Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS5905556 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/893,660
Publication dateMay 18, 1999
Filing dateJul 11, 1997
Priority dateJul 11, 1996
Fee statusPaid
Publication number08893660, 893660, US 5905556 A, US 5905556A, US-A-5905556, US5905556 A, US5905556A
InventorsTeruaki Suzuki, Shinichi Nishida, Masayoshi Suzuki, Takahiko Watanabe, Makoto Watanabe
Original AssigneeNec Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
In-plane type liquid crystal display apparatus with improved picture quality
US 5905556 A
Abstract
In an in-plane liquid crystal display apparatus including a ladder type source electrode having two first parallel sides and a plurality of first cross-pieces between the first parallel sides, and a ladder type common electrode having two second parallel sides and a plurality of second cross-pieces between the second parallel sides, the ladder type source electrode and the ladder type common electrode define one pixel area divided into a plurality of sub pixel areas. Each of the sub pixel areas is partitioned by one of the first parallel sides, one of the first cross-pieces, one of the second parallel sides and one of the second cross-pieces.
Images(22)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(13)
We claim:
1. An in-plane liquid crystal display apparatus comprising:
a ladder type source electrode having two first parallel sides and a plurality of first cross-pieces between said first parallel sides; and
a ladder type common electrode having two second parallel sides and a plurality of second cross-pieces between said second parallel sides;
said ladder type source electrode and said ladder type common electrode defining one pixel area divided into a plurality of sub pixel areas;
each of said sub pixel areas being partitioned by one of said first parallel sides, one of said first cross-pieces, one of said second parallel sides and one of said second cross-pieces;
wherein at least one of said first parallel sides and said second parallel sides has a stepped shape.
2. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein a sequence of said one of said first parallel sides, said one of said first cross-pieces, said one of said second parallel sides and said one of said second cross-pieces in each of said sub pixel areas is dependent upon a rotation direction of liquid crystal within each of said sub pixel areas.
3. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein, when liquid crystal inserted into said apparatus has a positive dielectic anisotropism, the following conditions are satisfied in each of said sub pixel areas:
45≦φLC <90
φLC -90<φE.spsb.1 ≦φLC 
where φLC is an initial orientation angle of said liquid crystal with respect to a direction perpendicular to said first and second cross-pieces, and φE.spsb.1 is a direction of an electric field applied by said ladder type source and said ladder type common electrode with respect to said direction.
4. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein, when liquid crystal inserted into said apparatus has a positive dielectic anisotropy, the following conditions are satisfied in each of said sub pixel areas:
-90<φLC <-45
φLC ≦φE.spsb.1 <φLC +90
where φLC is an initial orientation angle of said liquid crystal with respect to a direction perpendicular to said first and second cross-pieces, and φE.spsb.1 is a direction of an electric field applied by said ladder type source and said ladder type common electrode with respect to said direction.
5. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein, when liquid crystal inserted into said apparatus has a negative dielectic anisotropy, the following conditions are satisfied in each of said sub pixel areas:
-45≦φLC 21 0
φLCE.spsb.1 ≦φLC +90
where φLC is an initial orientation angle of said liquid crystal with respect to a direction perpendicular to said first and second cross-pieces, and φE.spsb.1 is a direction of an electric field applied by said ladder type source and said ladder type common electrode with respect to said direction.
6. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein, when liquid crystal inserted into said apparatus has a regative dielectic anisotropy, the following conditions are satisfied in each of said sub pixel areas:
0<φLC ≦45
φLC -90≦φE.spsb.1 <φLC 
where φLC is an initial orientation angle of said liquid crystal with respect to a direction perpendicular to said first and second cross-pieces, and φE.spsb.1 is a direction of an electric field applied by said ladder type source and said ladder type common electrode with respect to said direction.
7. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein said first parallel sides are superposed on said second parallel sides,
said first parallel sides being stepped;
said second parallel sides being straight.
8. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein said first parallel sides are superposed on said second parallel sides,
said first parallel sides being stepped;
said second parallel sides being stepped.
9. An in-plane liquid crystal display apparatus, comprising:
a ladder type source electrode having two first parallel sides and a plurality of first cross-pieces between said first parallel sides; and
a ladder type common electrode having two second parallel sides and a plurality of second cross-pieces between said second parallel sides;
said ladder type source electrode and said ladder type common electrode defining one pixel area divided into a plurality of sub pixel areas;
each of said sub pixel areas being partitioned by one of said first parallel sides, one of said first cross-pieces, one of said second parallel sides and one of said second cross-pieces;
wherein said first and second parallel sides have sloped edges.
10. The apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein, when liquid crystal inserted into said apparatus has a positive dielectic anisotropy, the following conditions are satisfied in each of said sub pixel areas:
45≦φLC <90
-90<φA ≦φLC -90
where φL C is an initial orientation angle of said liquid crystal with respect to a direction perpendicular to said first and second cross-pieces, and φA is a sloped angle of said edges of said first and second parallel sides with respect to said direction.
11. The apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein, when liquid crystal inserted into said apparatus has a positive dielectic anisotropy, the following conditions are satisfied in each of said sub pixel areas:
-90<φLC ≦-45
φLC +90≦φA <90
where φLC is an initial orientation angle of said liquid crystal with respect to a direction perpendicular to said first and second cross-pieces, and φA is a sloped angle of said edges of said first and second parallel sides with respect to said direction.
12. The apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein, when liquid crystal inserted into said apparatus has a negative dielectic anisotropy, the following conditions are satisfied in each of said sub pixel areas:
4≦φ.sub. LC <90
-90<φA ≦0
where φLC is an initial orientation angle of said liquid crystal with respect to a direction perpendicular to said first and second cross-pieces, and φA is a sloped angle of said edges of said first and second parallel sides with respect to said direction.
13. The apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein, when liquid crystal inserted into said apparatus has a negative dielectic anisotropy, the following conditions are satisfied in each of said sub pixel areas:
-90<φLC ≦-45
0≦φA <90
where φLC is an initial orientation angle of said liquid crystal with respect to a direction perpendicular to said first and second cross-pieces, and φA is a sloped angle of said edges of said first and second parallel sides with respect to said direction.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to an in-plane liquid crystal display (LCD) apparatus.

