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Publication numberUS625033 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1899
Filing dateJun 6, 1898
Publication numberUS 625033 A, US 625033A, US-A-625033, US625033 A, US625033A
InventorsJames Frederick Hoyne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
James frederick hoyne
US 625033 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nrrn STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JAMES FREDERICK I-IOYNE, OF YORK, N; Y.

PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING FIBERLE'SS THREAD.

SPECIFICATION formingpart of Letters Patent No. 625,033, dated May 16, 1899.

Application filed June 6,1898. Serial No. 682,682- (Speoimens.)

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, JAMES FREDERICK HOYNE, a subject of the Queen of Great Brit ain, and a resident of the city, county, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Processes of Manufacturing Fiberless Thread, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to the process of manufacturing fiberless thread that possesses certain properties rendering it suitable for use in the manufacture of articles as a substitute for silk or hair, which it closely resembles.

In carrying into effect said invention Idissolve purified cellulose in a basic solution of zinc nitrate;""bhlorid, or other suitable zinc salts of about 1.8 specific gravity at a temperature of about 90 centigrade. For some purposes I modify the result by the addition of calcium nitrate or calcium chlorid to the above solutions. I then filter the cellulose solu tion through felt or fine gau ze to remove any suspended impurities or undissolved cellulose. The solution is then driven by pressure through small holes at a suitable temperature into metliylat'edspjri fimilherlliouor, which will coagulat tlie cellulose in the form in which itissues from the holes and at the same time wash out some of the solvent. The thread as it is formed is wound on drums, from which it is afterward unwoundand the removal of the solvent completed by washing in spirits or Water. The thread is then strained nearly to the breaking-point and dried in a stretched state in order to obtain the maximum strength and gloss. The thread can now or before drying be dyed and made waterproof by the usual methods and is then,

ready for use; but to avoid the cost of skilled manipulations involved in the ordinary processes of dyeing I add the dye and mordants in the necessary proportion to the cellulose sure in giving the desired form is assisted by dry-or moist heat. This same property and the absence of fiber render this thread suitable for use in place of hair.

For use in the manufacture of articles usually made from dress or soft silk it is necessary to make the threads much finer than for other uses. To secure this fineness,I force the solution through very fine holes arranged in groups, using the threads from each group to form a compound thread. The twisting together of the component thread of each group is effected before or in the act of winding. After drying, however, the thread may be spun 0r twisted in the usual manner.

I claim 1. The process herein described of making fiberless thread, which consists in dis olving cellulose in a basic solution of zinc saltsafil:

tering the cellulose solution, passing the same under pressure through thread-forming medium into a coagulating compound, straining the thread and then drying the same, as set forth.

2. The process herein described of making fiberless thread, which consists in dissolving cellulose in a basic solution of zinc nitrate, chlorid or other zinc salts, filtering the -cellulose solution, passing the same under pressure through small holes into methylated spirits, thereby coagulating the cellulose, strainin g the thread and drying the same while under strain, as set forth.

3. The process herein described of making fiberless thread, which consists in dissolving cellulose in a basic solution of zinc salts, adding dye and mordants to such solution, passing the same under pressure through thread forming medium into a coagulating compound, then straining and drying the threads, as set forth.

4. The process herein described of making fiberless thread, which consists in dissolving cellulose in a basic solution of zinc salts, filtering the cellulose solution, passing the same under pressure through very fine holes into a coagulating compound, twisting together a plurality of threads, winding and stretching JAMES FREDERICK HOYNE.

Witnesses:

JAMES M. TULLY, FRANK HARVEY DAVIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4302252 *Apr 30, 1980Nov 24, 1981International Telephone And Telegraph Corp.Solvent system for cellulose
US4367191 *Mar 25, 1981Jan 4, 1983Research CorporationPreparation of cellulose films or fibers from cellulose solutions
US4750939 *Dec 2, 1986Jun 14, 1988North Carolina State UniversityAnisotropic cellulose solutions, fibers, and films formed therefrom
US4840673 *Mar 9, 1988Jun 20, 1989North Carolina State UniversityAnisotropic cellulose articles, fibers, and films and method of producing same
US4999149 *Oct 21, 1988Mar 12, 1991Purdue Research Foundation, Division Of Sponsored ProgramsCellulose and zinc chloride mixture, stirring, extrusion, coagulation followed by stretching, immersion in bath and crystallization
US5290349 *Jul 22, 1991Mar 1, 1994Purdue Research Foundation, Division Of Sponsored ProgramsHigh strength cellulose fiber or film
DE749082C *Nov 17, 1940Nov 20, 1944 Verfahren zur Herstellung von Celluloseloesungen
WO1992009726A1 *Dec 3, 1990Jun 4, 1992Purdue Research FoundationProduction of high strength cellulose fiber using zinc chloride, organic solvents and aqueous solution
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD01F1/10