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Publication numberUS6143806 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/008,544
Publication dateNov 7, 2000
Filing dateJan 16, 1998
Priority dateJan 17, 1997
Fee statusLapsed
Publication number008544, 09008544, US 6143806 A, US 6143806A, US-A-6143806, US6143806 A, US6143806A
InventorsEiichi Kato, Sadao Osawa, Kazuo Ishii
Original AssigneeFuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil-based ink for preparing printing plate by ink jet process and method for preparing printing plate by ink jet process
US 6143806 A
Abstract
An oil-based ink for a printing plate by an ink jet process comprising spraying an oil-based ink comprising at least resin particles dispersed in a nonaqueous carrier liquid having an electric resistance of 109 Ωcm or more and a dielectric constant of 3.5 or less on a water-resistant support having a lithographically printable hydrophilic surface to dropwise from a nozzle form an image, wherein the resin particles dispersed are polymer particles obtained by polymerization granulation of a solution comprising (i), (ii) and (iii): (i) at least one monofunctional monomer (A) which is soluble in a nonaqueous solvent at least miscible with the nonaqueous carrier liquid and becomes insoluble therein by polymerization; (ii) (ii-a) at least one monomer (B) represented having a specific substituent copolymerizable with the monomer (A), or (ii-b) at least one specific monofunctional macromonomer (MA) having a weight average molecular weight of 2104 or less; and (iii) at least one dispersion-stabilizing resin soluble in the nonaqueous solvent and having no graft group polymerizing with a monomer, and a method for preparing a printing plate by an ink jet process using the ink.
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Claims(2)
What is claimed is:
1. A method for preparing a printing plate by an ink jet process consisting essentially of discharging an oily ink using an electrostatic field on a lithographic printing late precursor comprising a water-resistant support having provided thereon an image receiving layer having a lithographically printable hydrophilic surface dropwise from a head having a discharge electrode to form an image on the surface of the lithographically printable hydrophilic surface;
wherein the oily ink comprises resin particles dispersed in a nonaqueous solvent having an electric resistance of 109 Ωcm or more and a dielectric constant of 3.5 or less, and said resin particles dispersed are copolymer resin particles obtained by polymerization granulation of a solution comprising (i), (ii) and (iii):
(i) at least one monofunctional monomer (A) which is soluble in a nonaqueous solvent which is at least miscible with said nonaqueous carrier liquid and becomes insoluble therein by polymerization;
(ii) (ii-a) at least one monomer (B) represented by the following formula (I-A) which is copolymerizable with said monomer (A), or
(ii-b) at least one monofunctional macromonomer (MA) having a weight average molecular weight of 2104 or less in which a polymerizable double bond group represented by the following formula (II-B) is combined with only one end of a main chain of a polymer comprising a repeating unit corresponding to a monomer represented by the following formula (I-B); and
(iii) at least one dispersion-stabilizing resin which is soluble in said nonaqueous solvent and has no graft group polymerizing with a monomer; ##STR34## wherein E1 represents an aliphatic group having 8 or more carbon atoms or a substituent having a total number of atoms of 8 or more, provided that hydrogen atoms directly attached to a carbon or nitrogen atom are excluded from the number, represented by the following formula (III-A):
.paren open-st.A1 --B1 .paren close-st.m .paren open-st.A2 --B2 .paren close-st.n R21 (III-A)
wherein R21 represents a hydrogen atom or an aliphatic group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms;
B1 and B2 are the same or different and each represents --O--, --S--, --CO--, --CO2 --, --OCO--, --SO2 --, --N(R22)--, --CON(R22)--, --N(R22)CO--, --N(R22)SO2 --, --SO2 N(R22)--, --NHCO2 -- or --NHCONH--, in which R22 has the same meaning as R21 ;
A1 and A2 are the same or different and each represents at least one group selected from a group represented by the following formula (III-Aa) and a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, which each may be substituted, provided that, in the case where A1 or A2 represents two or more groups selected from a group represented by the following formula (III-Aa) and a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, it represents (1) two or more groups represented by formula (III-Aa), (2) a combination of at least one group represented by formula (III-Aa) and at least one hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, or (3) two or more hydrocarbon groups having 1 to 18 carbon atoms: ##STR35## wherein B3 and B4 are the same or different and each has the same meaning as B1 and B2 ;
A4 represents a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms which may be substituted;
R23 has the same meaning as R21 ; and
m, n and p are the same or different and each represents an integer of 0 to 4, provided that m, n and p are not 0 at the same time;
U1 represents --COO--, --CONH--, --CON(E2)--, --OCO--, --CONHCOO--, --CH2 COO--, --(CH2)k OCO--, --O--, --C6 H4 -- or --C6 H4 --COO--, in which E2 represents an aliphatic group or a substituent represented by formula (III-A) described above, and k represents an integer of 1 to 4; and
a1 and a2 are the same or different and each represents a hydrogen atom, an alkyl group, a halogen atom, a cyano group, --COO--E3 or --CH2 COO--E3 in which E3 represents an aliphatic group; ##STR36## wherein V0 represents --COO--, --OCO--, --(CH2)r COO--, --(CH2)r OCO--, --O--, --SO2 --, --CONHCOO--, --CONHCONH--, --CON(D11)--, --SO2 N(D11)-- or a phenylene group, in which D11 represents a hydrogen atom or a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 22 carbon atoms, and r represents an integer of 1 to 4;
a11 and a12 are the same or different and each represents a hydrogen atom, a halogen atom, a cyano group, a hydrocarbon group, --COO--D12 or --COO--D12 linked through a hydrocarbon group, in which D12 represents a hydrogen atom or a hydrocarbon group which may be substituted;
D0 represents a hydrocarbon group having 8 to 22 carbon atoms or a substituent group having a total number of atoms of 8 or more, provided that hydrogen atoms attached to a carbon or nitrogen atom are excluded from the number, represented by the following formula (III-B):
.paren open-st.A11 --B11 .paren close-st.m0 .paren open-st.A12 --B12 .paren close-st.n0 D21(III-B)
wherein D21 represents a hydrogen atom or an aliphatic group having 1 to 22 carbon atoms;
B11 and B12 are the same or different and each represents --O--, --CO--, --CO2 --, --OCO--, --SO2 --, --N(D22)--, --CON(D22)--, or --N(D22)CO--, in which D22 has the same meaning as D21 ;
A11 and A12 are the same or different and each represents at least one group selected from a group represented by the following formula (III-Ba) and a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, which each may be substituted, provided that, in the case where A11 or A12 represents two or more groups selected from a group represented by the following formula (III-Ba) and a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, it represents (1) two or more groups represented by formula (III-Ba), (2) a combination of at least one group represented by formula (III-Ba) and at least one hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, or (3) two or more hydrocarbon groups having 1 to 18 carbon atoms; ##STR37## wherein B13 and B14 are the same or different and each has the same meaning as B11 and B12 ;
A14 represents a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms which may be substituted;
D23 has the same meaning as D21 ; and
m0, n0 and p0 are the same or different and each represents an integer of 0 to 4, provided that m0, n0 and p0 are not 0 at the same time; ##STR38## wherein V1 represents --COO--, --CONHCOO--, --CONHCONH--, --CONH-- or a phenylene group; and
b11 and b12 are the same or different and each has the same meaning as a11 and a12 in formula (I-B);
wherein the support has a specific electric resistance of 1010 Ωcm or less at least an area directly under the image receiving layer;
wherein said resin particles dispersed in the oily ink are electrically detectable particles positively or negatively charged;
wherein the lithographically printable hydrophilic surface faces the discharge electrode, and a counter electrode is provided on the opposite side thereof.
2. The method as claimed in claim 1, wherein said water-resistant support is a support having a specific electric resistance of 1010 Ωcm or less as a whole of the support.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to an oil-based ink for preparing a printing plate by an ink jet process, and a method for preparing a printing plate by an ink jet process using it. More particularly, the present invention relates to an oil-based ink excellent in redispersibility, stability, image reproducibility and printability (press life), and a method for preparing a printing plate by an ink jet process using it.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

With recent developments in business machines and progress in office automation, in the field of light printing, offset lithographic systems have been widely applied in which printing process is conducted, namely images are formed, on direct imaging lithographic printing plate precursors comprising water-resistant supports having provided thereon image receiving layers having hydrophilic surfaces.

Conventional printing plate precursors for direct imaging lithographic printing comprise supports formed of paper or plastic films which are subjected to water-resistant treatments having provided thereon image accepting layers (or image receiving layers) containing inorganic pigments, water-soluble resins and water resistance imparting agents. Methods are known in which lipophilic images are formed on such direct imaging lithographic printing plate precursor with typewriters or by hand writing using lipophilic ink, or by transferring images from ink ribbons by heat melting with heat transfer printers, thereby preparing printing plates.

However, the printing plates prepared by such methods are not sufficient in mechanical strength of image areas, so that missing easily takes place in the image areas in printing.

On the other hand, ink jet recording is a recording method low in noise and printable at high speed, and has recently been rapidly popularized.

As such ink jet recording systems, there are proposed various ink jet processes such as a so-called electric field controlling system in which ink is discharged using electrostatic attraction, a so-called drop-on-demand system (pressure pulse system) in which ink is discharged using the oscillation pressure of a piezoelectric element, and a so-called bubble (thermal) system in which ink is discharged using pressure developed by forming bubbles and allowing them to grow by heating at high temperature, and very detailed images can be obtained by these systems.

In these ink jet recording systems, aqueous ink using water as a main solvent, and oil-based ink using an organic solvent as a main solvent are generally used.

It is also carried out that the above-mentioned lithographic printing plate precursors are made with typewriters using ink jet recording systems, and in this case, aqueous ink in which water is used as a dispersing medium is also employed. However, the aqueous ink has the problem that blurs appear in images on precursor materials, or that the picture drawing speed is decreased because of slow drying. In order to reduce such a problem, a method using oil-based ink in which a nonaqueous solvent is used as a dispersing medium is disclosed in JP-A-54-117203 (the term "JP-A" as a used herein means an "unexamined published Japanese patent application").

However, this method is also insufficient, because blurs are observed in actual printing process images, furthermore, blurs are developed in printing, and the number of printing sheets is limited to several hundred at the most. Furthermore, such ink has the problem of being liable to clog a nozzle for discharging minute ink droplets which make it possible to obtain printing process images having high resolution.

In the ink jet recording systems, ink is generally discharged from nozzles through filters, so that abnormal discharge of ink is liable to take place by clogging of the nozzles or the filters, changes in fluidity of ink with time, or other various factors.

This abnormal discharge of ink takes place with respect to not only aqueous ink compositions, but also oil-based ink compositions. Various proposals for improving such abnormal discharge of ink have been submitted. For example, in order to prevent the abnormal discharge of ink at the time when oil-based ink compositions are used, it is proposed that the viscosity and the specific resistance of the ink compositions are controlled as described in JP-A-49-50935, for the ink jet recording system of the electric field controlling system. It is further proposed that the dielectric constant and the specific resistance of solvents used in the ink compositions are controlled as described in JP-A-53-29808.

Furthermore, as attempts to prevent clogging of nozzles caused by general oil-based ink for ink jet printers, there are proposed, for example, methods in which the dispersion stability of pigment particles is improved (e.g., JP-A-4-25573, JP-A-5-25413 and JP-A-5-65443) and methods in which specific compounds are contained as ink compositions (e.g., JP-A-3-79677, JP-A-3-64377, JP-A-4-202386 and JP-A-7-109431).

However, when they are used in image formation of lithographic printing plates, all of them are poor in image strength in printing, and printing plates which can satisfy the press life have not been obtained.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of the present invention is to provide an oil-based ink for a printing plate by an ink jet process excellent in redispersibility, storage stability and press life.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an oil-based ink for a printing plate by an ink jet process which makes it possible to print many sheets of printed material having clear images.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an oil-based ink for a printing plate by an ink jet process which does not induce clogging in a nozzle and in the course of ink supply and stabilizes ink discharge.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a method for preparing a printing plate by an ink jet process using the above-mentioned oil-based ink.

These and other objects of the present invention have been accomplished by the following:

(1) an oil-based ink for a printing plate by an ink jet process comprising spraying an oil-based ink comprising at least resin particles dispersed in a nonaqueous carrier liquid having an electric resistance of 109 Ωcm or more and a dielectric constant of 3.5 or less on a water-resistant support having a lithographically printable hydrophilic surface dropwise from a nozzle to form an image,

wherein said resin particles dispersed are polymer particles obtained by polymerization granulation of a solution comprising (i), (ii) and (iii):

(i) at least one monofunctional monomer (A) which is soluble in a nonaqueous solvent which is at least miscible with said nonaqueous carrier liquid and becomes insoluble therein by polymerization;

(ii) (ii-a) at least one monomer (B) represented by the following formula (I-A) which is copolymerizable with said monomer (A), or

(ii-b) at least one monofunctional macromonomer (MA) having a weight average molecular weight of 2104 or less in which a polymerizable double bond group represented by the following formula (II-B) is combined with only one end of a main chain of a polymer comprising a repeating unit corresponding to a monomer represented by the following formula (I-B); and

(iii) at least one dispersion-stabilizing resin which is soluble in said nonaqueous solvent and has no graft group polymerizing with a monomer: ##STR1##

wherein E1 represents an aliphatic group having 8 or more carbon atoms or a substituent having a total number of atoms of 8 or more, provided that hydrogen atoms directly attached to a carbon or nitrogen atom are excluded from the number, represented by the following formula (III-A):

.paren open-st.A1 --B1 .paren close-st.m .paren open-st.A2 --B2 .paren close-st.n R21 (III-A)

wherein R21 represents a hydrogen atom or an aliphatic group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms;

B1 and B2 are the same or different and each represents --O--, --S--, --CO--, --CO2 --, --OCO--, --SO2 --, --N(R22)--, --CON(R22)--, --N(R22)CO--, --N(R22)SO2 --, --SO2 N(R22)--, --NHCO2 -- or --NHCONH--, in which R22 has the same meaning as R21 ;

A1 and A2 are the same or different and each represents at least one group selected from a group represented by the following formula (III-Aa) and a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, which each may be substituted, provided that, in the case of two or more, it represents a combination of the group represented by formula (III-Aa) and/or the hydrocarbon group: ##STR2##

wherein B3 and B3 are the same or different and each has the same meaning as B1 and B2 ;

A4 represents a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms which may be substituted;

R23 has the same meaning as R21 ; and

m, n and p are the same or different and each represents an integer of 0 to 4, provided that m, n and p are not 0 at the same time;

U1 represents --COO--, --CONH--, --CONH(E2)--, --OCO--, --CONHCOO--, --CH2 COO--, --(CH2)k OCO--, --O--, --C6 H4 -- or --C6 H4 --COO--, in which E2 represents an aliphatic group or a substituent represented by formula (III-A) described above, and k represents an integer of 1 to 4; and

a1 and a2 are the same or different and each represents a hydrogen atom, an alkyl group, a halogen atom, a cyano group, --COO--E3 or --CH2 COO--E3, in which E3 represents an aliphatic group: ##STR3##

wherein V0 represents --COO--, --OCO--, --(CH2)r COO--, --(CH2)r OCO--, --O--, --SO2 --, --CONHCOO--, --CONHCONH--, --CON(D11)--, --SO2 N(D11)-- or a phenylene group, in which D11 represents a hydrogen atom or a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 22 carbon atoms, and r represents an integer of 1 to 4;

a11 and a12 are the same or different and each represents a hydrogen atom, a halogen atom, a cyano group, a hydrocarbon group, --COO--D12 or --COO--D12 linked through a hydrocarbon group, in which D12 represents a hydrogen atom or a hydrocarbon group which may be substituted;

