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Publication numberUS597524 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1898
Filing dateJun 24, 1897
Publication numberUS 597524 A, US 597524A, US-A-597524, US597524 A, US597524A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
molloy
US 597524 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 2 Sheebs-Sheet 1.

T. A. MULLOY & L. KIRCHNER. BOOT 0R SHOE.

No. 597,524. Patented Jan. 18, 1898.

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BOOT OR SHOE.

Patented Jan. 18, 1898.

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UNITED STATES PATENT OEErcE.

THOMAS A. MOLLOY AND LOUIS KIRCHNER, OF POUGHKEEPSIE, NE,T YORK, ASSIGNORS OF ONE-THIRD TO MARTIN P. MANNING, OF SAME PLACE.

BOOT on SHOE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 597,524,6.ated January 18, 1893.

Application filed June 24,1897. Serial No. 642,070. (No model.)

To @ZZ wilom it may concern:

Be it known that we, THOMAS A. MoLLov and LOUIS KIRCHNER, citizens of the United States,residing at Poughkeepsie,in the county of Dutchess and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Boots or Shoes; and we do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and eXact description of the invention, such as will enable 1o others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to letters of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification. The objects of this invention are to provide an article of footwear adapted to be worn particularly by metal-melders, furnace-men, and others liable to tread on highly-heated bodies of metal; to provide a shoe which will not be 2o injured or affected by such contact with said heated metal; to enable the shoe to be employed advantageously both in the foundry in Contact with said metal and while walking to and from the foundry or mill or under other conditions with comfort and ease; to enable the movements of the wearer of the heavy metal soles to be cushioned when said shoes are not used in walkin g in the foundry or mill and thus to reduce the noise and jar in walking-as, for example, when walking to and from the foundry or mill, as above indicated 5 to enable the cushion to be removed with ease and facility; to secure a removable contact cushion or pad of simple structure and little 3 5 cost, and to obtain other advantages and results, some of which may be referred to hereinafter in connection with the description of the working parts.

The invention consists in the improved 4o boot or shoe for the personal wear of molders and those employed in rolling-mills and in like situations where the person walking is apt or liable to tread upon heated bodies of metal or other matter and in the arrange- 4 5 ments and combinations of parts of the same, all substantially as will be hereinafter set forth, and finally embraced in the clauses of the claim.

Referring to the accompanying drawings,

5o in which like letters of reference indicate corresponding parts in each of the several views,

Figure l is a side elevation, partly in longitudinal section, of a shoe of the improved construction. Fig. 2 is a transverse section of the same on line per. Fig. 4 is a section thereof on line y. Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the shoe, showing the cushions or pads removed from the tread-surfaces of the shoe-bottom. Fig. G is 6o a side elevation of the heel-tread cushion. Fig. 7 is a side elevation of the sole-tread cushion. Fig. 8 is a longitudinal sectional View showing the shoe without the cushions;

and Fig. 9 is a transverse section of the heel, 65

showing the removable pad in position.

In said drawingsJ a indicates the upper of the shoe, which may be of leather or other material and of any suitable construction.

Said upper consists, preferably, of the body 7o portion a', the welt a, and the lining or insole am, the last two being sewed to the body of the upper and the welt forming outwardlyprojecting flanges which extend around the sides of the shoe to receive the pintles c, as 7 5 hereinafter described. h indicates a sole-andheel body portion attached to said upper in any suitable manner, but preferably by means of pintles c, attached to said body portion b in the act of casting. sists of a single integral piece of metal, preferably aluminium, because of its lightness,

body being deeply recessed, as shown, so as 9o to receive a heel-pad d' of considerable thickness, which will serve to produce a very considerable resilience, cushioning the heel of the foot in the act of walking. Said heel-pad is composed of a layer of cork fastened to the 95 under side of the lining, although it may be of other resilient or cushion-lille material. The upper edge of this metallic casting is raised, forming a thick marginal rib or rim r, extending entirely around the casting both roo at the heel and sole parts thereof, which rib or rim forms areeeptacle for the non-conduct- Fig. 3 is a sole-and- 55 heel portion of a shoe detached from the up- Said body portion con- 8o On the upive filling above referred to. rib, being thick, as described, produces a rm and strong bedding, in which the series of pintles c are cast, the pintles being preferably of non-elastic steel adapted to be passed through the Welt and clenched at their projecting extremities, so as to hold said Welt down firmly upon the said marginal rib.