2. Description of the Related Art

In an in-plane LCD apparatus, liquid crystal is driven by an electric field generated horizontally with respect to substrates.

A first prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus includes a comb-shaped source electrode and a comb-shaped common electrode which are interleaved with each other, thus generating a horizontal electric field therebetween. As a result, liquid crystal molecules are rotated in a certain direction by the horizontal electric field (see U.S. Pat. No. 3,807,831 & JP-A-56-91277). This will be explained later in detail.

In the first prior art LCD however, electric fields generated around the tops and bottoms of the comb-shaped portions of the source electrode and the common electrode are radial. As a result, a torque is applied to some of the liquid crystal molecules in an opposite direction. Therefore, some of the liquid crystal molecules are rotated in an opposite direction, which creates extraordinary domains (dark domains). Also, in this case, since a discrimation or a boundary face is created between the extraordinary domains (dark domains) and the ordinary domains (light domains), such a boundary face cannot be controlled, and therefore, is unstable.

In a second prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus (see JP-A-7-36058), a part of the source electrode and a part of the common electrode are enlarged to suppress the above-mentioned extraordinary domains. This will also be explained later in detail. However, the inventors have found that the second prior art LCD apparatus has never showen a reduction of the extraordinary domains.

In a third prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus (see JP-A-7-36058), a source electrode and a common electrode are both of a ladder type. Also, the source electrode is isolated from the common electrode by an insulating layer. The source electrode is partly superposed onto the common electrode, to increase the capacitance therebetween. As a result, the numerical apperture can be increased, and the voltage retention characteristics can be improved, In addition, short-circuit and disconnection of the source electrode and the common electrode can be avoided, which increases the manufacturing yield. This will also be explained later in detail.

Even in the third prior art LCD apparatus, however, electric fields generated around the edged portions of the source electrode and the common electrode are radial. As a result, some of the liquid crystal molecules are rotated in an opposite direction, which creates extraordinary domains (dark domains).

Also, a fourth prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus improves visible angle characteristics as compared with TN-type LCD apparatuses (see JP-A-5-505247), corresponding to WO 91/10936). However, this fourth prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus has comb-type electrodes to create the above-mentioned extraordinary domains, which degrades the picture quality.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide an in-plane LCD apparatus with a high picture quality.

According to the present invention, in an in-plane liquid crystal display apparatus including a ladder type source electrode having two first parallel sides and a plurality of first cross-pieces between the first parallel sides, and a ladder type common electrode having two second parallel sides and a plurality of second cross-pieces between the second parallel sides, the ladder type source electrode and the ladder type common electrode define one pixel area divided into a plurality of sub pixel areas. Each of the sub pixel areas is partitioned by one of the first parallel sides, one of the first cross-pieces, one of the second parallel sides and one of the second cross-pieces.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will be more clearly understood from the description as set forth below, as compared with the prior art, with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view illustrating a first prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus;

FIGS. 2A and 2B are diagrams for explaining the rotation of the liquid crystal molecules of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are photographs for showing the generation of extraordinary domains in the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a graph showing the voltage-to-light transmittance characteristics of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 6A through 6H are plan views illustrating a second prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus;

FIG. 7 is a plan view illustrating a third prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus;

FIG. 8 is a photograph for showing the generation of extraordinary domains in the apparatus of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a plan view illustrating a first embodiment of the in-plane type LCD apparatus according to the present invention;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line I-I' of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a plan view for explaining the operation of the apparatus of FIG. 9;

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line I-I' of FIG. 11;

