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Publication numberUS617779 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 17, 1899
Filing dateDec 23, 1895
Publication numberUS 617779 A, US 617779A, US-A-617779, US617779 A, US617779A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elevator
US 617779 A
Images(10)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N o..6|7,779. Patented Ian. I7 I899.-

- '6. D. SEEBEBGER.

ELEVATOR. (Application filed Dec. 23, 1895.)

(No Model.) I!) Sheets-Sheet I.

Gk arig z f fg r M% M a days Patented Ian. I7, I899.

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ELEVATOR. (Application filed Dec. 23, 1895.) (Np Model.) I0 Sheets-Sheet 2.

'I W I N K N IN 3 5 Fr x E 5% LE- w- I a I we in I I g l 1 g E N I E x;

Wv'izess es InVe71/607" No.6|7,779. Patented Jan. 17,1899.

c. n. seem-1mm.

ELEVATOR.

(Application filed Dec.'23, 189 5.)

(No Model.) U l0 Sheots$heet WL M No. 6|7,779. Patented Jan. l7, I899.

\ c. u. SEEBEBGEB.

ELEVATUR.

(Application filed De c. 23, 1895.)

(N0 Model.) IQSheets-Sheet 5.

N0. 6|7;779. Patented Jan. l7, I899.

C D. SEEBEBGER:

ELEVATOR. Lpg1icn.tion fi 1ed Dec. 23, 1895.)

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(No Model.

778176 egfsqs 1%, 416- No. 617,779. Patented .J-an. 17, I899.

C. D. SEEBERGER.

ELEVATOR.

(Application filed Dec. 23, 1895.) (No' Model.) l0 Sheets-Shani 7- W\ m fi is.

. g 06 m iv w N JR '5 all" No. 6l7,779, Patented Jan. 0,1899. c, n. SEEBERGER. ELEVATOR.

' (Application filed me. 23, 1895.)

(No Model.) l0 Sheets-Sheet l0.

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I UNITED STATES CHARLES D. SEEBERGER, O13 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

ELEVATQR.

SPECIFIOATIONforming part of Letters Patent No. 617,779, dated January '17, 1899. Application filed December 23, 1895. Serial No. 573,068. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, CHARLES D. SEEBER- GER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Elevators, which is fully set forth in the following specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawifigs, in which-- Figure lie :1 plan view of my elevator. Fig. 2 is an. elevation in the direction of the arrow 2 2 ofFig. 1. Fig. 3 is a plan of an as-' cending or descending portion of the elevator, showing the wainscoting hoods and hand-rails. Fig. 4 is a detail view of the mechanism for supplying the power. Fig. 5 is an elevation of -twoascending or descending portions of my elevator-,with parts thereof broken away, showing devices for transmitting power. Fig. 6 is a plan of a portion of my elevator where it'is taken at a-point where its ascent commences, the upper parts ofthe track-casings being removed to show the tracks and chain-bars. section along the line 7 7, Fig. 0. Fig.8 is an enlarged detail view of themechanism for varying the length of the chain-bars. Fig.

" 9 is a vertical sectionon the line 9 9 of Fig.

8. Fig. 10 is a detail view, in horizontal section, of the attachment of the chain-barsto the moving steps of the elevator. Fig. 11 is a vertical longitudinal section on the line 11 11, Fig. 6. Fig. 12 is a'vertical cross-section on the line 12 12, Fig. 11. Fig. 13 is an elevation of a portion of the mechanism for operatingthe wainscoting and the hand-rail, with a portion of the hood covering the same removed, beinga section on the line 13 13 of 'Fig. 14. Fig. 14 is a-vertical section onthe line 14 14 of Fig. 13, Fig. 15 is an elevation of one of the panels of which the wainscoting is composed. Fig. 16 is a section along the line 16 1", Fig. 15. Big. 17 is'a horizontal section along the line 17 17 of Fig. 14, showing the attachment of the hand-rail.

step. Fig. 19 is a side elevation of such a step, a part of which is broken away and shown in vertical section. Fig. 20 is a diagrammatic View. of the operation of the scv Fig. 7 is a vertical Fig. 18 is a plan of a portion of one of the mov eral tracks and rollers at the several points of the commencement of the ascent of my elevator. Fig. 21 is a perspective of one of the steps or platforms, showing the mat and hand-rail with which I may provide the same. Fig. 22 is adetail view of the lower part of one of the hoods shown in Fig. 5, looked at from the elevator side. Fig. 23 is a plan of devices and arrangements for the admission to and exit from the elevator. Fig. 24 is a vertical section, on a larger scale, of one of the turnstiles for controlling admission to the elevator. Fig. 25 is a detail plan view of the turnstile-arms on line 25 25 of Fig. 2-1. Fig. 26 is a front elevation of the Wainscoting shown in Fig. 23.

s As is well known, ithas been 'the usual practice to give a vertically-reciprocating and an intermittent movement to the carrying device-that is, the said carrying device (the elevator-cage is alternately raised and lowered in a suitable shaft or well, stopping at each end of its courseand at intermediate points, if desired. Such an arrangement has necessarily'two principal defects. First, the elevator isoperative at any given moment for carrying purposes only at that point where the cage happens to be at that moment. Throughout the rest of the length of the .shaf 1'. or well the elevator is not availableat that moment. At every such moment and at all times, therefore, such an elevator is operative and available only; to a very limited extent as compared with the space occupied by the mechanism. Second, the continual necessary stopping of such an elevator, including the slowing down before and the gradual starting after each stop, the opening and closing ofthe door, and the exit and entrance of passengers, usually consumes several .times the time occupied by the actual transit of the cage and constitutes a still further and greater limitation uponthe capacity of this typeof elevator.

Another type of elevating mechanism which has been devised, but has not, so far as I am aware, been put iu use, consists of anemiless series of interconnected trucks or steps,

.which remain horizontal "whether movinghorizontally or onan incline, an themature of a moving stairway aud'moving. platforms; but in overy such prior construction of WhlOl'l .of people from one floor to another.

