Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS599397 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1898
Filing dateMay 6, 1896
Publication numberUS 599397 A, US 599397A, US-A-599397, US599397 A, US599397A
InventorsNewman R. Marshman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
marshman
US 599397 A
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 Sheets-Sheet 1. ID GB.

(No Model.)

N. R. MARSHMAN 82: L. S. BURR TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

No. 599,397. Patented Peb.22, 1898.

WITNESSES:

(No Model.) 7 Sheets-Sheet 2. N. R. MARSHMAN & L. S. BURRIDGE.

' TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

No. 599,397. Patented Feb. 22,1898.

air #9 a E a? a a "3 f 3 77 7 7 J 97 Y J 7 1 .4 7 30 76- i 3 n 26 29 72 6 WITNESSES: I I INVENTURS,

I a QC )l. [BM/1% M? V, WWW. ATTORNEY Tn: Ncnms ravens c0. FHOTD-LKTNO" WASHINGTON. u c

(No Model.) 7 Sheets- Sheet 3 N. R. MARSHMAN & L. S. BURRIDGE. TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

No. 599,397. Patented Feb. 22, I898.

oooooocoooooeaoooooooooaoooooo WITNESSES: INVENTOR5 w M ATTORNEY Tn: norms PETERS co. moraurnmwumnmou, o. c

(No Model.) 7Sheets-Sheet 4h N. R. MABSHMAN & L. S. BURRIDGE. TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

No. 599,397. Patented Feb. 22, 1898.

WITNESSES: I INVENTORS',

' ATTORNEY (No Model.) 7 Sheew-Sheet 5.

N. R. MARSHMAN & L. S,'BURRIDGE.

TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

No. 599,397. Patented geb. 22, 1898.

5 1 i i C) C) ()(D nn g g IN T055 WlTN E AMY/@ ATTORNEY (No Model.) 7 SheetsSheet 6.

N. R. MARSHMAN 8a L. S. B'URRIDGE. TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

No. 599,397, Patented Feb. 22,1898.

I /nn\\\\ WITNESSES: Va INVENTOiR 4.21. W

V BY

ATTORNEY m: cams Pm: c

(No Model.) 7 Sheets-Sheet 7..

N. R. MARSHMAN & L. S. BURRIDGE.

TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

No. 599,397. Patgntgd Feb. 22,1898.

WITNESSES: INVENTOIR5 ATTORNEY NlTED STATES NEIVMAN R. MARSIIMAN AND LEE S. BURRIDGE, OF NEIV YORK, N. Y), AS- SIGNORS TO THE AMERICAN TYPEVVRITER COMPANY, OF SAME PLACE.

TYPE-WRITING MACHINE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 599,397, dated February 22, 1898. Application filed May 6, 1896. Serial No. 590,417. (No model.) Patented in England June 2'7, 1896, No. 14,288.

To aZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, NEWMAN R. MARSH- MAN and LEE S. BURRIDGE, citizens of the United States, and residents of New York city, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Type-VVriting Machines, of which the following is a specification.

The improvements made the subject-matter of this application have been patented in Great Britain by Letters Patent N 0. 14,288, dated June 27, 1896.

Heretofore it has been attempted to make I 5 type-writing machines with simple mechanism that could be sold at a low price; but such machines have been found in practice to be so slow of operation as to seriously impair their value. The main object of our invention is to produce such a simple and cheap machine that can be operated at a speed approximate to that of the more expensive machines.

Our invention consists in the combination of two independently-movable type-carriers,

each provided with a handle, so thatthe operator can use both hands in Writing, and in providing means for causing any type upon either carrier to be impressed at a common 0 impression-point, means for printing either lower-case or capital letters, and in further features and details of construction, all of which will be hereinafter more fullydescribed, and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view of a type-writing machine embodying our improvements in one form or construction. Fig. 2 is a right-hand end view of the same. Fig. 3 is a substantially central vertical longitudinal section. Fig. 4 is an enlarged central vertical section to illustrate more particularly the shifting and impression mechanisms. Fig. 5 is a front elevation of the type-carriers. Fig. 6 is a plan view of a machine embodying our invention in another form. Fig. 7 is a like view of still another embodiment of our invention. Fig. 8 is a front elevation of the same. Fig. 9 is a plan view of still another embodiment of our in vention. Fig. 10 is a transverse vertical section through the type-carriers. Fig. 11 is a plan view of a machine embracing our invention in still another form and one which we at present prefer to any of those heretofore referred to, and Fig. 12 is a detail view of one of the key-levers and of a portion of the universal bar or spacing mechanism.