FIGS. 13A and 13B are diagrams for explaining the rotation of the liquid cryatal molecules of FIG. 11;

FIG. 14 is a plan view of a simple example of the apparatus of FIG. 9;

FIG. 15 is a photograph for showing the generation of extraordinary domains in the apparatus of FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a plan view illustrating a second embodiment of the in-plane type LCD apparatus according to the present invention;

FIG. 17 is a plan view illustrating a third embodiment of the in-plane type LCD apparatus according to the present invention;

FIG. 18 is a plan view illustrating a fourth embodiment of the in-plane type LCD apparatus according to the present invention;

FIGS. 19A and 19B are diagrams for explaining the rotation of the liquid crystal molecules of FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is a plan view illustrating a fifth embodiment of the in-plane type LCD apparatus according to the present invention;

FIG. 21 is a partial enlargement of the apparatus of FIG. 20; and

FIG. 22 is a plan view illustrating a modification of the apparatus of FIG. 9.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Before the description of the preferred embodiments, prior art in-plane type LCD apparatuses will be explained with reference to FIGS. 1, 2A, 2B, 3, 4, 5, 6A through 6H, 7 and 8.

In FIG. 1, which illustrates a first prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus (see JP-A-56-91277), a plurality of gate bus lines such as GLi, which are also called scan bus lines, are arranged in parallel with each other. Also, a plurality of drain bus lines such as DLj, which are also called signal bus lines, are arranged in parallel with each other. The drain bus lines are perpendicular to the gate bus lines.

A plurality of thin film transistors (TFTs) such as Qi j are provided at each intersection between the gate bus lines and the drain bus lines. The TFT Qi j has a gate electrode connected to the gate bus line GLi, a drain electrode formed by the drain bus line DLj, and a source electrode S. Also, a common electrode CE opposes the source electrode S.

The source electrode S and the common electrode CE are both comb-shaped, and the source electrode S is interleaved with the common electrode CE. Thus, a parasitic capacitance between the common electrode CE and the gate bus lines and a parasitic capacitance between the common electrode CE and the drain bus lines can be reduced.

In addition, nematic liquid crystal material having a positive anisotropic dielectric constant, for example, is inserted between two transparent substrates (not shown). In this case, the initial orientation angle φLC of liquid crystal molecules M is 45≦φLC <90. As shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B, note that the orientation angle is defined by the optical axis (longitudinal direction) of the liquid crystal molecules M relative to a direction perpendicular to the comb-shaped portions of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE.

If no voltage is applied between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE, the orientation angle of the liquid crystal molecules M is definite (=φLC).

On the other hand, when a voltage is applied between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE, an electric field E1 generated perpendicularly to the comb-shaped portions of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE. As a result, a torque is applied to the liquid crystal molecules M, so that the liquid crystal molecules M are forced to be in parallel with the electric field E1. In this case, since the liquid crystal molecules M are anchored at the orientation layers of the substrates, only the center portion of the liquid crystal molecules M apart from the substrates are deformed, i.e., twisted. Also, generally, the direction of the twisted angle of the liquid crystal molecules M is dependent upon the initial orientation thereof, and the amount of the twisted angle is dependent upon the electric field E1. Thus, the liquid crystal molecules M are rotated in a clockwise direction as indicated by R1 in FIG. 1 as well as FIG. 2A.

Thus the absence and presence of an electric field changes the orientation angle φLC of the liquid crystal molecules M, so that the polarization plane of incident light is changed by the double refraction characteristics of the liquid crystal material. In this case, the absence of the voltage prohibits transmission of light to realize a dark state. Contrary to this, the presence of the voltage permits transmission of light to realize a light state.

In the apparatus of FIG. 1, however, electric fields generated around the tops and bottoms of the comb-shaped portions of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE are radial. As a result, a torque is performed upon some of the liquid crystal molecules M in a counterclockwise direction. Therefore, some of the liquid crystal molecules M are rotated in a counterclockwise direction as indicated by R2 in FIG. 1 as well as FIG. 2B, which create extraordinary domains (dark domains) as shown in FIG. 3. Also, in this case, since a discrimation or a boundary face is created between the extraordinary domains (dark domains) and the ordinary domains (light domains), such a boundary face cannot be controlled, and therefore, is unstable.

In FIG. 3, a voltage of 5V is applied between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE. If this voltage is further increased to 10V, the extraordinary domains are grown as shown in FIG. 4. Such extraordinary domains degrade the picture quality.

On the other hand, FIG. 5 shows voltage-to-light transmittance characteristics where the width and spacing of the electrodes S and CE are 3 μm and 10 μm, respectively; a dielectric anisotropsm Δε of the liquid crystal material is 6.0; and a refractive index anisotropy Δn of the liquid crystal material is 0.27. Also, the orientation layers made of polyimide are used to give a pretilt angle of about 2 to 3 by the conventional rubbing process. When the applied voltage becomes higher than 6V, FIG. 6 shows that extraordinary domains are generated. Note that the applied voltage may be 6V or more due to the initial operation of the peripheral circuits or the like. Thus, the extraordinary domains are considered to be easily generated.