I am aware there hasnlways been a large proportion of the elevating mechanism not available for carrying purposes. Over .part of their travel the trucks or steps are necessarily along its extent this mechanism is available and operative for carrying purposes, and its movement is'continuous and uninterrupted.

My invention further relates to elevating apparatus of the class described in which certain features of construction are employed,

said features consisting mainly of the use of curves in-the ways or tracks, by which I am enabled to construct my elevating apparatus very compactly as regards to the space occupied thereby and at the same time by availing myself of all the possible carrying-sun face of the stairway to transport a large numberof persons by using a comparatively small following description, however, and the draw- 35 structure.

It will be obvious that the broad principle of my invention may be employed in practice in many and various forms. I shall limit the ingsillustrative thereof to one specific arrangement,'withoutintending to imply,nevertheless, that my invention is thus restricted.

Referring now'to the drawings,'Figs. 1 and 2 show more or less diagrammatic views of my elevator as a whole, the former in plan and the latter in elevation in the direction of the arrow 2 2 in the former. 'l-o explain the direction of the movement of the elevator at the different points of its course, as exhibited in these figures, we may suppose that it is boarded by a passenger at the point 1, where it is traveling horizontally along the lowest floor shown, which may be called the first floor. The passenger is carried a short distance horizontally to the point 2. Here the ascent begins, (represented by the curve 2 3 4 5, at the last of which points he reaches the second floor.) He is now carried horizontally over the second floor along the curve 5 6 7 8, which does not appear in Fig. 2, since it is on the same level with and behind the curved portion 17 18 19 20,11ereinafter referred to. At the point 8 the ascent from the second to the third floor commences, (represented by the ourve'S 9 1011.) At the point I] the passenger reaches the third floor and is carried horizontallyover the same alongthe curve 11 12 13 14. At It begins the descent to the second floor, (represented by the curve 12': 15 1'6 17.) From the point 17 the passenger is transported horizontally over the second floor along the curve 17 18 19 20, this curve being inside ,of and parallel with the curve ,5 6 7 S, horeinabove described. From thepoint 20 the descent to the first floor commences and is represented by the-curve 20 21 22 23. At the point 23 the passenger reaches the first floor again and is carried along the horizontal curve 23 24, &c., back to the original starting-point 1. This curve 23 24 1 2, being in great part verticallyunderneath the third-story curve 11 12 13 14, is represented in dotted lines, chiefly in Fig. 1.

.Tlhe arrows in the two figures are placed in corresponding positions and indicate the directions of the movement abovedescribed.

In practice-it is not to be presumed that passengers will make the continuous trip above outlined. Persons upon the first floor desiring to ascend will board the elevator somewhere along the curve 23 24 1 2 and will be carried upward to the second floor. Those who wish to get oil? there will do so. Those wishing to ascend to the third floor will remain upon the elevator or will board the same somewhere along the curve 5 6 7 8 and will be carried upward to the third door. The same principle will prevail as to the descent portions of my elevator.

The elevator will be moved, preferably, at a speed of about two miles per hour. A pas-. senger will find no difliculty, therefore, in stepping upon or 01f from one of the component steps or platforms of the elevator where the said steps are moving in horizontal direction. Thesaid steps remain severally and individually horizontal during both the ascent and descent of the elevator. It is not intended, however, that passengers shall enter or leave the elevator at such points. I In order to insure the passengers being in' the right position for the ascent or descent upon a step or platform, the top or tread A of each step may be provided witha mat A, as shown in Fig. 21,.to indicate the space upon which the passenger should stand. To prevent the possibility of the passengers falling during the transit, the said step may be provided with a supporting device A which may consist of asingle post a or-of two such posts and a rail 0., as shown in Fig. 21, or of any other convenient device of which the passenger can take hold. I may go further and construct upon each of the steps or platforms of my elevator one or more seats adapted to hold one or more persons. This modification I have not thought necessary to illustrate.

I shall now describe the construction and interconnection of the individual steps or platforms which constitute my elevator, particular reference being had to Figs. 11 and 12.

Each step or platform comprises a horizontal portion or t. cad A, upon the forward and rearward ends of which are formed nosings A", the particular constructions of which will be later described. At each of the said ends of the platform, in downwardly-projecting lugs a is pivoted the upper end of a ertical piece A which corresponds to that part of a stair called the-rise. It will be obvious that when the elevator ascends the rearward of the two parts A upon each platform will becxposed and operative. Whcn the elevator descends, the forward of the said two parts upon each step wil-lbc exposed and op-- erative. A spring (1" maybe arranged in any convenient manner to exert its tension upon which axle are mounted the forward wheel-s l3 and the rearward wheels 13*. "At the center of each of, the bars Bis vsecured a further bracket 0, in the lower end of each of which is formed a bearing for an axle-bar C. To each of the ends of the axle-bar G is secured a casting consisting of two sleeves C and 0 connected by an offset portion C In each outer sleeve 0 is secured an axle C (Shown .in Fig. 10.) Upon this axle and next to the sleeve 0* is mounted the roller 0, which is preferably provided with ball-hearings. A washer c is secured upon the axle next to the roller 0 and holds the same in position.

' Next to 0 upon the said axle is secured the tooth-shaped part 0 which forms one of the teeth D of the sprocket-chains Next to 0 upon the same axle is mounted the chain-bar attachment-piece G which comprises two perforated ears 0 c ,the said piece C being threaded upon and pivotally connected with the said axle-by means of these perforations, and its swivel portion 0 upon which is swiveled one 7 end ofthe chain-haul). =A second chain-bar attachment-piece C comprises aperforated car 0 which is threaded upon the axle C between the two ears 0 0 just described, and a teeth D D similar to those mounted upon" the urough which movement is supplied to my chain-bars D.- The sprocket-chain elevatorconsists of chain;bars D, attached to each other and to the moving platforms, as just Upon each'of the four sides are mounted teeth,

those teeth upon the sides normally vertical being letteredD and those upon the sides-normally horizontal being lettered D .l he power-supplying mechanism mayprefierably be located at the head of each ascending portion of the elevate r, as shown in Fig. 5.