D0 represents a hydrocarbon group having 8 to 22 carbon atoms or a substituent group having a total number of atoms of 8 or more, provided that hydrogen atoms attached to a carbon or nitrogen atom are excluded from the number, represented by the following formula (III-B):

.paren open-st.A11 --B11 .paren close-st.m0 .paren open-st.A12 --B12 .paren close-st.n0 D21(III-B)

wherein D21 represents a hydrogen atom or an aliphatic group having 1 to 22 carbon atoms;

B11 and B12 are the same or different and each represents --O--, --CO--, --CO2 --, --OCO--, --SO2 --, --N(D22)--, --CON(D22)--, or --N(D22)CO--, in which D22 has the same meaning as D21 ;

A11 and A12 are the same or different and each represents at least one group selected from a group represented by the following formula (III-Ba) and a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, which each may be substituted, provided that, in the case of two or more, it represents a combination of the group represented by formula (III-Ba) and/or the hydrocarbon group: ##STR4##

wherein B13 and B14 are the same or different and each has the same meaning as B11 and B12 ;

A14 represents a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms which may be substituted;

D23 has the same meaning as D21 ; and

m0, n0 and p0 are the same or different and each represents an integer of 0 to 4, provided that m0, n0 and p0 are not 0 at the same time; ##STR5##

wherein V1 represents --COO--, --CONHCOO--, --CONHCONH--, --CONH-- or a phenylene group; and

b11 and b12 are the same or different and each has the same meaning as a11 and a12 in formula (I-B);

(2) a method for preparing a printing plate by an ink jet process comprising spraying the oil-based ink described in the above (1) dropwise from a nozzle on a water-resistant support having a lithographically printable hydrophilic surface dropwise from a nozzle to form an image by an ink jet process;

(3) the method described in the above (2), wherein said image formation by an ink jet process is conducted by a method of discharging the oil-based ink using an electrostatic field;

(4) the method described in the above (2) or (3), wherein said lithographic printing plate precursor comprises a water-resistant support having provided thereon an image receiving layer having a lithographically printable hydrophilic surface, and the support has a specific electric resistance of 1010 Ωcm or less at least at an area directly under the image receiving layer;

(5) the method described in the above (4), wherein said water-resistant support is a support having a specific electric resistance of 1010 Ωcm or less as a whole of the support; and

(6) the method described in any one of the above (2) to (5), wherein said resin particles dispersed in the oil-based ink are electrically detectable particles positively or negatively charged.

BRIEF EXPLANATION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic view showing one embodiment of a device system used in the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a schematic view showing a main part of an ink jet recording device used in the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a partially sectional view showing a head of the ink jet recording device used in the present invention.

1 Ink jet recording device

2 Master

3 Computer

4 Path

5 Video camera

6 Hard disk

7 Floppy disk

8 Mouse

10 Head

10a Discharge slit

10b Discharge electrode

10c Counter electrode

11 Oil-based ink

101 Upper unit

102 Lower unit

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention is characterized in that the above-mentioned oil-based ink is discharged on a printing precursor for lithographic printing by an ink jet process to form an image. The oil-based ink used is excellent in dispersion stability, redispersibility and storage stability, and it is possible to print clear images on a number of sheets by use of the resulting lithographic printing plate.

The oil-based ink for use in the present invention is described below.

The nonaqueous carrier liquids having an electric resistance of 109 Ωcm or more and a dielectric constant of 3.5 or less used in the present invention preferably include straight chain or branched aliphatic hydrocarbons, alicyclic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and halogen-substituted products of these hydrocarbons. Specific examples thereof include octane, isooctane, decane, isodecane, decalin, nonane, dodecane, isododecane, cyclohexane, cyclooctane, cyclodecane, benzene, toluene, xylene, mesitylene Isoper-E, Isoper-G, Isoper-H, Isoper-L (Isoper: trade name of Exxon Co.), Shellsol 70, Shellsol 71 (Shellsol: trade name of Shell Oil Co.), Amsco OME and Amsco 460 (Amsco: trade name of Spirits Co.), and mixtures thereof. The upper limit value of the electric resistance of such nonaqueous carrier liquids is about 1016 Ωcm, and the lower limit value of the dielectric constant is about 1.80.

The nonaqueous dispersed resin particles (hereinafter also referred to as "latex particles"), which are the most important constituent in the present invention, are granulated in the presence of a resin (P) for dispersion stabilization which is soluble in an nonaqueous solvent by (i) polymerizing at least one monofunctional monomer (A) with at least one monomer (B) (referred to as "first embodiment of the present invention") or (ii) polymerizing at least one monofunctional monomer (A) with at least one macromonomer (MA) (referred to as "second embodiment of the present invention").

Here, as the nonaqueous solvents, ones miscible with the nonaqueous carrier liquids of the above-mentioned oil-based ink are basically usable.

That is, as the solvents used in producing the dispersed resin particles, any solvents may be used as long as they are miscible with the above-mentioned carrier liquids. Preferred examples thereof include straight chain or branched aliphatic hydrocarbons, alicyclic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and halogen-substituted products of thesehydrocarbons. For example, hexane, octane, isooctane, decane, isodecane, decalin, nonane, dodecane, isododecane, Isoper-E, Isoper-G, Isoper-H, Isoper-L, Shellsol 70, Shellsol 71, Amsco OME and Amsco 460 solvents can be used alone or as a mixture of them.

Solvents which can be used by mixing together with these organic solvents include alcohols (for example, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, propyl alcohol, butyl alcohol and fluorinated alcohols), ketones (for example, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and cyclohexanone), carboxylic acid esters (for example, methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, propyl acetate, butyl acetate, methyl propionate and ethyl propionate), ethers (for example, diethyl ether, dipropyl ether, tetrahydrofuran and dioxane), and hydrocarbon halides (for example, methylene dichloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, dichloroethane and methylchloroform).

These nonaqueous solvents used by mixing are desirably removed by distillation under heating or reduced pressure after polymerization granulation. However, even if they are taken in oil-based ink as latex particle dispersions, no problem is encountered as long as the requirements that the resistance of the ink is 109 Ωcm or more and that the dielectric constant is 3.5 or less satisfied.

Usually, it is preferred that solvents similar to the carrier liquids are used in the stage of the production of resin dispersions. As described above, such solvents include straight chain or branched aliphatic hydrocarbons, alicyclic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon halides.

The monofunctional monomers (A) for use in the present invention may be any, as long as they are monofunctional monomers soluble in nonaqueous solvents, but insolubilized by polymerization. Specific examples thereof include monomers represented by the following formula (IV): ##STR6##

wherein T1 represents --COO--, --OCO--, --CH2 OCO--, --CH2 COO--, --O--, --CONHCOO--, --CONHOCO--, --SO2 --, --CON(W1)--, --SO2 N(W1)-- or a phenylene group (a phenylene group is hereinafter described as "--Ph--", including 1,2-, 1,3- and 1,4-phenylene groups), in which W1 represents a hydrogen atom or an aliphatic group having 1 to 8 carbon atoms which may be substituted (for example, methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, 2-chloroethyl, 2-bromoethyl, 2-cyanoethyl, 2-hydroxyethyl, benzyl, chlorobenzyl, methylbenzyl, methoxybenzyl, phenethyl, 3-phenylpropyl, dimethylbenzyl, fluorobenzyl, 2-methoxyethyl and 3-methoxypropyl);

D3 represents a hydrogen atom or an aliphatic group having 1 to 6 carbon atoms which may be substituted (for example, methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, 2-chloroethyl, 2,2-dichloroethyl, 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl, 2-bromoethyl, 2-glycidylethyl, 2-hydroxyethyl, 2-hydroxypropyl, 2,3-dihydroxypropyl, 2-hydroxy-3-chloropropyl, 2-cyano-ethyl, 3-cyanopropyl, 2-nitroethyl, 2-methoxyethyl, 2-methanesulfonylethyl, 2-ethoxyethyl, N,N-dimethyl-aminoethyl, N,N-diethylaminoethyl, trimethoxysilylpropyl, 3-bromopropyl, 4-hydroxybutyl, 2-furfurylethyl, 2-thienylethyl, 2-pyridylethyl, 2-morpholinoethyl, 2-carboxyethyl, 3-carboxypropyl, 4-carboxybutyl, 2-phosphoethyl, 3-sulfopropyl, 4-sulfobutyl, 2-carboxyamidoethyl, 3-sulfoamidopropyl, 2--N-methylcarboxyamidoethyl, cyclopentyl, chlorocyclohexyl or dichlorohexyl); and

d1 and d2 are the same or different and each preferably represents a hydrogen atom, a halogen atom (for example, chlorine or bromine), a cyano group, an alkyl group having 1 to 3 carbon atoms (for example, methyl, ethyl or propyl), --COO--Z1 or --CH2 --COO--Z1, in which Z1 represents a hydrogen atom or a hydrocarbon group having 10 or less carbon atoms which may be substituted (for example, alkyl, alkenyl, aralkyl or aryl).

Specific examples of the monofunctional monomers (A) include vinyl esters or allyl esters of aliphatic carboxylic acids having 1 to 6 carbon atoms (for example, acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, monochloroacetic acid and trifluoropropionic acid); alkyl esters or amides having 1 to 4 carbon atoms which may be substituted of unsaturated carboxylic acids such as acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, crotonic acid, itaconic acid and maleic acid (the alkyl groups include, for example, methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, 2-chloroethyl, 2-bromoethyl, 2-fluoroethyl, trifluoroethyl, 2-hydroxyethyl, 2-hydroxypropyl, 2-cyanoethyl, 2-nitroethyl, 2-methoxyethyl, 2-methanesulfonylethyl, 2-benzenesulfonylethyl, 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl, 2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethyl, 2-carboxyethyl, 2-phosphoethyl, 4-carboxybutyl, 3-sulfopropyl, 4-sulfobutyl, 3-chloropropyl, 2-hydroxy-3-chloropropyl, 2-furfurylethyl, 2-pyridinylethyl, 2-thienylethyl, trimethoxysilylpropyl and 2-carboxyamidoethyl); styrene derivatives (for example, styrene, vinyltoluene, α-methylstyrene, vinylnaphthalene, chlorostyrene, dichlorostyrene, bromostyrene, vinylbenzenecarboxylic acid, vinylbenzenesulfonic acid, chloromethylstyrene, hydroxymethylstyrene, methoxy-methylstyrene, N,N-dimethylaminomethylstyrene, vinylbenzenecarboxyamide and vinylbenzenesulfoamide); unsaturated carboxylic acids such as acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, crotonic acid, maleic acid and itaconic acid; cyclic acid anhydrides of maleic acid and itaconic acid; acrylonitrile; methacrylonitrile; and heterocyclic compounds having polymerizable double bond groups (specifically, for example, compounds described in "Polymer Data Handbook, -Fundamental Volume-", edited by Kobunshi Gakkai, pages 175 to 184, Baifukan (1986), for example, N-vinylpyridine, N-vinylimidazole, N-vinyl-pyrrolidone, vinylthiophene, vinyltetrahydrofuran, vinyloxazoline, vinylthiazole and N-vinylmorpholine).

Two or more kinds of monomers (A) may be used in combination.

Then, the monomers (B) for use in the present invention, having specific substituents and represented by formula (I-A) are further described.

First, the case where E1 represents an aliphatic group having 8 or more carbon atoms is described in detail.

E1 preferably represents an alkyl group having a total carbon number of 10 or more which may be substituted, or an alkenyl group having a total carbon number of 10 or more. Examples thereof include a decyl group, a dodecyl group, a tridecyl group, a tetradecyl group, a pentadecyl group, a hexadecyl group, a heptadecyl group, an octadecyl group, a docosanyl gorup, an eicosanyl group, a decenyl group, a dodecenyl group, a tridecenyl group, a tetradecenyl group, a hexadecenyl group, an octadecenyl group, a dococenyl group, a linoleyl group and an oleyl group. Substituents thereof include a hlogen atom (e.g., fluorine, chlorine, bromine), a hydroxyl group, a cyano group, and an alkoxy group (e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, propoxy, butoxy).

U1 preferably represents --COO--, --CONH--, --CON(E2)--, (in which E2 preferably represents an aliphatic group having 1 to 32 carbon atoms (examples of the aliphatic groups include alkyl, alkenyl and aralkyl)), --OCO--, --CH2 OCO-- or --O--. More preferably, U1 is --COO--, --CONH-- or --CON(E2)--.

a1 and a2 are the same or different and each preferably represents a hydrogen atom, a halogen atom (e.g., fluorine, chlorine, bromine), a cyano group, an alkyl group having 1 to 3 carbon atoms, --COO--E3 or --CH2 COO--E3 (in which E3 preferably represents an aliphatic group having 1 to 32 carbon atoms, such as methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, hexyl, octyl, decyl, dodecyl, tridecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, docosanyl, pentenyl, hexenyl, heptenyl, octenyl, decenyl, dodecenyl, tetradecenyl, hexadecenyl and octadecenyl). These aliphatic group may have a substituent described in the above E1. More preferably, a1 and a2 are each a hydrogen atom, an alkyl group having 1 to 3 carbon atoms (e.g., methyl, ethyl, propyl), --COO--E3 or --CH2 COO--E3 (in which E3 is more preferably an alkyl or alkenyl group having 1 to 12 carbon atoms, such as methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, hexyl, octyl, decyl, dodecyl, tridecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, docosanyl, pentenyl, hexenyl, heptenyl, octenyl, decenyl) which may be substututed.

When E1 represents an aliphatic group having 8 or more carbon atoms in the monomers (B) represented by formula (I-A) as described above, specific examples thereof include esters of unsaturated carboxylic acids such as acrylic acid, α-fluoroacrylic acid, α-chloroacrylic acid, α-cyanoacrylic acid, methacrylic acid, crotonic acid, maleic acid and itaconic acid having aliphatic groups each having a total carbon number of 10 to 32 (the aliphatic groups may contain halogen atoms and substituents such as hydroxyl, amino and alkoxy groups, or heteroatoms such as oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen atoms may intervene carbon-carbon bonds of main chains) (examples of the aliphatic groups include decyl, dodecyl, tridecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, docosadecyl, dodecenyl, hexadecenyl, oleyl, linoleyl and docosenyl); amides of the above-mentioned unsaturated carboxylic acids (the aliphatic groups have the same meaning as given for the esters); vinyl esters or allyl esters of higher fatty acids (examples of the higher fatty acids include lauric acid, myristic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and behenic acid); and vinyl ethers substituted by aliphatic groups each having a total carbon number of 10 to 32 (the aliphatic groups have the same meaning as given for the aliphatic groups of the above-mentioned unsaturated carboxylic acids).

