (FIG. 2) present on signal path 76 via A/D converter 20, which symbols contain information indicative of the time and frequency at which the samples of the information data 52 are being received by the A/D converter 20. The synchronization network 24, in response to the synchronization symbols 56 present on signal path 76, generates a first output signal routed to voltage or numerically controlled oscillator 26, via signal path 78, and a second output signal routed to master timer 28, via signal path 80. The master timer 28, sometimes referred to as a master clock, is connected by signal path 82 to A/D converter 20, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) demodulator 30, differential demodulator 32, and receiver data demodulator 34. The operation of the synchronization means 22 provides synchronization that uses a feedback so that the master timer 28 generates windows, that is, intervals during which the elements 20, 30, 32 and 34 are gated open to permit their signal sampling, so that the information contained in the information data 52 may be correctly applied to all of the elements of FIG. 1, for example, to the fast fourier transform (FFT) modulator 30. To this end, synchronization network 24 controls data sample timing synchronization between system 10 and incoming digital information 52, as set forth in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/570,456, and entitled NETWORK FOR TIME SYNCHRONIZING A DIGITAL INFORMATION PROCESSING SYSTEM WITH RECEIVED DIGITAL INFORMATION, which is assigned to the assignee of the present invention, and which patent application is herein incorporated by reference.

The voltage/numerically controlled oscillator 26 supplies a signal to mixer 18, via signal path 74, to thereby control the operating frequency of voltage/ numerically controlled oscillator 26. Synchronization network 24 thus further controls frequency synchronization between system 10 and incoming digital information 52 by controlling voltage/numerically controlled oscillator 26 as set forth in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/570,213, and entitled AFC FREQUENCY SYNCHRONIZATION NETWORK, which is assigned to the assignee the present invention, and which patent application is herein incorporated by reference.

The operation of the fast fourier transform modulator 30 is known in the art and utilizes a class of algorithms that break down complex signals, such as the related phase information employed the Eureka-147 system, (shown as φi,k in FIG. 2) into complex data components shown in FIG. 3 as complex data components I and Q. The operation of fast fourier transform network 30, having its related algorithms, correspondingly responds to an inverse fast fourier transform operation employed by the transmitter 12 to encode the digital information 52. The complex data components I and Q are applied to the differential demodulator 32, which differentially decodes the carriers of adjacent FFT output symbols, represented by the completed data components I and Q generated by the fast fourier transform (FFT) demodulator 30. The differential demodulator 32 operates at the complex-sample output rate of the fast fourier transform (FFT) demodulator 30, which operation allows the same differential decoder 32 to decode all the symbols (shown in FIG. 2) transmitted throughout the entire data frame 54 (also shown in FIG. 2). The differential demodulator 32 comprises a plurality of elements given in Table 3 and may be further described with reference to FIG. 3.

              TABLE 3______________________________________REFERENCE NO.   ELEMENT______________________________________84              Read Only Memory (ROM 1)86              Read Only Memory (ROM 2)88              Random Access Memory (RAM 1)90              Address Generator92              Read Only Memory (ROM 3)94              Read Only Memory (ROM 4)______________________________________

As is known in the art, the read only memories, such as ROM 1, 2, 3, or 4, serve as a means for electronically performing a function and each contains a routine which defines a complete sequence of instructions for performing an operation, i.e., a program or a program segment so as to achieve a predetermined result. Each of these routines may include a look-up table that may be involved with both the functions being performed by the ROM and the desired result being achieved by the ROM. A general description of operation of the routines of each of the ROMs of FIG. 3 is given in Table 4.

              TABLE 4______________________________________ROM          GENERALIZED OPERATION______________________________________1            I and Q data components converted        into magnitude (Mi) for each carrier        i = 1, n2            I and Q data components converted        into phase signals (φi,k) for each        carrier i = 1, n3            phase (φ i, k) and phase (φ i,k - 1)        signals of present (k) and previous        (k - 1) data symbols respectively are        compared to provide differential        phase (Δφ i) signals4            differential phase (Δφ i) signals        and magnitude (Mi,k) signals of the        present symbol are combined to        derive differential data components        (ΔIi) and (Δφi), wherein (Mi,k) has        gain g______________________________________

As seen in FIG. 3, each of ROM 1 (84) and ROM 2 (86) receives data components I and Q representative of the complex phase information for each of the multiple adjacent carriers of each data symbol. ROM 1 (84) performs a well- known magnitude operation on the data components I and Q which yields a magnitude (Mi) signal for each of the i carriers (i=1, n) within the present data symbol. ROM 2 (86) performs a well-known phase operation on the data components I and Q which yields a phase (φi, k) signal for each of the i carriers (i=1,n) within the present (k) data symbol, which are then transferred to RAM 1 (88) and ROM 3 (92).