The several mechanisms may be connected by shafting, as there, shown, or the power may be distrihuted to the said mechanisms in other andobvious ways. i In. the construction I Upon the extreme described. Each bauD is four-sidcd.

the said circle or circles.

have illustrated in the drawings the vertical shafts E are mounted within the .columns E1.-

The upper end of the shaft carries abevelgear E ,WlllCll meshes with a second bevel-gear as is shown articular-l in Fig. 4. The P y gear-wheel E is keyed upon a shaft E, upon which is also secured the sprocket-wheel E. The sprocket-wheel is constructed with two annular ribs 6 0, extending around the edges of the perimeter of the same, each of the said ribs carrying the o 'ipositely-disposcd teeth 0 c. with the sprocket-chain the teeth e e of the sprocket-wheel bear against the teeth D D of the chain-bar, while the lower teeth D of the chain bar pass without -engagement through the space between the annular ribs c of the sprocket-wheel. Only those teeth of the chain-bar, therefore, are operative which are mounted upon the vertical sides of the,

chain-bar when it engages with the sprocket- As the sprocket-wheel engages too circle shown in Fig. 1 not as a perfect circle merely larger in diameter than the inner circle there shown, but as a compound'circle or curvethat is, the inner circle'in Fig. 1 is drawn from the point 25 as a center, with a constant radius, which may be called Z. Of the outer circle .the curve between X on the first floor and X and between X? and X on the third floor (in all one hundred and twenty degrees) is drawn from the point 27 as a center and with a radius larger than Z, which (sixty degrees) isdrawn from the point 26 as a center and with a radius equal to Z again, the curve between X and X (one hundredand twenty degrees) is drawn from 25 as a centerand with a radius equal to Z, and the curve may be called Z, the curve between X and X between X and $2 (sixty degrees) is drawn I ner side, but would hear a fixed and constant proportion thereto, this proportion varying inversely as the distance of the inside and outside of the platform from the'center of If, however, the elevator has to'travel during part of" its course along acircle of a given radius and during another part of its course along a cir- 010 of a greater radius, which would be the ease in the construction exhibited in Fig. 1

if the enter circle there shown he considered a perfect; circle, then that proportion between the length of the outer ehain-bars and the inner chain-bars which would be adapted for the smaller circle would not be adapted.

I chain-ba rs would be of the same length. In the case of such 'a construction it would be "necessary to arrange at the point-X some rs device by which the length of the outer chainbars could be decreased, or,'what is-the same thing, the length of theinner chain-bars be increased, as at this 'point the-circle would Imakinga change of the reverse'character.- Inasmuch, however, as the outer circle shown in Fig. 1 in itspractical construction is a. 7 compound circle, as explained hereinab'ove,

commence to expand. Also at the 'pointX, verticallyabovetheisaidpoint X, it would be necessary to arrange a similar mechanism for it will be iiecessaryto employ four-fiirther mechanisms such as those just referred to, one at X. to adapt the chairt-bars tothe sharper cu rvebetween that point and X another at X to res'torethe relative lengths of the chain-bars as they stood before reaching the pointX, a third at X" likc that at 'X,

and a fourth at .X" like that at X%. "ri'lhe,

two original mechanisms, one at X on the first Moor and another at X uponthe third floor and vertically above the first, have been already refcrred'to'. I The mechanism which Iemploy for-eilfecting these changes in the length of the chaiu-bars is illustrated. particularly in Figs. 8and ii. A sprocket-wheel F is mounted just beyond the point at which it is desired to eifect .this change in such a position that its teeth' f will engage with the teeth D" D- of the chain-bars, which teeth I)" I)", as shown in Fig.- 8, are upon the sides of the chain-bars ;I.), which at this point are vertical, as will presently be explained. The sprocket-wheel 'Fis thus rotated by the passage of the successive chain-bars, and thereby rotates the shaft 1 upbn which it is mounted. Upon 'the-shaft-F' is mounted thebevel-gear F -which meshes with the bevelpinion F,

mounted upon a counter-shaft F. Upon the other end .of the counter-shaft F is mounted the pinion I "",of an elongated form, asshown in Fig. 8, each of the teeth F of which will engage with a determined number of the teeth I) of the chain-bars, thereby rotating the chain-ba'rin a plane perpendicular to thatof its length and of thedirection of its move: ment. Now it hasbeen seen that one end of each chain-bar has a swiveled attachment and the opposite end has a screw threade'd attachment. The effect of such rotation, therefore,

will be to lengthen or shortcn' the screwthreaded attachment, according tothe direction in whichthescrcw-threadruns. Suppos ammo ing, therefore, that at the point considered it be desired to adapt the proportion of the chainbars to the beginning of a smaller circle by lengthening the outer chain-bar, this mechanism would be so arranged that the screw threaded attachment of each outer chain-bar would be partially unscrewed as v the chainbarspassed in succession this mechanism. It will of course be necessary to place the sprocket-wheel F and the pinion F at such adist-anee apart that the two will not be in contact at any time with the same chain-bar, which I have indicated by breakingaway part of the shaft F, Fig. 8. If the pairs ofteeth D and the pairs of teeth D were opposite each other upon the chain -bars, it would result from this lengthening of the screwthreaded attach ment thatthe teeth nearest to'the said attachment'would be at a greater distance from the teeth D than would the adjacent teeth upon the next chain-bar or than any two adjacent:

pairs of teeth upon the same chain-bar from each other. This disb 'epancy might in some cases cause unevenness in the running of my app'aratuagat 'those points where thechainbars thus --rlengthened are engaged by the sprocket-wheels which supply power thereto. To remedy this, I divide up this discrepancy betweeniall the successive pairs of'teeth 'upon cach chain-bar by the arrangement which I shall now describe. Considering that chain- .bar, the upper and forward end of which is shown at the lefthand side of Fig. 8, it will be seen that 'the'pairs of opposite teeth, D

