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Publication numberUS6225074 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/932,072
Publication dateMay 1, 2001
Filing dateSep 17, 1997
Priority dateAug 18, 1997
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asEP1019531A1, EP1019531A4, US20010014462, WO1999009209A1
Publication number08932072, 932072, US 6225074 B1, US 6225074B1, US-B1-6225074, US6225074 B1, US6225074B1
InventorsDennis Wright, David J. Phelps
Original AssigneeDennis Wright, David J. Phelps
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mixing test sample with reagent solution of chloramphenicol or derivative, an acyl coenzyme a compound, and a tetrazolium salt, then observing optical response; solution does not contain redox enzyme
US 6225074 B1
Abstract
A direct assay for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) has been presented wherein the assay reagent comprises chloramphenicol, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and wherein the reagent does not have any added coupling redox enzymes. In one embodiment, the reagent is mixed with the test sample and the presence of CAT is detected by an optical response. In a second embodiment, the reagent is mixed with a test sample containing CAT and the optical response is quantitated by comparison with standards to measure CAT activity in the test sample. In another embodiment, an exogenous electron carrier such as phenazines may be used to enhance the detection of CAT. The assay for the presence or activity of CAT can be used in a high-throughput screening assay or to detect CAT as a reporter gene for measuring the expression of a gene of interest. Kits containing the reagents are also provided.
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Claims(52)
We claim:
1. A method of detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a test sample, comprising:
combining the test sample with a reagent solution comprising chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and wherein the reagent solution does not have an added redox enzyme to create an assay sample; and
observing an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT in the assay sample, thereby detecting the presence of CAT in the test sample.
2. A method according to claim 1, further comprising determining the activity of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in the test sample, by
comparing the optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT observed in the assay sample to an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT obtained from combining one or more standard samples comprising CAT of known activity with one or more reagent solutions comprising chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and wherein the reagent solutions do not have an added redox enzyme, and
thus determining the activity of CAT in the test sample.
3. A high throughput method of screening test samples for the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT), comprising:
preparing a plurality of assay samples, each assay sample comprising a test sample and a reagent solution comprising a tetrazolium salt, a chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, and an acyl CoA compound, and wherein the reagent solution does not have an added redox enzyme, and
detecting the presence of CAT in each test sample by observing an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT in the assay samples which indicates the presence of CAT in the test samples.
4. A high throughput method according to claim 3, further comprising determining the activity of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in the test samples, by
comparing the optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT observed in each assay sample to an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT obtained from combining one or more standard samples comprising CAT of known activity with one or more reagent solutions comprising chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound and a tetrazolium salt, and wherein the reagent solutions do not have an added redox enzyme, and
thus determining the activity of CAT in the test sample.
5. A method according to claims 1, 2, 3, or 4, wherein the optical response is color or fluorescence.
6. A method according to claims 1, 2, 3, or 4, wherein a spectrophotometer or a spectrofluorometer is used to observe the optical response.
7. A method according to claims 1, 2, 3, or 4, wherein the reagent solution further comprises exogenous electron carrier which facilitates the response.
8. A method according to claim 7, wherein the electron carrier is a phenazine salt of the structure:
where R is an alkyl, Z is an alkyl, alkoxyl, halo, or nitro, and X is a counter ion.
9. A method according to claim 7, wherein the electron carrier is selected from the group consisting of phenazine methosulfate (PMS) phenazine ethosulfate (PES), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and 4-aminoantipyrine.
10. A method according to claim 9, wherein the electron carrier is phenazine methosulfate (PMS).
11. A method according to claims 1, 2, 3, or 4, wherein the tetrazolium salt has the structure of:
where R1 is aryl or heteroaryl, and R2 is aryl or heteroaryl, and X is a counter ion.
12. A method according to claims 1, 2, 3, or 4, wherein the tetrazolium salt is selected from the group consisting of dimethylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC), 2-(2′-benzothiazolyl)-5-stryl-3-(4-phthalhydrazidyl) tetrazolium chloride (BPST), neotetrazolium chloride (NTC), (3,3′-{1-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium}-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzene sulfonic acid) (XTT), p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT) and cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC).
13. A method according to claims 1, 2, 3, or 4, wherein the acyl CoA compound is selected from a group consisting of acyl CoA, acetyl CoA, propionyl CoA, and butyrylCoA.
14. A method according to claims 1, 2, 3, or 4, wherein the test sample is a cell lysate.
15. A method of detecting the expression of a gene of interest by assaying for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) present in a sample of a cell lysate due to expression of a CAT gene used as a reporter for measuring expression of a gene of interest in transfected cells, comprising:
combining the test sample with a reagent solution comprising chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and wherein the reagent solution does not have an added redox enzyme to create an assay sample; and
observing an optical response in the assay sample which is characteristic of the presence of CAT activity, and wherein CAT activity is indicative of the expression of the gene of interest, and thus, upon observation of the optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT activity, detecting the expression of the gene of interest.
16. A method of detecting expression of a gene of interest in transfected cells by measuring the expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene used as a reporter group, comprising:
combining a sample of cell lysate from the transfected cells with a reagent solution comprising chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and wherein the reagent solution does not have an added redox enzyme, to create an assay sample; and
measuring an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT in the assay sample and in samples of CAT of known activity, and wherein CAT activity is indicative of the expression of the gene of interest; and
comparing the optical response obtained for the assay sample with the optical response obtained from samples of CAT of known activity to quantitate the expression of the gene of interest.
17. A method according to claims 15 or 16, wherein the optical response is color or fluorescence.
18. A method according to claim 17, wherein a spectrophotometer or a spectrofluorometer is used to observe the optical response.
19. A method according to claims 15 or 16, wherein the reagent solution further comprises an oxogenous electron carrier which facilitates the response.
20. A method according to claim 19, wherein the electron carrier is a phenazine salt.
21. A method according to claim 20, wherein the phenazine salt is phenazine methosulfate (PMS).
22. A method according to claim 19, wherein the electron carrier is a phenazine salt of the structure.
where R is an alkyl, Z is an alkyl, alkoxyl, halo, or nitro, and X is a counter ion.
23. A method according to claim 19, wherein the electron carrier is selected from the group consisting of phenazine methosulfate (PMS) phenazine ethosulfate (PES), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and 4-aminoantipyrine.
24. A method according to claims 15 or 16, wherein the tetrazolium salt has the structure of:
where R1 is aryl or heteroaryl, and R2 is aryl or heteroaryl, and X is a counter ion.
25. A method according to claims 15 or 16, wherein the tetrazolium salt is selected from the group consisting of dimethylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC), 2-(2′-benzothiazolyl)-5-stryl-3-(4-phthalhydrazidyl) tetrazolium chloride (BPST), neotetrazolium chloride (NTC), (3,3′-{1-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium}-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzene sulfonic acid) (XTT), p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT) and cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC).
