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Publication numberUS5976200 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/967,665
Publication dateNov 2, 1999
Filing dateNov 10, 1997
Priority dateFeb 9, 1996
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asCN1128857C, CN1160745A, DE19704874A1, DE19704874B4, US5725609
Publication number08967665, 967665, US 5976200 A, US 5976200A, US-A-5976200, US5976200 A, US5976200A
InventorsHercilio Rivas, Gustavo A. Nunez, Tulio Colmenares, Manuel Chirinos
Original AssigneeIntevep, S.A.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water in viscous hydrocarbon emulsion combustible fuel for diesel engines and process for making the same
US 5976200 A
Abstract
A combustible fuel for diesel engines and a process for forming same in the form of a water in hydrocarbon emulsion wherein the mean water drop diameter is≦4 μm with a maximum diameter of≦10 μm.
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Claims(1)
What is claimed is:
1. A combustible fuel for diesel engines comprising a water in hydrocarbon emulsion having a water to hydrocarbon ratio of from about 40:60 to 10:90 and a non-ionic surfactant in an amount of≧2000 ppm, said hydrocarbon being characterized by an API gravity of≦16 API and a viscosity of≧100 cPs at 122 F. and said non-ionic surfactant having an ethylene oxide (EO) content of≧10, said water in hydrocarbon emulsion being characterized by a mean water drop diameter of≦4 μm with a maximum drop diameter of≦10 μm.
Description

This is a Division of application Ser. No. 08/599,305, filed Feb. 9, 1996, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,725,609.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a process for utilizing a viscous hydrocarbon as a combustible fuel for diesel engines as well as a combustible fuel product.

It is well known in the art to form hydrocarbon in water emulsions either from naturally occurring bitumens or residual oils in order to facilitate the production and/or transportation of these viscous hydrocarbons. Typical processes are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,380,531; 3,467,195; 3,519,006; 3,943,954; 4,099,537; 4,108,193; 4,239,052; and 4,570,656. In addition to the foregoing, the prior art teaches that hydrocarbon in water emulsions formed from naturally occurring bitumens and/or residual oils can be used as combustible fuels. See for example U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,144,015; 4,378,230; 4,618,348; and British Patent Specification 974,042.

The hydrocarbon in water emulsions discussed above, while useful as combustible fuels in some power plants, are not suitable for burning in diesel engines, particularly low speed diesel engines. Naturally, it would be highly desirable to be able to use viscous naturally occurring bitumens and/or residual oils as a combustible fuel for diesel engines.

Accordingly, it is the principal object of the present invention to provide a process for utilizing a viscous hydrocarbon as a combustible fuel for diesel engines.

It is a particular object of the present invention to provide a process as aforesaid wherein the viscous hydrocarbon is in the form of a naturally occurring bitumen or residual oil.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a combustible fuel for diesel engines in the form of a water in hydrocarbon emulsion.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will appear hereinbelow.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a process for utilizing a viscous hydrocarbon as a combustible fuel for diesel engines as well as a combustible fuel product.

In accordance with the process of the present invention the viscous hydrocarbon is formed as a hydrocarbon in water emulsion in order to facilitate the production and transportation of the viscous hydrocarbon to the burning site. The hydrocarbon in water emulsion may be prepared by any known process as described in the patents discussed above or as disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,801,304; 4,795,478; 4,834,775; 4,923,483; 4,824,439; 4,994,090; 4,776,977; 4,781,819; 4,806,231; and 4,915,819. Additional known processes for forming hydrocarbon in water emulsions are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,934,398; 4,618,348; 4,666,457; 4,684,372; and 4,793,826.

In accordance with the process of the present invention, the hydrocarbon in water emulsion is formed having a hydrocarbon in water ratio of from about 60:40 to about 90:10, preferably, 65:35 to 75:25. The hydrocarbon in water emulsion is formed by employing a non-ionic surfactant. The non-ionic surfactant is present in the emulsion in an amount of greater than or equal to 2000 ppm. The non-ionic surfactant is required to have an ethylene oxide content of greater than or equal to 10 and, preferably, between about 10 to 100. The viscous hydrocarbons usable in the process of the present invention are those hydrocarbons characterized by an API gravity of less than or equal to 16 API and a viscosity of greater than or equal to 100 cPs at 122 F.

The hydrocarbon in water emulsion described above is subjected to inversion by heating the hydrocarbon in water emulsion to an elevated temperature and mixing the emulsion at the elevated temperature so as to invert the emulsion from a hydrocarbon in water emulsion to a water in hydrocarbon emulsion. In accordance with the present invention, it is critical that the resulting water in hydrocarbon emulsion product have a mean water droplet diameter of less than or equal to 4 microns (μm) and a maximum drop diameter of less than or equal to 10 microns (μm). In order to obtain a combustible fuel product which may be utilized in diesel engines the drop diameter of the resulting water in hydrocarbon emulsion must be controlled. The diameter of the water droplets is controlled by the following factors:

(1) the temperature at which the hydrocarbon in water emulsion is heated for inversion,

(2) the concentration of the non-ionic surfactant;

(3) the EO content of the non-ionic surfactant;

(4) the mixing energy employed during the inversion process; and

(5) the ratio of hydrocarbon to water in the original hydrocarbon in water emulsion.