In addition, if the voltage applied between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE returns to 0V, the extraordinary domains are retarded; however, thereafter, if a voltage is again applied between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE, the extraordinary domains are further grown eveb more, which further degrades the picture quality. For example, even if the apparatus is in an OFF state for one day or more, the picture quality cannot be recovered.

In FIGS. 6A through 6H, which illustrate a second prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus (see JP-A-7-36058), a part of the source electrode S and a part of the common electrode CE are enlarged to suppress the above-mentioned extraordinary domains. However, the inventors have found that none of the apparatuses as illustrated in FIGS. 6A through 6H have ever showed a reduction of the extraordinary domains.

In FIG. 7, which illustrates a third prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus (see JP-A-7-36058), a source electrode S and a common electrode CE are both of a ladder type. Also, the source electrode S is isolated from the common electrode CE by an insulating layer (not shown). The source electrode S is partly superposed onto the common electrode CE, to increase the capacitance therebetween. As a result, the numerical apperture can be increased, and the voltage retention characteristics can be improved. In addition, short-circuit and disconnection of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE can be avoided, which increases the manufacturing yield.

Even in the apparatus of FIG. 7, however, electric fields generated around the edged portions of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE are radial. As a result, some of the liquid crystal molecules M are rotated in a counterclockwise direction as indicated by R2 in FIG. 7, which create extraordinary domains (dark domains) as shown in FIG. 8 where a voltage of 5V is applied between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE. Such extraordinary domains degrade the picture quality. In FIG. 8, note that one square pixel is constructed by three color elements R, G and B.

Also, a fourth prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus improves visible angle characteristics as compared with TN-type LCD apparatuses (see JP-A-5-505247 corresponding to WO 91/10936). However, this fourth prior art in-plane type LCD apparatus has comb-type electrodes to create the above-mentioned extraordinary domains, which degrades the picture quality.

FIG. 9 is a plan view illustrating a first embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line I-I' of FIG. 9.

In FIG. 9, in the same way as in FIG. 7, a source electrode S and a common electrode CE are both of a ladder type. Also, the source electrode S is isolated from the common electrode CE by an insulating layer (not shown). The source electrode S is partly superposed onto the common electrode CE, to increase the capacitance therebetween. As a result, the numerical apperture can be increased, and the voltage retention characteristics can be improved. In addition, short-circuit and disconnection of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE can be avoided, which increases the manufacturing yield.

Also, in FIG. 9, the source electrode S and the common electrode CE divide one pixel area into four sub pixel areas SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4. In this case, the sub pixel area SP1 is the same as the sub pixel area SP3, and the sub pixel area SP2 is the same as the sub pixel area SP4. That is, in the sub pixel areas SP1 and SP3, the upper and right sides are partitioned by the source electrode S, and the lower and left sides are partitioned by the common electrode CE. In more detail, in the upper portions of the sub pixel areas SP1 and SP3, the edge of the source electrode S is protruded by about 2 μm from the edge of the common electrode CE. Also, in the lower portions of the sub pixel areas SP1 and SP3, the edge of the source electrode S is recessed by about 2 μm from the common electrode CE. On the other hand, in the upper portions of the sub pixel areas SP2 and SP4, the edge of the source electrode S is recessed by about 2 μm from the edge of the common electrode CE. Also, in the lower portions of the sub pixel areas SP2 and SP4, the edge of the source electrode S is protruded by about 2 μm from the common electrode CE. Therefore, if the parallel sides of the common electrode CE is 7 μm wide, the parallel sides of the source electrode S have a 7 μm wide portion and a 3 μm wide portion. In this case, the cross-pieces of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE are 3 μm in width and 15 μm in pitch.

In the upper and lower portions of the pixel areas SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4, if the sequence of the common electrode CE, an edge and the source electrode S coincides with the rotation direction R1 (see FIG. 11) of the liquid crystal molecules M, the edge is formed by the source electrode S. On the other hand, if the sequence of the common electrode CE, an edge and the source electrode S does not coincide with the rotation direction R1 (see FIG. 11) of the liquid crystal molecules M, the edge is formed by the common electrode CE.

Also, referring to FIG. 10 as well as FIG. 9, the common electrode CE is formed on a glass substrate 1. In this case, the gate bus lines such as GLi are made of the same material such as Cr as that of the common electrode CE. Also, an insulating layer 2 made of silicon nitride is formed on the common electrode CE and the gate bus lines such as GLi. Further, an amorphous silicon layer (not shown) is formed on a TFT portion of the gate bus line GLi. Further, the drain bus lines such as DLj and the source electrode S made of Cr are formed on the insulating layer 2. Also, an insulating layer 3 made of silicon nitride is formed on the drain electrode DLj and the source electrode S. Further, an orientation layer 4 made of insulating organic material is formed on the insulating layer 3.