26. A method according to claims 15 or 16, wherein the acyl CoA compound is selected from a group consisting of acyl CoA, acetyl CoA, propionyl CoA, and butyrylCoA.
27. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT), comprising component parts capable of being assembled, comprising:
a tetrazolium salt, chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, and an acyl CoA salt, and wherein the component parts do not have an added reducing agent.
28. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT), comprising component parts capable of being assembled, comprising:
a tetrazolium salt, chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an exogenous electron carrier and an acyl CoA salt, and wherein the component parts do not have an added redox enzyme.
29. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase according to claims 27 or 28, wherein the component parts are all contained in a vial or container.
30. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase according to claims 27 or 28, wherein the component parts further comprise a reconstitution buffer.
31. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) in a plurality of test samples having component parts combine of being assembled, comprising a multiplicity of containers, and within each container ingredients comprising a tetrazolium salt, chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, and an acyl CoA salt, and wherein the containers do not have an added redox enzyme.
32. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) in a plurality of test samples having component parts combine of being assembled, comprising a multiplicity of containers, each container comprising a tetrazolium salt, chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, exogenous electron carrier, and an acyl CoA salt, and wherein the containers do not have an added redox enzyme.
33. A kit according to claims 28 or 32, wherein the electron carrier is a phenazine salt.
34. A kit according to claim 33, wherein the phenazine salt is phenazine methosulfate (PMS).
35. A kit according to claim 28 or 32, wherein the electron carrier is a phenazine salt of the structure:
where R is an alkyl, Z is an alkyl, alkoxyl, halo, or nitro, and X is a counter ion.
36. A kit according to claims 27, 28, 31 or 32, wherein the tetrazolium salt has the structure of:
where R1 is aryl or heteroaryl, and R2 is aryl or heteroaryl, and X is a counter ion.
37. A kit according to claims 27, 28, 31 or 32, wherein the tetrazolium salt is selected from the group consisting of dimethylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC), 2-(2′-benzothiazolyl)-5-stryl-3-(4-phthalhydrazidyl) tetrazolium chloride (BPST), neotetrazolium chloride (NTC), (3,3′-{1-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium}-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzene sulfonic acid) (XTT), p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT) and cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC).
38. A kit according to claims 27, 28, 31 or 32, wherein the acyl CoA compound is selected from a group consisting of acyl CoA, acetyl CoA, propionyl CoA, and butyrylCoA.
39. A kit according to claims 27, 28, 31 or 32, further comprising a reconstitution buffer.
40. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT), comprising component parts capable of being assembled, consisting essentially of:
a tetrazolium salt, chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, and an acyl CoA salt.
41. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT), comprising component parts capable of being assembled, consisting essentially of:
a tetrazolium salt, chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an exogenous electron carrier, and an acyl CoA salt.
42. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) in a plurality of test samples having component parts capable of being assembled, comprising a multiplicity of containers, each container including components consisting essentially of a tetrazolium salt, chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, and an acyl CoA salt.
43. A kit for detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) in a plurality of test samples having component parts capable of being assembled, comprising a multiplicity of containers, each container including components consisting essentially of a tetrazolium salt, chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an exogenous electron carrier and an acyl CoA salt.
44. A kit according to claims 40, 41, 42, or 43, further comprising a reconstitution buffer.
45. A method of detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a test sample, comprising:
combining the test sample with a reagent solution consisting essentially of chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt to create an assay sample; and
observing an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT in the assay sample, thereby detecting the presence of CAT in the test sample.
46. A method according to claim 45, further comprising determining the activity of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in the test sample, by
comparing the optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT observed in the assay sample to an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT obtained from combining one or more standard samples comprising CAT of known activity with one or more reagent solutions consisting essentially of chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and
thus determining the activity of CAT in the test sample.
47. A high throughput method of screening test samples for the presence of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), comprising:
preparing a plurality of assay samples, each assay sample comprising a test sample and a reagent solution consisting essentially of a chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and
detecting the presence of (CAT) in each test sample by observing an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT in the assay samples which indicates the presence of CAT in the test samples.
48. A high throughput method according to claim 47, further comprising determining the activity of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in the test samples, by
comparing the optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT observed in the assay sample to an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT obtained from combining one or more standard samples comprising CAT of known activity with one or more reagent solutions consisting essentially of chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and
thus determining the activity of CAT in the test sample.
49. A method of detecting expression of a gene of interest by assaying for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) present in a sample of a cell lysate due to expression of a CAT gene used as a reporter for measuring expression of a gene of interest in transfected cells, comprising:
combining the sample cell lysate with a reagent solution consisting essentially chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, to create an assay sample; and
observing an optical response in the assay sample which is characteristic of the presence of CAT activity, and wherein CAT activity is indicative of the expression of the gene of interest, and thus, upon observation of the optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT activity, detecting the expression of the gene of interest.
50. A method of detecting the presence of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a test sample, comprising:
combining the test sample with a reagent solution consisting essentially of chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, a tetrazolium salt and a phenazine salt to create an assay sample; and
observing an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT in the assay sample, thereby detecting the presence of CAT in the test sample.
51. A method according to claim 50, further comprising determining the activity of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in the test sample, by
comparing the optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT observed in the assay sample to an optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT obtained from combining one or more standard samples comprising CAT of known activity with one or more reagent solutions consisting essentially of chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and a phenazine salt, and
thus determining the activity of CAT in the test sample.
52. A method of detecting expression of a gene of interest by assaying for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) present in a sample of a cell lysate due to expression of a CAT gene used as a reporter for measuring expression of a gene of interest in transfected cells, comprising:
combining the sample cell lysate with a reagent solution consisting essentially chloramphenicol or a derivative or analog thereof, an acyl CoA compound, and a tetrazolium salt, and a phenazine salt to create an assay sample; and
observing an optical response in the assay sample which is characteristic of the presence of CAT activity, and wherein CAT activity is indicative of the expression of the gene of interest, and thus, upon observation of the optical response characteristic of the presence of CAT activity, detecting the expression of the gene of interest.
Description