Referring now particularly to Figs. 1 to 5, inclusive, the numeral 1 designates the base of the machine, which'of course may be of any desired form, design, or construction. Mounted on the base is a bed-plate 2 for a paper-carriage 3, which likewise may be of any desireddesign, form, or construction. The said paper-carriage comprises a feed-roller 4, mounted to turn in end plates or arms 5. A pressure-plate 6 is attached to the bottom bar of the carriage and bent or curved to extend in front of the said feed-roller, and a platen 7c in the form of a fiat bar 7 is arranged immediately above the feed-roller and pressure plate and occupies a vertical position. The said platen is formed integral with a horizontal top plate 8, secured to the side or end arms 7 5 5. The bottom bar of the carriage is formed at its front or inner edge with a series of teeth and notches to constitute a feed-rack 9. The feed-roller may be provided with a knurled button 10 and a notched or ratchet Wheel 11, adapted to a holding pawl or finger 12. This construction of papercarriage is substantially that which is shown and described in the patent to L. P. Valiquet, No. 510,214, dated December 5, 1893.

Engaging with the feed-rack is a push-pawl 13, pivoted at the outer or rear end of a link 14, the shorter arm of said push-pawl being connected to said link by a spring 15, which tends to hold the point of said pawl always inserted in one of the notches of said feedrack. In conjunction with said pawl is em" ployed a checking-dog 16, which is pivoted at 17 and loosely connected also to the pivot, by which the push-pawl is attached to the link, 5 all substantially in the manner set forth in the aforesaid patent to Valiquet. The inner or forward end of said link let is pivoted to the upright arm 18 of a bell-crank lever 19, which is pivoted at 20 to an arm or bracket 10:) 21 or to a part of the framework. The other substantiall horizontal and lon er arm 22 of y m said bell-crank extends forward to beneath the keyboard or index-plate 23, which in this machine is arc-shaped and made in one piece. The said keyboard is mounted upon or attached to the free outer ends of two levers 24, one at each side of the machine, which are attached at their rear ends to a transverse rock-shaft 25, mounted in upright arms 26 and provided with one or more coiled or returning springs 27. A stop 28 limits the upward movement of the frame,compr.ising the levers 24 and rock-shaft 25, to which the keyboard 23 is attached. By this construction and arrangement when the keyboard is de-- Preferably the outer end of the bell-crank is notattached to the keyboard, and for this reason it is provided with an independent spring 29 at its pivot-for returning said bellcrank andits connected parts and holding the outer arm thereof always up and in contact with theunder side of the keyboard 23. The said bell-crank maybe used as a spacing-lever for feeding the carriage between words,

and to facilitate this action the arm 22 of said bell-crank is provided with a space-key 30.

When the keyboard is caused to descend, it simultaneously throws into action the printing mechanism in a manner-Which will now' be described. I

Pivoted at 31 is a lever or arm 32, which is adapted to be vibrated by means of an'arm 33, attached at one end to the rock-shaft 25 and connected at its other rear end'to said lever by a pin-and-slot connection, the pin'34 being on the arm and the slot in the lever. The saidvertically-arranged lever 32 is provided at its uppermost end with a horizontally-arranged pin 35, which is pivotally or loosely connected thereto at its inner end and which is adapted to slide in a hole or bearing 36 in a standard 37, and the said lever 32 is also provided at about its middle with another pivotal or loosely-attached pin 38, the freeend of which likewise slides in a perforation'or bearing 39 in the said standard 37 Between these two pins the lever 32 is formed or provided with an impression device 40, which is adapted to pass through aguide-slot 41? and press the types against the paper on the platen.

From the foregoing it will be understood that whenthe keyboard is depressed the lever 32 is vibrated rearwardly, and the pins 35 and 38'slide rearwardly through their holes or perforations, and the impression device 40 moves through its slot or guideway.

We'will now describe the type-carriers and the actions thereupon of the said pins and impression device and also the novel means for selecting the types to be printed.

There are two type-carriers 41 and 42, one arranged immediately above the other and both of segmental shape. Each type-carrier is made substantially like the other-that is to say, each consists of an arc-shaped plate provided with a series of holes 43, arranged closely together, with a longitudinal slot 44 next the row of holes and with a soft-rubber strip 45 attached to the plate at one edge, and provided at its free edge with a series of types or characters 45, also of soft rubber. Radial arms 46 at the ends of the arc-shaped plate connect the latter to a central plate-like portion 47 which is mounted to turn freely about a vertical pivot, which will presently be more fully explained. The edges of the type-carriers, which bear the type characters, are arranged adjacent to each other, and, as will be seen at Fig. 5, each carrier bears both uppercase characters and lower-case characters, while both also bear punctuation-marks and numerals.

The upper type-carrier central plate 47 is formed with a hub 48, which may be elon gated, as at 49, to secure a long bearing for said plate upon a vertically-arranged fixed round rod or post 50, secured to the-base and extending up considerably above the plane of the type-carriers. This rod or post also forms apivot for both type-carriers. In other words, said type-carriers both slide up.and down upon said post and swing or rotate thereabout as a center of motion.