mourted upon the top and bottom of the 'chaimbar, are slightly in advance of those pairs. of teeth shown mounted upon the side of thechain-bar at that point. The distance represented by this advance is made in the-case of the teeth adjacent to the point of connection with the platform equal to that amount by which it is'found necessary to ,increase the length of the chain-bar when the same is to be increased, as above described. The next pair of teeth D are placed a less distance in advanee of the corresponding teeth D the third pair a still less distance, and so on until the last pair of teeth 1)? next to the swiveled end of the chain-bar are approximately opposite the correspoiulin g teeth D In order to illustrate the operation of this mechanism, we may suppose that the necessary increase of length of each chainbar is three-tenths of an inch and that the pitchof the screw-thread attachment (1 is onetenth of an inch approximately. The sprocketwheel F, the bevel-gear F, and bevel-pinion 1* will in such a case be so constructed that the passage of one chain-bar will so operate the sprocket-wheel F as to revolve the pinion F sufiicientl'y to cause "the chain-bar with which it contacts to make-three and a quarter rotations and to leave theY teeth D upon the vertical sides of the chain-bar, ,while the teeth :D will be on the top and bottom thereof.

:Nowbythe construction of the -teeth D with relation to the teeth D this increase of length aware e of the chain-bar is divided up among all the intervals between the teeth D, so that each interval will be increased one-tenth of the whole three-tenths-inch increase of the length ofthe chain-bar as compared with the intervals between the teeth D The chain-bar a portion of which is shown at the right-hand side of Fig. 8' is represented as having thus been rotated, bringing the teeth D into operative position on the vertical sides of the bar,

while the teeth D are now on the top and hottom thereof. The sprocket-wheels which supply power to the outside sprocket-chains will be formed to fit whichever set of teeth D or D are in operative position atthe points where power is supplied.

The tracks for my elevator I form, preferably, as follows: Upon each side of the elevator I construct a casing G, forming in crosssection three sides of arectangle opening inward, the three sides being respectively the top G, the vertical side G and the bottom G as shown particularly in Fig. 12. Upon the bottom G3 and near the inner edge thereof is placed a flange or rib g, by which there.

is formed a track g on each side of the elevator, adapted to receive the wheels B and B when the elevator is running horizontally. Where the elevator is so'traveling horizontally, the rollers C are apt operative.

" As each platform, however, comes into the again inoperative.

position shown-on the left-hand side of Fig. 11,where it commences its ascent, there is arranged ine'ach of the casings ,Gr a roller track H, supported by the bracket H, se-. cured to the track-casing by the flange H These tracks H are arranged in such a position and at such an angle that as the wheels 13 move up the ascending portion of the track 9' the rollers G will travel upon the track H, whereby the step or platform continues to retain a horizontal position, the rear wheels B becoming for the time inoperative. This position of one of the steps is shown in the diagrammatic view in Fig. Abracket I, carrying a flange along its upper edge, is bolted to the top of the casing G. To the lower edge of the bracket is secured a track 1?. This bracket and track are so constructed that as the platformcontinues its ascent the rear wheels 13 enter upon and travel upon the said track I At this point the support of the rollers 0 becomes unnecessary, and their tracks II are therefore discontinued,- as shown at H, whereby the rollers 0 become I prefer todiscontinue the tracks H immediately after the rear wheels enter upon and travel upon the track I? not only because the additional friction of the rollers O is a waste of energy, but also because the employment of three distinct rollers at each end to furnish a bearing while moving on the inclined portions would tendto make the step unstable if there should be the slightest variation in the relation of the three tracks with which the two wheels and tho-rollers (06perate.

On account of the extension of the axle C beyond the planes of the wheels B and 13; it becomes necessary to employ the offset portions 0 in said axles previously referred to in order to prevent any interference between the track I and the axle C, which interference would occur when traveling on the inclined portions of the tracks unless the portions of the axle 0 directly beneath the tracks I were offset, as shown.

As is shown in Fig. 20, when the platform has just commenced its ascent before the rear wheels B have entered upon the tracks I there might be a tendency for the rear end of the step to tip downward. This tendency is checked by forming upon the lower side of the'track I an upthrust track 1 against which the forward wheels B will immediately hear if there be such tendency of the rear end of the step to tip downward with the axle O as the pivotal point. Another upthrusttrack is formed of atrack proper, .1, attached to the upper side of the track-casing G" by the brackets J. This upthrust track is arranged over the path of the rollers C and along those portions of the elevator just be- -fore the-commencement'of each ascent. In

case, therefore, that there be any tendency i on the part of the, step before commencing its ascent to be lifted by the upward pull of the sprocket-chains the roller 0 will contact with and bear against the upthrust track J and counteract such tendency.

At each point where the elevator commences an ascent and at each point where it ends a descent it will be necessary to provide the track constructions hereinabovedescribed.

At eacli point where the elevator ends an ascent or commences a descent it will be necessary to provide the said track constructions, with the exception of the upthrust tracks J.

Along the sides of those'parts of my elevator where it ascends or desoeudsl find it desirable to provide something in the nature of a balustrade on the stairway to afford protec- -tion and support to the passengers as they are transported upward and downward. To this end I have devised and I construct an endless wainscoting and hand-rail, which travel upward or downward, according as the elevator ascends or descends, upon each side of the elevator and in close proximity thereto.