This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 08/912,462, filed Aug. 18, 1997 now abandoned.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a method of detection of enzymatic chemical reactions that result in the cleavage or formation of a chemical, usually covalent bond. Most particularly, the invention is a method for the chromogenic or fluorogenic detection of such enzyme reactions, in particular as an assay screen for new chemical combination that are produced by biotechnology methodologies, that may have activity in enzyme-substrate interactions.

1. Background of the Invention

Enzymes are catalytic proteins that are pervasive in biological systems. Many enzymes catalyze specific reactions which entail the cleavage or formation of a chemical bond. In particular such an Enzyme (E) will increase the rate of reaction of a specific Substrate (S) that involves the formation or cleavage of a covalent bond resulting in a Product (P.) Enzymes are necessary in almost every biological reaction, and helpful in many chemical, pharmaceutical and manufacturing processes. Detecting enzyme activity and defining and measuring enzyme-substrate interactions is desirable in many clinical and laboratory situations, particularly in screening enzyme activity and screening molecules as inhibitors, enhancers or modifiers of pharmacologically interesting enzymes.

2. Description of Related Art

Known enzymes are classified by the International Union of Biochemistry Commission on Enzymes into six distinct categories: oxidoreductases, transferases, hydrolases, lyases, isomerases and ligases. Recent advances in enzymology have identified previously unknown and/or non-natural catalytic molecules that have enzymatic-like speed and specificity, such as extremozymes, abzymes, recombinant enzymes, semi-synthetic enzymes, and catalytic ribozymes.

Recently techniques have been developed which permit large numbers of different chemical compounds to be synthesized rapidly and systematically for drug screening. Large collections of such components called, combinatorial chemical libraries, are expensive to produce so that typically only milligram quantities or less of each different molecule is in a library. Screens for different types of pharmacological or chemical activity can generally require different techniques, different instruments, varying time frames, different sensitivity levels, different software and different methods of data interpretation. As a result, to screen a large combinatorial library, or other large collection of compounds for different types of pharmaceutical or chemical activity heretofore required great expenses for training, instrumentation and reagents. Sifting through such libraries of molecules to determine structural features which show activity and act as possible pharmacological or industrial agents is a tremendous effort.

The field of enzyme study dates back more than one hundred years. Many methods to study and detect enzymatic events are now known. Significantly important enzyme-assay methods include: (1) spectophotometry, using either ultraviolet or visual light; (2) fluorometry; (3) assays involving detection of radioactivity; (4) coupled assays; and (5) enzyme linked immunsorbent assays (ELISA.) Virtually every enzyme requires a specific and unique substrate for its reactivity. The development of an assay for a particular enzyme/substrate reaction is often a difficult endeavor. Because this is a mature field—although still the subject of intense research and development activities—many textbooks and compilations of methods exist, in addition to articles in peer-reviewed journals.

Conventional assays for enzyme activity are virtually as numerous as the number of enzymes. Some examples of conventional assays for enzyme activity are:

creatine kinase, which is used as a serum control for the diagnosis of muscle deterioration is most frequently assayed in a coupled system with pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase;

proteases are conventionally measured using specific synthetic substrates which contain a chromogenic or fluorogenic enzyme conjugate at the amide bond which is hydrolyzed by the enzyme;

chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) is a widely used reporter gene in expression studies. There are several commercially available assays. Such assays for CAT include enzyme linked assays (ELISA), radioactive assays and fluorescent methods. Conventional ELISA methods for assaying for CAT typically take from 2-4 hours and are generally sensitive to only 1-2.5×10−12 g/ml of enzyme. The radioactive and fluorescent assays use expensive and/or dangerous reagents, and typically require a time-consuming post-event separation to measure the CAT activity.

Due to ease of use, specificity and sensitivity, the current method of choice for detection is most assay systems is radioactivity. However the rapid decay of the radioactive probe, danger of radiation exposure, extensive processing of samples, and storage and disposal problems for radioactive materials make non-radioactive methods of detection desirable.

For conventional non-radioactive detection systems to work, synthetic substrates must be designed to report on the event being monitored. In the case of many proteases, hydrolysis products serve to report on the activity of the protease. However, such hydrolysis products are frequently carcinogenic.

The design of non-radioactive methods usually involves the attachment of chromophores, fluorophores or lumigens at the scissile bond of the reporter substrate. A signal is generated if the enzymatic event takes place because a detectable chromogenic, fluorogenic or lumigenic species is liberated. Designing such reporter substrates is difficult; when a probe is introduced onto the substrate, the substrate can lose its lock and key fit to the enzyme, thus losing its enzyme specificity. If the substrate still fits the enzyme, the binding and energetics of the enzyme catalysis may be altered in significant ways with the result that the synthetic reporter substrate will not be a true measure of the enzyme reaction.

Proteases are enzymes that hydrolyze proteins. All living organisms contain proteases to metabolize proteins, regulate cellular processes, defend themselves against exogenous proteins and mediate other important requirements of survival. In the purification of any protein from a natural source, it is necessary to inhibit endogenous proteases to prevent them from breaking down the proteins of interest. The search for the presence of known and unknown proteases in a sample is an important endeavor both at the research stage and the development stage in all areas of biotechnology and related sciences. If the protease is known and it is known to be in the sample of interest, methods for its analysis and strategies for its purification or inhibition will generally have been elaborated. If a sample contains a protease which is not known or, which is not known to be present in that sample, it may be difficult to determine that one is even present in that sample and considerably more difficult to determine what type of protease it is in order to inhibit its activity.

Proteases are classified into a number of categories dependent upon their mechanism of action. They are further classified dependent upon the cleavage site in the proteins which they hydrolyze. The combination of action and cleavage site leads to multiplicative complexity in determining what proteases are present and how their activities might be inhibited. There is no single cleavage site in a protein which will be hydrolyzed by all enzymes and therefore no known substrate which will be a reporter for all enzymes. More importantly, there is no rapid, sensitive high-throughput method to characterize many types of enzyme activity in a single experiment.

Existing art is aimed at determining if any protease activity is present in a sample and is limited to two types of tests:

a. Fluorescently labeled casein;

b. Electrophoretic mobility assay.

Each of these assays typically requires lengthy incubation, is therefore slow (the test may take hours). Moreover the assays are generally insensitive, and may require post-hydrolysis separation or expensive instrumentation. In the best of circumstances and either assay will tell if protease activity is present, but cannot tell what type of protease is present, whether there is more than one type of protease present, or how to analyze or inhibit the protease based on known enzyme-substrate interaction.