Upon the upper side of the upper type-carrier 41 are two ears 51, arranged forward of the post 50 and which serve as bearings for a horizontal pivot or rock-shaft 52, to which is attached, by a set-screw 53 or other means, a nearly vertical arm 54 and a substantially horizontal arm 55. The arm 54 is provided at its upper end with alever or plate 56, which is pivoted at 57 and which is provided with a spring 58, that tends to keep one arm 59 of said lever or plate against a pin-stop 60 on the arm 54. The said lever or plate 56 is notched or bifurcated at its front edge and bears against a curved or arc-shaped wire or frame 61, having arms 62, which are bent toward each other and secured to a bracket 63, fixed firmly to the upper end of the post 50 by means of a set-screw 64. The arm 55 is secured to the said pivot or rock-shaft 52 and is extended forward toward the keyboard. This arm is preferably made tubular to receive and support a rod or long stem 65,which at its outer end is formed with a ring or fingerpiece 66. The said rod or stem 65 is adapted to slide in and out of said tubular arm, and the finger-ring 66 is preferably provided with an antifriction or antibinding device for the finger, in this instance made in the form of a coil of wire 67 and of a length slightly less than the circumference of the ring, so that it may have a sliding movement around said ring with the finger during the V twisting or turning action of the finger in the swinging movements of the stem and its supporting-arm. This device prevents the finger from binding or wedging in the ring. The arm 55 constitutes a handle for rotating the type-carrier about its pivot and bringing the several types thereon to the printing position.

The central plate of the lower type-carrier 42 is separate from that of the upper typecarrier, but it is mounted upon the same post 50 and is formed with a hub 68 on its upper side, which contacts with a like hub on the under side of the upper plate 47 and supports the latter in its normal position. On the under side of the central plate of the lower carrier is another elongated hub 69, surrounding the post and supported bya coiled spring 70, likewise surrounding said post. The hub 69 does not bear directly upon said spring 70, owing to the interposition of the hub 71 of the arm 72, which bears two inking-disks 73 and 74, but the said spring acts to support the type-carriers and restore them to their normal positions, as will be presently eX- plained.

Each type carrier is rotatable independently of the other, and the lower type-carrier is arranged to print all its characters without shifting the said carrier or changing its horizontal plane or position. The upper typecarrier, however, must be shifted and in this case depressed, in order to bring its type characters to the impression-point, and this shifting or depression of said type-carrier is effected by a downward movement of the tubular arm 55, by which the arm 54 is rocked forwardly, and as the plate-like lever at the upper end thereof bears against the fulcrum or frame 61 by a toggle-like action the central plate 47 and its adjuncts (including the upper type-carrier) are caused to descend a short distance and thereby bring the types of the upper carrier to the impression-plane, as indicated by the dotted lines at Fig. 4. At about the time the shift has been made the keyboard is depressed by a continued down movement of the hand and the printing and locking lever 32 are vibrated, the type-carrier is caused to be locked, and the type which is opposite the printing-pointis caused to press against the paper. At the same time the feed mechanism is actuated, as before described. The type-impressing device 40 acts upon the types of both carriers, but each carrier is provid ed with a separate locking-pin. WVhen the lower type-carrier is being worked, the lower pin 38 enters one of the holes 43 in said type-carrier and looks or retains the same firmly in position, while the impressing device forces the type againstthe paper. During this action of the lower pin the upper pin 35, while it is simultaneously operated, does not pass into one of the holes of the upper carrier, but passes in actively through the longitudinal slot 44: of said carrier. Again, when the upper type-carrier is being worked the lower locking-pin 38 passes idly through the slot 44 in the lower carrier and the upper locking-pin passes into one of the holes in the upper carrier to maintain it in a steady condition, while the type-impressing device pushes a type of the upper carrier against the paper.

It will be understood, of course, that when the downward pressure upon the arm 55 is released the spring operates to restore the two type-carriers and their connected parts to their normal positions, while at the same time the toggle or cam plate 56 returns to its normal position, assisted by its individual spring.

The arm 51L being attached to the upper type-carrier is adapted to turn therewith, and hence the toggle-plate or lever 56 is caused to bear at different points upon the curved frame or wire 61, according to the swing or movement of the type-carrier, and which, of course, is governed by the arm or handle 55 and the finger-piece attached thereto.

The lower type-carrier is adapted to be swung or vibrated by means of a separate tubular arm or handle 75, and a fingeupiece comprising a ring 76, having an antibinding device 77 and a stem 78, movable in said tubular arm 75.