When E1 represents an aliphatic group having 8 or more carbon atoms in the monomers (B) represented by formula (I-A) as described above, specific examples thereof include esters of unsaturated carboxylic acids such as acrylic acid, α-fluoroacrylic acid, α-chloroacrylic acid, α-cyanoacrylic acid, methacrylic acid, crotonic acid, maleic acid and itaconic acid having aliphatic groups each having a total carbon number of 10 to 32 (the aliphatic groups may contain halogen atoms and substituents such as hydroxyl, amino and alkoxy groups, or heteroatoms such as oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen atoms may intervene carbon-carbon bonds of main chains) (examples of the aliphatic groups include decyl, dodecyl, tridecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, docosadecyl, dodecenyl, hexadecenyl, oleyl, linoleyl and docosenyl); amides of the above-mentioned unsaturated carboxylic acids (the aliphatic groups have the same meaning as given for the esters); vinyl esters or allyl esters of higher fatty acids (examples of the higher fatty acids include lauric acid, myristic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and behenic acid); and vinyl ethers substituted by aliphatic groups each having a total carbon number of 10 to 32 (the aliphatic groups have the same meaning as given for the aliphatic groups of the above-mentioned unsaturated carboxylic acids).

The case where E1 represents a substituent having a total number of atoms of 8 or more (excluding a hydrogen atom directly attached to a carbon or nitrogen atom) represented by formula (III-A) in the monomer represented by formula (I-A) is described in detail.

A1 and A2 each represents at least one group selected from the group consisting of a group represented by formula (III-Aa) and a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms (in the case of two or more, each represents a bond of the group of formula (III-Aa) and/or the hydrocarbon group). More specifically, they are composed of any combinations of atomic groups such as --C(R24)(R25)-- (in which R24 and R25 each represents a hydrogen atom, an alkyl group or a halogen atom), --(CH═CH)--, a cyclohexylene group (the cyclohexylene group is hereinafter often represented by "--C6 H10 --", including 1,2-, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexylene groups) and the group represented by formula (III-Aa).

When E1 represents the substituent having a total number of atoms of 8 or more represented by formula (III-A), it is preferred that a "binding main chain" composed of U1 to R21 (namely, U1, A1, B1, A2, B2 and R21) in a binding group (--U1 .paren open-st.A1 --B1 .paren close-st.m .paren open-st.A2 --B2 .paren close-st.n R21), in formula (I-A) has a total number of atoms constituting the binding main chain of 8 or more.

Here, the number of atoms constituting the "binding main chain" means that, for example, when U1 represents --COO-- or --CONH--, the oxo group (═O group) and the hydrogen atom are not contained in the number of atoms, and the carbon atom, the ether type oxygen atom and the nitrogen atom constituting the binding main chain are contained in the number of atoms (which is different from the total number of atoms specified in E1). Accordingly, with respect to --COO-- and --CONH--, the number of atoms is counted as 2. At the same time, when R21 represents --C9 H19, the hydrogen atoms are not contained in the number of atoms, and the carbon atoms are contained therein. In this case, therefore, the number of atoms is counted as 9.

When U1 represents --CON(E2)--, and E2 represents the substituent represented by formula (III-A), namely (--U1 .paren open-st.A1 --B1 .paren close-st.m .paren open-st.A2 --B2 .paren close-st.n R21), a binding main chain composed of E2 is also included in the above-mentioned "binding main chain". Furthermore, when A1 and A2 each has the group represented by formula (III-Aa), a (--B3 .paren open-st.A4 --B4 .paren close-st.p R23) group is also included in the above-mentioned "binding main chain".

In the monomer (B) represented by formula (I-A) as described above, specific examples in the case where E1 represents the substituent shown by formula (III-A) include the following compounds.

In the following formulas (1) to (19), each symbol shows the following contents:

r1 : --H, --CH3, --Cl or --CN

r2 : --H or --CH3

l: an integer of 2 to 10

p: an integer of 2 to 6

q: an integer of 2 to 4

m: an integer of 1 to 12

n: an integer of 4 to 18 ##STR7##

The dispersed resin according to the first embodiment of the present invention comprises at least one monomer (A) and at least one monomer (B), and it is important that the resin synthesized from these monomers is insoluble in an nonaqueous solvent, thereby being able to obtain the desired dispersed resin.

More specifically, the monomer (B) represented by formula (I-A) is used preferably in an amount of 0.1% to 15% by weight, more preferably 0.1% to 10% by weight, and most preferably 0.3% to 8% by weight, based on the monomer (A) to be insolubilized.

Then, the monofunctional macromonomers (MA) for use in the present invention are further described.

The monofunctional macromonomer (MA) is a macromonomer having a weight average molecular weight of 2104 or less in which a polymerizable double bond group represented by formula (II-B) is combined with only one end of a main chain of a polymer comprising repeating units represented by formula (I-B).

In formulas (I-B) and (II-B), hydrocarbon groups contained in a11, a12, V0, D0, b11 and b12 each has carbon atoms shown (as an unsubstituted hydrocarbon group), but they may be substituted with a halogen atom, an acyl group, an amino group, a cyano group, an alkyl group having 1 to 5 carbon atoms, an alkoxy group, an aryl group which may be substituted with an alkyl or haloalkyl group, or an amido group.

In formula (I-B), D11 in the substituent group represented by V0 represents a hydrocarbon atom, as well as a hydrogen atom. Preferred examples of the hydrocarbon groups include alkyl groups having 1 to 22 carbon atoms which maybe substituted (for example, methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, heptyl, hexyl, octyl, nonyl, decyl, tridecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, eicosanyl, docosanyl, 2-chloroethyl, 2-bromoethyl, 2-cyanoethyl, 2-methoxycarbonylethyl, 2-methoxyethyl and 3-bromopropyl), alkenyl groups having 4 to 18 carbon atoms which may be substituted (for example, 2-methyl-1-propenyl, 2-butenyl, 2-pentenyl, 3-methyl-2-pentenyl, 1-pentenyl, 1-hexenyl, 2-hexenyl, 4-methyl-2-hexenyl, decenyl, dodecenyl, tridecenyl, hexadecenyl, octadecenyl and linoleyl), aralkyl groups having 7 to 12 carbon atoms which may be substituted (for example, benzyl, phenetyl, 3-phenylpropyl, naphthylmethyl, 2-naphthylethyl, chlorobenzyl, bromobenzyl-, methylbenzyl, ethylbenzyl, methoxybenzyl, dimethylbenzyl and dimethoxybenzyl), alicyclic groups having 5 to 8 carbon atoms which may be substituted (for example, cyclohexyl, 2-cyclohexylethyl and 2-cyclopentylethyl), and aromatic groups having 6 to 12 carbon atoms which may be substituted (for example, phenyl, naphthyl, tolyl, xylyl, propylphenyl, butylphenyl, octylphenyl, dodecylphenyl, methoxyphenyl, ethoxyphenyl, butoxyphenyl, decyloxyphenyl, chlorophenyl, dichlorophenyl, bromophenyl, cyanophenyl, acetylphenyl, methoxycarbonylphenyl, ethoxycarbonylphenyl, butoxycarbonylphenyl, acetamidophenyl, propioamidophenyl and dodecyloylamidophenyl).

When V0 represents --Ph-- (a phenylene group), a benzene ring may have a substituent group. The substituent groups include halogen atoms (for example, chlorine and bromine) and alkyl groups (for example, methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, chloromethyl and methoxymethyl).

a11 and a12 are the same or different and each preferably represents a hydrogen atom, a halogen atom (for example, chlorine or bromine), a cyano group, an alkyl group having 1 to 3 carbon atoms (for example, methyl, ethyl or propyl), --COO--D13 or --CH2 COO--D13 (wherein D13 represents a hydrogen atom or an alkyl, alkenyl, aralkyl, alicyclic or aryl group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms, which may be substituted, and specific examples thereof are the same as those described for D11 above).

When D0 represents a hydrocarbon group having 8 to 22 carbon atoms, specific examples thereof are the same as those described for D11 mentioned above.

The case where D0 represents a substituent having a total number of atoms of 8 or more (excluding a hydrogen atom directly attached to a carbon or nitrogen atom) represented by formula (III-B) is described in detail.

A11 and A12 each represents at least one group selected from a group represented by formula (III-Ba) and a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 18 carbon atoms (examples of the hydrocarbon group include an alkyl group, an alkenyl group, an aralkyl group and an alicyclic group, and specific examples thereof include those described as D11) (in the case of two or more, each represents a bond of the group of formula (III-Ba) and/or the hydrocarbon group).

More specifically, examples of A11 and A12 include any combinations of atomic groups such as --C(D31)(D32)-- (in which D31 and D32 each represents a hydrogen atom, an alkyl group or a halogen atom), --(CH═CH)--, a phenylene group (--Ph--), a cyclohexylene group and the group represented by formula (III-Ba).

When D0 represents the substituent having a total number of atoms of 8 or more represented by formula (III-B), it is preferred that a "binding main chain" composed of V0 to D21 (namely, V0, A11, B11, A12, B12 and D21) in a binding group (--V0 .paren open-st.A11 --B11 .paren close-st.m0 .paren open-st.A12 --B12 .paren close-st.n0 D21) in formula (I-B) has a total number of atoms constituting the binding main chain of 8 or more. The number of atoms constituting the binding main chain is counted in the same manner as described above in formula (I-A).

In the repeating unit represented by formula (I-B) as described above, specific examples in the case where D0 represents the substituent shown by formula (III-B) include repeating units represented by the above-described formulas (1) to (19).

The macromonomer (MA) used in the present invention has a chemical structure in which a polymerizable double bond group represented by formula (II-B) is combined with only one end of a main chain of a polymer comprising repeating units corresponding to a monomer represented by formula (I-B), directly or through any binding group.

In formula (II-B), V1 represents --COO--, --CONHCOO--, --CONHCONH--, --CONH-- or a phenylene group.

Here, specific examples of the phenylene groups are the same as those of the phenylene groups for V0 in formula (I-B).

b11 and b12 are the same or different and each has the same meaning as a11 and a12 in formula (I-B), and examples thereof are the same as those of a11 and a12.

It is more preferred that either of b11 and b12 in formula (II-B) is a hydrogen atom.

A group connecting a component of formula (I-B) to a component of formula (II-B) is constituted by any combination of atomic groups of a carbon-carbon bond (single bond or double bond), a carbon-heteroatom bond (examples of the heteroatoms include an oxygen atom, a sulfur atom, a nitrogen atom and silicon atom) and a heteroatom-heteroatom bond.

Of the macromonomers (MA) of the present invention, preferred are ones represented by the following formula (V-B): ##STR8##

wherein symbols other than Z have the same meanings as given for those in formulas (I-B) and (II-B).

Z represents a single bond, or an independent binding group selected from atomic groups such as --C(D41)(D42)-- (in which D41 and D42 each independently represents a hydrogen atom, a halogen atom (for example, fluorine, chlorine or bromine), a cyano group, a hydroxyl group, an alkyl group (for example, methyl, ethyl or propyl)), --(CH═CH)--, --C6 H10 -- (a cyclohexylene group), --Ph-- (a phenylene group), --O--, --S--, --CO--, --N(D4)--, --COO--, --SO--, --CON(D43)--, --SON(D43)--, --NHCOO--, --NHCONH--, --Si(D43)(D44)-- (in which D43 and D44 each independently represents a hydrogen atom or a hydrocarbon group having the same meaning as given for D described above) and an independent binding group shown in groups shown below, or a binding group constituted by any combination thereof. ##STR9##

In formula (V-B), particularly preferred examples of a11, a12, b11, b12, V0 and V1 are each shown below.

V0 includes --COO--, --OCO--, --O--, --CH2 COO-- and --CH2 OCO--, V1 includes all the groups described above, and a11, a12, b11 and b12 include a hydrogen atom and a methyl group.

Specific examples of moieties represented by the following formula (II'-B) in formula (V-B) are shown below, but it is to be understood that the present invention is not limited thereto: ##STR10##

In the following, b represents --H or --CH3 ; m1 represents an integer of 1 to 12; and n1 represents an integer of 2 to 12. ##STR11##

Furthermore, in polymerization components of the macromonomers (MA) used in the present invention, other repeating units may be contained as copolymerization components together with the repeating units corresponding to the monomers represented by formula (I-B).

The other copolymerization components may be any compounds, as long as they are monomers copolymerizable with the monomers corresponding to the repeating units of formula (I-B). Examples thereof include unsaturated carboxylic acids such as acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, itaconic acid, crotonic acid, maleic acid, vinylacetic acid and 4-pentenoic acid, esters and amides of these unsaturated carboxylic acids, vinyl esters and allyl esters of fatty acids having 1 to 22 carbon atoms, vinyl ethers, styrene and styrene derivatives and heterocyclic compounds containing unsaturated binding groups.

Specific examples thereof include but are not limited to the compounds shown as examples in the above-mentioned monomers (A).

In the total amount of the repeating units of the macromonomer (MA), a component of the repeating units corresponding to the monomer represented by formula (I-B) is contained preferably in an amount of 60% by weight or more of the total, and more preferably in an amount of 80% to 100% by weight.

The macromonomer (MA) of the present invention has a weight average molecular weight of 1103 to 2104, preferably 3103 to 1.5104.

Within each specified range described above, the dispersed resin particles show the effects in dispersion stability, redispersion stability and storage stability.

The macromonomers (MA) of the present invention can be produced by known synthesis methods. Examples thereof include (1) a method by ionic polymerization in which various reagents are allowed to react on terminals of living polymers to form macromonomers; (2) a method by radical polymerization in which various reagents are allowed to react with terminal reactive group-binding oligomers obtained by radical polymerization using polymerization initiators and/or chain transfer agents containing reactive groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups in their molecules, thereby forming macromonomers; and (3) a method by polyaddition condensation in which polymerizable double bond groups are introduced into oligomers obtained by polyaddition or polycondensation reaction, in the same manner as in the above-mentioned radical polymerization method.

Specifically, they can be synthesized according to methods described in reviews, and literatures and patents cited therein, such as P. Dreyfuss & R. P. Quirk, Encycl. Polym. Sci. Eng., 7:551 (1987), P. F. Rempp & E. Franta, Adv. Polym. Sci., 58:1 (1984), V. Percec, Appl. Polym. Sci., 285:95 (1984), R. Asami & M. Takari, Makromol, Chem. Suppl., 12:163 (1985), P. Rempp et al., Makromol. Chem. Suppl., 8:3 (1984), Yusuke Kawakami, Kagaku Kogyo, 38:56 (1987), Yuya Yamashita, Kobunshi, 31:988 (1982), Shiro Kobayashi, Kobunshi, 30:625 (1981), Toshinobu Higashimura, Nippon Setchaku Kyokaishi, 18:536 (1982), Koichi Ito, Kobunshi Kako, 35:262 (1986) and Kishiro Azuma & Takashi Tsuda, Kino Zairyo, 10:5 (1987).

Examples of the above-mentioned polymerization initiators containing reactive groups in their molecules include azobis compounds, such as 4,4'-azobis-(4-cyanovaleric acid), 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid chloride), 2,2'-azobis(2-cyanopropanol), 2,2'-azobis-(2-cyanopentanol), 2,2'-azobis[2-methyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)propioamide], 2,2'-azobis{2-methyl-N-[1,1-bis-(hydroxymethyl)ethyl]propioamide}, 2,2'-azobis{2-methyl-N-[1,1-bis(hydroxymethyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]propioamide}, 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane), 2,2'-azobis[2-methyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)propioamide], 2,2'-azobis[2-(5-methyl-2-imidazoline-2-yl)propane], 2,2'-azobis[2-(4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-1,3-diazepine-2-yl)propane], 2,2'-azobis[2-(3,4,5,6,-tetrahydropyrimidine-2-yl)propane], 2,2'-azobis[2-(5-hydroxy-3,4,5,6,-tetrahydropyrimidine-2-yl)-propane], 2,2'-azobis{2-[1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-imidazoline-2-yl]propane}, 2,2'-azobis[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-methylpropionamidine] and 2,2'-azobis[N-(4-aminophenyl)-2-methylpropionamidine].

