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Publication numberUS602488 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 19, 1898
Filing dateJun 25, 1897
Publication numberUS 602488 A, US 602488A, US-A-602488, US602488 A, US602488A
InventorsM. Tice
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Filter for rain-water
US 602488 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

W. M. 8u L. TICE. FILTER FOR BAIN WATER.

Patented Apr. 19,1898.

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VILSON M. TICE AND LEVI TICE, OF BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVANIA.

FILTER FOR RAIN-WATER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 602,488, dated April 19, 1898.

Application filed June 25, 1897. Serial No. 642,295. (No model.)

To @ZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, WILSON M. TICE and LEVI TICE, citizens of the United States, residing at Bethlehem, in the county of Northampton and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Filter for Rain-lVater, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to filters for rainwateigits object being to provide animproved device of this character adapted to be detachably suspended in a suitable casing, which casing is interposed at a convenient point in the rain-water pipe between the gutter and a cistern.

XVith this object in view the invention consists of the several details of construction and combination of parts hereinafter fully described, and particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a rain-water pipe, showing our improved filter in position. Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section through the filter and its casing. Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the outer strainer detached. Fig. 4 is a similar view of the inner coiled-wire strainer detached.

Similar reference-numerals indicate similar parts in the several figures.

l indicates a rain-water pipe, such as is commonly used to convey the rain-water from the roof-gutterto a cistern. In the drawings this pipe is shown as being corrugated; but it is obvious that it may be round or any other form desired.

2 indicates the casing, within which the tilter is suspended, and this casing is provided at each end with a pipe-section 3 for connecting it to the rain-water pipe. Vithin the casing at the upper end acollart is provided, which surrounds the opening through which the water passes from the rain-water pipe, and this collar is provided with outwardlyprojecting pins 5. The outer strainer of the filter is indicated by G and is formed of wirenetting made into the shape of a cylinder, with its lower end closed with a disk of wirenetting secured to the cylinderin any suitable manner. At the upper end of the strainer a sleeve 7 is secured, and this sleeve is provided with L-shaped slots 8, the horizontal portions of which are provided with a recess 9 at their inner ends and are adapted to receive the pins 5 on the collar 4 of the casing to form an ordinary bayonet-joint, by means of which the strainer is detachably suspended within the casing.

10 indicates a handle formed of a piece of wire bent into practically U shape, with the ends of its arms inturned, as indicated at 11, which inturned ends are pivoted in holes in the sleeve 7. This handle forms a convenient means for connecting or disconnecting the strainer from the pins 5.

12 indicates the inner strainer, which consists of a tapering coil of wire, and the coils at the upper end are arranged to normally lie close together, while the spaces between the lower coils gradually increase toward the lower end. A iiange l13 is formed at the upper end of this coiled-wire strainer, preferably by arranging two or three coils of the wire in a horizontal plane and soldering them together. This flange is adapted to be supported on a series of lugs 14, which project inwardly from the inner periphery of the sleeve 7. It is obvious, therefore, that the coiled-wire strainer can be easily removed from the outer strainer 6 whenever it may be necessary for the purpose of cleansing the filter. A piece of coarse wire-netting is secured in the lower end of the casing immediately above the discharge-opening therefrom, and this netting is adapted to support a sponge 1G or other suitable absorbent material, through which the Water will be free to percolate.

The casing 2 is provided on one side with an opening 17, which is of sufcient length to permit the removal of the strainer from the casing, and on opposite sides of this opening strips 18 are secured, the opposing edges of which are bent to form grooved ways 19.

2O indicates a sliding door, which is curved to conform to the curvature of the casing and is provided at its opposite sides with flanges 21, adapted to slide in the grooved Ways 19. The upper end of the door is provided with a handle 22, by means of which the door can be easily moved in the grooved ways 19.