Tetrazolium salts have been used for the study of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in vivo. A reduction of a substrate by an enzyme produces electrons which are transferred to the tetrazolium salt yielding a formazan which is deeply colored. The tetrazolium salt thus functions as an indication. The use of an exogenous electron carrier such as phenazine methosulfate can significantly increase the speed and sensitivity of the reaction. U.S. Pat. No. 5,354,658 entitled “Non-Radioactive Method for Detecting a Labelled Segment and A Solution or Composition Therefor”, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference, describes a sensitive and specific method of using phenazine methosulfate and dimethylthiazole diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) to detect a specific enzyme-substrate in particular the reaction of alkaline phosphatase with a 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate reaction in vitro. The method of the patent allows a thousand times greater increase of sensitivity, and orders of magnitude greater speed than previously reported tetrazolium methods. However this patent did not address or solve the problem of screening large combinatorial chemical libraries rapidly and efficiently, much less teach or suggest any solution to that problem.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to the present invention there is provided a non-radioactive method of monitoring an enzyme-substrate reaction by addition of an exogenous electron carrier and a tetrazolium salt to the reaction medium, and allowing the reaction to proceed to a colored or fluorescent formazan in an irreversible reaction. Preferred tetrazolium salts for the invention have the structure of (1) where R is cyano, aryl, heteroaryl or aralkyl; R1 is aryl, heteroaryl, or aralkyl and R2 is aryl, heteroaryl or aralkyl including: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT); 2,2′-di-p-nitrophenyl-5,5′-diphenyl-3,3′-(3,3′-dimethoxy-4,4′-diphenylene)ditetrazolium chloride (nitroblue tetrazolium, NBT); 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC); 2-(2′-benzothiazolyl)-5-styryl-3-(4-phthalhydrazidyl) tetrazolium chloride (BPST); neotetrazolium chloride (NTC); 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2-H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt (XTT); p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT) and

cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC). Dimers of tetrazolium salts also are useful to this invention. It is anticipated that dimethylthiazol diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) as the tetrazolium salt will be particularly preferred in this invention.

Preferred exogenous electron carriers for the invention include: phenazine methosulfate (PMS); phenazine ethosulfate (PES), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD); nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide; flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or 4-aminoantipyrine.

The tetrazole-catalyst color indicator test can be linked to a wide variety of different enzyme-substrate electron transfers.

The present invention also provides for a solution or composition to be used as a test kit. The test kit of the invention would include a substrate, a tetrazolium salt and an electron carrier which when in solution added to a sample to be assayed would be capable of producing a colored or fluorescent formazan which results in a color or fluorescent change indicative of an electron transfer. Alternatively, the test kit could include one or more substrates, one or more enzymes, one or more cofactors a tetrazolium salt, an electron carrier and one or more specific inhibitors which when in solution added to a sample to be assayed would be capable of producing a colored or fluorescent formazan which results in a color or fluorescent change indicative of an electron transfer.

Preferred embodiments of the invention provide for a chromogenic or fluorogenic method that is non-radioactive and can be amenable to existing instrumentation, and software packages for enzyme analysis. The preferred methods of the invention have considerably high sensitivity, namely a sensitivity of 10−15 gram or less in contrast to prior methods of 1031 12 i.e. 103 or 1,000 times more sensitive. Moreover, preferred embodiments of the invention can achieve a detectable color change in five to fifteen minutes. No amplification technique of the formazan product is required in preferred embodiments of the invention. No stabilizing agent for the tetrazolium salt is required in preferred embodiments.

The present invention permits different enzymes to be studied using the same spectrophotometer or plate reader, the same robotic system, the same training or personnel, similar or identical reagent systems, similar or identical disposables and consumables, similar or identical software, and similar or identical calculations of activity. Preferred embodiments of the present invention may be used to particular advantage in carrying out screening for useful chemical activities of the compounds of chemical libraries since all screens for various activities of interest using the tetrazolium and electron carrier will deliver the identical detection molecule, with the same wavelength of detection, the same extinction coefficient, similar reaction times and similar sensitivity and detection levels. In addition, with proper planning, the use of inhibitors or other chemicals, will allow the possibility of two or more entirely different screens to be done in the same microwell or cuvette or on the same blot.

The invention described herein has many advantages over the previous methods of detection, including the use of natural substrates, the ability to assay a wide variety of enzymes, presumably even presently unknown enzymes, to detect activity, and the ability to tailor the reaction to a specific determination of one enzyme in the presence of competing enzymatic activities.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In one preferred embodiment of the invention, enzyme-substrate reactions are detected by transfer of an electron to dimethylthiazol diphenyl tetrazolium bromide. Dimethylthiazol diphenyl tetrazolium bromide has the chemical name of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide, the chemical formula, C18H16N5SBr, a molecular weight of 414.33, a melting point of 195°(dec), and an absorption of λMAX 378 nm.

The preferred exogenous electron carrier phenazine methosulfate has the clinical formula of N-methylphenazonium methosulfate, the chemical formula C14N14N2O4S, a molecular weight of 306.34 and a melting point between 158°-160° (dec), and an absorption at λmax 386 nm.

In a preferred assay of the invention, the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT enzyme) reacts with chloramphenicol and actyl CoA in the presence of the indicator dimethylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) and phenazine methosulfate (PMS). The MTT serves as a hydrogen acceptor in the reaction. The reaction can be written as:

CAT+chloramphenicol+acyl coA→CAT-chloramphenicol-CoA

CAT-chloramphenicol-CoA+PMS→CAT+PMS-H2+acyl-chloramphenicol+HS-CoA

PMS-H2+MTT→formazan+PMS.

The formazan product is colored and may therefore be detected in the presence of the other reaction species, which are generally colorless.

While an assay for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, ad described above, is a preferred application of the invention the method may be used to detect substantially all categories of enzyme activity; for example, oxidoreductases, transferases, hydrolases, lyases, isomerases, ligases and novel classes of enzymes. Consequently, the enzyme activity assay of the present invention is expected to have applicability in both commercial processes such as pharmaceutical development, insect control, food science, pulp and paper, laundry and other industrial processes and basic molecular scientific research.

In addition, with this invention, test kits for specific enzyme/substrate interactions could be provided that include specific substrates and a tetrazolium dye. Individually, the different substrates would have different special characteristics and therefore could not be detected conventionally by the same spectrophotometer or microplate reader at the same time, same wavelength and same extinction coefficient. In contrast, with the present invention, different substrates ultimately yield the same reduced formazan, so that multiple enzymes can be studied with the same spectroscopic settings. A single microplate could have wells for each specific substrate. Combinations of inhibitors and control enzymes could be used to define new or unexpected enzymatic activities. Observing the development of color would confirm the presence or absence of specific enzymes.

The unique feature of this invention is that widely different enzymes, widely different inhibitors and widely different specific substrates can be studied with the same tetrazolium detection reagent and the same spectrophotometer or plate reader. This adds a tremendous efficiency over current art.

EXAMPLES

The generalized reaction where E=enzyme, S=substrate, T=tetrazolium salt, C=electron carrier, P=product is:

E+S→E−S

E−S+T→E+TH2+P

or

E+S→E−S

E−S+C→E+CH2+P

CH2+T→C+TH2

The experimental results for Experiments 1-12 are described by the color change of the experimental solution. These colors result from the interaction of the enzyme and substrate with the transfer of an electron to a tetrazolium salt. The reactive product, formazan, is detected as dark blue, black. The BCI substrate without MTT is pale blue. PMS and MTT alone are yellow. PMS and BCI is yellow+blue which is green. The reaction detected required the enzyme, substrate and tetrazolium salt.

Example 1

Microtiter testing was performed, with the following substrate combinations to demonstrate chromogenic detection of esterase (EC3.1.1.1).