On the other hand, a counter glass substrate 5 has an orientation layer 6 thereon. Also, striped color filters of red (R), green (G) and blue (B) and a light shielding black matrix are formed on the counter glass substrate 5.

Rubbing operations are performed upon the orientation layers 4 and 5, and a liquid crystal layer 7 of nematic liquid having a refractive anisotropy of 0.067 is inserted between the glass substrates 1 and 5 with the orientation layers 3 and 6 with a gap of about 4.5 μm therebetween. For example, if the dielectric anisotropy characteristic of the liquid crystal layer 7 is positive, the initial orientation angle φLC (see FIGS. 2A and 2B) is

45≦φLC <90                 (1)

Note that, if the dielectric anisotropy characteristic of the liquid crystal layer 7 is negative, the initial orientation angle φLC is

-45≦φLC <-0

Further, polarization plates (not shown) are adhered on the outer sides of the glass substrates 1 and 5. In this case, the polarization face of one of the polarization plates is perpendicular to that of the other, and coincides with the rubbing direction of the above-mentioned rubbing operations.

In addition, a driving circuit and a backlight are mounted to complete an LCD apparatus of 4096 (=6403 (R, G, B)480) pixels.

Note that a size of one pixel is 110 μm330 μm, for example. Also, the width of the gate bus lines such as GLi is 16 μm, and the width of the drain bus lines such as DLj is 8 μm.

The operation of the apparatus of FIGS. 9 and 10 is explained next with reference to FIGS. 11, 12 and 13.

First, when no voltage is applied between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE, the orientation angle of the liquid crystal molecules M is also definite (=φLC).

Next, when a voltage is applied between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE, an electric field E1 are generated between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE as illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12. That is, an electric field E1 is generated perpendicularly to the source electrode S and the common electrode CE. Aa a result, a torque is applied to the liquid crystal molecules M, so that the liquid crystal molecules M are forced to be in parallel with the electric field E1. In this case, since the liquid crystal molecules M are anchored at the orientation layers of the substrates, only the center portion of the liquid crystal molecules M apart from the substrates are deformed, i.e., twisted.

In the center portion of each of the sub pixel areas SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4, the angle φE.spsb.1 of the electric field E1 is approximately 0 as shown in FIG. 13A. Therefore, the liquid crystal molecules M of the center portion are rotated in a clockwise direction as indicated by R1 in FIG. 11 as well as in FIG. 13A.

Also, in the top and bottom portions of each of the sub pixel areas SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4, the angle φE.spsb.1 of the electric field E1 is shown in FIG. 13B, i.e.,

φLC -90<φE.spsb.1 ≦φLC (2)

Therefore, the liquid crystal molecules M of the top and bottom portions are also rotated in a clockwise direction as indicated by R1 in FIG. 11 and FIG. 13B.

Thus, in the first embodiment, extraordinary domains (dark domains) are not created, thus improving the picture quality.

The apparatus of the first embodiment is realized by a simple structure as illustrated in FIG. 14, where electrodes EP1 and EP2 made of Cr form the common electrode CE and the source electrode S of FIGS. 11 and 12 whose spacing is 10 μm. In this case, rubbing operations are performed upon orientation layers (not shown) made of polyimide so that the initial orientation angle φLC of the liquid crystal molecules M is 75. Also, a distance between two substrates (not shown) is 4.5 μm. Further, one pixel is divided into six sub pixel areas.

When a voltage is applied between the electrodes EP1 and EP2, it has been shown that no extraordinary domains (dark domains) are created as shown in FIG. 15.

In FIG. 16, which illustrates a second embodiment of the present invention, the source electrode S and the common electrode CE divide one pixel area into eight sub pixel areas SP1 through SP8. In this case, the sub pixel areas SP1, SP3, SP5 and SP7 are the same as each other, and the sub pixel area SP2, SP4, SP6 and SP8 are the same as each other. That is, in the sub pixel areas SP1, SP3, SP5 and SP8, the upper and right sides are partitioned by the source electrode S, and the lower and left sides are partitioned by the common electrode CE. In more detail, in the upper portions of the sub pixel areas SP1, SP3, SP5 and SP7, the edge of the source electrode S is protruded by about 2 μm from the edge of the common electrode CE. Also, in the lower portions of the sub pixel areas SP1, SP3, SP5 and SP7, the edge of the source electrode S is recessed by about 2 μm from the common electrode CE. On the other hand, in the upper portions of the sub pixel areas SP2, SP4, SP6 and SP8, the edge of the source electrode S is recessed by about 2 μm from the edge of the common electrode CE. Also, in the lower portions of the sub pixel areas SP2, SP4, SP6 and SP8, the edge of the source electrode S is protruded by about 2 μm from the common electrode CE.