The lateral edges of the metal body flare outwardly toward the bottom, forming a keeperrib s, over which are sprung the dan ges of the removable bottom portions, cushions, or `pads b', adapted to be employed in Walking to and from business or when there is no heated metal to injure the same. Said pads, cushions, or bottom pieces b' consist of leatherrof suitable thickness, having secured to their edges resilient flanges t, adapted to fit over the flaring edges of the sole and heel and be thus held firmly thereto, cushioning the tread and enabling the person Walking on ordinary sidewalks to do so Without producing the ob jectionable noise and avoiding the objectionable jar incident to such Walking.

The edges of the body or bottom casting are provided at the upper parts with projecting marginal protecting-ribs b", Which serve to guard the upper edges of the iianges of the cushions, so that the latter cannot by inadvertence, accident, or otherwise be forced off the sole and heel, the said protecting-ribs b" conducing to a greatersecurity of the cushions in the act of Walkinggas will be understood.

The cushions b', in addition to the advantages above referred to, serve to give contactsurfaces which are not apt to slip upon the ice, snow, rbc.

Having thus described the invention, what We claim as newr is- This marginal l. The combination in ashoe, of an upper, a cast-metal bottom having integral pintles for fastening said bottom to said upper, leather plates for the sole and heel of said bottom having spring-flanges for removably securing said leather plates to said bottom, substantially as set forth.

2. The improved shoe comprising a metal bottom integrally including the sole and heel, having pintles embedded therein near the outer edges, and having at said edges a flaring part to receive a flange of a pad or cushion and a guarding-rib to protect the upper edge of said ange, a cushion having said flange, and an upper held to the metallic bottom, substantially as set forth.

3. The improved metalmolders or furnacemans shoe, comprising a metallic bottom integrally embodying sole and heel parts, which have at their edges, keeper-ribs s, and are centrally hollowed out at the upper side, said casting at the upper edges being provided With vertical ribs having pintles cast therein, an upper and insole or lining held directly upon said. metal body by said pintles, and a non-conductive filling arranged between the metal and said insole, whereby heat conducted by the metal will not be freely transmitted to the said lining and foot, substantially as set forth.

In testimony that We claim the foregoing We have hereunto set our hands this 3d day of March, 1897.

THOMAS A. MOLLOY. LOUIS KIRCHNER.

XVitnesses:

CHARLES H. PELL, C. B. PITNEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6092305 *May 6, 1998Jul 25, 2000Footwear Concept Center, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
US6519876Jul 5, 2000Feb 18, 2003Kenton Geer Design Associates, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
US6701643Dec 3, 2002Mar 9, 2004Kenton Geer Design Associates, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
US7010869Apr 26, 2000Mar 14, 2006Frampton E. Ellis, IIIShoe sole orthotic structures and computer controlled compartments
US7059067Nov 14, 2003Jun 13, 2006Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
US7334350Jul 26, 2005Feb 26, 2008Anatomic Research, IncRemovable rounded midsole structures and chambers with computer processor-controlled variable pressure
US7562468Jul 31, 2007Jul 21, 2009Anatomic Research, IncRemovable rounded midsole structures and chambers with computer processor-controlled variable pressure
US7591083Jun 13, 2006Sep 22, 2009Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
US7707742Jul 31, 2007May 4, 2010Ellis Iii Frampton EShoe sole orthotic structures and computer controlled compartments
US7793429Jun 26, 2007Sep 14, 2010Ellis Iii Frampton EShoe sole orthotic structures and computer controlled compartments
US7793430Jun 12, 2009Sep 14, 2010Anatomic Research, Inc.Removable rounded midsole structures and chambers with computer processor-controlled variable pressure
US8261468Aug 26, 2010Sep 11, 2012Frampton E. EllisShoe sole orthotic structures and computer controlled compartments
US8291614Aug 27, 2010Oct 23, 2012Anatomic Research, Inc.Removable rounded midsole structures and chambers with computer processor-controlled variable pressure
US8381416Oct 26, 2010Feb 26, 2013Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
US8656607Jul 23, 2012Feb 25, 2014Anatomic Research, Inc.Soles for shoes or other footwear having compartments with computer processor-controlled variable pressure
US8667709Sep 7, 2012Mar 11, 2014Frampton E. EllisShoe sole orthotic structures and computer controlled compartments
EP1284610A1 *May 1, 2001Feb 26, 2003Kenton Geer Design Associates, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
WO2000064293A1 *Apr 26, 2000Nov 2, 2000Anatomic Res IncShoe sole orthotic structures and computer controlled compartments
WO2001082732A1 *May 1, 2000Nov 8, 2001Kenton Geer Design AssociatesFootwear structure and method of forming the same
WO2001082733A1 *May 1, 2001Nov 8, 2001Kenton D GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA43B9/02