Reagents:
PBS Phosphate Buffer Solution
MTT Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-2128)
PMS Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
BCI 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl acetate (Sigma B-4377)
acetate in 50% Dimethyl formamide
Esterase diluted with PBS @ pH 7.4 to a final concentration of
100 units/ml (Sigma E-2884)

Experiment

Four test samples were prepared. The samples A, B, C, D contained the following reactants:

A. 100 μl PBS (Phosphate Buffer Solution) @ pH 7.4
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI acetate @ 12.5 mg/ml
B. 100 μl PBS @ pH 7.4
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI acetate @ 12.5 mg/ml
C. 100 μl PBS @ pH 7.4
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI acetate @ 12.5 mg/ml
D. 100 μl PBS @ pH 7.4
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI acetate @ 12.5 mg/ml

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A to serve as a control. 10 μl of the enzyme esterase (1 unit) was added to substrate samples B, C, and D. Detection of test results was done by visual determination.

Results

Sam-
ple Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCI acetate yellow - no color change detected
(no esterase)
B MTT, H2O, BCI acetate, 10 μl dark blue < 10 seconds)
esterase
C H2O, PMs, BCI acetate, 10 μl yellow-blue - slight change
esterase
D MTT, PMS, BCI acetate, dark blue (instantaneous)
10 μl esterase

Example 2

Microtiter testing was performed, with the following substrate combination—in duplicate —to demonstrate chromogenic detection of esterase (EC3.1.1.1):

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-2128)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
BCI acetate 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-acetate (Sigma B 4377)
in 1 ml of H2O to a 5 mg/ml concentration
BCI butyrate 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-butyrate (Sigma B 9151)
in 1 ml of H2O to a 5 mg/ml concentration
Esterase Diluted with H2O to a 5 mg/ml concentration
(Sigma E-2884)

A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O A′. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM) 10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM) 10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O B′. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM) 10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O 10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O C′. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O 10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM) 10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O D′. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM) 10 μl MTT (10 mM
10 μl PMS (10 mM) 10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate
E. 120 μl de-ionized H2O E′. 120 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate

10 ul of H2O was added to substrate sample A and A′ to serve as a control. 10 ul of esterase (1 unit) was added to substrate samples B, B′, C, C′, D, D′, and E, E′.

Sample Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCI-butyrate yellow - no color change detected
(no esterase)
B MTT, H2O, BCI-butyrate dark blue (<30 minutes)
(esterase)
C H2O, PMS, BCI-butyrate yellow-blue (<30 minutes)
(esterase)
D MTT, PMS, BCI-butyrate dark blue (<20 minutes)
(esterase)
E BCI-butyrate (ester) pale blue (>1 hour)
A′ MTT, PMS, BCI-acetate yellow - no color change dected
(no esterase)
B′ MTT, H2O, BCI-acetate dark blue (<10 sec)
(esterase)
C′ H2O, PMS, BCI-acetate yellow-blue (<30 sec)
(esterase)
D′ MTT, PMS, BCI-acetate dark blue (instant detection)
(esterase)
E′ BCI-acetate (esterase) pale blue (>10 minutes)

All chromogenic BCI-butyrate reactions were observed to be much slower than the corresponding BCI-acetate reactions, event though the concentration of substrates and enzymes were similar. This indicates that the acetate reactions are a better substrate for esterase. Time to react could be used to qualify different substrates in unknown samples.

Example 3

Microtiter testing was performed, with the following substrate combinations to demonstrate chromogenic detection of esterase (EC3.1.1.1).

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-2128)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
BCI 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl 1,3 diacetate (Sigma
acetate B-5630) in H2O (5 mg/ml)
Esterase diluted with H2O to a final concentration of
100 units/ml (Sigma E-2884)

Experiment

Five test samples were prepared. The samples A, B, C, D, E contained the following reactants:

A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI-1,3 diacetate
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI-1,3 diacetate
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI-1,3 diacetate
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI-1,3 diacetate
E. 120 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl BCI-1,3 diacetate

10 μl of H2 O was added to substrate sample A to serve as a control. 10 μl of the enzyme esterase (1 unit) was added to substrate samples B, C, D and E. Detection of test results were done by visual determination.

Results

Sam-
ple Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCI-1,2 diacetate yellow - no color change detected
(no esterase)
B MTT, H2O, BCI-1,3 dark blue (>1 hour)
diacetate, 10 μl esterase
C H2O, PMS, BCI-1,3 diacetate, yellow-blue
10 μl esterase
D MTT, PMS, BCI-1,3 dark blue (>40 minutes)
diacetate, 10 μl esterase
E H2O, BCI-1,3 diacetate pale faint blue

All chromogenic BCI-1,3 diacetate reactions were observed to be much slower than the corresponding BCI-acetate and slower than the BCI-butyrate reactions. Of the BCI-substrates tested, substrate, preference for both esterase and cholesterol esterase is BCI-acetate>BCI-butyrate>BCI-1,3 diacetate, the concentration of substrates and enzymes were similar. Using a series of substrates which are good, better and best for a set of enzymes, it is possible to distinguish relative activity or presence of one or more enzymes.

Example 4

Microtiter testing was performed, with the following substrate combinations to demonstrate chromogenic detection of B-glucuoronidase (EC3.2.1.3.1).

Reagents:
PBS Phosphate Buffer Solution as aqueous solvent and to
maintain pH in the 5.0 range
MTT Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-2128)
PMS Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
BCI 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-B-D-glucuronide (Sigma
glucuronide B-5285) Reconstituted with 1 ml H2O to a
final concentration of 10 mg/ml
Beta Reconstituted with 1 ml H2O to a final concentration
glucuronidase of 0.1 unit/μl (Sigma G-5897)

Experiment

Four test samples were prepared. The samples A, B, C, D contained the following reactants.

A. 100 μl PBS (Phosphate Buffer Solution) @ pH 5.0
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI glucuronide
B. 100 μl PBS @ pH 5.0
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI glucuronide
C. 100 μl PBS @ pH 5.0
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI glucuronide
D. 100 μl PBS @ pH 5.0
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI glucuronide
E. 100 μl PBS @ pH 5.0
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI glucuronide

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A to serve as a control. 10 ul of β-glucuronidase (10 units) was added to substrate samples B, C, and D.

Sam-
ple Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCI glucuronide yellow - no color change detected
(no glucuronidase)
B MTT, H2O, BCI glucuronide dark blue (< 5 minutes)
(glucuronidase)
C H2O, PMs, BCI glucuronide yellow-blue - slight change
(glucuronidase)
D MTT, PMS, BCI glucuronide dark blue (<5 minutes)
(glucuronidase)
E H2O, BCI glucuronide pale blue (after 5 minutes)
(glucuronidase)

Example 5

Microtiter testing was performed with a protease inhibitor and various substrate combinations to demonstrate esterase activity and/or contamination in a commercially available elastase (EC3.4.21.36) preparation.