By referring to Fig. 1 it will be observed that the keyboard is provided with three concentric rows of keys 7 9, which keys, as shown at Fig. 2, are preferably elevated above the surface of the board or support 23. The said keys are made round or button-like, in imitation of the keys of one of the standard machines, and are provided With letters, numerals, and other characters corresponding with the type characters on the segments both in kind and relative position or arrangement. As will be seen at Fig. 1, certain of the keys are adapted for two characters, one of which may be said to be in the lower case and the other in the upper case. These keys all bear the numerals and punctuation-marks. The alphabetical keys bear each only a single character, but they are adapted for use to print both the upper case and the lower case of that character.

Owing to the arrangement of the keys in several rows the handles or finger pieces must be capable of movement backward and forward, and it is for this reason that the said finger-pieces are made separate from the arms 55 and 75, and by means of their stems are adapted to slide in and out thereof.

As illustrated at Figs. 1 and 2, it is designed that the first or index finger of each hand shall be passed through the ring of its fingerpiece and act as a stylus to control the movement of the type-carrier, so as to bring any desired type on either carrier to the impression-point and thereafter effect the printing of such character and the proper feed movement of the paper-carriage.

If it be desired, for instance, to print the word Spring, beginning with a capital S, the finger-piece of the arm 55 is moved over until the finger in the ring arrives at the letter S on the keyboard, which the finger touches. This movement brings the capital letter S on the upper type-carrier to the printing-point, and by the slight downward movement of the finger necessary to touch the key the upper type-carrier is shifted or depressed, (which depression forces down the lower type-carrier also,) and then with the finger still upon the letter S enough pressure is brought to bear to cause the entire keyboard to descend, whereupon the printing and locking lever is vibrated to cause the upper type-carrier to be locked and the selected type pressed back against the paper. At the same time the feed mechanism of the carriage is actuated, so that when the finger-pressure is relieved the carriage feeds a letter-space and all of the parts affected by the depression of the keyboard are restored to their normal positions. The said finger-piece is then swung over toward the right and moved inwardly in its tube or support, so that the finger may bear upon the letter P in the first or inner row. The bringing down of the finger upon the letter P causes the upper type-carrier to descend as before and then by the continued depression of the keyboard the small letter p is caused to be printed. To print the letter r the left-hand arm is swung over to the key R, which brings the small letter r on the lower type-carrier to the printing-point, and then the keyboard is depressed as before to cause the said letter to print. The letter i is impressed by moving the right-hand arm 55 in the proper direction or directions, so that the finger on the right hand may descend upon the key I and cause the letter i on the upper carrier to be printed when the keyboard is depressed. This same finger is then moved to the key N to bringthe type n on the upper carrier to the printing-point and effect its impression in the manner before explained. The final letter of the word is selected and printed by moving the left-hand index-finger over to the key G and causing the type g on the lower carrier to come to the printing-point and be impresed on the paper when the keyboard is forced down.

It will be observed from the foregoing description of the manner of writing the word Spring that every time the right-hand finger-piece is actuated the upper type-carrier is shifted-or caused to descend, and also that when the said right-hand finger-piece is manipulated over the right-hand half of the keyboard only lower-case letters or characters are printed, while when said right-hand fingerpiece is swung over on the left-hand half or portion of the keyboard only upper-case letters are printed thereby, and it will be understood from the drawings and the general description that while the left-hand finger-piece is at work upon the left-hand half of the keyboard lower case characters only will be printed, but when said finger-piece is carried over to work upon the right-hand half of the keyboard upper-case characters will be printed thereby. We have used a heavy broken line on the keyboard to indicate the line of division between what we have designated as the right-hand half and the left-hand half of the keyboard. This mark will serve to enable operators to distinguish between the upper-case and lower-case charactersthat is to say, they will thereby be informed that the right-hand finger-piece will print all lower-case characters as long as it is manipulated in the right-hand field, but that when it is swung over past the dividingline upper-case characters will be obtained, and, similarly, that as long as the left-hand finger-piece is kept working on the left-hand side of the line 80 lower-case characters will be printed, but when moved over on the right of said line the printing of upper-case characters will be effected.

The types may be supplied with ink in any desired manner; but we prefer the fiat inkingdisks 73 and 74 for the upper and lower typesegments, respectively, which disks are adapted to shift with the upper type-carrier.