Figs. 3 and 5 show general views of this .con-

shaft M, suitably journaled in an upright position within the hood. The shaft M carries a V-pulley N, which moves the endless V-belt N, the said belt passing about asimilar pulley or sheave at the upperend of the hood. The V-belt N is out out at intervals, as at u, and each of these transverse groovcsis-provided with a staple N in the manner shown in Fig. 16, wherebya space it is left between the head of the staple and the belt. The waiuseoting is formed of a series of panels 0, of-the shape shown particularly in Fig. 15, o o o forming the vertical sides thereof, 0 0? being the horizontal bottom edge thereof and o 0 being the upper and slanting edge of the said panel 0, the slant being the same as the angle of ascent or descent of the elevator. The inside of each of the panels 0 is provided with two vertical strips 0 (),which are th readed loosely in the spaces 1;. formed in the belt N, as hereinbefore described. Further, each of the panels 0 is provided on its inner side with one or more brackets P,'each carrying a roller 1, the track upon which the said rollers bear being most conveniently formed upon the top G .of the track-casing G. There is formed along the upper part of and within the hood a framework com prisiug'an upper flat bar Q and a lower one Q, the two being con-- nected together, and spacethby the posts Q This framework as a whole may be supported from the track-casing. From the bottom of Q extend downward two ribs or flanges q. From the top of Q extend upward two corresponding ribs or flanges q. These ribs q q form slotted guides or tracks adapted to receive the rollers R. The rollersR are secured upon the sprocket-chain R, which is moved by the sprocket-wheel R mounted upon the top of-the shaft M. Each roller R is attached by a bracket R to one of the panels 0, and thus forms a support and guide for the upper part of the panel, as does the roller 1 for the lower part. thereof. To each of the brackets R is pivoted an arm S, the outer end of which carries a ring S. Through the rings S is threaded an endless cord or hand-rail S'-'. The hand-rail S passesout from within the hood, on the side next to the elevator, through the aperture S in the hood. (Shown in Fig. 22.) The operation 0'! these de- .viees is apparent from the above description of their construction. 'lo suppose, for the sake of illustration, that Figs. 13 and 14 of the drawings show the lower end of the hood at a point where the velevator commences to ascend, the shaftv M will revolve in such direction that the panels 0 are carried downward when in the position shown in Fig. 13, will pass around the shaft at the lower end of the hood, and move upward in close proximity with the upward-moving elevator and at the same rate of speed therewith. The object of pivoting the arms S upon the brackets R is topermit the said arms to swing upward when the panels pass around the mechanism at the lower end of the -hood,and thus avoid the straining or stretching of the hand-rail which would otherwise ensue. The panels 0 are preferably made of some flexible material to permit their passing around, the said mechanism at the lower end of the hood. panels are so shaped and mounted that as they descend upon that side away from the elevator their upper diagonal edges 0 0 will The said stand in some such relation to each other asl,

showuin Fi 13. \Vhen however the )anels' Q I descent, and should'such passenger, fall he,

will be prevented by the wainseoting from falling olflronrthe elevator, and the movement of the wainscotin'g will preven t his being in any way caught thereby, as might be the case with'a' motionless 'balust-rading.

I have in my'deseription of tho individuat steps referred to a nosing A at the front and rear ends of each stepwr phat-form.

elastic -in order thatrit may prevent the for 'lhis. nosing is prel'erablyico'nstrlnoted so as to be mation of. spaces oncraeks between the adjacent steps when themlevatm changes its course from one of the larger circles, heroinabove described, to "it-smaller circle. elasticity on the part of the nosing may be had by constructing the nosing of some elastic material, such as rubber. I may find it preferable in practice, however, to providea positive adjustment to adapt the nosing to Such.

the. changes in relative position of: the ad joining steps, and one form of such positive adjustment I have illustratcftain; the drawings. Toward the middle of the under side of each step or platform is mounted a short upright shaft Tin any suitable manner, the lower end of which shaft carries a toothed wheel T, so placed as to engage with a toothed rack T secured to the track 9 at those pointsv where it is desirable to etl'oct the adjustment of the nosing. The upper end of the shat't'l is provided with a small toothed pinion l ..whieh engages with the 'sliding toothed bars T, held within. the guides T upon the bottom of the step. The outer edge U of the nosing is rigidly attached to or is made integral witha fiat plate U, pivoted under the edge of the step or platform at oneend, as at if. The free end of the plate U is bolted to an enlargement it of the rod 'T, which enlargement is adapted to slide backward and forward in the guides u. Between the outer edge of the nosing U and the edge of the top 'of the step proper are mounted two or more spring-bars V V, one end of each thereof being rigidly attached, as at u 'v', the other ends being free to slide horizontally upon the pin carried forward against the said barrier, Y

' \V as a guide in such manner that they-tend to divide up into equal spaces the distance between the outer nosing U and the edge of the top of the platform. lhe whole of this mechanism is so arranged that the adjustment of the nosing will adapt itself to the changes in distance between the adjacent I steps.

Between those two portions of my elevator which runhorizontally and parallel to each other upon the second floor, as shown in Fig.

1, I arrange a hand-rail Y. (Shown in Figs.

, l and In Fig. I have shown in plan an arrange ment of turnstiles for controlling entrance to and exit from the elevatonand a device for compelling passengers to leave theelevator. These devices, in case they be employed, will preferably be located at such a point as X upon the first floor. The elevator at this point moves horizontally in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 23.

At the said point X the hood L, with its wainscoting andhandrail, is curved outward, forming an angular projection L across the direction of travel of the elevator; As the passenger arrives upon the first floor and approaches from the right,-

as shown in Fig. 23, this barrier, formed by the projection L, the said passenger is supposed to step from the elevator onto thefioor- In case he does not so do, however, he is whereupon the resultant of the diagonal motion of the wainscoting and theforward move-- ment of the elevator will be to push the passenger sidewise from the said elevator upon the floor 29. Arrived upon the said floor the passenger will leave the elevator by one of a series of exit-turnstiles 30, of ordinary construction, adapted to turn in but one direction. (Indicated by the arrows.) Entrance to the elevator is to take place through .the passsage-ways 31, formed and separated from each other by the railings 32. At the entrance to each passage-way is stationed at turnstile 33, which consists of a vertical shaft 34, mounted in suitable bearings,one of which,35,is located below'the floor and the other, 36, upon the .fioor. Upon the upper end of the shaft 34,