Furthermore, examples of the chain transfer agents containing specific reactive groups in their molecules include mercapto compounds containing said reactive groups or substituent groups derivable to the reactive groups (for example, thioglycolic acid, thiomalic acid, thiosalicylic acid, 2-mercaptopropionic acid, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, 3-mercaptobutyric acid, N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine, 2-mercaptonicotinic acid, 3-[N-(2-mercaptoethyl)amino]propionic acid, N-(3-mercaptopropionyl)alanine, 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid, 3-mercaptopropanesulfonic acid, 4-mercaptobutanesulfonic acid, 2-mercaptoethanol, 3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol, 1-mercapto-2-propanol, 3-mercapto-2-butanol, mercaptophenol, 2-mercaptoethylamine, 2-mercaptoimidazole and 2-mercapto-3-pyridinol) and iodinated alkyl compounds containing said reactive groups or substituent groups derivable to said reactive groups (for example, iodoacetic acid, iodopropionic acid, 2-iodoethanol, 2-iodoethanesulfonic acid and 3-iodopropanesulfonic acid). Preferred examples thereof include mercapto compounds.

The amounts of these chain transfer agents and the polymerization initiators used are each preferably 0.5 to 20 parts by weight, and more preferably 1 to 10 parts by weight, based on 100 parts by weight of the total monomers.

The dispersed resin according to the second embodiment of the present invention comprises at least one monomer (A) and at least one monofunctional macromonomer (MA). It is important that the resin synthesized from these monomer is insoluble in a nonaqueous solvent, whereby the desired dispersed resin can be obtained.

More specifically, the monofunctional macromonomer (MA) is used preferably in an amount of 0.1% to 20% by weight, and more preferably 0.3% to 15% by weight, based on the monomer (A) to be insolubilized.

The weight average molecular weight of the dispersed resin of the present invention is preferably 1103 to 1106, and more preferably 8103 to 5105. As to thermal properties, the dispersed resin of the present invention has preferably a glass transition point ranging from 15 C. to 80 C. or a softening point of 38 C. to 120 C., and particularly preferably a glass transition point ranging from 20 C. to 60 C. or a softening point of 40 C. to 90 C.

Within the ranges as described above, the dispersed resin particles of the oil-based ink of the present invention are excellent in dispersion stability, redispersion stability and storage stability, the rapid fixing property after image formation is good, images are retained also in printing, and the high press life is exhibited.

The resins for dispersion stability (P) used in the present invention are described, which are used for turning polymers produced by polymerization of the monomers in aqueous solvents and insoluble in the nonaqueous solvents into stable resin dispersions.

The resins for dispersion stability (P) used in the present invention are resins containing no graft groups polymerizable with monomers, and known dispersion stabilizers can be used. That is, various synthetic resins and natural resins soluble in nonaqueous solvents are used alone or as a combination of two or more of them.

The resins for dispersion stability (P) used in the present invention are soluble in organic solvents, and specifically, the resins for dispersion stability which are soluble in an amount of at least 5 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of toluene solvent at a temperature of 25 C. are preferred.

The weight average molecular weight (Mw) of the resins for dispersion stability (P) used in the present invention is preferably 5103 to 1106, more preferably 1104 to 1106, still more preferably 1104 to 2105, and most preferably 2104 to 2105.

For example, esters of acrylic acid, methacrylic acid or crotonic acid which have alkyl or alkenyl chains each having a total carbon number of 6 to 32, preferably 10 to 32 (these aliphatic groups may contain halogen atoms and substituent groups such as hydroxyl, amino and alkoxy groups, or heteroatoms such as oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen atoms may intervene carbon-carbon bonds of main chains), higher fatty acid vinyl esters, alkyl vinyl ethers, polymers of olefins such as butadiene, isoprene and diisoprene, and copolymers by a combination of two or more of them can be used. Furthermore, copolymers obtained by polymerizing monomers forming polymers soluble in the nonaqueous solvents as described above with at least one of various monomers as described below at ratios within the range that the resulting copolymers are soluble in the nonaqueous solvents can also be used.

Examples of such monomers include vinyl acetate, allyl acetate, methyl, ethyl and propyl esters of acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, crotonic acid, maleic acid and itaconic acid, styrene derivatives (for example, styrene, vinyltoluene and α-methylstyrene), unsaturated carboxylic acids such as acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, crotonic acid, maleic acid and itaconic acid and acid anhydrides thereof, hydroxyethyl methacrylate, hydroxyethyl acrylate, diethylaminoethyl methacrylate, N-vinylpyrrolidone, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, 2-chloroethyl methacrylate, 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate, and monomers containing various polar groups such as hydroxyl, amino, amido, cyano and sulfonic acid groups, halogen atoms and heterocycles.

In addition to the above-mentioned synthetic resins, natural resins such as alkyd resins, alkyd resins modified with various fatty acids, linseed oil and modified polyurethane resins can also be used.

The dispersed resin particles used in the present invention are generally produced by heat polymerization of the resins for dispersion stabilization (P), the monomers (A) and the monomers (B) or macromonomers (MA) as described above in the nonaqueous solvents in the presence of polymerization initiators such as benzoyl peroxide, bisazoisobutyronitrile and butyllithium. Specifically, there are (1) a method of adding the polymerization initiator to a mixed solution of the resin for dispersion stabilization (P), the monomer (A) and the monomer (B) or macromonomer (MA), (2) a method of adding dropwise the monomer (A) and the monomer (B) or macromonomer (MA) together with the polymerization initiator to a solution in which the resin for dispersion stabilization (P) is dissolved, (3) a method of arbitrarily adding the polymerization initiator and the remainders of the monomer (A) and the monomer (B) or macromonomer (MA) to a mixed solution containing the total amount of the resin for dispersion stabilization (P) and parts of the monomer (A) and the monomer (B) or macromonomer (MA), and (4) a method of arbitrarily adding a mixed solution of the resin for dispersion stabilization (P), the monomer (A) and the monomer (B) or macromonomer (MA) to the nonaqueous solvent together with the polymerization initiator. The dispersed resin particles can be produced using any of these methods.

The total amounts of the monomer (A) and the monomer (B) or macromonomer (MA) are each preferably 10 parts to 100 parts by weight, and more preferably 10 parts to 80 parts by weight, based on 100 parts by weight of nonaqueous solvent.

The amount of the resin for dispersion stabilization (P) is preferably 1 parts to 50 parts by weight, more preferably 5 parts to 50 parts by weight, still more preferably 5 to 30 parts, and most preferably 6 to 20 parts, based on 100 parts by weight of the total monomers used above.

The amount of the polymerization initiator is suitably 0.1% to 10% by weight based on the total monomers. The polymerization temperature is preferably about 40 C. to about 180 C., and more preferably 50 C. to 120 C. The reaction time is preferably 3 hours to 15 hours.

When the above-mentioned polar solvents such as alcohols, ketones, ethers and esters are used in combination with the nonaqueous solvents used in the reaction, or when unreacted monomers of the monomers (A) and the monomer (B) or macromonomers (MA) to be subjected to polymerization granulation remain, it is preferred that the polar solvents or the unreacted monomers are removed by distillation under heating to temperatures equal to or higher than boiling points of the solvents or the monomers, or under reduced pressure.

The nonaqueous dispersed resin particles produced according to the present invention as described above are present as particles which are fine and uniform in particle size distribution. The mean particle size thereof is 0.08 μm to 0.8 μm, preferably 0.08 μm to 0.5 μm, still more preferably 0.1 μm to 0.5 μm, and most preferably 0.1 μm to 0.4 μm. This particle size can be determined with CAPA-500 (trade name, manufactured by Horiba, Ltd.). At the same time, they show very stable dispersibility, and particularly, even when repeatedly used in a recording device for a long period of time, they are good in dispersibility and easily redispersed, so that contamination due to adhesion of the resin particles to each part of the device is not observed at all.

Furthermore, the rapid treatment by heating after ink image formation easily forms a strong coating on a surface of a support for a lithographic printing plate, thereby exhibiting the good fixing property. This makes it possible to print a large number of sheets (high press life) also in offset printing.

The oil-based ink of the present invention bringing about the effects as described above becomes available according to the insoluble latexes of the present invention.

Previously, in the compounds used as the monomers (A), for example, methacrylates, acrylates, vinyl esters of fatty acids and allyl esters of fatty acids, the carbon number of the alkyl groups contained in their molecules was usually 1 to 4, and at most 6 or less. This was for avoiding the problem that the formed resins were solubilized in nonaqueous solvents to cause difficulty in particle formation, or that the softening point of the formed resins was lowered to become weak to thermal changes, resulting in deterioration of the keeping quality. However, the dispersed resin particles of the present invention obtained by polymerization granulation, allowing the monomer (B) copolymerizable with the monomer (A) to concurrently exist in a small amount (0.1% to 15% by weight) based on the monomer (A), together with the monomer (A) insolubilized by polymerization, did not cause solubilization of the resin and a decrease in softening point of the resin to a degree becoming unpractical as described above, formed monodisperse particles having a desired mean particle size, and were significantly improved in redispersibility.

The dispersed resin particles of the present invention obtained by polymerization granulation, allowing the macromonomer (MA) composed of a copolymerization component soluble in a nonaqueous solvent to exist together with the monomer (A) insolubilized by polymerization, are considered to be caused by the presence of a soluble component contained in the macromonomer (MA) in the particle interface of the insolubilized and dispersed resin, which brings about some kind of improvement on the particle surface to improve the affinity for a dispersing medium and increase the solvation with the dispersing medium, resulting in prevention of coagulation of the resin particles.

From these, it is considered that coagulation and precipitation of the insoluble particles are inhibited, thereby significantly improving the redispersibility.

As described above, the use of the resins for dispersion stabilization (P) of the present invention improves the dispersion stability, and the resins are condensed in the oil-based ink when the ink is repeatedly used for a long period of time, thereby improving the fear of raising various problems.

It is preferred that the oil-based ink used in the present invention contains coloring materials as coloring components for detecting printing plates after processing, together with the above-mentioned dispersed resin particles.

As the coloring materials, any can be used as long as they are pigments and dyes previously used in oil-based ink compositions or liquid developers for electrostatic photography.

As the pigments, ones generally used in the technical field of printing can be used, regardless of inorganic pigments or organic pigments. Specifically, known pigments can be used without particular limitation, such as carbon black, cadmium red, molybdenum red, Chrome Yellow, cadmium yellow, Titan Yellow, chromium oxide, pyridian, Titan Cobalt Green, ultramarine blue, Prussian blue, cobalt blue, azo pigments, phthalocyanine pigments, quinacridone pigments, isoindolinone pigments, dioxazine pigments, threne pigments, perylene pigments, perynone pigments, thioindigo pigments, quinophthalone pigments and metal complex pigments.

Preferred examples of the dyes include oil-soluble dyes such as azo dyes, metal complex dyes, naphthol dyes, anthraquinone dyes, indigo dyes, carbonium dyes, quinoneimine dyes, xanthene dyes, cyanine dyes, quinoline dyes, nitro dyes, nitroso dyes, benzoquinone dyes, naphthoquinone dyes, phthalocyanine dyes and metallophthalocyanine dyes.

These pigments and dyes may be used alone or can be used appropriately in combination. They are preferably contained within the range of 0.01% to 5% by weight based on the whole ink.

These coloring materials may be dispersed by themselves in the nonaqueous solvents as dispersed particles, separately from the dispersed resin particles, or allowed to be contained in the dispersed resin particles. When they are allowed to be contained in the dispersed resin particles, the pigments are generally coated with resin materials of the dispersed resin particles to form resin-coated particles, and for the dyes, surface portions of the dispersed resin particles are generally colored therewith to form colored particles.

As one of the methods, there is a method described in JP-A-57-48738 in which a dispersed resin is dyed with a preferable dye. As another method, there is a method described in JP-A-53-54029 in which a dispersed resin is allowed to chemically combine with a dye, or a method described in JP-B-44-22955 (the term "JP-B" as used herein means an "examined Japanese patent publication") in which a monomer previously containing a dye is used in the production by polymerization granulation to form a dye-containing copolymer.

The dispersed resin particles and the colored particles (or coloring material particles) contained in the oil-based ink of the present invention are electrically detectable particles positively or negatively charged.

It is attainable to impart the electric detecting property to these particles by appropriately utilizing the technology of developers for wet electrostatic photography. Specifically, it is carried out by using electric detecting materials described in "Recent Developments and Utilization of Electrophotographic Development Systems and Toner Materials", pages 139 to 148, "Fundamental and Application of Electro-photographic Techniques", edited by Denshi Shashin Gakkai, pages 497 to 505 (Corona, 1988), and Yuji Harazaki, "Electro-photography", 16 (No. 2), 44 (1977), and other additives.

Specifically, it is described, for example, in British Patents 893,429 and 934,038, U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,122,397, 3,900,412 and 4,606,989, JP-B-4-51023, JP-B-6-19595, JP-B-6-19596, JP-B-6-23865, JP-A-60-185963 and JP-A-2-13965.

Charge regulating agents are preferably added in an amount of 0.001 part to 1.0 part by weight based on 1000 parts by weight of dispersing medium or carrier liquid. Various additives maybe further added if desired, and the upper limit of the total amount of these additives is restricted by the electric resistance of the oil-based ink. That is, if the electric resistance of the ink with the dispersed particles removed is lower than 109 Ωcm, it becomes difficult to obtain continuous tone images of good quality. It is therefore necessary to control the amount of each additive added within this limit.

The water-resistant supports having lithographically printable hydrophilic surfaces used in the present invention may be any as long as they provide hydrophilic surfaces suitable for lithography, and supports used for conventional offset printing can be used as such.

Preferably, the surfaces of the image receiving layers receiving ink images are hydrophilic surfaces having a contact angle with water of 5 degrees or less, more preferably 0 degree, which give printed material generating no ink stains in non-image areas as offset printing plates.

In the present invention, the smoothness of the surface of the image receiving layer is preferably 50 (second/10 ml) or more, and more preferably 80 (second/10 ml) or more, by the Beck smoothness.

Here, the Beck smoothness can be measured with a Beck smoothness tester. The Beck smoothness tester is a tester for measuring a time required for a definite amount (10 ml) of air to pass through between a test piece and a glass surface under reduced pressure, wherein the test piece is pressed to a highly smoothly finished circular glass plate having a hole at its center at a definite pressure (1 kg/cm2).

Defects and blurs of ink images formed by the magnitude of unevenness of the image receiving layers are preferably inhibited at a Beck smoothness of 50 or more.

Preferred embodiments thereof include water-resistant supports comprising water-resistant substrates having provided thereon image receiving layers having lithographically printable hydrophilic surfaces (hereinafter also referred to as a precursor for lithographic printing).