Referring now to Fig. 6,.it will be observed that essentially the same principle of construction is again illustrated; but in this form of our invention we have divided the keyboard into two parts in order to avoid the depression of the entire keyboard for the printing of individual characters. Owing to this division of the keyboard the lever-frame carrying the same is slightly modified in constructionthat is to say, there is a lever-frame provided for each independent half of the keyboard. To obtain this construction, the rock-shaft 25 is divided or made in two separate parts, each having a spring and provided at its outer end with a lever 24, whose outer end is attached to the keyboard. At the inner end of each rock-shaft is provided another lever 24, which at its outer end is also connected to its associated portion of the keyboard. The bell-crank 19, to which the link 14 is attached, is provided with a space-key 30, as before; but there is provided an extra arm 22 for the said space-key, which arm is attached at its inner end to the pivot of the bell-crank. In all other respects the construction is substantially the same as that described with reference to the previous views, and the operation of the mechanism is likewise substantially the same, the only difference being that one-half of the keyboard is depressed at a time.

Referring now to Figs. 7 and 8, the construction again is substantially the same as that shown at Figs. 1 to 5, inclusive, with'the exception of the keyboard. In this case the keys are arranged in three concentric rows and radially of the center of oscillation of the type-carriers, as before. These keys are, however, independently movable, while the frame in which they are mounted is fixed.

Each key-head or button is provided with a v stem or shank 81, which slides in slots or bearings in two parallel horizontal plates 82 and 83, suitably supported from the base of the machine. The lower ends of the shanks of these individual keys all rest normally upon a universal bar or plate 84, sufiiciently wide and long to embrace all of said keys.

This universal bar or plate is attached to and supported by levers 24, extending forward from a transverse rock-shaft 25, bearing returning-springs 27. The construction and operation of the selecting mechanism and the feeding mechanism are substantially the same as in the constructions hereinbefore described. In the printing operation the fingers act to depress the keys individually or separately instead of depressing either the whole keyboard or one-half thereof, and it will be understood that when any key is thus depressed the universal bar or plate is caused to descend and the printing and locking lever is vibrated to impress a type against the paper and to simultaneously lock the particular type-carrier which may be in action, and at the same time such depression of the universal bar or plate effects the carriage-feed movement by reason of the extension of the bellcrank to a point beneath said universal bar or plate.

Referring now to Figs. 9 and '10, the keyboard is of that type which is illustrated at Fig. 1, but the typecarriers and their actuating devices are somewhat difierent. In this instance the type-carriers instead of being segmental or arc-shaped are made straight and are provided with racks which are movable endwise by means of toothed sectors which in turn are operated by the fin ger-pieoes or handles before described. 85 designates a frame which is adapted to support the upper and lower type-carriers and to guide them in their longitudinal movements. The upper type-carrier consists of the bar 86, to which is attached the soft-rubber type-plate, and on the back of said bar is formed or provided a rack 87, with which is adapted to engage the toothed rack on the upper sector 88, which swings about a vertical post, as 50 The lower type-carrier consists of a similar bar 89, a rubber type-plate, and a longitudinally-arranged rack 90, adapted to be engaged by the teeth of the lower sector 91. To each sector is connected an arm and finger-piece in the manner hereinbefore described, whereby the sector is enablad to be oscillated as the fingerpiece is carried over the keyboard and by such oscillation to transmit movement by means of the gearing to one or other of the type-carriers to bring the desired type to the printing-point. Theframe85,beingattached to or supported upon the vertical post 50, is adapted to move up and down thereupon to enable the upper type-carrier to be shifted to and from the impression-plane. This shiftin g action of the type-carriers may be effected by the same means as shown at Figs. 1, 4, &c. and which means have been omitted from Figs. 9 and 10 in order to simplify the drawings, the purpose of this modification of the invention being principally to illustrate that the improvements made by us may be carried out in machines in which the type-carriers vary in shape and construction; and it will of course be understood in all cases that almost any of the known forms or constructions of type-carriers composed of or provided with rubber types or metal types may be used without departing from the spirit of our invention.

Referring now to Figs. 11 and 12, it will be seen that We have shown our improvements still further developed and in the form to which we now give preference over those forms hereinbefore described, and illustrated in the remaining views. In this machine the main difference is to be found in the construction and arrangement of the keyboard and in the employment of a universal bar. To the free ends of the side levers 24E is attached a universal bar 92, which underlies a series of key-levers 93, arranged radially of the post 50 and having bends at their outer ends, which are provided with keys or buttons likewise arranged radially of said posts. Each key-lever, excepting the extreme ones, is provided with three keys or buttons, which are adapted to be depressed by the fingers inserted in the rings of the finger-pieces or handles, as hereinbefore described. The rear ends of the said key-levers are pivoted at 94 upon brackets 95 on a transverse supportingplate 96, and each said lever is provided with a returning-spring 97. In this'construction it will be observed that only three keys are depressed at the same timethat is to say, when any one of the keys on any one of the levers is actuated only the two other keys on said levers move with the selected key, which we deem a better arrangement than either that shown at Fig. 1 or that shown at Fig. 6, because only a small portion of the entire keyboard is moved at a time, and hence not onlyis the touch of the machine made lighter, but the work is less tiresome to the eyes of the operator. While the form shown at Figs. 7 and 8 of course reduces the movements of the parts to a single key at a time, the construction, nevertheless, is more complex and costly. The operation of the construction shown at Figs. 11 and 12 is substantially the same as that hereinbefore described of the other views and apparentlyneeds no further detailed description.