.which may extend from three to four feet above the floor, is mounted a collar 37, to whichrare pivoted to move in vertical planes the arms 38, preferably four in number. A hollow column 89 surrounds that. portion of the shaft 34 which extends above the floor and is provided at its upper end with a cam device 40, which lies directly underneath and close to the collar 37. The cam 40, commencin g with the vertical edge,is en t awayabruptly at i1 and is sloped outward again to its original edge at 42. Mounted upon thei'ipper end or the shaft 3i and extending downward to cover the collar 37 and cam 40 1 construct a hemispherical hood 43, provided with slots 4i bpposite to the arms :58 and adaptedto per-' min the arms to rise upward to a horizontal position. From-this description of the constr uction it will be apparent that as the shaft .34 is turned 'in the direction of the arrow of Fig. 525, each of the arms 38 will drop into a vertical position when it reaches the point 41 and will be brought upward again into a horizontal position as it passes over the part 42 of the-cam 40'. This construction is-econoinical of space and permits the arrangement of the passages 31, close together and side by'side.

That portion of the floor at the end of each passage-way 31 nearest to the elevator is con-- structed in the form of a pivoted float or trap .45, hinged to the floor proper at the points 46 upon one of its edges. To the bottom of the float I attach a bracket 47,- to which is pivoted ,one end of a lever 48. The said lever is pivotally supported upon the post 49, and its remaining end is pivoted to one end of the bell-crank lever 50. The said bell-crank lever 50 is pivotally supported from the bracket 51. Its remaining end is pivotally connected to the bar 52, which is adapted to slide back and forth horizontally in the guides 53. This sliding bar 53 is provided at its ends with downweirdly-projecting forked arms 54: and 55. The forked arm 54 engages with a sleeve 56, which is made integral with or rigidlyadapted to the bevel-gear 57. 5G and gear 57 are keyed upon the shaft 58 and at the same time are adapted to slide horizontally upon the said shaft while remaining so keyed thereto. The horizontal shaft 58 is mounted in suitable bearings 59, and on its endopposite to that which carries the gear 57 is mounted the sprocket-wheel 60, which lies in the path of and is adapted to be rotated by the passage of the chain-bars D.

The downwardly-projecting forked arm engages with the sleeve 61, to which isattached the bevel-gear G2, the said sleeve and gear being loosely mounted upon the stubaxle 63. I preferably adapt the said gear 62 to rotate in only one direction upon the said axle by means of a pawl 65 and ratchet device 66 or any equivalent construction. The vertical turnstile-shaft 3 l'carrie's near its lower hearing a bevel-gear 64., adapted to mesh with the gear 57 or with the gear 62, according to with which one the said gear 64 is in engagement.- The operation of these devices is as follows: YVhen there is no weight upon the float 45,

the gear 57 engages with the gear 64 and the turnstile-shaftfie, with its arms, is rotated by the movement of' the elevator. When a passenger passes through the rotating turnstile 33 and steps upon the floor 45, the downward movement of the float throws the gear 57 out of engagement with the gear 64 and brings the gear 62 into engagement with the said gear 64. The turnstile thereupon ceases to rotate. Moreover, by the pawl-and-ratchet device attached to the gear 62 the'turnstil'e is locked against any further rotation in the same direction. Inasmuch, however, as the gear 62 is free to turn one way the turnstile canbe rotated in a direction opposite to that The said sleeve of its normal movement by a passenger who has once entered, but wishes to return without going upon the elevator.

The float 45 is provded with any convenient 5 spring device which will restore itto its normal position when not carrying any weight. In some cases I may find it desirable to give to the said spring device such tension that it will require the weight of two intending passengers instead of the weight of but one to depress the float and throw the gear 57 out of engagement with the gear 64. This construction may be adopted when the platforms A are adapted to the accommodation of two passengers eachl The said spring device for restoring the float to its normal position and recommencing the rotation of the turnstile is constructed to operate in combination with a dash-pot or other equivalent device,'which will be so regulated that the passenger who wishes to return through the turnstile without.-

going upon the elevator will be given snffiv cient time for so doing before the turnstile recommences its rotation, as aforesaid.

It will be evident from .a consideration of the mode of operation of the above-mentionedtu rnstiles controlling the entrance to theelevator that they are designed to act synchronously, as it were, with the traveling-surface of the elevator or other conveying apparatus, so as to prevent the crowding upon the conveying apparatus of more than acertain num ber of passengers, a feature which is evidently very desirable, and I desire to claim such a construction broadly without any limitation as to the exact form-of mechanism or construction to be employed therein.

.To illustrate the construction last above described, I'show in Fig. 24 a dash-pot 67, surrounded by a coiled compression spring 68, the upper end of which isattached tothe piston 69 of the dash-pot. The said piston-69 is pivoted to the lever 48, abovedesc-ribed'.

The passages 31 are arranged, as shown in Fig. 23, obli'quely to the direction of movement of the elevator at that point. This arrangementis for the purpose or causing the passenger tohave a movement in the same direction as the movement of the elevator and of approximately the same speed atthe 'point where he enters upon the elevator;

The preceding description and theaccom- ,panyingdrawingsgjllustrating the same, are restricted lpone specific form of construction for embodying the principles of my invention;

or any other. specific form; but

What I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-' y 1. As an elevating apparatus, endless circular tracks which have the formof a double spiral comprising two or more endless curves when projected on a horizontal plane, the said tracks through part ofthe'ir length being horizontal, through part inclined; an endless series of interconnected platforms adapted to move along the said tracks; means for mov- My invention is not therefore limited to' this 7 ing the said platforms; and devices adapted to keep the said platforms in a horizontal position throughout their movement.

2. As an elevating apparatus, endless cir cular tracks extending horizontally on a certain level, ascending to a -second level, extending horizontally thereon, ascending to a third levehextndinghorizontally thereon, descending to thesaid second level, again extending horizontally thereon, descending to thesaid first level,and extending horizontally :the said wheels are adapted to move; secondary' inclined tracks, I", mounted over theinclined portions of the tracks g; short guidetracks, H, adapted to receive the rollers C and guide the said wheels B upon the secondary tracks 1, whereby the said platforms remain severally horizontal throughout their movement; and means for moving the said s'.e' ries of platforms.