The esterase substrates were observed to generate positive signal upon addition of an elastase dilution (10 μl). Elastase was serially diluted two fold to signal extinction with elastase substrate. The last dilution yielding robust signal was incubated with the competitive inhibitor elastatinal for 10 minutes—with subsequent addition of esterase substrates.

Reagents:
PBS Phosphate Buffer Solution
MTT Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-2128)
PMS Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
BCI 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl acetate (Sigma B-4377)
acetate in 50% Dimethyl formamide
Elastase (Sigma lot #17H8005)
Elastase N-Succinyl-ALA-ALA-ALA p nitroanilide in 50%
Substrate Dimethy formamide (Sigma-4760) 50% DMF at a 12.5 mg/ml
concentration
Elastatinal Elasatase inhibitor (Sigma E-0881

Results

Enzyme + Contents Reaction
Elastase + MTT, PMS, BCI-acetate dark blue (<5 minutes)
Inhibitor
Elastase + Elastase substrate clear (no color > 10 min.)
Inhibitor
Elastase + MTT, PMS, BCI-acetate dark blue (<5 minutes)
H2O
Elastase + Elastase substrate yellow
H2O

The generation of positive signal with esterase substrates and generation of positive signal in the microtiter wells containing elastase with elastase substrate and no initial signal development in wells containing the elastase—inhibitor reacted with elastase substrate demonstrate the presence of esterase activity and/or contamination in the elastase preparation.

Example 6

Microtiter testing was performed, with the following substrate combinations—in duplicate —to demonstrate chromogenic detection of beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21):

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-2128)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
BCI glucoside 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-B-D-glucoside (Sigma
M-4527) in 1 ml of H2O to a final concentration
of 5 mg/ml
Beta Diluted with 10 ml of H2O to a final concentration of 50
glucosidase units/ml (Sigma lot #37H4031)

Five test samples were prepared. The samples A, B, C, D, E contained the following reactants:

Experiment:
A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI glucoside @ 5 mg/ml
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI glucoside @ 5 mg/ml
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS(10 mM)
10 BCI glucoside @ 5 mg/ml
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI glucoside @ 5 mg/ml
E. 120 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl BCI glucoside @ 5 mg/ml

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A to serve as a control. 10 μl of β-glucosidase (0.5 units) was added to substrate samples B, C, D and E.

Sample Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCI-glucoside yellow - no color change detected
(no glucosidase)
B MTT, H2O, BCI-glucoside dark blue (<5 minutes)
(glucosidase)
C H2O, PMS, BCI-glucoside yellow-blue - slight change
(glucosidase)
D MTT, PMS, BCI-glucoside dark blue (<5 minutes)
E BCI-glucoside pale blue (>10 minutes)
(glucosidase)

The presence of enzyme and substrate was rapidly detected, with or without the electron transport carrier PMS.

Blot testing on 0.2 um nitrocellulose membrane was performed to demonstrate chromogenic detection of beta glucosidase, 5 ul of glucosidase (0.25 U) was spotted and allowed to dry. 10 ul of each substrate combination (B, C, D, and E) was applied to the dried enzyme spots. Similar detection results were obtained as above. Controls were tested with 5 ul H2O spots- instead of enzyme- with respective substrate combinations (10 ul)—with no observable detection reaction.

Example 7

Microtiter testing was performed, with identical protocol and substrate combinations of example 5 (in duplicate) to demonstrate chromogenic detection of cholesterol esterase (EC3.1.1.13).

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-2128)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9635)
BCI acetate 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indoyl-B-D-acetate (Sigma B 4377)
in 1 ml of H2O
BCI butyrate 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indoyl-B-D-butyrate
(Sigma B 9151) in 1 ml of H2O to a
5 mg/ml concentration
Cholestrol reconstituted to a concentration of 5 U/ml with H2O
esterase (Sigma C-5921)

Experiment

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A to serve as a control. 10 ul of cholesterol oxidase (25 U/mL) was added in appropriate testing.

A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O A′. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM) 10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS(10 mM) 10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O B′. 100 ul de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM) 10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O 10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O C′. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O 10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM) 10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O D′. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM) 10 μl MTT (10 mM
10 μl PMS (10 mM) 10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate
E. 120 μl de-ionized H2O E′. 120 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl BCI butyrate 10 μl BCI acetate

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A and A′ to serve as controls. 10 ul of esterase (1 unit) was added to substrate samples B, B′, C, C′, D, D′, and E, E′.

Sam-
ple Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCI-butyrate yellow - no color change detected
(no cholesterol esterase)
B MTT, H2O, BCI-butyrate dark blue (<30 minutes)
(cholesterol esterase (0.05 U))
C H2O, PMS, BCI-butyrate yellow-blue - (<30 minutes)
(cholesterol esterase (0.05 U))
D MTT, PMS, BCI-butyrate dark blue (<20 minutes)
(cholesterol esterase (0.05 U))
E BCI-butyrate (cholesterol pale blue (>1 hour)
esterase (0.05 U))
A′ MTT, PMS, BCI-acetate yellow - no color change detected
(no cholesterol esterase)
B′ MTT, H2O, BCI-acetate dark blue (<10 sec)
(cholesterol esterase (0.05 U)
C′ H2O, PMS, BCI-acetate yellow-blue (<30 sec)
(cholesterol esterase (0.05 U)
D′ MTT, PMS, BCI-acetate dark blue (instant detection)
(cholesterol esterase (0.05 U)
E′ BCI-acetate (cholesterol pale blue (>10 minutes)
esterase (0.05 U)

All chromogenic BCI-butyrate reactions were observed to be much slower than the corresponding BCI-acetate reactions, event though the concentration of substrates and enzymes were similar. This indicates that the acetate reactions are a better substrate for esterase. Time to react could be used to qualify different substrates in unknown samples.

Example 8

Microtiter testing was performed, with the following substrate combinations—in duplicate —to demonstrate chromogenic detection of cholesterol oxidase (EC1.1.3.6):

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-66H5033)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
cholesterol reconstituted with deionized H2O to a concentration
oxidase of 25 U/ml (Sigma C-5421)
Cholesterol Std reconstituted with deionized H2O to a concentration
(Sigma C-9908) 50 mg/dl

Experiment:
A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl Cholesterol Std @ 50 mg/dl
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl Cholesterol Std @ 50 mg/dl
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl Cholesterol Std @ 50 mg/dl
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl Cholesterol Std @ 50 mg/dl
E. 120 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl Cholesterol Std @ 50 mg/dl

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A (substrate control.) Cholesterol Oxidase (25 U/ml) was added to A, B, C, D and E.