It will be understood from the foregoing description that in all instances both handles may be simultaneously operated to select their respective types-that is, the desired types on each carrier may be brought simultaneously to the printing center or plane namely, to the vertical plane passing through the impression device-so that both types will be in position to be impressed upon the paper, although of course only one type can be printed at a time.

IIO

As shown in the various views, the inner or rear ends of the arms and are connected to their respective carriers in different horizontal planes, so that each finger-piece may be swept over the entire keyboard without clashing of the said arms or the said fingerpieces.

As the operator is enabled to use both hands in operating the machine, and as one hand may be employed in selecting a key or type while the other is engaged in depressing a previously-selected key, the advantage of the natural alternate motion of the hands is secured, the operation of the machine very much facilitated, and a speed may be reached approximate to that attainable on the more complicated and costly machines in general use. By our invention the work is divided about equally between the two hands, and

each hand (except when printing capital letters) remains at its own side of the keyboard, whereas in former machines of the index class only one hand could be employed and it was necessary to manipulate and travel over the entire keyboard with the single index.

Heretofore index-plates or keyboards have been provided with small and compactly-arranged letters, in consequence of which it was difficult to distinguish the letters readily from one another, thus hindering the rapid manipulation of the machines. An important feature of our invention is the adaptation of a set of finger-keys to be used in connection with a selecting means, the fingerkeys being easily distinguishable and easily manipulated.

Heretofore where a single keyboard-alphabet has been employed in connection with both lower-case and capital types it has not been possible to print capital letters without previously manipulating an independent shift-key; but by our invention this is notnecessary, each of the indexes or handles being capable of printing either lower-case letters or capitals at the will of the operator withoutthe use of any independent shift-key,

the keyboard being provided with only one alphabet, which corresponds to the types on each carrier. As before stated and as shown at Fig. 5, each carrier bears both upper-case characters and lower-case characters. Each class or set is grouped by itself, and all of the characters of both sets are arranged in one continuous row. One of the type-carriers contains a portion of the lower-case types and also a portion of the upper-case types, and the other type-carrier contains the remainder of the lower-case types and the remainder of the upper-case types.

It will thus be seen that we have produced a practicable machine of few parts,which can be manufactured and sold at a low price and which may be operated at considerable speed.

So far as some features of our invention are concerned lower-case types need not be employed, but two complete sets of capitals can be used without departing from the spirit of our invention, or only one set of capital letters may be employed, half on each carrier, without lower-case types. features of our invention are concerned the usual index-plate can be employed instead of finger-keys, rods and tubes may be reversed, metal types may be used, the paper may be pressed against the types, and the finger-piece may be of other than ring form, and as the machine can be modified in various other ways without departing from our invention we do not desire to be considered as limiting ourselves to the precise constructions herein set forth unless they are specifically referred to in the claims.

Difierent type-carrier-locking and type-impressing devices and a different paper carriage and feeding mechanism therefor may be employed without avoiding our main im-' provements.

What we claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent, is as follows:

1. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a keyboard comprising a plurality of characters arranged substantially in arcs of circles, a type-carrier, and a rigid handle or finger-piece connected thereto; the said handle or finger-piece being adapted for reciprocation transversely of said keyboard without affecting the type-carrier, and for the purpose of bringing the operating portion of said handle or finger-piece in register with the desired row of characters; and the said handle So far as other or finger-piece being adapted also to be swung or vibrated about an axis for the purpose of bringing its operating portion into register with the particular character desired in said row, and at the same time to also bring the type corresponding to said character to the printing-plane.

'2. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a movable type-carrier, an independently-movable type-carrier, a keyboard or set of keys, and means independent of the keyboard for moving the type-carriers comprising forwardly-proj ectin g rigid handles or finger-pieces having each an independent, re-- ciprocatory motion transversely of the keyboard, and also avibratory motion lengthwise thereof.

3. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a rotatory type-carrier, a handle for selecting the character to be printed provided with a pivot, and a series of finger-keys arranged in concentric rows about said pivot for causing the imprint.

4. In a type-Writing machine, the combination of a rotatory type-carrier, a series of finger-keys arranged in rows for causing the imprint, and a handle for the carrier provided with a sliding finger-piece, for selecting the type to be printed.

5. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a type-carrier, a handle, and a fingerring provided with an antifriction device.

6. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a carrier bearing a series of types, said types standing normally out of line with .the impression-point, an impression device for projecting the selected type, means for operating the impression device, and means for automatically bringing said types into line with the impression-point during the operation of said impression device.