Examples of the water-resistant supports include a plastic sheet, paper for which printability is provided, an aluminum sheet, a zinc sheet, a bimetal sheet (e.g., a copper-aluminum sheet, a copper-stainless steel sheet and a chromium-copper sheet), a trimetal sheet (e.g, a chromium-copper-aluminum sheet, a chromium-lead-iron sheet, a chromium-copper-stainless steel sheet), preferably having a thickness of 0.1 to 3 mm, most preferably 0.1 to 1 mm.

Furthermore, they include paper having a thickness of 80 μm to 200 μm subjected to water-resistant treatment, paper laminated with plastic films or metal foil, or a plastic film.

Preferably, the water-resistant support has electroconductivity, and a specific electric resistance of 1010 Ωcm or less at least at an area directly under the image receiving layer. The specific electric resistance is preferably 108 Ωcm or less.

In order to provide the specific electric resistance of at least an area directly under the image receiving layer on a substrate such as paper and a film, for example, a layer comprising an electroconductive filler such as carbon black and a binding agent is coated, a metal foil is stuck, and a metal is evaporated.

On the other hand, examples of the support having an electroconductivity as a whole include electroconductive paper to which sodium chloride is impregnated, a plastic film with which an electroconductive filler is mixed, and a metal plate such as aluminum.

In the above electroconductivity range, when ink droplets which have been charged in ink jet recording by electric field control are adhered to the image-receiving layer, the charge of the ink droplets is disappeared quickly through earth, and a clear image having no disorder is formed.

The specific electric resistance (volume specific electric resistance, electric resistivity) was measured by a three-terminal method using a guard electrode according to JIS K-6911.

The support having an electroconductivity as a whole is explained below.

For example, the support is obtained by providing both sides of an electroconductive precursor paper obtained by impregnating sodium chloride into a substrate with a water-resistant electroconductive layer.

In the present invention, the precursor paper used for the substrate include wood pulp paper, synthetic pulp paper and mixed paper of wood pulp paper and synthetic pulp paper as they are.

The electroconductive layer is explained below.

The electroconductive layer is formed by coating a layer containing an electroconductive filler and a binding agent to both of the above electroconductive paper. The thickness of the electroconductive layer is 5 μm to 20 μm.

The electroconductive filler includes particulated carbon black, graphite, metal powder (e.g., silver powder, copper powder, nickel powder), stannic oxide powder, flake aluminum or nickel, fiber carbon, brass, aluminum, copper and stainless steel.

The resin used for the binding agent can be selected from various resins appropriately, and specifically, includes hydrophobic resins (e.g., acrylic resin, vinyl chloride resin, styrene resin, styrene-butadiene resin, styrene-acrylate resin, urethane resin, vinylidene chloride resin, vinyl acetate resin) and hydrophilic resins (e.g., polyvinyl alcohol resin, cellulose derivative resin, starch and derivatives thereof, polyacrylamide resin, styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer).

The electroconductive layer may be formed by laminating an electroconductive thin film. Examples of the electroconductive thin film include a metal foil and an electroconductive plastic film. More specifically, the metal foil laminated material includes an aluminum foil and the electroconductive plastic film laminated material includes a polyethylene resin with which carbon black is mixed. The aluminum foil may be hard or soft, and the thickness thereof is preferably 5 μm to 20 μm.

The polyethylene resin laminated film with which carbon black is mixed is preferably obtained by an extrusion laminating method. The method comprises melting polyolefin by heating to form a film, immediately pressing the film on precursor paper, and cooling it for laminating. Various apparatus for the method are known. The thickness of the laminated layer is preferably 10 μm to 30 μm. As the support having an electroconductivity as a whole, a plastic film having an electroconductivity as a substrate and a metal sheet can be used as they are so long as the water-resistivity is satisfied.

The plastic film having an electroconductivity includes polypropylene or polyester film with which an electroconductive filer such as carbon fiber or carbon black is mixed. The metal sheet includes aluminum. The thickness of the substrate is preferably 80 μm to 200 μm. If it is less than 80 μm, strength as a printing plate is insufficient. If it exceeds 200 μm, handling properties such as a transportability in a drawing apparatus are decreased.

The composition for providing a layer having an electroconductivity is explained below.

Forming of an electroconductive layer on a water-resistant substrate is carried out in the same manner as in the above-described formation of the support having an electroconductivity as a whole. That is, one surface of the substrate is coated with a layer containing an electroconductive filer and a binding agent having a thickness of 5 μm to 20 μm, or laminated with a metal foil or a plastic film having an electroconductivity.

Furthermore, in addition to the above methods, for example, a metal vaporization film such as aluminum, tin, palladium or gold may be coated on a plastic film.

According to the above methods, a support having a specific electric resistance of 1010 Ωcm or less as a whole of the support.

As to the support used in the present invention, the smoothness of a surface on the side adjacent to the image receiving layer is preferably adjusted to 300 (second/10 ml) or more, more preferably 900 (second/10 ml) to 3000 (second/10 ml), and most preferably 1000 (second/10 ml) to 3000 (second/10 ml), by the Beck smoothness.

The image reproducibility and the press life can be further improved by restricting the smoothness of the surface on the side adjacent to the image receiving layer of the support to 300 (second/10 ml) or more by the Beck smoothness. Such an improving effect is obtained even if the smoothness of the surface of the image receiving layer is the same, and it is considered that an increase in the smoothness of the surface of the support has improved the adhesive quality between the image area and the image receiving layer.

The highly smooth surface of the water-resistant support thus restricted means a surface directly coated with the image receiving layer. For example, when an under layer or an overcoat layer described later is provided on the support, it means a surface of the under layer or the overcoat layer.

The image receiving layer whose surface state is adjusted as described above without the influence of unevenness of the surface of the support is sufficiently maintained thereby, which makes it possible to further improve the image quality.

As methods for establishing the smoothness within the above-mentioned range, various known methods can be used. Specifically, such methods include a method of melt-adhering a resin to a surface of a substrate, and a method of adjusting the Beck smoothness of a surface of a support by calendering with a highly smooth hot roller.

As the above-mentioned method of melt-adhering the resin, coating by extrusion lamination is preferred in the present invention. The support adjusted to a desired smoothness can be produced by coating by this extrusion lamination. The extrusion lamination is a method in which a resin is melted into a film, which is immediately pressed to base paper, followed by cooling, thus laminating the base paper with the film, and various apparatuses are known.

The thickness of the resin layer thus laminated is 10 μm or more in terms of production stability, and preferably 10 μm to 30 μm.

Furthermore, in the present invention, the under layer can be provided between the support and the image receiving layer for improving the water resistance and the interlayer adhesive quality as described above, and a backcoat layer (back surface layer) can be provided on a surface of the support opposite to the image receiving layer for preventing curls. It is preferred that the backcoat layer has a smoothness ranging from 150 (second/10 ml) to 700 (second/10 ml).

When a printing plate is supplied to an offset printer, this allows the printing plate to be accurately set on the printer without the occurrence of deviation or slippage.

When the under layer and the backcoat layer of the support are each adjusted to such a smoothness, it is preferred that the smoothness is controlled by repeating a calender treatment step plural times, for example, by once conducting calender treatment after formation of the image receiving layer and conducting it again after formation of the backcoat layer, or by a combination of the adjustment a with respect to compositions of the under layer and the backcoat layer described later, for example, the ratio and the grain size of a pigment, and the adjustment of calender treatment conditions.

The backcoat layer is formed by coating and drying or laminating a coating liquid containing a resin, a pigment or the like on a support. The resin can be selected from various resins appropriately. Specifically, they include those described for the above-described electroconductive layer (under layer).

Furthermore, the pigments include clay, kaolin, talc, diatom earth, calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, titanium oxide and micas. In order to attain the desired smoothness, these pigments are preferably used by appropriately selecting their grain size. For example, a relatively high smoothness is required in the under layers, so that pigments from which small-sized and large-sized grains are cut off, specifically, having a grain size of about 0.5 μm to about 10 μm are preferably used. The pigments as described above are preferably used at a ratio of 80 parts to 200 parts by weight in the backcoat layers based on 100 parts by weight of resin. In order to obtain excellent water resistance, the under layers and the backcoat layers effectively contain water resistance imparting agents such as melamine resins and polyamide epichlorohydrin resins. The above-mentioned grain size can be measured using a scanning electron microscopic (SEM) photograph. When the grain is not spherical, the size is a diameter determined by converting a projected area to a circle.

When the lithographic printing plate precursor of the present invention is prepared, generally, a solution containing components for the under layer is applied onto one side of the support, followed by drying to form the under layer, if necessary, a solution containing components for the backcoat layer is further applied onto the other side of the support, followed by drying to form the backcoat layer, if necessary, and subsequently, a coating solution containing components for the image receiving layer is applied, followed by drying to form the image receiving layer. The amounts of the image receiving layer, the under layer and the backcoat layer coated are each 1 g/m2 to 30 g/m2, and particularly suitably 6 g/m2 to 20 g/m2.

More preferably, the thickness of the water-resistant support provided with the under layer and the backcoat layer ranges from 90 μm to 130 μm, and preferably from 100 μm to 120 μm.

The image receiving layer having is provided on the water-resistant support, and the thickness thereof is preferably 5 μm to 50 μm.

For example, the image receiving layer comprises a water-soluble binder, an inorganic pigment and a water-resistance imparting agent as its main component. The binder includes water-soluble resins, such as PVA, modified PVA (e.g., carboxyl PVA), starch and derivatives thereof, CMC, hydroxyethyl cellulose, casein, gelatin, polyacrylate, polyvinylpyrrolidone, poly (vinyl methyl ether), a copolymer of vinyl acetate and crotonic acid, a copolymer of maleic anhydrate, and a copolymer of styrene and maleic acid.

The water resistance imparting agent includes glyoxaly a primary condensation product of a melamine formaldehyde resin, an urea formaldehyde resin or the like, a modified polyamide resin such as a methylated proamide resin, and a polyamide-polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin. Examples of the inorganic pigments include clay, kaolin, calcium carbonate, silica, titanium oxide, zinc oxide, barium sulfate, alumina and talc. Among these, silica is preferred.

In addition, the image receiving layer may contain a crosslinking catalyst such as ammonium chloride or a silane coupling agent.

A method for forming an image on the above-mentioned precursor for lithographic printing (hereinafter also referred to as a "master") is described below. As a device system for performing such a method, there is, for example, one shown in FIG. 1.

The device system shown in FIG. 1 comprises an ink jet recording device 1 using an oil-based ink.

As shown in FIG. 1, pattern information of images (graphics or sentences) to be formed on a master 2 is first supplied from an information supply source such as a computer 3 to the ink jet recording device 1 using oil-based ink through a transmittal means such as a path 4. A head for ink jet recording 10 of the recording device 1 stores oil-based ink therein, and sprays fine droplets of the ink on the master 2 according to the above-mentioned information, when the master 2 passes through in the recording device 1. Thereby, the ink adheres to the master 2 according to the above-mentioned pattern.

Thus, the image formation on the master 2 is completed to obtain a processing master (a printing precursor for processing).

An embodiment of the ink jet recording device as shown in the device system of FIG. 1 is shown in FIG. 2 and FIG. 3. In FIG. 2 and FIG. 3, members common to the members in FIG. 1 are designated by the common reference characters. FIG. 2 is a schematic view showing a main part of such an ink jet recording device, and FIG. 3 is a sectional view showing a part of the head.

The head 10 attached to the ink jet recording device has a slit between an upper unit 101 and a lower unit 102, a leading edge thereof forms a discharge slit 10a, a discharge electrode 10b is disposed in the slit, and the inside of the slit is filled with oil-based ink 11, as shown in FIG. 2 and FIG. 3.

In the head 10, voltage is applied to the discharge electrode 10b according to a digital signal of pattern information of images. As shown in FIG. 2, a counter electrode 10c is provided opposite to the discharge electrode 10b, and the master 2 is placed on the counter electrode 10c. The application of voltage forms a circuit between the discharge electrode 10b and the counter electrode 10c, and the oil-based ink 11 is discharged from the discharge slit 10a of the head 10, thereby forming images on the master 2 placed on the counter electrode 10c.

It is preferred that the width of the discharge electrode 10b is as narrow as possible in its leading edge, for forming images of high quality, for example, conducting printing.

For example, the head of FIG. 3 is filled with oil-based ink, the discharge electrode 10b whose leading edge has a width of 20 μm is used, the distance between the discharge electrode 10b and the counter electrode 10c is adjusted to 1.5 mm, and a voltage of 3 kV is applied between these electrodes for 0.1 millisecond, whereby 40 μm-dot printed letters can be formed on the master 2.

Production examples of resins for dispersion stabilization, production examples of latex particles and examples of the present invention are shown below to illustrate the effects of the present invention in more detail, but it is to be understood that the present invention is not limited thereto. All parts, weights, ratios and the like are by weight unless otherwise indicated.

Production Example 1

Resin Particles (L-1)

A mixed solution of 14 g of poly(dodecyl methacrylate), 100 g of vinyl acetate, 4.0 g of octadecyl methacrylate and 385 g of Isoper H was heated to a temperature of 70 C. with stirring under a steam of nitrogen. As a polymerization initiator, 1.5 g of 2,2'-azobis(isovaleronitrile) (referred to as "A.I.V.N." simply) was added thereto to conduct a reaction for 4 hours. Furthermore, 0.8 g of 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (referred to as "A.I.B.N." simply) was added thereto, followed by heating to a temperature of 80 C. to conduct the reaction for 2 hours. Subsequently, 0.6 g of A.I.B.N. was added thereto, and the reaction was conducted for 2 hours. Then, the temperature was elevated to 100 C. and the resulting product was stirred for 1 hour as such to remove unreacted vinyl acetate by distillation. After cooling, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth. The resulting white dispersion was a latex having a rate of polymerization of 93% and an average particle size of 0.20 μm. The particle size was measured with CAPA-500 (manufactured by Horiba, Ltd.) (hereinafter the same).

A part of the white dispersion was centrifuged (1104 r.p.m., 1 hour), the precipitated resin particles was collected and dried. The weight average molecular weight (Mw) of the resin particles was 2105 (a value converted to polystyrene by the G.P.C. method, hereinafter the same), and the glass transition point (Tg) thereof was 38 C.

Production Example 2

Resin Particles (L-2)

A mixed solution of 18 g of a dodecyl methacrylate/acrylic acid (97/3 by weight ratio) copolymer and 177 g of Isoper H was heated to a temperature of 60 C. with stirring under a steam of nitrogen. A mixed solution of 20 g of methyl methacrylate, 80 g of methyl acrylate, 3.5 g of octadecyl acrylate, 200 g of Isoper G and 1.0 g of A.I.V.N. was added dropwise thereto for 2 hours, and the mixture was stirred as such for 2hours. Furthermore, 0.5 g of A.I.V.N. was added thereto, followed by stirring for 3 hours. After cooling, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth. The resulting white dispersion was a latex having a rate of polymerization of 99% and an average particle size of 0.23 μm.

The Mw of the resin particles was 3105, and the Tg thereof was 28 C.