4. In an elevating apparatus, an endless series of interconnected platforms provided with the-wheels B -and B and with the rollers 0; tracks g through part of their extent hori zontal, through part inclined, adapted to re-- IOI ceive the said wheels; secondary tracks, I,

mounted above the inclined portions of the tracks g; short guide-tracks, H, adapted to receive the rollers C? and guide the wheels B onto the tracks I; upthrusttracks I against which wheels B? are adapted to bear, located beyond the end of each ascent and before each descent of .the tracks; and means for moving the said series of platforms.

5. In an elevating apparatus, an endless series of interconnected platforms provided with theasheels l3 and B, and with the roll- -ers Q"; tracks g through part of their extent horizontal, through part inclined, adapted to receive the said'wheels; tracks I mounted above the inclined portions of the tracks, 9; short guide-tracks, H, adapted to receive the rollers 0,, and guide the wheels B onto the tracks I; upthrust=tracks, J, against which the rollers O are adapted to bear, located before the beginning of each ascent of the tracks;

and meansfor communicating movement to the said series of platforms.

6. In an elevating apparatus, an endless series of interconnected platformsprovided with the wheels B and B, and'with the rollersC; tracks g through part of their extent horizontal, through part inclined, adaptedto receive the said wheels; tracks I mounted erarro above. the inclined portions of the tracks, g; short guide-tracks, H, adapted toreceive therollers Gfland guide the wheels B onto the tracks 1 upthrust-tracks, J located before the beginning of each ascent of the tracks, against which the rollers C are adapt ed to bear; upthrust-tracks, 1 against which the wheels B are adapted to bear, located beyond the end of each ascent andbefore each descent of the tracks; and means for communicating movement to the said series of platforms.

7. In an elevating apparatus, an endless series of interconnected platforms provided with the wheels B B and with the axle-bar, ofliset connections 0 and rollers 0; tracks g adapted to receive the wheels B B, through part of their extent horizontal, through part inclined; secondary tracks I mounted above the inclined portions of the tracks g; guidetracks, H, adapted to receive the rollers 0 and guide the wheels 13 upon the secondary tracks I upthrust-tracks I projecting within the offset portions O of the roller-supports, and adapted to bear against the wheels B tnd means for moving the said series of platorms.

-8. In an elevating apparatus, an endless series of. interconnected platforms, provided with the wheels B B, and with the axle-bar O, offset connections G aud rollers G, whereby the. axles of the wheels and rollers may be broughtin the same horizontal plane on theinclined parts of the tracks 9; tracks g adapted to receive the wheels B and B, through part of their extent horizontal, through part inclined; secondarytracks I mounted above the inclined portions of the tracks 9; guidetracks H adapted to receive therollers Cf and guide the wheels 13 upon the secondary tracks 1 and means for moving the said series ;of platforms. 1

V 9. In an elevating apparatus, an endless series of platforms, A, provided with wheels, B 13*; tracks, g, upon which the said wheels are adapted to move, through part of their extent horizontal, through part inclined; secondary tracks I mounted above the inclined portions of the tracks g; devices adapted to guide the wheels 13* upon the tracks 1*; connecting-bars, D, pivoted at their opposite ends to centrally-disposed supports carried by the adjoining platforms; and means for moving the said series of platforms.

l0. In an elevating apparatus of the general the sprocket-wheel with the pinion F and type described, the steps A; connecting-bars D pivotally secured at opposite ends to the adjacent platforms; and means for moving the platforms:

11. In an elevating apparatus of the general type described, the platformsA; the cen trally-disposed axle-bars C; the chain-bars D connecting the adjacent platforms,and provided with teeth, and sprockct-wheels adapted to, engage with the said teethand communicato motion to said platforms.

12. In an elovati ngapparatns of the general type described, the platforms A; the centrally-disposed axle-bars O; the chain-bars -D pivotally connected therewith, and provided withthe teeth D and D and the sprocket-wheels E provided with the flanges,

c, and teeth, e adapted to engage with the said chain-bars and supply motion to the said platforms. 4

13. In an elevating apparatus of the general type described, the series of platforms A; the

chain-bars D connecting the adjacent platforms; automatic means for changing the length of the chain-bars; and meansfor moving the platforms.

' 14. In an elevating apparatus of the general type described, the decries of platforms A .adaptedto move over two or more curves of different radii; chain-bars D connecting the adjacent platforms and on opposite sides thereof, the chain-bars upon one side of the said platforms being connected at one end by a swiveled attachment, at the other by a type described, adapted to move over two or more curves of different radii the series of platforms A; the chain-bars D connecting the adjacent "platforms and on opposite sides thereof, those chain-bars upon one side of the platforms A being each connected at one end by a swiveled attachment, at the other bya screw threaded attachment; projections mounted upon the sides of the said chainbars; a pinion, F adapted to engage with the said projections and rotate the said chain'- bars; means for supplying movement to the said pinion from the movement of the appa- "ratus; and means for moving the apparatus. 16. In an elevatipg apparatus of the general type described, a series of platforms A adapt-- ed to move over two or more curves of different radii; chain-bars D provided with teeth,

D connecting the adjacent platforms and 4 (means for supplying movement to the said elevating apparatus.

17. In an elevating apparatus of the general type described, a series of platforms A adaptedto move over two or more curves of differ,-

-ent r'adii; the chain-bars D connecting the adjacent platforms and on opposite sides thereof, the chain-bars upon one sideof the platforms being each connected at one end by a swiveled attachment, at the other by a screw-threaded attachment teeth, I) and D mountedupon the said chain-bars, substan- .tially as described; the sprocket -wheel F, adapted to engage with and be rotated by the successive chain-bars; means for transmit- 5 ting the movement of the sprocket-wheel F t a pinion F; the pinion l5 adapted to enl\ ge with and rotate the chain-bars D; the sprocket-wheels, E adapted to engage with the chaimbars D, and communicate motion 1 to the apparatus.

