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Publication numberUS595967 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1897
Filing dateApr 13, 1897
Publication numberUS 595967 A, US 595967A, US-A-595967, US595967 A, US595967A
InventorsWalter G. Parsons
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bicycle-rack
US 595967 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) v

W. G. PARSONS.

BICYCLE RACK.

No. 595,967. Patented'Dec. 21,1897.

. ynn f 1I f'// W 1 4 WITNESSES ww W ATTORNEYS.

UNITED STATES PATENT I Fries. i

WALTER G. PARSONS, OF ENGLEWOOD, NEWV JERSEY.

BICYCLE-RACK.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 595,967, dated December 21, 1897.

Application filed April 13, 1897. Serial No. 632,016. (No model.)

of rack for stowing bicycles, designed especially for use in connection with baggagecars, but applicable to use in any situation where space is limited and it is desired to stow a number of bicycles.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this-specification, in which similar characters of referenceindicate corresponding parts in all the figures.

Figure 1 is a perspective view of my device as applied to a baggage-car. Fig. 2 is a detail section of the eye at the end of the longitudinal bars. Figs. 3, 4, and 5 are details of modified forms of hook. I

In transporting bicycles in baggage-cars the question of storage of the same has given a great deal of trouble. My device is designed to stow the bicycles in such a manner that they will occupy as little space as possible in that portion in the upper part of the car where it is the least available for stowing heavy matter, such as trunks; also, to make any one of the bicycles readily accessible without disturbing the others.

In carrying out my invention I provide lateral bars D, which are supported at each end upon some fixed obj ect. In placing the same within baggage-cars this support is provided by fastening U-shaped brackets or sockets 0 upon the side of the car just beneath the roof. These are placed adistance apart considerably less than the longest dimension of a bicycle. This would approximately be about three feet.

The bar D would extend entirely across the baggage-car. These bars would also be made in pairs. Upon these bars are placed longitudinalbarsE. Thesebarsareprovidedwith eyes G at each end, having holes adapted to fit over the bars D, so that the barsE maybe slid thereon to any point desired. These eyes consist of a cylindrical portion adapted to embrace the bars D and aflange or socket G,extending therefrom to one side and adapted to receive the end of the bar E. The bar E is fastened securely thereto by a bolt g or a rivet, if the separation of these two parts is not desired. A number of these longitudinal bars are placed upon each pair of lateral bars. Upon each of these longitudinal bars are placed at least two hooks F. The bars themselves are made of a polygonal section or one which will prevent the hooks from turning on the bars. In the drawings the bars E are shown as made fiat.

The hook F is provided with a hole fitting snugly upon the bar E, so that the hook may be readily moved thereon. The hook has a horizontally-extendin g arm f, which acts as a hook upon which the bicycle-frame may be placed. For convenience in adjusting the height of the hook and also the angle at which it projects I have'shown a hook II, which consists of a threaded shank h and a horizontal arm extending from the lower end thereof and forming the hook proper. The shank h of this hook is threaded into a hole passing through the hook F. The hook H can thus be adjusted considerably in height and also in its direction of projection.

In using my device the upper horizontal bar of the bicycle-frame or any other convenient portions-as, forinstance, the handle-bar and saddle-1nay'be placed over the hooks f and H, thus supporting the bicycle in the upper portion of the car, leaving the lower portion of the car free for baggage of any kind.

In many cases the hooks f will be found more convenient, as they will support the wheel at ahigher elevation than will the hooks H. In many cases, as in a drop-frame machine, it will be necessary to have a hook projecting in a dilferent direction from the hook f, in which case the hook His available. This also permits of considerable adjustment and makes it possible to support the bicycle from a point considerably below its upper part. It also makes it possible to suspend two wheels from one bar, if desired.

The hook shown in Fig. 3 is a modification of the hook H of Fig. 1. This hook consists of the threaded shank h and a head at its lower end, which has two horizontal hooks H slightly separated from each other. This is a more convenient form for engagement with the handle-bar or saddle of a bicycle than that shown in Fig. 1.

. Fig. 4. shows another form of hook and consists of the eye F adapted to embrace the bar E, and the. downwardly-projecting and upwardly-curved hooks f. In using this form of hook the curved portions f should project laterally and longitudinally also-that is, in a direction diagonal to the direction of the bar E. This makes it possible to place the handle-bar of a machine over the hooks or to place the upper bar of the frame over the hooks.