Production Example 3

Resin Particles (L-3)

A mixed solution of 12 g of poly(octadecyl methacrylate), 95 g of vinyl acetate, 5 g of crotonic acid, 8 g of octadecyl methacrylate and 468 g of Isoper E was heated to a temperature of 70 C. with stirring under a steam of nitrogen. As a polymerization initiator, 1.7 g of A.I.V.N. was added thereto to conduct a reaction for 3 hours. Furthermore, 0.8 g of A.I.B.N. was added thereto, followed by heating to a temperature of 85 C. to conduct the reaction for 3 hours. Subsequently, 0.6 g of A.I.B.N. was added thereto, and the reaction was conducted for 2 hours. Then, the temperature was elevated to 100 C. and the resulting product was stirred for 1 hour as such to remove unreacted vinyl acetate by distillation. After cooling, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth. The resulting white dispersion was a latex having a rate of polymerization of 95% and an average particle size of 0.18 μm.

The Mw of the resin particles was 8104, and the Tg thereof was 44 C.

Production Example 4

Resin Particles (L-4)

A mixed solution of 18 g of a tridecyl methacrylate/2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (9/1 by molar ratio) copolymer, 85 g of vinyl acetate, 15 g of N-vinylpyrrolidone, 6 g of vinyl stearate and 380 g of n-decane was heated to a temperature of 75 C. with stirring under a steam of nitrogen. As a polymerization initiator, 1.7 g of A.I.V.N. was added thereto to conduct a reaction for 4 hours. Furthermore, 0.5 g of A.I.B.N. was added thereto to conduct the reaction for 2 hours. After cooling, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth. The resulting white dispersion was a latex having a rate of polymerization of 93% and an average particle size of 0.20 μm.

The Mw of the resin particles was 7104, and the Tg thereof was 47 C.

Production Example 5 to 11

Resin Particles (L-5) to (L-11)

Resin particles (L-5) to (L-11) of the present invention were produced in the same manner as in Production Example 1 described above with the exception that monomers (B) described in Table 1 shown below were each used in an amount of 0.01 mol in place of 4.0 g of octadecyl methacrylate in Production Example 1 of resin particles.

The rate of polymerization of each resin particles thus obtained was 88% to 95%, the average particle size thereof ranged from 0.15 μm to 0.25 μm, and the monodispersibility was good.

The Mw of each resin particles ranged from 8104 to 2105, and the Tg thereof ranged from 36 C. to 39 C.

              TABLE 1______________________________________  Resin  Production Particles  Example (L) Monomer (B)______________________________________5      L-5      Vinyl Oleate  6 L-6 Octadecyl Vinyl Ether  7 L-7 Hexadecyl Methacrylate   - 8 L-8             #STR12##   - 9 L-9             #STR13##   - 10   L-10             #STR14##   - 11   L-11            ##STR15##______________________________________
Production Example 12 to 20

Resin Particles (L-12) to (L-20)

Resin particles (L-12) to (L-20) of the present invention were produced in the same manner as in Production Example 2 described above with the exception that compounds described in Table 2 shown below were each used in place of monomer (A) (namely, methyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate) and monomer (B) (namely, octadecyl acrylate) in Production Example 2 of resin particles.

The respective resin particles thus obtained were 95% to 100% in the rate of polymerization, 0.18 μm to 0.28 μm in the average particle size, and good in the monodispersibility.

The Mw of the respective resin particles ranged from 8104 to 2105, and the Tg thereof ranged from 36 C. to 39 C.

                                  TABLE 2__________________________________________________________________________Produc-Resin  tion Parti-  Example cles (L) Monomer (A) Monomer (B)__________________________________________________________________________12   L-12    Methyl  CH2 ═CH--CONH(CH2)3 COOC13            H27               2.5 g    Methacrylate:50 g    Ethyl    Acrylate:50 g  13 L-13 Methyl Octadecyl α-Chloroacrylate 3.5 g    Methacrylate:25 g    Methyl    Acrylate:75 g  14 L-14 Methyl Tetradecyl α-Cyanoacrylate 3.0 g    Methacrylate:25 g    Methyl    Acrylate:75 g   - 15 L-15 Methyl  Methacrylate:25 g  Methyl  Acrylate:75 g                                     4.5 g ##   - 16 L-16 Methyl  Methacrylate:45 g  Ethyl  Acrylate:55 g                                     2.8 g ##   - 17 L-17 Methyl Dodecyl Acrylate 1.5 g    Methacrylate:60 g  Methyl  Acrylate:40 g                                     2.0 g ##   - 18 L-18 Methyl  Methacrylate:20 g  2-Cyanoethyl  Acrylate:8 g  Ethyl                                    Acrylate:72 g                                     3.3 g ##   - 19 L-19 Vinyl  Acetate:80 g  Styrene:10 g  Vinyl  Propionate:10 g                                     4.2 g ##   - 20 L-20 Methyl Docosanyl Acrylate 4.5 g    Methacrylate:20 g    n-Propyl    Methacrylate:80 g__________________________________________________________________________
Production Example 21

Resin Particles (L-21)

Comparative Example A

Resin particles (L-21) of the present invention was produced in the same manner as in Production Example 1 described above with the exception that octadecyl methacrylate used as monomer (B) in Production Example 1 was eliminated.

The rate of polymerization of the resulting resin particles was 95%, and the average particle size thereof was 0.2 μm.

The Mw of the resin particles was 1105, and the Tg was 38 C.

Production Example 22

Resin Particles (L-22)

Comparative Example B

Resin particles (L-22) of the present invention was produced in the same manner as in Production Example 1 described above with the exception that 1.7 g of n-hexyl methacrylate was used in place of octadecyl methacrylate used as monomer (B) in Production Example 1 was eliminated.

The rate of polymerization of the resulting resin particles was 90%, and the average particle size thereof was 0.28 μm.

The Mw of the resin particles was 1105, and the Tg was 37 C.

EXAMPLE 1

Preparation of Lithographic Printing Plate Precursor

Composition 1 having the following contents was placed in a paint shaker (manufactured by Toyo Seiki Co., Ltd.) together with glass beads, and dispersed for 60 minutes. Then, the glass beads were filtered off to obtain a dispersion.

Composition

______________________________________Gelatin                     20     g  Silica: Silysia 310 (manufactured by 3 g  Fuji Silysia Chemical Co., Ltd.)  20% Solution of Colloidal Silica: 3.8 g  (Snowtex C)  (manufactured by Nissan Chemical  Industries, Ltd.)  Alkyl Ester Fluoride FC 430 0.8 g  (manufactured by 3M Co.)  Hardening Compound 0.24 g  [CH2 ═CHSO2 CH2 CONH(CH2)3 NHCOCH2                              SO2 CH═CH2 ]  Water 54 g______________________________________

Using a support of Metalme 100TS comprising a PET film having a thickness of 100 μm having provided thereon a vaporized aluminum layer, the above-mentioned composition was applied onto the support by use of a wire bar and dried at 100 C. for 10 minutes to form an image receiving layer having an amount coated of 15 g/m2, thereby obtaining a precursor for lithographic printing.

Furthermore, the smoothness of the image receiving layer was determined by measuring the smoothness (second/10 ml) of the printing plate precursor using a Beck smoothness tester (manufactured by Kumagaya Riko Co., Ltd.) under the condition of an air volume of 10 ml, and it was 180 (second/10 ml), and the contact angle with water thereof was 0 degree. The contact angle of the image receiving layer with water was determined by placing 2 μl of distilled water on the printing plate precursor and measuring the surface contact angle (degrees) after 30 seconds with a surface contact angle meter (CA-D, manufactured by Kyowa Kaimen Kagaku Co., Ltd.).

Preparation of Oil-Based Ink (IK-1)

Ten grams of dodecyl methacrylate/acrylic acid copolymer (copolymerization ratio: 95/5 by weight ratio), 10 g of Alkali Blue and 30 g of Shellsol 71 were placed in a paint shaker (manufactured by Tokyo Seiki Co., Ltd.) together with glass beads, and dispersed for 4 hours to obtain a fine dispersion of Alkali Blue.

Forty-five grams (as a solid amount) of resin particles (L-1) of Production Example 1 of resin particles, 18 g of the above-mentioned dispersion of Alkali Blue, and 0.16 g of an octadecene-half maleic acid octadecylamide copolymer were diluted with 1 liter of Isoper G, thereby obtaining blue oil-based ink.

A servo plotter, DA8400, manufactured by Graphtech Co., which can write an output from a personal computer, was converted so that the ink discharge head shown in FIG. 2 was mounted on a pen plotter section, and the precursor for lithographic printing prepared as described above was placed on a counter electrode spaced at 1.5 mm. Printing was performed on the precursor for lithographic printing by use of oil-based ink (IK-1) described above to conduct processing. Successively, heating was carried out for 20 seconds by use of a Ricoh Fuser Model 592 (manufactured by Ricoh Co., Ltd.), adjusting the surface temperature of an ink image surface to 70 C., thereby sufficiently fixing an image area.

A copied image of the resulting processed material (namely, the printing plate) was visually observed under an optical microscope at a magnification of 200. As a result, the copied image had no problem, fine lines and fine letters were good, abnormalities such as blurs, missing and dullness were not observed, and contamination was not observed in a non-image area.

Using as a damping solution a solution prepared by diluting SLM-OD (manufactured by Mitsubishi Paper Mill, Ltd.) 15 times with water, and Oliver 94 type (manufactured by Sakurai Seisakusho Co., Ltd.) as a printing material, this printing precursor was printed with a black ink for offset printing.

As a result, 3000 sheets or more of printed material having clear images in which no toning was developed were obtained.

Then, using the above-mentioned ink jet printer, an ink jet test was made. As a result, stable ink jet was obtained even after an elapse of 500 hours. The ink stored at room temperature for 6 months showed no development of aggregates, and gave stable ink jet in the same jet test as described above.

When the processed printing plate under these conditions was actually printed, 3000 sheets or more of printed material having clear images in which no toning was developed were obtained.

Furthermore, the redispersibility of the ink was evaluated under enforced conditions. That is, the discharge head used in the above-mentioned printer was filled with the ink, taken away and allowed to stand at 35 C. for 3 days. Then, the discharge head was immersed in Isoper G for 3 minutes, followed by mild stirring. Thereupon, ink (IK-1) was all removed from the inside of the slit.

That is, this is considered to be caused by that the ink (IK-1) adhered to the leading edge of the slit of the discharge head in the non-fluid state by standing was easily redispersed by the salvation with the dispersing medium.

Comparative Example A

Comparative Example A was conducted in the same manner as in Example 1 with the exception that oil-base ink (IKR-1) described below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-1) used in Example 1.

Oil-Based Ink (IKR-1) for Comparison

Oil-base ink (IKR-1) was prepared in the same manner as in oil-based ink (IK-1) with the exception that 45 g (as a solid amount) of resin particles (L-21) for comparison was used in place of resin particles (L-1) used in oil-based ink (IK-1).

Comparative Example B

Comparative Example B was conducted in the same manner as in Example 1 with the exception that oil-based ink (IKR-2) described below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-1) used in Example 1.

Oil-Based Ink (IKR-2) for Comparison

Oil-base ink (IKR-2) was prepared in the same manner as in oil-based ink (IK-1) with the exception that 45 g (as a solid amount) of resin particles (L-22) for comparison was used in place of resin particles (L-1) used in oil-based ink (IK-1).

When the lithographic printing plates obtained in Comparative Examples A and B described above were first printed, 3000 sheets or more of printed material having clear images in which no toning was developed were obtained. However, in the ink jet test, both of the ink in Comparative Example A and the ink in Comparative Example B became unstable in ink jet after an elapse of about 100 hours. Furthermore, in the ink in Comparative Example A and the ink in Comparative Example B after 6 months of storage, coagulated precipitates were deposited, and were not redispersed even on shaking.

Furthermore, in Comparative Examples A and B, the enforced test of the ink redispersibility was made under the same conditions as with Example 1. As a result, deposits remained in the slit of the discharge head section.

EXAMPLES 2 TO 8

Using wood free paper having a basis weight of 100 g/m2 as a substrate, one surface of the substrate was coated with a coating for a backcoat layer having the following composition using a wire bar to form the under layer having a dry amount coated of 12 g/m2. The smoothness of the surface of the backcoat layer was 50 second/10 ml, and adjusted to 1500 (second/10 ml) by a calender treatment.

Coating for Backcoat Layer

______________________________________Kaolin (50% water dispersion)                   200    parts  Polyvinyl alcohol solution (10%) 60 parts  SBR Latex (solid: 50%, Tg 0 C.) 100 parts  Melamine resin (solid: 80%, 5 parts  Sumirez resin SR-613)______________________________________

The other surface of the substrate was further coated with coatings A-G for an under layer having the following composition shown in Table 3 using a wire bar to form the under layer having a dry amount coated of 10 g/m2. Then, a calender treatment was conducted, establishing the calender conditions so that the smoothness of the backcoat layer is adjusted to about 1500 (second/10 ml). The thus obtained water-resist support Nos. 2-8 was obtained by using the coating formulations A-G, respectively.

              TABLE 3______________________________________  Composition (% by weight)Formu-  Carbon           SBR           Support  lation black Clay latex Melamine No.______________________________________A       0         60     36     4      2  B 3 57 36 4 3  C 5.4 54.6 36 4 4  D 7.2 52.8 36 4 5  E 9 51 36 4 6  F 15 45 36 4 7  G 30 30 36 4 8______________________________________

Coating for Under Layer

Carbon black (30% water dispersion)

Clay (50% dispersion solution)

SBR Latex (solid: 50%, Tg 25 C.)

Melamine resin (solid: 80%, Sumirez resin SR-613)

The above components were mixed according to Table 3, and water was added to adjust the total solid concentration to 25% to obtain coatings A to G for an under layer.

1) Specific Electric Resistance of Under Layer

The specific electric resistance of the under layer was measured by the following.

Coatings A to G for the under layer each was coated on a sufficiently desensitized and washed stainless solution. The specific electric resistance of the thus obtained 7 samples were measured by a three terminal process having a gourd electrode according to JIS K-6911.

              TABLE 4______________________________________Formulation of         Specific electric  under layer resistance (Ω cm)______________________________________A              2  1012  B  1  1011  C 4  109  D 1  108  E 7  104  F 5  103  G 4  103______________________________________

On support sample Nos. 2 to 8, dispersions having the following composition were coated to form an image receiving layer having a dry amount coated of 6 g/m2 to obtain precursor samples for lithographic printing Nos. 2 to 8, respectively.

By using sample Nos. 2 to 8 of the thus prepared precursor for lithographic printing, processing was carried out with oil-based ink (IK-1) in the same manner as in Example 1. In processing, the under layer provided directly under the image receiving layer of sample Nos. 2 to 8 of the precursor for lithographic printing and a counter electrode was electrically connected using silver paste.

After the above processing, in a fully automatic printer (AM-2850, produced by AM Co., Ltd.), a solution obtained by 100 times diluting EU-3 (PS plate processing agent, produced by Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.) was added as damping water into a dish for damping water, and the processed material was inserted into the printer by using a black ink for offset printing.

The image quality of the thus obtained drawn image of the processing material was evaluated as follows. The results are shown in Table 5.

              TABLE 5______________________________________       Property  Precursor  Image quality   Sample of the processed Printable number  Example No. material in printing______________________________________2      2          Bad          50  3 3 Bad  100  4 4 Good 1500  5 5 Very good 3000  6 6 Very good 3000  7 7 Very good 3000  8 8 Very good 3000______________________________________

2) Image Quality of Processed Material

A drawn image of the resulting processed material was visually observed under an optical microscope at a magnification of 200. The results are represented as shown below.