The coiled-Wire strainer isdesigned to intercept the passage of leaves and other similar objects which may be carried by the rainwater down the spout, and as the leaves accumulate in the lower end of this coiled-wire IOO strainer it will automatically extend, and the upper portion of the coils will be forced apart and permit the water to pass out freely between them into the outer strainer 6, and this outer strainer will intercept smaller particles which will pass through the coiled Wire strainer. From the outer strainer the water will pass to the sponge or other absorbent material supported in the lower end of the casing, and this will intercept the smaller particles of matter which maybe carried in with the rain-water. It is obvious, therefore, that the water after leaving the filtering devices will be pure and available for use in any manner.

From the foregoing description it will be obvious that the ltering device can be easily disconnected from the casing and from each other for the purpose of cleaning them and also that the sponge or absorbent material can be removed from the casing whenever it may be necessary to clean it.

It will understood that changes inthe form, proportion, and the minor details of construction may be resorted to without departing from the spirit or sacricing any of the advantages of this invention.

Having thus described the invention,what we claim isl. In a filter for rain-water, the combination with a casing interposed in the rain-water pipe and having a door in its side, of an outer strainer made of wire-netting detachably suspended within the casing and movable through the door, and a coarser, automatically-extensible strainer detachably suspended within the outer strainer, and movable therewith, substantially as described.

2. In a lter for rain-water, the combination with a casing interposed in the rain-Water pipe and having a door in its side, of an outer strainer made of wire-netting detachably suspended within the casing and movable through the door, a coarser, automatically-extensible strainer detachably suspended within the outer strainer, and movable therewith, and a sponge or similar absorbent device supported on a grating in the` lower end of the casing, substantially as described.

3. In a filter for rain-water, the combination of a casing provided with a sliding door and adapted to be connected to a rain-Water pipe, an outer strainer made of Wire-netting detachably suspended Within the casing and an inner strainer consisting of a tapering coil of wire detachably suspended within the outer strainer, substantially as described.

4. In a filter for rain-water, the combination of a casing adapted to be connected to a rain-Water pipe, and provided with an interior collar at its upper end, an outer strainer of wire-netting having a sleeve at its upper end adapted to be detachably connected to said collar by a bayonet-joint, a handle pivoted on the said sleeve, lugs projecting inwardly from the sleeve, and an inner strainer consisting of a tapering coil of wire having a iiauge at its upper end adapted to be supported on the said lugs, substantially as described.

5. A strainer for a rain-water filter coinposed of a tapering coil of wire, the coils at the upper end normally lying close together and the spaces between the lower coils gradually increasing toward the lower end of the Strainer, substantially as described.

In testimony that we claim the foregoing as our own we have hereto affixed our signatures in the presence of two witnesses.

WILSON M. TICE. LEVI T CE.

Witnesses:

JOHN I-I. KREssLER, URIAH YOUNG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2489292 *Jul 13, 1945Nov 29, 1949Clarcnce Hobbs JamesPipe strainer
US2532388 *Mar 5, 1947Dec 5, 1950Batt Jr AlbertDrainpipe filter
US2595538 *Aug 8, 1950May 6, 1952William L ColemanDownspout strainer
US2778502 *Jun 22, 1953Jan 22, 1957Albert R WhiteCombined quick-coupler and hollow core for an oil-refining pack
US4689147 *Sep 27, 1985Aug 25, 1987Nalge CompanyPlastic filter assembly
US4731177 *Dec 30, 1986Mar 15, 1988Hemman Edward BFor removal of debris from paint solutions
US4816148 *Oct 16, 1987Mar 28, 1989Hemman Edward BMulti-stage straining apparatus
US7950527 *Feb 1, 2006May 31, 2011Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Helical internal support structure for intake screens
US8292089May 31, 2011Oct 23, 2012Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Helical support structure for intake screens
DE1212044B *May 18, 1962Mar 10, 1966Schuler Filtertech WilhelmFilterzylinder zum Einsatz von der Reinseite her in Filterapparaten
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB01D29/0054