18. In an elevating apparatus substantially as described, the series of platforms A; chain- Qbars D; teeth D',D D the sprocket-wheels E the sprocket -wheels'F; the pinion F;

l 5 connections between the said sprocket-wheels F and thesaid pinion F constructed and operating substantially as described; v

l 19. In an elevating apparatus of the general type described, the combination, with a series of tracks or ways comprisinghorizontal and inclined portions, of a series of movable steps cooperating with said ways and having their tread-surfaces horizontal to form a continuous landing on the horizontal portions of the z 5 tracks and a moving stairway on the inclined portions, the tread-surfaces of the steps each 7 having a portion in the center of the step,

but not extending to the edges of the adjacent step, constructedditferently from the 3's rest of the tread-surface so as to makeit evident to-a person standing on the steps, when they form a continuous. landing, whether or not he is standing upon a single step or upon more than one, substantially as and for the 3 5 purpose specified.

' 20. In an elevatin gapparatus of the general type described, the combination, with a-series of tracks or ways comprising horizontal and inclined portions, of a series of movable steps 40 cooperating with said ways and having their tread-surfaces horizontal to form a continuous landing on the horizontal portions of the tracks and a moving stairway on the inclined portions, the tread-surfaces of the steps each i being provided with a raised mat A in the center of the step, but not extending to the edges of the adjacent steps, so as to make a pronounced depression between the adjacent steps when they form a continuous-landing,

whereby the passenger will know whether or not heis standinguponpa single step, substantially as and forthe, purpose specified.

21. In an elevating apparatus of the general type described, the combination, with a series of tracks or ways comprising horizontal and inclined portions, of a series'of movable steps cocperating with said ways and having their.

tread-surfaces horizontal to form a continuous landing on the horizontalportions of the 6p tracks and a moving stairway onthe inclined I portions, and arail A u'pon eachstep adapted to afford support to a pa'ssengerstanding uponthe step, substantially as and for the purpose described. I

22. In an elevating apparatus of the general type described, the platforms A provided with tread-surfaces, portions of each of which are expansible, for the purpose specified.

23. Man elevating apparatus of the general type described, the platforms A provided with expansible nosings A, for thepurpose speci fied. 24.. In an elevatingapparatus of the general type described, adapted to move along curves of different radii the .platforms A; the adjust- 15 platforms.

26. In an elevating apparatus of the type de- 25 5 scribed the platforms A;the pivoted nosingplate, U U; the rod, T; the tooth-pinion, T the ratchet-wheel, T and the stationary rack, T, operating substantially in the manner and for the purpose described.

- 9 27. In an elevating apparatussubstantiall y of the type described, the platforms A; the pivoted nosing-plate, U U; the spring-bars, V V; and means for adjusting the free end of the pivoted plate, operating substantially 5 in the mannerand for the purpose described; 28. In an elevating apparatus of the general type described, the platforms A; the risers A;

and the springs, a, adaptedto hold the said risers in contact with the adjacent platforms. I00

29. In an elevating apparatus of the general type-described, the platforms A; the nosings, A; the pivoted risers, A; and the springs, (1., adapted to hold the free edges of the risers in contact with the nosings, substantially as 1o5 described.

30. In an elevating apparatus of the general 7 a type described, the platforms A; the expansible nosings, A; the risers, A, pivotally attached at their upper edges to the said platno forms; and the springs; a, adapted to hold the lower and free edges of the risers in contact with the expansible nosings of the adjacent platforms.

31. In an elevating apparatus, a series of platforms, A, in combination with endless wainscotings at the sides of the said plat- -'-forms but separate therefrom, adapted to move with the said platforms-along part of, the travel of the said platforms, in thegenx20 eral manner described. 7

32. In an levating apparatus; a series of platforms adapted to move upon an in lint incombination with wainscotingsy adapted to move at the sides of and at the same rate of speed as the said platforms.

33. In an elevating apparatus, a series 0 platforms adapted to move.upon an incline;-

a wainscoting adapted tomove by the aides of and at the same rate as the said plat arms; :30

and hand-rails. carried by, and moving. with the said wainscotinc.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4565282 *Nov 22, 1983Jan 21, 1986Frigoscandia Contracting AbStoring installation for carrying a number of piled helically extending turns of an endless conveyor belt
US4681206 *Aug 9, 1985Jul 21, 1987Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaCurvilinear escalator
US4739870 *Jun 25, 1986Apr 26, 1988Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaMoving staircase with a curved conveyor passage
US4746000 *Dec 16, 1985May 24, 1988Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaCurved escalator
US4883160 *Mar 27, 1989Nov 28, 1989Otis Elevator CompanyCurved escalator with fixed center constant radius path of travel
US4884673 *Mar 27, 1989Dec 5, 1989Otis Elevator CompanyCurved escalator with fixed center constant radius path of travel
US4895239 *Mar 27, 1989Jan 23, 1990Otis Elevator CompanyCurved escalator with fixed center constant radius path of travel
US4899871 *Jul 20, 1987Feb 13, 1990Frigoscandia Contracting AbStoring installation, primarily for an endless conveyor belt travelling helically in a number of turns laid upon one another in a pile
US4930622 *Mar 27, 1989Jun 5, 1990Otis Elevator CompanyCurved escalator with fixed center constant radius path of travel
US4949832 *Oct 16, 1989Aug 21, 1990Otis Elevator CompanyCurved escalator with vertical planar step risers and constant horizontal velocity
US4953685 *Aug 10, 1989Sep 4, 1990Otis Elevator CompanyStep chain for curved escalator
US5009302 *Mar 9, 1990Apr 23, 1991Otis Elevator CompanyCurved escalator with fixed center constant radius path of travel
US5050721 *Sep 11, 1990Sep 24, 1991Otis Elevator CompanyStep riser profile for curved escalator
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB66B29/08