7. In a type-writing machine, the combina tion of a type-carrier, a handle 55 pivoted thereto, an arm 54- fixed to said handle, a frame 61, a lever 56 connecting said arm to said frame, and a spring.

8. In a type-writing machine, the combination of two handle-actuated carriers, each bearing a series of independently-movable types, with a common impression device for impressing any type of either carrier upon the paper and with means for bringing either carrier into the line of the impression-point independently of the impression device.

9. In a type-writing machine, the combination with two handle-actuated type-carriers, of a common pivoted impression device adapted to coact with either of the carriers, the types on said carriers being arranged between the platen and said pivoted impression device.

10. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a platen, a pair of independent type-carriers arranged in front thereof, each provided with a handle for actuating the same, a set of imitation finger-keys coijperating with said handles and adapted to be depressed directly by the fingers of the operator, an impression device in front of said typecarriers and adapted to project the type of each carrier, and means extending from said impression device to said finger-piece whereby after the selection of the type and during the depression of a selected key the said impression device is moved to force the selected type against the paper on the platen.

11. In a type-writing machine, the combination of two type-carriers, each provided with a series of perforations, with an impression device carrying two locking-pins, one for each series of perforations.

12. In a type-writing machine, the combination of two type-carriers, each provided with a series of perforations and a slot, with two locking-pins, one for each carrier.

13. In a type-writing machine, the combination with a type-carrier, of a locking-pin, the carrier being provided with a series of holes for receiving the pin when the carrier is in operative position, and with a slot for the pin to pass through when the carrier is in an inoperative position and the locking-pin is operated.

14. In a type-writing machine, the combi nation of a type-carrier provided with part of an alphabet, another type-carrier provided with the remainder of the alphabet, a k ey-' board or set of keys, and means independent of the keyboard for moving said type-carriers and bringing any type to the printing-point without previous manipulation of a shift-key.

15. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a type-carrier having a handle and provided with part of an alphabet of lowercase letters and part of an alphabet of capital letters, and a superposed type-carrier having a handle and provided with the remainder of the alphabet of lower-case letters and the remainder of the alphabet of capital letters, the said handles being adapted to bring any type to the printing-point without previous operation of a shift-key.

16. In a type-writing machine, the combi nation of a type-carrier having a handle and provided with an alphabet, part of which are lower-case letters and part of which are capital letters, with another superposed type-carrier likewise having a handle and provided with an alphabet, part of which are likewise small letters and the remainder capital letters,- and means for bringing all of said characters on both carriers to a common impressionpoint, without previous operation of a shiftkey.

17. In a type-writing machine, the combi nation of two type-carriers, having handles and each provided with an alphabet part of which are lower-case letters and the remainder capital letters, the lowercase letters on one carrier corresponding with the capital letters on the other carrier, and means for bringing all of said characters on both carriers to a common impression-point.

18. In a type-writing machine, the combination of two carriers, each provided with a single row of types, and each row comprising a series of small or lower-case letters placed next to a series of capital or upper-case letters the capital letters on one carrier being the same as the small letters on the other carrier, and vice versa.

15). In a type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard bearing a single alphabet, of two independentlymovable handles for controlling two sets of types and so constructed and arranged as that either handle may operate over the entire index-plate or keyboard.

20. In a type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard bearing a single alphabet, of two handles for controlling two sets of types, each handle being adapted for manipulation at any portion of the entire keyboard and to cause any letter upon said keyboard to be printed on the paper.

21. In a type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard bearinga single alphabet, of two independentlymovable handles, one of which controls part of an alphabet of lower-case letters and part of an alphabet of capital letters, and the other of which controls the remainder of the alphabet of lower-case letters and the remainder of the alphabet of capitals without an independently-operated shift mechanism.

22. In a type-writing machine, the combination of two independently-movable typecarriers, each provided with a manipulatinghandle, and an index-plate or keyboard, the

said handles being arranged in different horizontal planes, and so constructed that each may be manipulated at any portion of the keyboard without clashing with the other.

23. In a type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard bearing an alphabet, of a carrier provided with a single alphabet of types corresponding with said keyboard in their relative arrangement, a portion of said types being lower-case and a portion being capitals, and a handle connected to said carrier and extending to the keyboard.

24:. In a'type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard bearing a single alphabet, of two independentlymovable handles, each connected to a typecarrier, one of the carriers bearing an alphabet corresponding to the keyboard but havin g a portion of its types lower-case and a portion capitals, and the other of the carriers bearing an alphabet likewise corresponding to the keyboard and having the remainder of the lower-case letters and the remainder of the capitals.