Results

Sample Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, cholesterol yellow, then slight
(no Cholesterol Oxidase) green-yellow
B MTT, H2O, cholesterol yellow, no color change
(Cholesterol Oxidase)
C H2O, PMS, cholesterol yellow, no color change
(Cholesterol Oxidase)
D MTT, PMS, cholesterol dark blue (<1 minutes)
(Cholesterol Oxidase)
E H2O (Cholesterol Oxidase) clear, no color change

Example 9

Microtiter testing was performed with the following substrate combinations in duplicate to demonstrate chromogenic detection of glucose oxidase (EC1.1.3.4):

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-66H5033)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
glucose oxidase diluted with H2O to a concentration
of 0.2 U/μl (Sigma G-9010)
glucose solubilized with H2O to a concentration (Sigma
G-8270) 50 mg/ml

Experiment:
A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl 5% glucose solution
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl 5% glucose solution
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl 5% glucose solution
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl 5% glucose solution
E. 120 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl 5% glucose solution

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A as the control sample. Glucose oxidase (2U) was added to samples B, C, D.

Results:

Sample Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, glucose yellow,
(no glucose oxidase)
B MTT, H2O, glucose (glucose dark blue (>10 min)
oxidase)
C H2O, PMS, glucose (glucose yellow-green
oxidase)
D MTT, PMS, glucose (glucose dark blue (immediate)
oxidase)

EXAMPLE 10

Microtitre testing was performed with the following substrate combinations in duplicate to demonstrate chromogenic detection of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.28)

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-66H5033)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
Chloramphenicol reconstituted with deionized H2O to a concentration of
Acetyltransferase 500 U/ml (Sigma C-2900)
Acetyl CoA solubilized with deionized H2O to a concentration of
2 mg/ml

Experiment:
A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl Acetyl CoA
10 μl Chloramphenicol
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl Acetyl CoA
10 μl Chloramphenicol
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl Acetyl CoA
10 μl Chloramphenicol
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl Acetyl CoA
10 μl Chloramphenicol

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A as the substrate control. Chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (5U/10μl) was added to each substrate combination.

Results:

Sample Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, yellow
Chloramphenicol, Acetyl CoA
(no Chloramphenicol acetyl
transferase)
B MTT, H2O, orange detection
Chloramphenicol, Acetyl CoA (>5 minutes)
(Chloramphenicol acetyl
transferase)
C H2O, PMS, Chloramphenicol, orange (>5 minutes)
Acetyl CoA (Chloramphenicol
acetyl transferase)
D MTT, PMS, Chloramphenicol, orange-red (<2 minutes
Acetyl CoA (Chloramphenicol
acetyl transferase)

Further testing was performed with ten-fold dilutions of the enzyme using substrate sample D. The reaction is sensitive to between 0.5U and 0.05U of enzyme.

EXAMPLE 11

Microtitre testing was performed with the following substrate combinations in duplicate to demonstrate chromogenic detection of neuraminidase (EC 3.2.1.18)

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazxol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-66H5033)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
BCI-acetyl- 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl acetyl neuraminic acid
neuraminic acid diluted with 500 μl of H2O
Neuraminidase Solubilized with 1 ml of H2O to a final concentration
of 10 units/ml

Experiment:
A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI-acetylneuraminic acid
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI-acetylneuraminic acid
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI-acetylneuraminic acid
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI-acetylneuraminic acid
E. 120 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl BCI-acetylneuraminic acid

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A as the substrate control. 10 μl of neuraminidase (0.1 units) was added to substrate samples B, C, D, and E.

Results:

Sample Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCI- yellow
acetylneuraminic acid
(no neuraminidase)
B MTT, H2O, BCI- light blue formazan reaction
acetylneuraminic acid,
neuraminidase
C H2O, PMS, BCI- green
acetylneuraminic acid,
neuraminidase
D MTT, PMS, BCI- dark blue (>5 minutes)
acetylneuraminic acid
(neuraminidase)
E H2O BCI-acetylneuraminic pale blue (<2 minutes)
acid (neuraminidase)

The presence of enzyme and substrate was rapidly detected with the tetrazolium salt plus the electron transport carrier.

EXAMPLE 12

Microtitre testing was performed with the following substrate combinations in duplicate to demonstrate chromogenic detection of Beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30):

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazxol Tetrazolium
(Sigma M-66H5033)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
Beta-N- solubilized with H2O (12.5 U/ml)
acetylglucoaminidase (Sigma A-2415)
BCI- solubilized with 2 ml H2O to a concentration
acetylglucosaminide 12.5 mg/ml (Sigma B-3041)

Experiment:
A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI-acetylglucosaminide
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCI-acetylglucosaminide
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI-acetylglucosaminide
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCI-acetylglucosaminide
E. 120 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl BCI-acetylglucosaminide

10 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A (substrate control.) 10 μl Beta-N-acetylglucoaminidase (0.125 units) was added to A, B, C, D and E.

Results:

Sample Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCI- yellow
acetylglucosaminide
(no Beta-N-
acetylglucosaminidase)
B MTT, H2O, BCI- light blue formazan reaction
acetylglucosaminide, Beta-N-
acetylglucosaminidase
C H2O, PMS, BCI- green
acetylglucosaminide, Beta-N-
acetylglucosaminidase
D MTT, PMS, BCI- dark blue (<2 minutes)
acetylglucosaminide (Beta-N-
acetylglucosaminidase)
E H2O BCI-acetylglucosaminide light blue (>5 minutes)
(Beta-N-acetylgluco-
aminidase)

The presence of the enzyme and substrate was rapidly detected in the presence of PMS and MTT.

There are a wide variety of enzymes and inhibitors that can be used with this invention. The following are several examples of possible embodiments:

EXAMPLE 13

Reagents:

X=Substrate+MTT+PMS

E=sample to be analyzed for enzyme activity

I1=TLCK—specific inhibitor for chymotrypsin.

I2=TPCK—specific inhibitor for trypsin

I3=Elastinal—specific inhibitor of elastase

Experiments:

1. E would be incubated with I1, then treated with X: a color should develop if protease other than trypsin present.

2. E would be incubated with I2, then treated with X: a color should develop if protease other than chymotrypsin present.

3. E would be incubated with I3, then treated with X: a color should develop if protease other than elastase present.

4. E would be incubated with I1 and I2, then treated with X: a color if protease other than trypsin or chymotrypsin are present.

5. E would be incubated with I1 and I3, then treated with X: a color should develop if protease other than trypsin or elastase are present.

6. E would be incubated with I2 and I3, then treated with X: a color should develop if protease other than chymotrypsin or elastase are present.

In order to confirm these inhibition-based results, it is possible with this invention to make specific substrate solutions in which MTT and PMS are added to individual solutions of I1, I2 and I3 as defined above. These three different substrates have different spectral characteristics and cannot be read by the same spectrophotometer at the same time at the same wavelength and using the same extinction coefficient to calculate enzymatic activity. With this invention a single microplate could have wells for each inhibition study outlined above and each specific substrate as well. Observing the development of patterns of color would have confirmatory results on identification of the specific enzymes mentioned.