In the operation of transmitter 12, each of the carriers within a data symbol are transmitted simultaneously. Thus, ROM 1 and ROM 2 are operable to convert I and Q for each carrier of any data symbol into corresponding Mi and φi, k values. Since each of the carriers are phase modulated over time, RAM 1 (88) must store at least the phase values of the previous (k-1)th data symbol for comparison with the phase values of the present (kth) data symbol. Preferably, address generator 90 directs RAM 1 (88) to store the φi, k-1 values in a modulo-n (n=number of carriers within each data symbol) format for later comparison with the φi, k values. ROM 3 (92) is thus operable to receive the φi, k, i=1,n values, representing the phase values of each of the n carriers within the present (kth) data symbol, and the φi, k-1, i=1,n values, representing the phase values of each of the n carriers within the previous (k-1)th data symbol, to produce a phase difference value Δφi,i=1,n for each of the n carriers by subtracting each φi, k-1 from φi, k. It should thus be appreciated that the use of RAM 1 (88) and address generator 90 permits the ROMs (1-4) to be time shared.

With the magnitude (Mi,k) and phase (φi,k) of each carrier of a data symbol separated as described above, the correct phase difference (Δφi) can be obtained independently of the magnitude (Mi,k). It has been realized by this inventors of the present invention that a gain g, preferably made adjustable, can be placed within ROM 4 (94) to provide a gain control of the magnitude (Mi,k) separate from, and independently of, the phase difference (Δφi). ROM 4 (94) thus receives Mi,k from ROM 1 (84), and Δφi from ROM 3, and performs a well-known operation on these data components to produce the differential elementary components (ΔI, ΔQ) which are passed along to the input stage of the receiver data demodulator 34. The differential data components ΔI and ΔQ are dependent upon the phase difference between the multiple carriers of adjacent data symbols of the Eureka-147 system and are further processed by the receiver data demodulator 34 of FIG. 1 so as to be reconstructed into digital quantities that are converted to analog quantities by the D/A converter 46. Finally, the analog quantities are converted into high quality sound by speaker 48. The sound produced by speaker 48 is representative of high quality music capable of being reproduced by the digital audio broadcasting (DAB) system related to the present invention.

It should now be appreciated that the practice of the present invention provides for a differential demodulator that cooperates with fast fourier transform algorithms to decode digital data representative of sound that has been encoded, after its data compression operation, by inverse fast fourier transform algorithms. The decoding of the encoded information is accomplished without the need of synchronous demodulation. More particularly, the decoding of the present invention does not require knowledge of the carrier frequency. The differential demodulator of the present invention allows for a simplified decoding operation that enhances the capability of the Eureka-147 system.

It should be further appreciated that although the hereinbefore given description of the differential demodulator has been primarily described for the Eureka-147 system, it should also be recognized that the principles of the present invention teach the use of a differential demodulator that may be used in any type of digital signal processing system.