25. In a type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard, of two independently-movable type-carriers controlling handles, one arranged at the right hand of the keyboard and one at the left, and both adapted to cause lower-case letters to be printed on the paper, and means for causing capital letters to be printed when the righthand handle is manipulated at the left-hand side of the keyboard or when the left-hand handle is manipulated at the right-hand side of the keyboard.

26. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a key and two type-controlling handles, with means for causing a lower-case letter to be printed on the paper when the key is manipulated in connection with one of said handles, and means for causing a capital letter to be printed when the key is manipulated in connection with the other of said handles.

27. In a type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard bearing a single alphabet, of tWo handles for controlling two sets of types, each handle being adapted for manipulation at all portions of the keyboard, and each handle being adapted to produce capital letters where the other handle produces lower-case letters on the paper.

28. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a type-carrier, a handle connected thereto for selecting the character to be printed, a series of independently-depressible finger-keys, a universal bar, and an impression device.

29. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a typecarrier, a handle connected thereto for selecting the character to be printed, an impression device, means for actuating the impression device including a universal bar, and a series of key-levers for actuating the universal bar.

30. In a type-Writing machine, the combination of a type-carrier, a handle connected thereto for selecting the character to be printed, a paper-carriage, a feeding mechanism therefor including a universal bar, and'a series of independently-movable keys for actuating the universal bar.

31. In a type-writing machine, the combination of a letter-space-feeding mechanism, an actuating-lever therefor, a space-key attached to said lever, a universal bar arranged to actuate said lever,'a series of independentlydepressible keys for actuating said universal bar, a type-carrier, and a handle for controlling the carrier and selecting the character to be printed.

32. In a type-writing machine, the combination of two carriers, each provided with a set of movable types, with means for simultaneously selecting a type of each carrier, said means comprising two independent handles connected to said carriers and adapted each to be swung over the entire surface of a keyboard.

33. In a type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard bearing a single alphabet, of two independentlymovable handles, aset of lower-case types and a set of capital types connected to said handles, and means controlled wholly by said handles for impressing either a lower-case or capital type upon the paper at the will of the operator.

34. In a type-writing machine, the combination with an index-plate or keyboard bearing a single alphabet, of two independentlymovable handles constructed to move over the index-plate or keyboard, an alphabet of lower-case types, an alphabet of capital types, and means controlled wholly by the handles for bringing either lower-case or capital types into the printing-field.

35. In a type-writing machine, two independent type-carriers each having a separate handle or actuator adapted for movement over a keyboard connected to the printing mechanism, whereby both of the hands of the operator may be employed in the selection and printing of the type characters, the said handles or actuators having each a fingerring, and the said keyboard comprising a series of levers having each a plurality of keys adapted to be touched and depressed by the protruding fingers of the operator after the desired types have been selected by the proper movements of said handles or actuators.

36. In a type-Writing machine, the combination of two concentrically-pivoted typecarriers each provided with upper-case types and also with lower-case types, a forwardlyextended rigid handle attached to each carrier, a plurality of levers each provided with a plurality of imitation finger-keys, the entire set of keys being marked with a single alphabet adapted to serve for both said carriers, a finger-ring at the forward end of each said handles adapted to receive a finger of the operator and movable at the will of the operator lengthwise and also crosswise of the keyboard, so that the finger of the operator may move at pleasure directly to any key on the key board and in so doing automatically bring a corresponding type to the impression-plane, and so that the said finger of the operator may then be moved down to depress the selected key and cause the imprint of its type upon the paper.

37. In a type-Writing machine, the combination with a keyboard having imitation keys and two independent type-carriers, of two rigid handles for operating the latter, and provided each with a finger-ring for the insertion of the operating-finger of the typewritist and capable of a movement longitudinally of the keyboard and also transversely thereof, so that the finger of the operator may move in any direction at pleasure to touch any desired key and thereby automatically bring the type corresponding to such key to the printing-plane, and so that by subsequent depression of said key its said corresponding type may be caused to make its imprint.

38. In a type-Writing machine, a keyboard bearing or comprising a single alphabet, and two independent type-carriers each containing an alphabet corresponding to the keyboard, one of said carriers containing a portion of the lower-case types and also a portion of the upper-case types, and the other of said carriers containing the remainder of the lowercase types and the remainder of the uppercase types.

Signed at New York city, in the county of New York and State of New York, this 30th day of April, A. D. 1896.

NEWMAN R. MARSI-IMAN. LEE S. BUR-RIDGE. Witnesses:

A. B. MoRRIsoN, D. S. RITTERBAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4722621 *Oct 30, 1985Feb 2, 1988Johnson Reynold BKeyboard assembly and recording apparatus
US8083424 *Mar 12, 2009Dec 27, 2011Metamorfyx, LLCErgonomic keyboard
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB41J1/16