Fig. 5 shows another form of hook, consisting of a Zshaped bar F, having one end corresponding to the hook f. (Shown in Fig. l.) The bar F is also provided with an eye to which is fastened a small chain f and a double hook f.

In using my device the bar which is next to the wall will first be filled by hanging a Wheel thereon, the next wheel will be hung upon the next bar outside this, and so on until the space is completely filled. The bars which are not in use may be pushed over to one side of the car or to the space in the center of the car and the bars next to the Wall be gradually filled, leaving, finally, an open space only in the center of the car. In case it is desired to remove one of the bicycles which is near the side of the car those bars which are outside of the one carrying such bicycle will be slid to the opposite side of the car or to the center until the desired bicycle is uncovered, and it may then be easily removed and the other bicycles moved back to their former positions.

In placing bicycles upon the bars E it is desirable that each alternate machine be reversed in position-that is, that the front wheel of one bicycle be placed in the direction of the rear wheel of the other bicycle. This prevents the front wheel from swinging upon its pivot.

This device is readily taken down and stored when it is not needed.

The bars E'rnay be moved from the bars D by sliding them off from one end thereof.

. The bars D are readily taken down by lifting them out of the brackets O. The whole device is placed at such an elevation in the car that it will not interfere with the baggagemen passing thereunder. When not filled with bicycles, the device will therefore be found to be out of the way and will create no inconvenience when not in use. It also leaves the entire floor-space of the car available for trunks or other heavy baggage and securely supports the bicycles Where they will not be damaged by coming in contact with such bagbage. It also renders the bicycles readily accessible and prevents their becoming entangled with one another and avoids the damage liable to result therefrom.

This device is applicable as well to hotels and other places where bicycles are liable to be stored and where space is valuable.

possesses the same merits for such locations as when used in baggage-cars.

Having thus fully described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A bicycle-rack, comprising lateral bars arranged in pairs and supports therefor at each end, longitudinal bars having eyes in each end, fitting and sliding upon the lateral bars,.and hooks supported to slide without turning upon the longitudinal bars, substantially as described.

2. A bicycle-rack, comprising lateral bars arranged in pairs and supports therefor at each end, longitudinal bars having eyes at each end fitting and sliding upon the lateral bars, blocks fitted to slide without turning upon the longitudinal bars, having each a horizontally-extending hook fixed thereto, and also having a vertical threaded hole, and hooks having threaded shanks fitting said holes, substantially as described.

4. A bicycle-rack, comprising lateral bars, U-shaped blocks supporting the ends thereof, longitudinal bars of a polygonal section, eyes fitting and sliding upon the lateral bars, having a socket in one side to receive the end of the longitudinal bars, and'hooks upon the longitudinal bars fitted to slide thereon without rotation, substantially as described.

5. A bicycle-rack, comprising two lateral bars, supports for each end thereof, longitudinal bars of a non-circular section, eyes fitting and sliding on. the lateral bars, having a socket in one side to receive the ends of the longitudinal bar, hooks upon the longitudinal bars fittedto slide thereon without rotation and having vertical threaded holes therein, and hooks having threaded shanks fitting therein, substantially as described.

6. A bicycle-rack, comprising two lateral bars, supports for each end thereof, longitudinal bars of a noncircular section, eyes fitting and sliding on the lateral bars, having a socket in one side to receive the ends of the longitudinal bar, hooks upon the longitudinal bar fitted to slide thereon without rotation and hooks attached thereto adjustable in height and in angular position, substantially as described.

WALTER e. PARSONS.

Witnesses:

EVERARD BOLTON lliARSHALL, H. L. REYNOLDS.

IIO

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3924751 *May 6, 1974Dec 9, 1975Central Specialties IncBike rack hoist
US5460274 *Nov 16, 1993Oct 24, 1995Kramer; Robert L.Hanging bike rack
US7165684 *Apr 29, 2004Jan 23, 2007Ferron William JHigh density bicycle storage system
US7896206Feb 22, 2006Mar 1, 2011Jeffrey MyronStorage device for a vehicle roof top cargo carrier and corresponding methods
US8047492 *Mar 19, 2009Nov 1, 2011Wang Dennis HHanger
US8783536Jan 13, 2012Jul 22, 2014Ralph R. JulianUniversal bicycle rack with lifting mechanism
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB60P3/073