EXAMPLE 14

For lipase enzyme detection on a blot assay, the blot could be impregnated with a solution of the enzyme. Allow to dry. Treat the blot with a solution of natural or synthetic glyceride or cholesteryl ester, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity should develop.

EXAMPLE 15

For lipase enzyme detection in solution (microplate, tubes or cuvettes), add an enzyme solution or enzyme-antibody conjugate in solution to each microplate, tubes or cuvettes. Add a solution synthetic or natural glyceride or cholesteryl ester, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops and could be read in a spectrophotometer or plate reader.

EXAMPLE 16

For the study of lipase inhibition in solution, preincubate the enzyme solution with a solution of inhibitor. Add the substrate solution containing synthetic or natural glyceride or cholesteryl ester, MTT and PMS. Observe the development of color kinetically in comparison to a blank solution which contains enzyme and substrate but no inhibitor.

EXAMPLE 17

For aldolase enzyme detection on a blot assay, the blot could be impregnated with a solution of the enzyme. Allow to dry. Treat the blot with a solution of D-fructose-1,6-biphosphate, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops.

EXAMPLE 18

For aldolase enzyme detection in solution (microplate, tubes or cuvettes), add an enzyme solution or enzyme-antibody conjugate in solution to each microplate, tubes or cuvettes. Add a solution of D-fructose-1,6-biphosphate, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops and could be read in a spectrophotometer or plate reader.

EXAMPLE 19

For the study of aldolase inhibition in solution, preincubate the enzyme solution with a solution of inhibitor. Add the substrate solution containing of D-fructose-1,6-biphosphate, MTT and PMS. Observe the development of color as it develops in comparison to a blank solution which contains enzyme and substrate but no inhibitor.

EXAMPLE 20

For phosphoglucomutase detection on a blot assay, the blot could be impregnated with a solution of the enzyme. Allow to dry. Treat the blot with a solution of glucose-1-phosphate, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops.

EXAMPLE 21

For phosphoglucomutase enzyme detection in solution (microplate, tubes or cuvettes), add an enzyme solution or enzyme-antibody conjugate in solution to each microplate, tubes or cuvettes. Add a solution of glucose-1-phosphate, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops and could be read in a spectrophotometer or plate reader.

EXAMPLE 22

For the study of phosphoglucomutase inhibition in solution, preincubate the enzyme solution with a solution of inhibitor. Add the substrate solution containing glucose-1-phosphate, MTT and PMS. Observe the development of color as it develops in comparison to a blank solution which contains enzyme and substrate but no inhibitor.

EXAMPLE 23

For DNA ligase enzyme-detection on a blot assay, the blot could be impregnated with a solution of the enzyme. Allow to dry. Treat the blot with a solution of synthetic or natural DNA fragments, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops.

EXAMPLE 24

For DNA ligase enzyme detection in solution (microplate, tubes or cuvettes), add an enzyme solution or enzyme-antibody conjugate in solution to each microplate, tubes or cuvettes. Add a solution of synthetic or natural DNA fragments, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops and could be read in a spectrophotometer or plate reader.

EXAMPLE 25

For the study of DNA ligase inhibition in solution, preincubate the enzyme solution with a solution of inhibitor. Add the substrate solution containing synthetic or natural DNA fragments, MTT and PMS. Observe the development of color as it develops in comparison to a blank solution which contains enzyme and substrate but no inhibitor.

EXAMPLE 26

For DNA ligase enzyme detection on a blot assay, the blot could be impregnated with a solution of the enzyme. Allow to dry. Treat the blot with a solution of synthetic or natural DNA fragments, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops.

EXAMPLE 26

For DNA ligase enzyme detection in solution (microplate, tubes or cuvettes), add an enzyme solution or enzyme-antibody conjugate in solution to each tube. Add a solution of synthetic or natural DNA fragments, plus MTT, plus PMS. A color indicative of enzymatic activity develops and could be read in a spectrophotometer or plate reader.

EXAMPLE 27

For the study of DNA ligase inhibition in solution, preincubate the enzyme solution with a solution of inhibitor. Add the substrate solution containing synthetic or natural DNA fragments, MTT and PMS. Observe the development of color as it develops in comparison to a blank solution which contains enzyme and substrate but no inhibitor.

The invention has been described with respect to preferred embodiments. However, as those skilled in the art will recognize, modifications and variations in the specific embodiments which have been described and illustrated may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

EXAMPLE 28

Microtitre testing was performed with the following substrate combinations, in duplicate, to demonstrate chromogenic detection of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2)

Reagents:
MTT (10 mM) Dimethylthiazxol Tetrazolium (Sigma M-66H5033)
PMS (10 mM) Phenazine methosulfate (Sigma P-9625)
Acid Sigma (lot #64H7195) solubilized with H2O (23 units/ml)
Phosphatase
BCIP Sigma (B-6274 lot #34H5047) diluted with 2 ml H2O
(12.5 mg/ml)

Experiment:
A. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCIP @ 12.5 mg/ml
B. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl H2O
10 μl BCIP @ 12.5 mg/ml
C. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl H2O
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCIP @ 12.5 mg/ml
D. 100 μl de-ionized H2O
10 μl MTT (10 mM)
10 μl PMS (10 mM)
10 μl BCIP @ 12.5 mg/ml

5 μl of H2O was added to substrate sample A as the substrate control. 5 μl of acid phosphatase (0.115U) was added to each substrate samples B, C, D.

Results:

Sample Contents Reaction
A MTT, PMS, BCIP yellow
B MTT, H2O, BCIP light blue formazan (>5 minutes)
C H2O, PMS, BCIP faint green detection (3 minutes)
D MTT, PMS, BCIP dark purple formazan (<1 minute)

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7745163Oct 1, 2004Jun 29, 2010Albert Einstein College Of Medicine Of Yeshiva Universitycontacting sample with a reagent comprising a thiol-containing compound, a halo-acetyl-CoA or a halo-acetyl-pantetheine, and an acetyltransferase under conditions suitable for acetyltransferase enzyme activity then identifying a substrate that has formed a base-stable covalent bond to the reagent
US8329425Feb 28, 2011Dec 11, 2012The Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityMethod and system for detection of chloramphenicol
WO2005044077A2 *Oct 1, 2004May 19, 2005Blanchard John SAssay for acetyltransferases and acetyltransferase substrates
Classifications
U.S. Classification435/15, 435/7.91, 435/810, 435/193, 435/7.4
International ClassificationC12Q1/44, G01N21/78, C12Q1/48, C12Q1/60, C07D241/46, C07D257/04, C12Q1/54, C12Q1/26
Cooperative ClassificationY10S435/81, G01N2333/924, G01N2333/91057, G01N2333/916, C12Q1/26
European ClassificationC12Q1/26
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