Even in FIG. 16, when a voltage is applied between the source electrode s and the common electrode CE, the liquid crystal molecules M of the top and bottom portions of each sub pixel area are rotated in a clockwise direction in the same way as in the first embodiment. Thus, embodiment, extraordinary domains (dark domains) are not created, thus improving the picture quality.

In addition, in the second embodiment, since the capacitance between the source electrode S and the common electrode CE is increased as compared with the first embodiment, the voltage retention characteristics can be further improved, although the numerical aperture is reduced.

In FIG. 17, which illustrates a third embodiment of the present invention, the parallel sides of the common electrode CE and the parallel sides of the source electrode S are alternately stepped. In the first embodiment as illustrated in FIG. 9, note that the parallel sides of the source electrode S is stepped, while the parallel sides of the common electrode CE are not stepped. Therefore, the parallel sides of the source electrode S can be simple. In addition, short-circuit and disconnection of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE can be avoided, which increases the manufacturing yield.

In FIG. 18, which illustrates a fourth embodiment of the present invention, the apparatus of FIG. 18 is obtained by turning the apparatus of FIG. 17 inside out. As a result,

-90<φLC ≦-45               (3)

is satisfied.

Also, in the center portion of each of the sub pixel areas SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4, the angle φE.spsb.1 of the electric fieled E1 is approximately 0 as shown in FIG. 19A. Therefore, the liquid crystal molecules M of the center portion are rotated in a counterclockwise direction as indicated by R2 in FIG. 19A. Also, in the top and bottom portions of each of the sub pixel areas SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4, the angle φE.spsb.1 of the electric field E1 is shown in FIG. 19B, i.e.,

φLCE.spsb.1 ≦φLC +90(4)

Therefore, the liquid crystal molecules M of the top and bottom portions are also rotated in a counterclockwise direction as indicated by R2 in FIG. 19B.

Thus, in the fourth embodiment, extraordinary domains (dark domains) are not created, thus improving the picture quality.

Note that, if a left half part of one LCD apparatus is formed by pixels as illustrated in FIG. 17 and a right half part of the LCD apparatus is formed by pixels as illustrated in FIG. 18, it is possible to inject liquid crystal between substrates from both sides thereof, which reduces the injection time of liquid crystal. This is helfpul in simplifying the LCD apparatus.

FIG. 20 is a plan view illustrating a fifth embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 21 is a partial enlargement of the apparatus of FIG. 20. That is, in the sub pixel areas SP1 and SP3, the upper parallel sides of the source electrode S are sloped, and the lower parallel sides of the common electrode CE are sloped. Also, in the sub pixel areas SP2 and SP4, the upper parallel sides of the common electrode CE are sloped, and the lower parallel sides of the source electrode S are sloped. For example, the sloped angle φA of the parallel sides of the electrodes S and CE as shown in FIG. 21 is

-90<φA ≦φLC -90   (5)

For example, φA =-15. Note that, if the apparatus of FIG. 20 is applied to the apparatus of FIG. 18, the formula (5) is replaced by

φLC +90≦φA <90    (6)

Due to the sloped parallel sides of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE, the angle φE .spsb.1 of the electric field E1 in the top and bottom portions of each sub pixel area can be smaller than that of the first embodiment as illustrated in FIG. 9. This further suppresses the creation of extraordinary domains (dark domains).

Also, the patterning precision of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE of FIG. 20 can be relaxed as compared with that of the first embodiment as illustrated in FIG. 9, which reduces the manufacturing cost.

Note that the sloped parallel sides of the source electrode S and the common electrode CE can be stepped or curved.

Although the above-mentioned embodiments use liquid crystal having a positive dielectric anisotropy, the present invention can be applied to an LCD apparatus using liquid crystal having a negative dielectric anistopic. In this case, the initial orientation angle of liquid crystal is different by 90 from that in the avove-mentioned embodiments. For example, the first embodiment is modified into an LCD apparatus as illustrated in FIG. 21. In this case, the formulae (1), (2), (3), (4), (5) and (6) are replaced by the following formulae (7), (8), (9), (10'), (11) and (12), respectively:

-45≦φLC <0                 (7)

φLCE.spsb.1 ≦φLC +90(8)

0<φLC ≦45                  (9)

φLC -90≦φE.spsb.1 <φLC (10)

-90<φA ≦0                  (11)

0≦φA <90                   (12)