Specifically, the temperature and mixing energy at which the inversion takes places increases with an increase in concentration and EO content of the surfactant and with a decrease in the hydrocarbon content.

Control of the water droplet size and the resulting water in hydrocarbon emulsion is critical in that (1) the presence of water allows for a more complete combustion in a diesel engine, (2) small water droplet sizes assist in atomization, and (3) the fuel can be combusted at lower temperatures which correspondingly result in lower formations of NOX products as well as less formation of soot.

Further advantages and features of the present invention will appear hereinbelow from a consideration of the detailed description.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention is drawn to a process for utilizing a viscous hydrocarbon as a combustible fuel for diesel engines as well as a combustible fuel product for diesel engines in the form of a water in hydrocarbon emulsion.

The viscous hydrocarbons employed in the process of the present invention include naturally occurring bitumens and residual oils characterized by an API gravity of less than or equal to 16 API and a viscosity of greater than or equal to 100 cPs at 122 F. These viscous hydrocarbons in accordance with the present invention are handled for transportation purposes by forming a hydrocarbon in water emulsion. In accordance with the process of the present invention formation of the hydrocarbon in water emulsion employs the use of a non-ionic surfactant as an emulsifier. The hydrocarbon in water emulsion is characterized by a hydrocarbon to water ratio of from about 60:40 to about 90:10, preferably 65:35 to about 75:25. The non-ionic surfactant is required to have an ethylene oxide content (EO content) of greater than or equal to 10 and preferably between about 10 to 100. In accordance with the present invention, the non-ionic surfactant is present in the emulsion in an amount of greater than or equal to 2000 ppm. The hydrocarbon in water emulsion may be formed by any process known in the art. Suitable processes are disclosed for example in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,776,977 and 4,934,398 and others discussed above.

In order to obtain a viscous hydrocarbon combustible fuel the hydrocarbon in water emulsion described above must be inverted into a water in hydrocarbon emulsion. In accordance with the present invention a suitable combustible fuel product for diesel engines comprises a water in hydrocarbon emulsion wherein the droplet size of the water within the emulsion are within critical values. It has been found that in order to get a more complete combustion at lower temperatures with minimal formations of nitric oxides and soot, the water in hydrocarbon emulsion combustible fuel for diesel engines should have a mean droplet diameter of less than or equal 4 microns with a maximum water drop diameter of less than or equal to 10 microns. Such a combustible fuel emulsion product having a water to hydrocarbon ratio of 40:60 to about 10:90 preferably 35:75 to about 25:75 and a non-ionic surfactant content of greater than 2000 ppm and an EO content of preferably between 10 to 100 may be effectively atomized at lower temperatures and obtain complete combustion. When the water droplet diameters exceed the critical values set forth above, atomization of the fuel becomes incomplete, combustion efficiency is greatly decreased, and elevated temperatures are required for combustion thus resulting in the formation of high amounts of soot and NOX pollutants.

The water in hydrocarbon emulsion fuel product for use as a combustible fuel in a diesel engine is obtained from the hydrocarbon in water emulsion formed for transportation of the viscous hydrocarbon by subjecting the hydrocarbon in water emulsion to a controlled inversion process. In accordance with the present invention, the hydrocarbon in water emulsion is inverted at elevated temperature, that is, greater than or equal to 90 C., and critical mixing energies, that is, greater than or equal to 6106 J/m3 so as to invert the emulsion into a water in hydrocarbon emulsion having the required water droplet diameters, both mean and maximum. The inversion of the emulsion is controlled by controlling the temperature and mixing energy during the inversion process wherein the temperature is a function of the concentration and EO content of the non-ionic surfactant and the mixing energy is a function of the hydrocarbon content of the hydrocarbon in water emulsion. The temperatures required are greater than or equal to 90 C. and mixing energies of greater than or equal to 6.00106 J/m3. As will be made clear from the examples hereinbelow, the inversion process is a function of temperature, mixing energy as well the nature of the non-ionic surfactant (EO content), the amount of the surfactant in the emulsion, the nature of the viscous hydrocarbon and the hydrocarbon content.

Advantages of the present invention will be made clear from a consideration of the following examples.

