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Publication numberUS607086 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 12, 1898
Filing dateApr 17, 1897
Publication numberUS 607086 A, US 607086A, US-A-607086, US607086 A, US607086A
InventorsJoseph A. Safeord
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cushioned heel for boots or shoes
US 607086 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 607,086. Patented July I2, |898. l. A. SAFFORD.

CUSHIONED HEEL FOR BOOTS OR SHOES.

(Application led Apr, 17, 1897.)

Fil.

(No Model.)

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TINTTTED STATES PATENT muon.

CUSHIONED HEEL FOR BOOTS OR SHOES.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 607,086, dated July 12, 1898.

Application lled April 1 7 l 8 9 7.

T0 all whom t may concern:

Be it known that I, JOSEPH A. SAFFORD, of Malden, in the county of Middlesex and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Cushioned Heels for Boots or Shoes, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to boots and shoes the heel portions of which are provided with provisions for affording a yielding support to the heel of the wearer; and it has for its object to provide a simple, durable, and efficient construction whereby the desired result may be attained.

The invention consists in theimprovements which I will now proceed to describe and claim.

Of the accolnpanying drawings, forming a part of this specication, Figure 1 represents a longitudinal section of a portion of a boot orshoe embodying my invention. Fig. 2represents a similar view showing a different form of spring or cushion from that shown in Fig. l. Figs.8 andtrepresent, respectively,views of the two forms of cushion shown in Figs. I and 2. Fig. 5 represents a top view of the heel portion of the sole.

The same letters of reference indicate the same parts in all the iigures.V

In the drawings, a and a represent, respectively, the outer and inner soles of a boot or shoe,the whole constituting whatl hereinafter denominate the sole, and b represents the heel, which is attached, as usual, to the corresponding part of the sole.

c represents a pocket or cavity which is formed by cutting an orifice in the heel portion of the sole before the attachment of the heel thereto, the heel when subsequently attached forming the bottom of the pocket. The pocket c is of such form that its edges are separated from the margin of the heel portion by sufficient material to receive the nails which attach the heelb to the heel portion of the sole. In the pocket c isinserted a spring or cushion CZ, which is preferably made of rubber, and in the arched form shown in Figs. l and 3 the ends or abutments of the arch resting on the bottom and two sides of the pocket c, as shown in Fig. l. This form of spring gives a high degree of elasticity and is therefore very desirable. It is also free from liability to be displaced from its opera- Serial No. 632,651. (No model.)

tive position and does not require to be fastened in the pocket c, owing to the side portions of said spring bearing against the side walls of the pocket.

In Figs. 2 and 4 I show a spring made in tubular form, the axis of the tube being vertical and the side portions thereof bearing against the side walls of the pocket. In this case the central opening gives the cushion or spring the desired elasticity.

It will be seen that by cutting an orifice in the heel portion of the sole of a boot or shoe before the attachment of the heel thereto and then attaching the heel, so that it will extend across the orice, a spring-receiving pocket or cavity is formed without sacrificing the strength of the attachment of the heel to the sole. The rubber spring or cushion inserted in said pocket and projecting above the sole furnishes an elastic bearing for the heel of the wearer, reducing the jar which attends the impact of the heel against the pavement, and thus greatly conducing to the comfort of the wearer.

In both of the forms of spring shown the inner and outer walls are curved. This insures the leaving. of a sufficient space into which the rubber can be forced by the wearer, so as to increase the elasticity over what would be inherent in a solid spring. With the form shown in Fig. l the free spaces are shown as under the center of the spring and above each end thereof, while in the form shown in Figs. 2 and 5 the spaces are in each corner of the pocket c and also in the center of the spring.

I prefer to introduce a slip-sole e between the cushion d and the foot of the wearer. Said sole may be formed to extend the entire length of the interior of the boot or shoe or may terminate just forward of the heel. Its under side is preferably reinforced by a metallic plate c2, which preventsv the slip-sole from yielding or buckling where it bears on the cushion.

Owing to the orifice or pocket extending through the sole to the top of the heel said pocket is made deep enough to receive a rubber spring of sufcient size and strength for the purpose desired without making such orice of great area. In other words, the pocket is small and does not interfere with the ordi- IOO nary attachment of the heel and the sole in the usual manner.

I claiml l. A boot or shoe having an orifice formed in the heel portion of the sole, aheei attached to the said portion in position to extend across the orifice, said orifice and the heel forming a pocket, a rubber spring having curved in ner and outer Walls and inserted in said pocket and projecting above the sole and bearing against the side Walls of said pocket, and a slip-sole havinga metal reinforcementformed to bear on said cushion.

2. Aboot o1' shoe having an orifice formed in the heel portion of the soie, a heel attached to the said portion in position to extend across the orifice, said orifice and the heel forming a pocket, and an arched piece of rubber in-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2433329 *Nov 7, 1944Dec 30, 1947Adler Arthur HHeight increasing device for footwear
US4815221 *Feb 6, 1987Mar 28, 1989Reebok International Ltd.Shoe with energy control system
US6487796 *Jan 2, 2001Dec 3, 2002Nike, Inc.Footwear with lateral stabilizing sole
US6880267Jan 28, 2004Apr 19, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US6898870Mar 20, 2002May 31, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole having support elements with compressible apertures
US6964120Nov 2, 2001Nov 15, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US6968636Apr 26, 2004Nov 29, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole with a stiffness adjustment mechanism
US7082698Jan 8, 2003Aug 1, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US7401418Aug 17, 2005Jul 22, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US7493708Feb 18, 2005Feb 24, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with plate dividing a support column
US7533477Oct 3, 2005May 19, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7748141May 18, 2006Jul 6, 2010Nike, IncArticle of footwear with support assemblies having elastomeric support columns
US7774955Apr 17, 2009Aug 17, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7810256Apr 17, 2009Oct 12, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7841105Dec 7, 2009Nov 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US8056261 *Jul 20, 2007Nov 15, 2011Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Footwear sole construction
US8220183Jan 23, 2009Jul 17, 2012Nike, Inc.Removable heel pad for foot-receiving device
US8302234Apr 17, 2009Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8302328Jun 29, 2010Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8312643Sep 28, 2010Nov 20, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8453345Jun 15, 2012Jun 4, 2013Nike, Inc.Removable heel pad for foot-receiving device
US8656608Sep 13, 2012Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
WO2001086834A1 *May 10, 2001Nov 15, 2001Lehtinen Otto AleksanteriPower control in radio system
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/32