As explained hereinabove, according to the present invention, the creation of extraordinary domains can be suppressed to improve the picture quality.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3807831 *Jun 20, 1972Apr 30, 1974Beckman Instruments IncLiquid crystal display apparatus
US5598285 *Sep 20, 1993Jan 28, 1997Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display device
US5600464 *Sep 20, 1994Feb 4, 1997Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display device having the electric field parallel to the substrates
US5760856 *Aug 16, 1996Jun 2, 1998Hitachi, Ltd.In-plane field type liquid crystal display device with light shielding pattern suitable for high aperture ratio
JPH0736058A * Title not available
JPH05505247A * Title not available
JPH07191336A * Title not available
JPS5691277A * Title not available
JPS6321907A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6078375 *Sep 16, 1998Jun 20, 2000Nec CorporationLiquid crystal display device with wide viewing angle
US6128061 *Dec 8, 1998Oct 3, 2000Hyundai Electronics Industries Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display device
US6137557 *Nov 14, 1997Oct 24, 2000Frontec IncorporatedLiquid crystal display device
US6232943 *Mar 18, 1998May 15, 2001Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display
US6259503 *Dec 28, 1998Jul 10, 2001Nec CorporationActive matrix liquid crystal display device having a wide viewing angle without color shift
US6281958 *Dec 22, 1998Aug 28, 2001Sharp Kabushiki KaishaIn-plane type liquid crystal display device having even inclining directions of electric field lines
US6310676Feb 7, 2000Oct 30, 2001Sukekazu ArataniLiquid crystal display apparatus
US6356328 *Nov 24, 1998Mar 12, 2002Hyundai Electronics Industries Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display
US6384888Jan 3, 2001May 7, 2002Lg Electronics Inc.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
US6469765 *Jun 13, 2000Oct 22, 2002Nec CorporationLiquid crystal display and method of performing display operation
US6476900 *Nov 24, 1998Nov 5, 2002Hyundai Display Technology Inc.Liquid crystal display
US6483564Oct 24, 2001Nov 19, 2002Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display apparatus
US6552770Mar 28, 2002Apr 22, 2003Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display having shield layers on both sides of spacer across signal line
US6608662Jun 20, 1997Aug 19, 2003Lg. Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display device
US6630978Feb 16, 2001Oct 7, 2003Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display device
US6657694 *Oct 12, 2001Dec 2, 2003Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching LCD device having slanted corner portions
US6680772Sep 4, 2001Jan 20, 2004Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode thin film transistor liquid crystal display device with wide viewing angle
US6704083 *Nov 17, 1997Mar 9, 2004Samsung Electronics, Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display including polarizing plate having polarizing directions neither parallel nor perpendicular to average alignment direction of molecules
US6724454Jun 28, 2001Apr 20, 2004Lg.Philips Lcd Co., LtdIps lcd device having a light shielding layer under at least one common or data electrodes so that light transmittance areas of the common and data electrodes are the same and a method of manufacturing the same
US6741312Jan 23, 2002May 25, 2004Lg Electronics Inc.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
US6757042Aug 27, 2001Jun 29, 2004Lg. Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.Plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
US6778245Oct 10, 2002Aug 17, 2004Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display device
US6784965Nov 13, 2001Aug 31, 2004Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device and manufacturing method thereof
US6784967 *Nov 13, 2003Aug 31, 2004Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching LCD device having slanted corner portions
US6788279Dec 28, 2000Sep 7, 2004Lg. Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device and method for fabricating the same
US6803982 *Dec 17, 2001Oct 12, 2004Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device including common electrode on passivation layer which is formed over TFT and data electrode
US6833898Nov 5, 2002Dec 21, 2004Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display apparatus
US6862063Apr 17, 2003Mar 1, 2005Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display
US6876419Dec 2, 2003Apr 5, 2005Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Multi-domain liquid crystal display including polarizing plate having polarizing directions neither parallel nor perpendicular to average alignment direction of molecules
US6876421May 20, 2004Apr 5, 2005Lg.Philips Co., Ltd.Plane switching mode LCD with zigzag electrodes and electric frame
US6912037 *May 20, 2002Jun 28, 2005Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Higher and lower definition patterning of an active plate
US7006189Jul 20, 2004Feb 28, 2006Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device and manufacturing method thereof
US7016002Jun 28, 2001Mar 21, 2006Lg.Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
US7030953Sep 11, 2003Apr 18, 2006Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display with gate lines and an edge of the black matrix elongated parallel to an initial orientation direction
US7042542Jun 27, 2001May 9, 2006Lg. Philips Lcd Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device and method for manufacturing the same
US7173682Feb 13, 2004Feb 6, 2007L.G.Philips Lcd Co., LtdIn-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device and method of manufacturing the same
US7193675Aug 16, 2004Mar 20, 2007Lg. Philips Lcd Co., LtdLiquid crystal display device
US7227609 *Oct 30, 2003Jun 5, 2007Lg.Philips Lcd Co., LtdIn-plane switching mode thin film transistor liquid crystal display device with wide viewing angle
US7248325Mar 15, 2005Jul 24, 2007Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display having particular electrodes and particular common line
