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Publication numberUS5957840 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/943,114
Publication dateSep 28, 1999
Filing dateOct 3, 1997
Priority dateOct 3, 1996
Fee statusLapsed
Publication number08943114, 943114, US 5957840 A, US 5957840A, US-A-5957840, US5957840 A, US5957840A
InventorsHarutoshi Terasawa, Hitoshi Niwa
Original AssigneeNihon Kohden Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal
US 5957840 A
Abstract
A pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal which pinches a measuring site of a living body in order to detect a biomedical signal, includes a pair of body members which are opposed to each other, said body members being rotatably coupled to each other via a shaft portion, a movable member mounted to a tip end of one of said paired body members so as to be rotatable, and said movable member having a contact face opposed to another contact face which is formed at a tip end of another one of said paired body members, and a spring member urging said contact face of said movable member and said other contact face of said body member which is opposed to said movable member, in an approaching direction.
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Claims(4)
What is claimed is:
1. A pinch device for contacting a site of a living body, comprising:
a pair of body members which are opposed to each other, said body members being rotatably coupled to each other via a shaft portion;
a movable member mounted to a tip end of one of said paired body members through a spherical rotation shaft so as to be rotatable in any direction, and said movable member having a contact face opposed to another contact face which is formed at a tip end of another one of said paired body members; and
a spring member urging said contact face of said movable member and said other contact face of said body member which is opposed to said movable member, in an approaching direction.
2. The pinch device of claim 1 further comprising:
a notch provided in said one of said body members connected to said moveable member; and
a pin connected to a face of said moveable member, wherein the rotation of the spherical rotational shaft is restricted to a predetermined range when said pin is engaged with said notch.
3. The pinch device of claim 2 further comprising:
a wire connected to said moveable member, wherein said predetermined range of restriction of the spherical shaft prevents breakage of said wire.
4. A pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal which pinches a measuring site of a living body in order to detect a biomedical signal, comprising:
a pair of body members which are opposed to each other, said body members being rotatably coupled to each other via a shaft portion;
a movable member mounted to a tip end of one of said paired body members through a spherical rotation shaft so as to be rotatable in any direction, and said movable member having a contact face opposed to another contact face which is formed at a tip end of another one of said paired body members;
a spring member urging said contact face of said movable member and said other contact face of said body member which is opposed to said movable member, in an approaching direction;
a light emitting device connected to one of said contact faces for emitting light through a body portion; and
a photo-detecting device connected to the other of said contact faces for detecting said transmitted light said body portion, wherein
said detected transmitted light corresponds to the biomedical signal.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The invention relates to a pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal which pinches a finger, a nose, or an ear of a living body in order to detect a biomedical signal such as a pulse wave.

2. Related Art

FIG. 4 shows the configuration of an example of a prior art pinch device of this kind. Referring to FIG. 4, a pair of body members 1 and 2 are rotatably coupled to each other at their middle portions through a rotation shaft 3. The body members 1 and 2 are configured so as to be substantially symmetrical to each other with respect to the rotation shaft 3. The tip ends of the body members 1 and 2 are inwardly projected. Contact faces 1a and 2a are disposed at the projection ends so as to be opposed to each other, respectively. Driving portions 1b and 2b are disposed integrally with the rear ends of the body members 1 and 2 which are opposite to the tip ends with respect to the rotation shaft 3, respectively.

A substantially U-like spring member 4 is disposed on the outer peripheries of the body members 1 and 2 with placing the middle portion of the spring member at the rotation shaft 3. The ends of the spring member 4 are engaged with halfway positions between the tip ends of the body members 1 and 2 and the rotation shaft 3, respectively. These positions function as the points of application of the spring member 4. An LED 5 serving as a light emitting member, and a PD 6 serving as a light receiving member are embedded in the tip ends of the body members 1 and 2, respectively, and covered by a transparent resin so as to be flush with the contact faces 1a and 2a, respectively.