Very good: Completely no problem in drawn images, very good fine lines and fine letters

Good: No problem in drawn images, good fine lines and fine letters

Bad: Lacking and blurring of fine lines and fine letters

3) Printed Images

The images of the resulting printed material were evaluated in the same manner as the above image quality of the processed material. The printed image qualities have the same results as the processed image qualities.

4) Printability (Run Length)

Printable numbers having no toning of the printed material and lack of the images visually were examined.

By referring to the specific electrical resistance shown in Table 4, the results in Table 5 are considered.

In precursor sample Nos. 2 and 3 having a large specific electrical resistance of 1012 to 1011 Ωcm, the resulting images are missed and blurred. As a result of blurring, since the resin layer of the drawn images becomes thin, the printability is poor. On the other hand, in precursor sample Nos. 5 to 8 having a small specific electrical resistance of 108 to 102 Ωcm, the resulting images have no problem, the fine lines and fine letters are very good, and the printability is high.

That is, the results show that the higher the electroconductivity of the under layer of the support directly under the image receiving layer is, the more excellent the processed images and the printed images are.

EXAMPLE 9

Preparation of Lithographic Printing Plate Precursor

Composition 2 having the following contents was placed in a paint shaker (manufactured by Toyo Seiki Co., Ltd.) together with glass beads, and dispersed for 60 minutes. Then, the glass beads were filtered off to obtain a dispersion.

Composition

______________________________________Gelatin                     20     g  Silica: Silysia 310 (manufactured by 3 g  Fuji Silysia Chemical Co., Ltd.)  10% Solution of Aluminasol 10.3 g  (manufactured by Nissan Chemical  Industries, Ltd.)  Alkyl Ester Fluoride FC 430 0.8 g  (manufactured by 3M Co.)  Hardening Compound 0.30 g  [CH2 ═CHSO2 CH2 CONH(CH2)3 NHCOCH2                              SO2 CH═CH2 ]  Water 54 g______________________________________

Using a support of ELP-IX type master (produced by Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.) used as an electrophotographic lithographic printing precursor for light printing, the dispersion of under layer formulation F in Example 7 was applied onto the support to have an amount coated of 6 g/m2, and the above composition was coated by using a wire bar and dried at 100 C. for 10 minutes to form an image receiving layer having an amount coated of 18 g/m2, thereby obtaining a precursor for lithographic printing.

Furthermore, the Beck smoothness of the image receiving layer was 200 (second/10 ml), and the contact angle with water thereof was 0 degree.

Preparation of Oil-Based Ink (IK-2)

Ten grams of poly(dodecyl methacrylate), 10 g of Nigrosine and 30 g of Isoper were placed in a paint shaker (manufactured by Tokyo Seiki Co., Ltd.) together with glass beads, and dispersed for 4 hours to obtain a fine dispersion of Nigrosine.

Fifty grams (as a solid amount) of resin particles (L-13) of Production Example 13, 35 g of the above-mentioned Nigrosine dispersion, and 0.08 g of an octadecyl vinyl ether-half maleic acid dodecylamide copolymer were diluted with 1 liter of Isoper G, thereby preparing black oil-based ink.

Using this printing plate precursor and oil-based ink (IK-2), plate-making processing was conducted, a printing plate was formed and offset printing was performed in the same manner as in Example 1.

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 1, and the press life thereof was as good as 5000 sheets or more.

Furthermore, similarly to Example 1, the ink jet test for 500 hours and the enforced test of the redispersibility also showed the same good performance as that of ink (IK-1).

EXAMPLES 10 to 21

Plate-making processing and printing were conducted in the same manner as in Example 1 with the exception that oil-based ink described in Table 6 shown below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-1). The oil-based ink used was prepared in the same manner as in oil-based ink (IK-1) with the exception that 45 g (as a solid amount) of resin particles described Table 45 shown below were used in place of resin particles (L-1).

              TABLE 6______________________________________Example     Oil-based Ink                  Resin Particles (L)______________________________________10          IK-3       L-2  11 IK-4 L-3  12 IK-5 L-4  13 IK-6 L-5  14 IK-7 L-6  15 IK-8 L-7  16 IK-9 L-8  17  IK-10  L-13  18  IK-11  L-14  19  IK-12  L-15  20  IK-13  L-17  21  IK-14  L-19______________________________________

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 1, and the press life thereof was as good as 3000 sheets or more.

Furthermore, similarly to Example 1, the ink jet test for 500 hours and the enforced test of the redispersibility also showed the same good performance as that of ink (IK-1).

EXAMPLE 22

Plate-making processing and printing were carried out in the same manner as in Example 9, provided that oil-based ink (IK-15) described below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-2) used in Example 9.

Oil-Based Ink (IK-15)

A mixture of 500 g of white dispersion (L-4) obtained in Production Example 4 and 7.5 g of Sumikaron Black was heated to a temperature of 100 C., and stirred for 6 hours under heating. After cooling to room temperature, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth to remove the remaining dye, thereby obtaining a black resin dispersion having an average particle size of 0.20 μm.

Then, 250 g of the above-mentioned black resin dispersion and 0.4 g of charge regulating agent (CD-3) shown below were diluted with 1 liter of Isoper G, thereby preparing black oil-based ink. ##STR21##

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 2, and the press life thereof was as good as 5000 sheets or more.

Furthermore, similarly to Example 2, the ink jet test for 500 hours and the enforced test of the redispersibility also showed the same good performance as that of ink (IK-2).

EXAMPLE 23

Plate-making processing and printing were carried out in the same manner as in Example 1, provided that oil-based ink (IK-16) described below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-1) used in Example 1.

Oil-Based Ink (IK-16)

A mixture of 300 g of white dispersion (L-3) obtained in Production Example 3 and 5 g of Victoria Blue B was heated to a temperature of 100 C., and stirred for 6 hours under heating. After cooling to room temperature, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth to remove the remaining dye, thereby obtaining a blue resin dispersion having an average particle size of 0.18 μm.

Then, 260 g of the above-mentioned blue resin dispersion and 0.42 g of zirconium naphthenate were diluted with 1 liter of Shellsol 71, thereby preparing blue oil-based ink.

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 1, and the press life thereof was as good as 3000 sheets or more.

Furthermore, similarly to Example 1, the ink jet test for 500 hours and the enforced test of the redispersibility also showed the same good performance as that of ink (IK-1).

EXAMPLE 24

Preparation of Lithographic Printing Plate Precursor

Composition 3 having the following contents was placed in a paint shaker together with glass beads, and dispersed for 60 minutes. Then, the glass beads were filtered off to obtain a dispersion.

Composition 3

______________________________________Silica: Silysia 310 (manufactured by                    40     g  Fuji Silysia Chemical Co., Ltd.)  20% Solution of Colloidal Silica: 200 g  (Snowtex C)  (manufactured by Nissan Chemical  Industries, Ltd.)  50% Clay Dispersion 40 g  10% Solution of Polyvinyl Alcohol 120 g  (manufactured by Kuraray Co., Ltd.)  Melamine Resin 2.0 g  Sodium Chloride 0.2 g  Water 55 g______________________________________

Using a support in Example 9, the above-mentioned dispersion was applied onto the support by use of a wire bar and dried to form an image receiving layer having an amount coated of 20 g/m2, thereby obtaining a precursor for lithographic printing. The Beck smoothness of the image receiving layer was 150 (second/10 ml), and the contact angle with water thereof was 0 degree.

The precursor was processed in the same manner as in Example 9 to form a printing plate, and offset printing was carried out.

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 1, and the press life thereof was as good as 5000 sheets or more.

Production Example 101

Macromonomer (MA-1)

A mixed solution of 100 g of octadecyl methacrylate, 2 g of 3-mercaptopropionic acid and 200 g of toluene was heated to a temperature of 70 C. with stirring under a steam of nitrogen. Then, 1.0 g of A.I.B.N. was added thereto to conduct a reaction for 4 hours, 0.5 g of A.I.B.N. was further added to conduct the reaction for 3 hours, and 0.3 g of A.I.B.N. was still further added to conduct the reaction for 3 hours. Then, 8 g of glycidyl methacrylate, 1.0 g of N,N-di-methyldodecylamine and 0.5 g of t-butylhydroquinone were added to the reaction solution, and stirred at a temperature of 100 C. for 10 hours. After cooling, the reaction solution was reprecipitated in 2 liter of methanol to obtain 82 g of a white powder. The weight average molecular weight (Mw) of the polymer was 1104 (the weight average molecular weight indicates a value converted to polystyrene by the G.P.C. method).

Macromonomer (MA-1) ##STR22##

Production Examples 102 to 111

Macromonomers (MA-2) to (MA-11)

Macromonomers (MA-2) to (MA-11) were synthesized in the same manner as in Production Example 101 of macromonomer (MA) with the exception that only octadecyl methacrylate is replaced by compounds corresponding to the following Table 7 in Production Example 101. The weight average molecular weight of each macromonomer obtained ranged from 9103 to 1104. ##STR23##

              TABLE 7______________________________________Production  Example Macro-  of Macro- mon-  monomer omer  MA MA a1 /a2 X______________________________________  102 MA-2  --H/--CH3   - 103 MA-3  --H/--CH3                      #STR24##   - 104 MA-4  --H/--CH3                      #STR25##   - 105 MA-5  --H/--H                      #STR26##   - 106 MA-6  --H/--CH3 --(CH2)2 OCO(CH2)2                    COOC2 H5  107 MA-7  --H/--CH3 --(CH2)2 OCO(CH2)2                    COOC2 H5  108 MA-8  --H/--H --(CH2)2 OCOCH═CH--COOC5 H11                      - 109 MA-9  --H/--H                      #STR27##   - 110 MA-10 --H/--CH3                      #STR28##   - 111 MA-11 --H/--H --(CH2)2 OCO(CH2)2 SO2                    C8 H17______________________________________
Production Example 112

Macromonomer (MA-12)

A mixed solution of 100 g of tetradecyl methacrylate, 2 g of thioethanol and 200 g of toluene was heated to a temperature of 70 C. with stirring under a steam of nitrogen. Then, 1.0 g of A.I.B.N. was added thereto to conduct a reaction for 4 hours, 0.5 g of A.I.B.N. was further added to conduct the reaction for 3 hours, and then, 0.3 g of A.I.B.N. was still further added to conduct the reaction for 3 hours. The reaction solution was cooled to room temperature, and 8 g of 2-carboxyethyl acrylate was added thereto. Then, a mixed solution of 12.7 g of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (referred to as "D.C.C." simply) and 60 g of methylene chloride was added dropwise thereto for 1 hour. Then, 1.0 g of t-butylhydroquinone was added, followed by stirring as such for 4 hours.

Crystals deposited were filtered off, and the resulting filtrate was reprecipitated in 2 liters of methanol. The precipitated oily product was collected by decantation, dissolved in 150 ml of methylene chloride, and reprecipitated again in 1 liter of methanol. The oily product was collected, and dried under reduced pressure to obtain a polymer having a Mw of 8103 in a yield of 60 g.

Macromonomer (MA-12) ##STR29##

Production Examples 113 to 115

Macromonomers (MA-13) to (MA-15)

Macromonomers shown in the following Table 8 were each produced in the same manner as in Production Example 112 described above with the exception that a methacrylate monomer (corresponding to tetradecyl methacrylate) and an unsaturated carboxylic acid (corresponding to 2-carboxyethyl methacrylate) were each replaced in Production Example 112 of macromonomer (MA). The weight average molecular weight of each macromonomer obtained in a yield of 60 to 70 g ranged from 7103 to 9103.

                                  TABLE 5__________________________________________________________________________     Chemical  Produc- Macro- Structure of  tion monomer Micromonomer  Example (MA) (MA)__________________________________________________________________________  113 MA-13       #STR30##   - 114 MA-14       #STR31##    (Weight ratio)   - 115 MA-15      ##STR32##__________________________________________________________________________
Production Example 116

Macromonomer (MA-16)

A mixed solution of 100 g of 2,3-dipentanoyloxy methacrylate, 150 g of tetrahydrofuran and 50 g of isopropyl alcohol was heated to a temperature of 75 C. under a steam of nitrogen. Then, 5.0 g of 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid) (referred to as "A.C.V." simply) was added thereto to conduct a reaction for 5 hours, and 1.0 g of A.C.V. was further added to conduct the reaction for 4 hours. After cooling, the reaction solution was reprecipitated in 1.5 liter of methanol, and the oily product was collected by decantation and dried under reduced pressure. The yield was 85 g.

A mixture of 50 g of this oily product, 15 g of glycidyl methacrylate, 1.0 g of N,N-dimethyldodecylamine, 1.0 g of 2,2'-methylenebis (6-t-butyl-p-cresol) and 100 g of toluene was stirred at a temperature of 100 C. for 15 hours. After cooling, the reaction solution was reprecipitated in 1 liter of petroleum ether to obtain 63 g of a white powder. The weight average molecular weight was 7103.

Macromonomer (MA-116) ##STR33##

Production Example 201

Resin Particles (L-101)

A mixed solution of 10 g of poly(dodecyl methacrylate), 100 g of vinyl acetate, 4 g of macromonomer (MA-1) and 384 g of Isoper H was heated to a temperature of 60 C. with stirring under a steam of nitrogen. As a polymerization initiator, 1.5 g of A.I.V.N. was added thereto to conduct a reaction for 3 hours, and 0.8 g of A.I.V.N. was further added to conduct the reaction for 2 hours. Successively, 0.5 g of A.I.V.N. was added thereto, followed by heating to a temperature of 80 C. to conduct the reaction for 3 hours. Then, the temperature was elevated to 100 C. and the resulting product was stirred for 2 hours under a reduced pressure of 20 mmHg to remove unreacted monomers by distillation. After cooling, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth. The resulting white dispersion was a latex having a rate of polymerization of 93% and an average particle size of 0.20 μm. The particle size was measured with CAPA-500.

The above-mentioned white dispersion was partly centrifuged (the number of revolutions: 1104 r.p.m., revolution time: 1 hour), and the sedimented resin particles were collected and dried. Then, the weight average molecular weight (Mw) and the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the resin particles were measured. As a result, the Mw was 3105 (a value converted to polystyrene by G.P.C.), and the Tg was 37 C.

Production Example 202

Resin Particles (L-102)

A mixed solution of 16 g of a dodecyl methacrylate/acrylic acid (98/2 by weight ratio) copolymer and 177 g of Isoper H was heated to a temperature of 60 C. with stirring under a steam of nitrogen. A mixed solution of 40 g of methyl methacrylate, 60 g of methyl acrylate, 3 g of macromonomer (MA-5), 200 g of Isoper G and 1.0 g of A.I.V.N. was added dropwise thereto for 2 hours, and the mixture was stirred as such for 2 hours. Furthermore, 0.5 g of A.I.V.N. was added thereto, followed by heating to a temperature of 75 C. and stirring for 3 hours. After cooling, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth. The resulting white dispersion was a latex having a rate of polymerization of 99% and an average particle size of 0.23 μm. The MW of the resin particles was 1105, and the Tg thereof was 38 C.