US7283190Jan 21, 2005Oct 16, 2007Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display apparatus having alignment control for brightness and response
US7304706 *Oct 25, 2004Dec 4, 2007Nec Lcd Technologies, LtdIPS liquid crystal display device with edge of the pixel electrode, common electrode, and signal line having stairwise stepped portions
US7321412 *Mar 28, 2006Jan 22, 2008Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display apparatus having alignment control for brightness and response
US7405789 *Sep 16, 1999Jul 29, 2008Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display apparatus having alignment control for brightness and response
US7453541May 2, 2007Nov 18, 2008Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display having particular electrodes and a spacer
US7462872Jun 29, 2001Dec 9, 2008Lg Display Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
US7492428 *Oct 15, 2004Feb 17, 2009Lg Display Co., Ltd.Thin film transistor array substrate and fabricating method thereof
US7522245Dec 29, 2006Apr 21, 2009Lg Display Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
US7593081Oct 24, 2007Sep 22, 2009Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display apparatus having alignment control for brightness and response
US7760305May 15, 2008Jul 20, 2010Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display device with multiple alignment structures
US7768610Dec 21, 2004Aug 3, 2010Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display
US7808594Jul 31, 2009Oct 5, 2010Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display apparatus having alignment control for brightness and response
US7821603Apr 28, 2009Oct 26, 2010Sharp Kabushiki KaishaVertically-alligned (VA) liquid crystal display device
US7898627May 19, 2010Mar 1, 2011Sharp Kabushiki KaishaVertical alignment type liquid crystal display apparatus
US7965363Feb 19, 2008Jun 21, 2011Sharp Kabushiki KaishaVertically-aligned (VA) liquid crystal display device
US8013967Jun 18, 2010Sep 6, 2011Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display
US8018559Jul 31, 2009Sep 13, 2011Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display apparatus having alignment control for brightness and response
US8023085Jul 21, 2010Sep 20, 2011Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display apparatus having alignment control for brightness and response
US8120739 *Jul 24, 2007Feb 21, 2012Nlt Technologies, Ltd.LCD device including an insulator film having a contact hole for exposing a pixel electrode
US8134671Mar 29, 2011Mar 13, 2012Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display device
US8194220Jun 30, 2009Jun 5, 2012Nlt Technologies, Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
US8212984Mar 18, 2009Jul 3, 2012Lg Display Co., Ltd.Method of manufacturing an IPS LCD device having a light shielding layer under at least one common or data electrodes so that light transmittance areas of the common and data electrodes are the same
US8446553Jun 12, 2012May 21, 2013Lg Display Co., Ltd.In-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device and method of manufacturing the same
US8547515 *Feb 10, 2009Oct 1, 2013Samsung Display Co., Ltd.Display substrate with pixel electrode having V-shape and trapezoidal protrusions, a method of manufacturing the same and a display apparatus having the same
US8553188Jan 25, 2012Oct 8, 2013Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display device
US8687159Jul 18, 2008Apr 1, 2014Lg Display Co., Ltd.Liquid crystal display device of in-plane switching mode and method for manufacturing the same
US8810764Jan 19, 2011Aug 19, 2014Nlt Technologies, Ltd.Lateral-electric-field mode liquid crystal display device
US8842249Aug 28, 2013Sep 23, 2014Samsung Display Co., Ltd.Display substrate, a method of manufacturing the same and a display apparatus having the same
USRE43123Jan 17, 2008Jan 24, 2012Sharp Kabushiki KaishaVertically-aligned (VA) liquid crystal display device
CN100520541CNov 22, 2004Jul 29, 2009乐金显示有限公司Thin film transistor array substrate and fabricating method thereof
CN101634770BJul 17, 2009Jul 2, 2014Nlt科技股份有限公司面内切换模式液晶显示装置
EP1278097A1 *Jul 16, 2001Jan 22, 2003Hannstar Display Corp.Electrode structure for an in-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
EP1300722A1 *Feb 15, 2002Apr 9, 2003Hannstar Display Corp.Electrode structure for an in-plane switching mode liquid crystal display device
Classifications
U.S. Classification349/141, 349/144
International ClassificationG02F1/1368, G02F1/1337, G02F1/136, G02F1/1343
Cooperative ClassificationG02F1/134363
European ClassificationG02F1/1343A8
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 8, 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: NLT TECHNOLOGIES, LTD., JAPAN
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:NEC LCD TECHNOLOGIES, LTD.;REEL/FRAME:027188/0698
Effective date: 20110701
Oct 20, 2010FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Jun 7, 2010ASAssignment
Owner name: NEC LCD TECHNOLOGIES, LTD.,JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NEC CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:24495/216
Effective date: 20100301
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NEC CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:024495/0216
Owner name: NEC LCD TECHNOLOGIES, LTD., JAPAN
Oct 27, 2006FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jun 4, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: NEC LCD TECHNOLOGIES, LTD., JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NEC CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:014137/0065
Effective date: 20030401
Owner name: NEC LCD TECHNOLOGIES, LTD. 1753 SHIMONUMABE, NAKAH
Oct 25, 2002FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jan 25, 2000CCCertificate of correction
Jul 11, 1997ASAssignment
Owner name: NEC CORPORATION, JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:SUZUKI, TERUAKI;NISHIDA, SHINICHI;SUZUKI, MASAYOSHI;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:008642/0131
Effective date: 19970703