When a biomedical signal is to be detected by using the thus configured pinch device, the driving portions 1b and 2b are first inwardly pressed by fingers so that the contact faces 1a and 2a of the body members 1 and 2 are separated from each other. Next, a measuring site of a living body, for example, an ear 7 is inserted between the contact faces 1a and 2a and the driving portions are then released, so that the ear 7 is elastically pinched with the urging force exerted by the spring member 4. The LED 5 is then powered on and the PD 6 receives light transmitted through the ear 7 to detect a biomedical signal such as a pulse wave. Lead wires connected to the LED 5 and the PD 6 are not shown.

In the pinch device of the prior art configured as described, particularly when a measuring site of a living body is thick, the contact faces 1a and 2a of the body members 1 and 2 make point contact or line contact with the measuring site of the living body, so that the measuring site cannot be pinched by a uniform pressure. As a result, there arises a problem in that the pinch device is unstably attached and data of the detected biomedical signal are incorrect.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention has been conducted in view of these circumstances. It is an object of the invention to provide a pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal which can pinch a measuring site of a living body with a uniform pressure so that a biomedical signal can be correctly detected.

In order to attain the object, in the invention, a pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal which pinches a measuring site of a living body in order to detect a biomedical signal comprises a pair of body members which are opposed to each other, middle portions of the body members being rotatably coupled to each other via a shaft portion; a movable member which is mounted to a tip end of one of the paired body members via a spherical rotation shaft so as to be rotatable in any direction, and which has a contact face opposed to another contact face which is formed at a tip end of another one of the paired body members; and a spring member which urges the contact face of the movable member and the other contact face of the body member which is opposed to the movable member, in an approaching direction.

According to the configuration, the movable member on which one of the contact faces is formed is mounted to one of the body members via the spherical rotation shaft so as to be rotatable in any direction. In the case where a measuring site is to be pinched between the paired body members, even when the surface of the measuring site is tilted in any direction, therefore, the contact face can closely abut against the surface. As a result, the pinch device can pinch the measuring site in all the contact faces with a uniform pressure, so that a biomedical signal can be correctly detected.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view showing the configuration of an embodiment of the pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the whole appearance of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the configuration of a spherical rotation shaft and a movable member of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a aide view showing the configuration of an example of a pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal of the prior art.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Hereinafter, an embodiment of the pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal of the invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

FIGS. 1 to 3 show the configuration of the second embodiment of the pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal of the invention. In the figures, components which correspond to those of the prior art example shown in FIG. 4 are designated by the same reference numerals, and their description is omitted. The embodiment is characterized in that a disk-like movable member 12 is mounted to the vicinity of the tip end of one body member 1 via a spherical rotation shaft 11 so as to be rotatable in any direction, and a contact face 12a opposed to a contact face 2a which is formed at the tip end of another body member 2 is disposed on the movable member 12.

The spherical rotation shaft 11 is slidably fitted into a circular hole 1c which is formed in the vicinity of the tip end of the body member 1. Slits 11a passing through the center are formed in the shaft. The inner diameter of the circular hole 1c at an open side is squeezed. When the spherical rotation shaft 11 is compressed by a size corresponding to the width of the slits 11a, the rotation shaft can be attached to the hole through a diameter-reduced portion. An engagement plate 13 is fixed to the outside of the circular hole 1c so that the spherical rotation shaft 11 is inhibited by engagement from moving in the axial direction. A pin 14 erects on the upper face of the movable member 12. When the pin is engaged with A notch 1d formed in the inner face of the body member 1, the rotation of the spherical rotation shaft 11 is restricted to a predetermined range so that lead wires which will be described later are prevented from being broken. A spring member 4 is disposed on the outer peripheries of the body members 1 and 2 in the same manner as the prior art example shown in FIG. 4.

An LED 5 and a PD 6 are embedded into the contact face 12a of the movable member 12 and the contact face 12a of the body member 2, respectively. Lead wires 15 and 16 respectively connected to the LED 5 and the PD 6 elongate along grooves 17 and 18 formed in the inner faces of the body members 1 and 2 and are then drawn out to the outside through a lead wire drawing out hole 1e which is formed in the vicinity of the tip end of the body member 1.