EXAMPLE 1

Four samples of hydrocarbon in water emulsions were prepared for inversion having a hydrocarbon to water ratio of 70:30 wherein the viscous hydrocarbon had an API gravity of 8.5 and a viscosity of 700 cPs at 86 F. The four samples were formed employing a non-ionic surfactant in a concentration of 3000 ppm and an EO content of 13, 17, 33 and 38 respectively. Each of the four samples were heated to temperatures of 80 C., 90 C. and 100 C. and mixed with a mixing energy of 8.5106 J/m3. The time required to invert the emulsions and the resulting water droplet maximum and mean diameters where determined. The results are shown below in Table I.

              TABLE I______________________________________Temp. ( C.)Surfactant EO 80        90         100______________________________________13            22     sec    10   sec   5    sec17            280    sec    200  sec   80   sec33            800    sec    600  sec   250  sec38            1200   sec    800  sec   350  secAverage Drop Dia.Max           20     μm  10   μmMean          10     μm  5    μm 2    μm______________________________________

From the foregoing it can be seen that the time for inversion increases with EO content and decreases with- temperature. The average drop diameter both max and mean decreases with an increase in temperature.

EXAMPLE 2

Additional emulsions were prepared as in Example 1 wherein the content of the hydrocarbon was increased to 75:25 and 80:20. The emulsions were inverted at a temperature of 90 C. and a mixing energy of 8.5106 J/m3. The results are given in Table II.

              TABLE II______________________________________Hydrocarbon Content (%)Surfactant EO 70        75         80______________________________________13            10     sec    10   sec   4    sec17            200    sec    100  sec   20   sec33            600    sec    100  sec   30   sec38            800    sec    120  sec   35   secAverage Drop Dia.Max           8      μm  8    μm 6    μmMean          4      μm  4    μm 2    μm______________________________________

From Table II it can be seen that as the hydrocarbon content increases the time for inversion decreases with a decrease in average drop diameter both max and mean.

EXAMPLE 3

Emulsions were prepared as in Example 2 except that the surfactant concentration was reduced to 2000 ppm. The results are shown in Table III.

              TABLE III______________________________________Temp. ( C.)Surfactant EO 80        90         100______________________________________13            20     sec    10   sec   5    sec17            200    sec    100  sec   60   sec33            500    sec    300  sec   100  sec38            700    sec    400  sec   200  secAverage Drop Dia.Max           25     μm  8    μm 5    μmMean          10     μm  4    μm 2    μm______________________________________

From the foregoing it is clear that inversion time decreases with decrease in surfactant concentration as does average drop diameter as a function of temperature.

EXAMPLE 4

Emulsions were prepared as in Example 1 using a surfactant having an EO content of 17. The emulsions were inverted under varying conditions of elevated temperature and mixing energy. The results are shown in Table IV and Table V.

              TABLE IV______________________________________Mixing Energy (106 J/m3)            3.6    8.5      13.1 15.5______________________________________Temp  C. 90              800    200      180  120 95              400    150      60   40100              320    100      50   10______________________________________

              TABLE V______________________________________AT TEMP OF 90 C.             Average Drop DiameterMixing Energy (106 J/m3)             Max       Mean______________________________________3.6               15        88.5               10        513.1               6        315.5               5        2______________________________________

As can be seen from Tables IV and V, as the mixing energy increases, the average drop diameter both max and mean decreases as does inversion time.

As can be seen from the foregoing, the process of the present invention allows for the formation of a combustible fuel in the form of a water in hydrocarbon emulsion which allows for utilization of viscous hydrocarbons as combustible fuels in low speed diesel engines.

This invention may be embodied in other forms or carried out in other ways without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The examples described above are therefore considered as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the apended claims and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency are intended to be embraced therein.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6368367 *Sep 7, 1999Apr 9, 2002The Lubrizol CorporationProcess and apparatus for making aqueous hydrocarbon fuel compositions, and aqueous hydrocarbon fuel composition
US6419714Jan 16, 2001Jul 16, 2002The Lubrizol CorporationEmulsifier for an acqueous hydrocarbon fuel
US6716801 *Dec 23, 2002Apr 6, 2004Pauline Abu-JawdehCompositions and method for their preparation
Classifications
U.S. Classification44/301, 44/302, 516/30
International ClassificationC10L10/18, B01F3/08, C10L1/08, F02B47/02, B01F17/42, F02M25/025, C10L1/32, C10L10/02, F02B3/06
Cooperative ClassificationB01F2215/0088, C10L10/02, B01F3/0811, Y02T10/121, C10L1/328, F02B3/06, F02B47/02, F02M25/0228
European ClassificationF02M25/022, F02M25/022E, B01F3/08C1, C10L1/32D, F02B47/02, C10L10/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 20, 2011FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20111102
Nov 2, 2011LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Jun 6, 2011REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Apr 20, 2007FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
May 21, 2003REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
May 2, 2003FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4