Production Examples 203 to 206

Resin Particles (L-103) to (L-106)

Resin particles (L-103) to (L-106) of the present invention were produced in the same manner as in Production Example 201 described above with the exception that monomers (A) and macromonomers (MA) described in Table 9 shown below were each used in place of vinyl acetate (monomer (A)) and macromonomer (MA-1) in Production Example 201.

The rate of polymerization of each resin particles thus obtained was 93% to 98%, the average particle size thereof ranged from 0.20 μm to 0.24 μm, and the monodispersibility was good. The Mw of each resin particles from 8104 to 1105.

              TABLE 9______________________________________                                  Tg of  Produc- Resin  Macro- Resin  tion Parti-  monomer Parti-  Example cles (L) Monomer (A) (MA) cles______________________________________203    L-103    Vinyl Acetate: 80 g                           MA-1:  32 C.    Vinyl Propionate: 20 g 3 g  204 L-104 Vinyl Acetate: 95 g MA-16: 43 C.    Crotonic Acid: 5 g 4 g  205 L-105 Vinyl Acetate: 90 g MA-15: 45 C.    N-Vinylpyrrolidone: 10 g 4 g  206 L-106 Vinyl Acetate: 82 g MA-9: 35 C.    4-Vinylacetate: 8 g 5 g    Vinyl Butyrate: 10 g______________________________________
Production Examples 207 to 215

Particles (L-107) to (L-115)

Resin particles (L-107) to (L-115) of the present invention were produced in-the same manner as in Production Example 202 with the exception that compounds described in Table 10 shown below were each used in place of monomers (A) (namely, methyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate) and macromonomer (MA-5) in Production Example 202.

The rate of polymerization of each resin particles thus obtained was 95% to 99%, the average particle size thereof ranged from 0.18 μm to 0.25 μm, and the monodispersibility was good. The Mw of each resin particles ranged from 8104 to 2105.

              TABLE 10______________________________________Produc-  Resin                           Tg of  tion Parti-  Macro- Resin  Exam- cles  monomer Part-  ple (L) Monomer (A) (MA) icles______________________________________207    L-107   Methylmethacrylate: 50 g                           MA-2:  27 C.    Ethylacrylate: 50 g 4.5 g  208 L-108 Methylmethacrylate: 25 g MA-4: 26 C.    Methylacrylate: 75 g 4 g  209 L-109 Methylmethacrylate: 25 g MA-12: 26 C.    Methylacrylate: 75 g 3 g  210 L-110 Methylmethacrylate: 25 g MA-13: 26 C.    Methylacrylate: 75 g 2.5 g  211 L-111 Ethylmethacrylate: 45 g MA-8: 24 C.    Ethylacrylate: 55 g 3 g  212 L-112 Ethylmethacrylate: 60 g MA-16: 28 C.    Methylacrylate: 40 g 4 g  213 L-113 Methylmethacrylate: 20 g MA-14: 30 C.    2-Cyanoethylacrylate: 8 g 2.5 g    Methylacrylate: 72 g  214 L-114 Vinylacetate: 80 g MA-9: 35 C.    Styrate: 10 g 3 g    Vinylpropionate: 10 g  215 L-115 Methylmethacrylate: 50 g MA-11: 36 C.    n-Propylmethacrylate: 80 g 2.8 g______________________________________
Production Examples 216 to 219

Resin Particles (L-116) to (L-119)

Resin particles (L-116) to (L-119) of the present invention were produced in the same manner as in Production Example 201 described above with the exception that resins for dispersion stabilization and macromonomers (MA) described in Table 11 shown below were each used in place of poly(dodecyl methacrylate) and macromonomer (MA-1) in Production Example 201 of resin particles.

The rate of polymerization of each resin particles thus obtained was 97% to 98%, the average particle size thereof ranged from 0.18 μm to 0.22 μm, and the monodispersibility was good. The Mw of each resin particles ranged from 2105 to 3105, and the Tg ranged from 37 C. to 38 C.

              TABLE 11______________________________________Produc- Resin                      Macro-  tion Parti- Resin for Dispersion monomer  Example cles (L) Stabilization (MA)______________________________________216     L-116    Copolymer of      MA-3:    Dodecylmethacrylate/ 4.5 g    Octadecylacrylate    (40/60 by weight): 10 g  217 L-117 Copolymer of MA-6:    Hexadecylmethacrylate/ 3.5 g    Acrylate    (96/4 by weight): 9 g  218 L-118 Copolymer of MA-10:    Docosanylmethacrylate/ 3 g    Methacrylic Acid    (97/3 by weight): 8 g  219 L-119 Copolymer of MA-6:    Tetradecylmethacrylate/ 4 g    2-Hydroxyethylmethacrylate    (95/5 by weight): 9 g______________________________________
Production Example 220

Particles (L-120)

Comparative Example C

Resin particles (L-120) for comparison were produced in the same manner as in Production Example 201 with the exception that 4 g of macromonomer (MA-1) -used in Production Example 201 was eliminated.

The rate of polymerization of the resulting resin particles was 95%, and the average particle size thereof was 0.28 μm. The Mw of the resin particles was 3105, and the Tg was 38 C.

EXAMPLE 101

Preparation of Lithographic Printing Plate Precursor

Using a support of ELP-1 type master (produced by Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.) used as an electrophotographic lithographic printing precursor for light printing, the composition prepared in the same manner as in Example 1 was coated by using a wire bar and dried at 100 C. for 10 minutes to form an image receiving layer having an amount coated of 18 g/m2, thereby obtaining a precursor for lithographic printing. The Beck smoothness of the image receiving layer was 250 (second/10 ml), and the contact angle with water thereof was 0 degree.

Preparation of Oil-Based Ink (IK-101)

Fifty grams (as a solid amount) of resin particles (L-101) of Production Example 201 of resin particles, 18 g of the dispersion of Alkali Blue prepared by Example 1, and 0.16 g of an octadecene-half maleic acid octadecylamide copolymer were diluted with 1 liter of Isoper G, thereby obtaining blue oil-based ink. Plate-making processing and printing were carried out in the same manner as in Example 1, except for replacing oil-based ink (IK-1) with (IK-101).

As a result, 3000 sheets or more of printed matter having clear images in which no toning was developed were obtained.

Then, using the above-mentioned ink jet printer, an ink jet test was made. As a result, stable ink jet was obtained even after an elapse of 500 hours. The ink stored at room temperature for 6 months showed no development of aggregates, and gave stable ink jet in the same jet test as described above.

When the processed printing plate under these conditions was actually printed, 2000 sheets or more of printed matter having clear images in which no ground stains were developed were obtained.

Furthermore, the redispersibility of the ink was evaluated under enforced conditions. That is, the discharge head used in the above-mentioned printer was filled with the ink, taken away and allowed to stand at 35 C. for 3 days. Then, the discharge head was immersed in Isoper G for 3 minutes, followed by mild stirring. Thereupon, ink (IK-101) was all removed from the inside of the slit.

That is, this is considered to be caused by that the ink (IK-101) adhered to the leading edge of the slit of the discharge head in the non-fluid state by standing was easily redispersed by the salvation with the dispersing medium.

Comparative Example C

Comparative Example C was conducted in the same manner as in Example 101 with the exception that oil-base ink IKR-1 described below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-101) used in Example 101.

Oil-Based Ink (IKR-101) for Comparison

Oil-base ink (IKR-101) was prepared in the same manner as in oil-based ink (IK-101) with the exception that 45 g (as a solid amount) of resin particles (L-120) for comparison was used in place of resin particles (L-101) used in oil-based ink (IK-101).

When the lithographic printing plates obtained in Comparative Example C were first printed, 3000 sheets or more of printed material having clear images in which no toning was developed were obtained in the same manner as in Example 101. However, in the ink jet test, the ink in Comparative Example C became unstable in ink jet after an elapse of about 100 hours. Furthermore, in the ink in Comparative Example C after storage of 6 months, coagulated precipitates were deposited, and were not redispersed even on shaking.

EXAMPLE 102

Preparation of Lithographic Printing Plate Precursor

Composition 4 having the following contents was placed in a paint shaker (manufactured by Toyo Seiki Co., Ltd.) together with glass beads, and dispersed for 60 minutes. Then, the glass beads were filtered off to obtain a dispersion.

Composition

______________________________________Gelatin                     10     g  Silica: Silysia 310 (manufactured by 3 g  Fuji Silysia Chemical Co., Ltd.)  10% Solution of Aluminasol 200: 10.3 g  (manufactured by Nissan Chemical  Industries, Ltd.)  Alkyl Ester Fluoride FC 430 0.8 g  (manufactured by 3M Co.)  Hardening Compound 0.30 g  [CH2 ═CHSO2 CH2 CONH(CH2)3 NHCOCH2                              SO2 CH═CH2 ]  Water 54 g______________________________________

Using a support of ELP-II type master (produced by Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.) used as an electrophotographic lithographic printing precursor for light printing, the above composition was coated by using a wire bar and dried at 100 C. for 10 minutes to form an image receiving layer having an amount coated of 18 g/m2, thereby obtaining a precursor for lithographic printing. The Beck smoothness of the image receiving layer was 200 (second/10 ml), and the contact angle with water thereof was 0 degree.

Preparation of Oil-Based Ink (IK-102)

Ten grams of poly(dodecyl methacrylate), 10 g of Nigrosine and 30 g of Isoper were placed in a paint shaker (manufactured by Tokyo Seiki Co., Ltd.) together with glass beads, and dispersed for 4 hours to obtain a fine dispersion of Nigrosine.

Fifty grams (as a solid amount) of resin particles (L-102) of Production Example 102, 35 g of the above-mentioned Nigrosine dispersion, and 0.08 g of an octadecyl vinyl ether-half maleic acid dodecylamide copolymer were diluted with 1 liter of Isoper G, thereby preparing black oil-based ink.

Using this printing plate precursor and oil-based ink (IK-102), plate-making processing was conducted, a printing plate was formed and offset printing was performed in the same manner as in Example 101.

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 101, and the press life thereof was as good as 4000 sheets or more.

Furthermore, similarly to Example 101, the ink jet test for 500 hours and the enforced test of the redispersibility also showed the same good performance as that of ink (IK-1).

EXAMPLES 103 to 116

Plate-making processing and printing were conducted in the same manner as in Example 101 with the exception that oil-based ink described in Table 12 shown below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-101). The oil-based ink used was prepared in the same manner as in oil-based ink (IK-101) with the exception that 45 g (as a solid amount) of resin particles described Table 45 shown below were used in place of resin particles (L-101).

              TABLE 12______________________________________Example     Oil-based Ink                  Resin Particles (L)______________________________________103         IK-3       L-103  104 IK-4  L-107  105 IK-5  L-108  106 IK-6  L-109  107 IK-7  L-110  108 IK-8  L-111  109 IK-9  L-116  110 IK-10 L-112  111 IK-11 L-113  112 IK-12 L-114  113 IK-13 L-115  114 IK-14 L-117  115 IK-15 L-118  116 IK-16 L-119______________________________________

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 101, and the press life thereof was as good as 3000 sheets or more.

Furthermore, similarly to Example 101, the ink jet test for 500 hours and the enforced test of the redispersibility also showed the same good performance as that of ink (IK-101).

EXAMPLE 117

Using wood free paper having a basis weight of 100 g/m2 as a substrate, one surface of the substrate was coated with a coating for an under layer having the following composition using a wire bar to form the under layer having a dry amount coated of 10 g/m2. The smoothness of the surface of the under layer was 150 (second/10 ml), and adjusted to 1500 (second/10 ml) by a calender treatment.

Coating for Under Layer

______________________________________Silica gel              10     parts  SBR Latex 92 parts  (50 wt % water dispersion, Tg: 25 C.)  Clay (45 wt % water dispersion) 110 parts  Melamine (80 wt % water dispersion) 5 parts  Water 191 parts______________________________________

The other surface of the substrate was further coated with a coating A-G for a backcoat layer having the following composition shown below using a wire bar to form the under layer having a dry amount coated of 12 g/m2. Then, a calender treatment was conducted, establishing the calender conditions so that the smoothness of the backcoat layer is adjusted to about 50 (second/10 ml).

Coating for Backcoat Layer

______________________________________Kaolin (50% water dispersion)                   200    parts  Polyvinyl Alcohol 60 parts  SBR Latex (solid: 49%, Tg 0 C.) 100 parts  Primary Condensation Product of 5 parts  Melamine Resin (solid: 80%,  Sumirez resin SR-613)______________________________________

Plate-making processing and printing were carried out in the same manner as in Example 101 using the precursor for lithographic printing prepared in Example 24, provided that oil-based ink (IK-101) described below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-17) shown below.

Oil-Based Ink (IK-117)

A mixture of 500 g of white dispersion (L-105) obtained in Production Example 105 of resin particles and 7.5 g of Sumikaron Black was heated to a temperature of 100 C., and stirred for 6 hours under heating. After cooling to room temperature, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth to remove the remaining dye, thereby obtaining a black resin dispersion having an average particle size of 0.20 μm.

Then, 250 g of the above-mentioned black resin dispersion and 0.4 g of charge regulating agent (CD-3) shown in Example 22 were diluted with 1 liter of Isoper G, thereby preparing black oil-based ink.

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 101, and the press life thereof was as good as 2000 sheets or more.

Furthermore, similarly to Example 101, the ink jet test for 500 hours and the enforced test of the redispersibility also showed the same good performance as that of ink (IK-101).

EXAMPLE 118

Plate-making processing and printing were carried out in the same manner as in Example 101, provided that oil-based ink (IK-118) described below was used in place of oil-based ink (IK-101).

Oil-Based Ink (IK-118)

A mixture of 300 g of white dispersion (L-106) obtained in Production Example 106 and 5 g of Victoria Blue B was heated to a temperature of 100 C., and stirred for 6 hours under heating. After cooling to room temperature, the product was passed through a 200-mesh nylon cloth to remove the remaining dye, thereby obtaining a blue resin dispersion having an average particle size of 0.18 μm.

Then, 260 g of the above-mentioned blue resin dispersion and 0.42 g of zirconium naphthenate were diluted with 1 liter of Shellsol 71, thereby preparing blue oil-based ink.

The resulting printed material had clear image quality with no stain in a non-image area, similarly to the printed material of Example 101, and the press life thereof was as good as 2000 sheets or more.

Furthermore, similarly to Example 101, the ink jet test for 500 hours and the enforced test of the redispersibility also showed the same good performance as that of ink (IK-101).

While the invention has been described in detail and with reference to specific embodiments thereof, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that various changes and modifications can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope thereof.

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Reference
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7700527 *Apr 26, 2006Apr 20, 2010Cytec Surface SpecialtiesFoaming-resistant hydrocarbon oil compositions
US8263303 *Aug 10, 2006Sep 11, 2012Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.Method for producing colored resin particle dispersion liquid, colored resin particle dispersion liquid, and electrophotographic liquid developer
CN100402613CFeb 23, 2004Jul 16, 2008富士胶片株式会社Electrostatic inkjet ink composition
EP1352932A1 *Apr 10, 2003Oct 15, 2003Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Image forming method
EP1449893A1 *Feb 20, 2004Aug 25, 2004Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Electrostatic inkjet ink composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification523/160
International ClassificationC09D11/00, C09D11/10
Cooperative ClassificationC09D11/106, C09D11/36
European ClassificationC09D11/106, C09D11/36
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