According to the embodiment, even when both the faces of a measuring site such as an ear 7 are nonparallel with each other and inclined in an arbitrary direction as shown in FIG. 1, the movable member 12 is inclined with following the corresponding face. Therefore, the contact faces 12a and 2a can closely contact with the ear 7 and a biomedical signal such as a pulse wave can be correctly detected. Of course, the present invention is not limited by this embodiment. It is applicable for employing the feature such that the movable member supported on the body 12 by the axis to move it in a rotational direction along the body, in a rotational direction parallel to the body or the like.

In the embodiment described above, the LED 5 and the PD 6 are embedded into the contact face 12a of the movable member 12 and the contact face 2a of the body member 2, respectively. The arrangement relationship may be inverted. In place of the LED 5 or the PD 6, a plate-like electrode may be attached to the tip end of one of the body members. In place of the lead wires 15 and 16, a flexible circuit board on which predetermined wirings are formed may be used.

In the above, the embodiment in which the U-like spring is used has been described. Alternatively, the device may have a configuration in which a torsion coil spring is used.

As described above, according to the pinch device for detecting a biomedical signal of the invention, a movable member is mounted to the tip end of one of paired body members which are to pinch a measuring site of a living body, via a spherical rotation shaft so as to be rotatable in any direction, and the movable member has a contact face opposed to another contact face which is formed at a tip end of another one of the paired body members. Even when a measuring site is inclined in an arbitrary direction, therefore, the movable member is inclined with following a face of the measuring site. Consequently, the contact faces can closely contact with the measuring site, with the result that the pinch device can pinch the measuring site with a uniform pressure so that a biomedical signal can be correctly detected.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6546267 *Nov 27, 2000Apr 8, 2003Nihon Kohden CorporationBiological sensor
US6654621Aug 29, 2001Nov 25, 2003Bci, Inc.Finger oximeter with finger grip suspension system
US8073518 *May 2, 2006Dec 6, 2011Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcClip-style medical sensor and technique for using the same
US8229532May 1, 2009Jul 24, 2012The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaExternal ear-placed non-invasive physiological sensor
US8382675Jul 14, 2011Feb 26, 2013Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic information detecting apparatus
US8382676Jul 14, 2011Feb 26, 2013Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic information detecting apparatus
US8652052 *Jul 14, 2011Feb 18, 2014Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic information detecting apparatus
US8652053 *Jul 14, 2011Feb 18, 2014Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic information detecting apparatus
US8652054Jul 14, 2011Feb 18, 2014Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic information detecting apparatus
US8657752 *Oct 4, 2005Feb 25, 2014Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic information detecting apparatus
US8695206 *Apr 26, 2012Apr 15, 2014Nonin Medical, Inc.Tissue clamp for noninvasive physiological measurement
US20080319325 *Oct 4, 2005Dec 25, 2008Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic Information Detecting Apparatus
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US20110295131 *Jul 14, 2011Dec 1, 2011Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic Information Detecting Apparatus
US20110295132 *Jul 14, 2011Dec 1, 2011Nippon Telegraph And Telephone CorporationBiologic Information Detecting Apparatus
US20120289800 *Apr 26, 2012Nov 15, 2012Isaacson Philip OTissue clamp for noninvasive physiological measurement
EP1584287A1 *Apr 7, 2005Oct 12, 2005Elekon Industries USA, Inc.Clip-type sensor having integrated biasing and cushioning means
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WO2009135185A1May 1, 2009Nov 5, 2009The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaExternal ear-placed non-invasive physiological sensor
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/310, 600/344, 24/504
International ClassificationA61B5/0245, A61B5/0416
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/0416, A61B5/6816
European ClassificationA61B5/68B2B1B, A61B5/0416
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 15, 2011FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20110928
Sep 28, 2011LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
May 2, 2011REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Mar 2, 2007FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Mar 7, 2003FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Oct 3, 1997ASAssignment
Owner name: NIHON KOHDEN CORPORATION, JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:TERASAWA, HARUTOSHI;NIWA, HITOSHI;REEL/FRAME:008767/0863
Effective date: 19971001