While the invention has been illustrated and described in detail in the drawings and foregoing description, the same is to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character, it being understood that only the preferred embodiment has been shown and described and that all changes and modifications that come within the spirit of the invention are desired to be protected.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4301417 *Mar 12, 1980Nov 17, 1981Ncr CorporationQuadriphase differential demodulator
US4896336 *Aug 29, 1988Jan 23, 1990Rockwell International CorporationDifferential phase-shift keying demodulator
US5079512 *Jul 17, 1990Jan 7, 1992Nec CorporationQuadrature demodulation of a data sequence following a particular signal sequence with a local reference carrier signal having a frequency different from a received carrier signal
US5357502 *Mar 30, 1993Oct 18, 1994France Telecom And Telediffusion De France SaDevice for the reception of digital data time frequency interlacing, notably for radio broadcasting at high bit rate towards mobile receivers with nyquist temporal window
US5440265 *Sep 14, 1994Aug 8, 1995Sicom, Inc.Differential/coherent digital demodulator operating at multiple symbol points
US5446763 *May 6, 1993Aug 29, 1995Motorola, Inc.Apparatus and method for converting soft symbols into soft bits
US5452288 *Apr 6, 1993Sep 19, 1995France TelecomMethod for the transmission of digital data in radio paging systems and corresponding radio paging receiver
US5550812 *Feb 27, 1992Aug 27, 1996U.S. Philips CorporationSystem for broadcasting and receiving digital data, receiver and transmitter for use in such system
US5598125 *Jun 2, 1994Jan 28, 1997Nokia Telecommunications OyMethod for demodulating a digitally modulated signal and a demodulator
US5615230 *Feb 23, 1995Mar 25, 1997Ascom Tech AgProcess for transmitting digital signals which combines advantages of OQPSK and π/4-QPSK
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Digital Sound Broadcasting to Mobile Receivers, Bernard Le Flock, Roselyne Halbert Lassalle, Damien Castelain, IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics, vol. 35, 3 Aug. 1989.
2Digital Sound Broadcasting to Mobile Receivers, Bernard Le Flock, Roselyne Halbert-Lassalle, Damien Castelain, IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics, vol. 35, #3 Aug. 1989.
3 *Digital Sound Broadcasting to Vehicular, Portable, and Fixed Receivers for BSS (Sound) in the frequency range 500 3000 MHz, Document 10/30 E, 10 Dec. 1991.
4Digital Sound Broadcasting to Vehicular, Portable, and Fixed Receivers for BSS (Sound) in the frequency range 500-3000 MHz, Document 10/30-E, 10 Dec. 1991.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5982823 *Mar 17, 1998Nov 9, 1999Northrop Grumman CorpDirect frequency selection and down-conversion for digital receivers
US6144707 *Apr 14, 1998Nov 7, 2000Sony CorporationApparatus for receiving broadcasting signals
US6160791 *Aug 27, 1998Dec 12, 2000Sony International (Europe) GmbhTransmission system for the transmission of power control information in an OFDM system
US6310924 *Jan 8, 1998Oct 30, 2001Hyundai Electronics Industries Co., Ltd.Digital demodulator
US6545728 *Apr 14, 1999Apr 8, 2003Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Digital television receivers that digitize final I-F signals resulting from triple-conversion
US6720824 *Jul 10, 2001Apr 13, 2004Sony CorporationDemodulation method and apparatus
US6751263Jun 30, 2000Jun 15, 2004Infineon Technologies AgMethod for the orthogonal frequency division modulation and demodulation
US7505427 *May 7, 2004Mar 17, 2009Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Apparatus and method for improving signal-to-noise ratio in a multi-carrier CDMA communication system
US7508750 *Jun 21, 2004Mar 24, 2009Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Apparatus and method for improving signal-to-noise ratio in a multi-carrier CDMA communication system
US7573807 *Sep 17, 1999Aug 11, 2009Alcatel-Lucent Usa Inc.Method and apparatus for performing differential modulation over frequency in an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) communication system
US7702039May 10, 2001Apr 20, 2010Robert Bosch GmbhRadio receiver for receiving digital radio signals and method for receiving digital radio signals
US8275055Nov 19, 2008Sep 25, 2012Her Majesty The Queen In Right Of Canada, As Represented By The Minister Of Industry, Through The Communications Research Centre CanadaReceiver for differentially modulated multicarrier signals
US8599069 *Dec 21, 2009Dec 3, 2013Broadcom CorporationMethod and system for polar quantization for GNSS data
US20040058662 *May 10, 2001Mar 25, 2004Kurt GieskeRadio receiver for receiving digital radio signals and method for receiving digital radio signals
US20050185743 *Jan 13, 2005Aug 25, 2005Oki Techno Centre (Singapore) Pte LtdApparatus for burst and timing synchronization in high-rate indoor wireless communication
US20050193047 *Mar 28, 2005Sep 1, 2005Pentomics, Inc.Method for synchronizing symbol timing
US20050249109 *Jun 21, 2004Nov 10, 2005Samsung Electronics Co. , Ltd.Apparatus and method for improving signal-to-noise ratio in a multi-carrier CDMA communication system
US20050265274 *May 7, 2004Dec 1, 2005Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Apparatus and method for improving signal-to-noise ratio in a multi-carrier CDMA communication system
US20090129493 *Nov 19, 2008May 21, 2009Liang ZhangReceiver for differentially modulated multicarrier signals
US20110148702 *Dec 21, 2009Jun 23, 2011Andreas WarloeMethod and system for polar quantization for gnss data
DE10024267A1 *May 17, 2000Nov 29, 2001Bosch Gmbh RobertRundfunkempfänger für den Empfang von digitalen Rundfunksignalen und Verfahren zum Empfang von digitalen Rundfunksignalen
DE19930192C1 *Jun 30, 1999Oct 19, 2000Siemens AgOrthogonal frequency division modulation method
Classifications
U.S. Classification329/304, 375/261, 375/320, 375/324, 375/244
International ClassificationH04L1/00, H04L27/26
Cooperative ClassificationH04L27/2649, H04L1/0054
European ClassificationH04L1/00B5L, H04L27/26M5A1
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 3, 2002FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Sep 30, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: DELPHI TECHNOLOGIES INC., MICHIGAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DELCO ELECTRONICS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:017115/0208
Effective date: 20050930
Mar 22, 2006FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
May 24, 2010REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Oct 20, 2010LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Dec 7, 2010FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20101020