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Publication numberUS625427 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1899
Filing dateDec 29, 1898
Publication numberUS 625427 A, US 625427A, US-A-625427, US625427 A, US625427A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wrought-metal joist-hanger
US 625427 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 625,427. Patented May 23, I899. n. c; STEWART, 1B. & w. A. STEWART.

WROUGHT METAL JUIST HANGER.

(Application filed Dec. 29, 1898.)

(-No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet I.

ITIG-2. FIG-3.

- FIG.12. Ila-.11.

No; 625,421.. Patented m 23, 1899'.

n. c. STEWART, JR. & w. A. STEWART. WBOUGHT METAL JDIST HANGER.

(Application filed Dec. 29, 1898.) (No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

IIG.1. FIG-li 1167-.116. FIG-.lid.

7% dzZJZkVM/r Wan /VI 543M421 m: norms rzrzss co, Fnmuuma, WASNINGTON. u. c.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

RICHARD C. sTEWART, JR, AND WALLACE A. sTEWART, OF COVINGTON,

KENTUCKY.

WROUGHT-METAL JOlST-HANGER.

sPECIFIoATIoN forming part of Letters Patent No. 625,427, dated May 23, 1899.

Application filed December 29, 1898. serial No. 700,607. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Beit known that we, RICHARD O. STEWART, J12, and WALLACE A. STEWART, citizens of the United States, residing at Oovington, in the county of Kenton and State of Kentucky, have invented certain new and useful Improvernents in Wrought-Metal Joist-Hangers; and we do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, reference being had to the annexed drawings, which form a part of this specification.

This invention relates to those joist hangers or stirrups which are readily formed by first cutting a number of blanks from a metallic plate and then bending said blanks to the desired shape; and our improvement comprises such a hanger which combines, in an eminent degree, the threefold qualities of strength, cheapness, and simplicity of construction, the details of said device being hereinafter more fully described.

In the annexed drawings, Figure 1 is a plan showing a flat plate or sheet of metal so out as to afford blanks for forming two kinds of hangers. Fig. 2 shows one of said blanks separated from said sheet. Fig. 3 shows the first step in the formation of a hanger from said blank. Fig. 4 shows the succeeding step in forming said device. Fig. 5 shows a right and left pair of these hangers joined together by a tie-plate. Fig. 6 shows another form of blank separated from the metallic sheet. Fig. 7 shows the first step in the formation of a hanger from said blank. Fig. 8 shows the succeeding step in forming said device. Fig. 9 shows a modification of this last form of hanger. Fig. 10 shows another form of blank separated from the metallic sheet. Fig. 11 shows a pair of hangers made from such a blank and joined together with a tie-plate. Fig. 12 shows an elaboration of this form of hanger. Fig. 13 shows the back of a transversely-ribbed plate or sheet so cut as to af ford blanks of the same size and shape as those shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 14 shows a blank separated from said sheet. Fig. 14. shows on an enlarged scale the front of the aforesaid blank. Figs. 14 14, and 14 show successive steps in the formation of a hanger from said blank. Fig. 14 is an enlarged plan of the blank shown in Fig. 14. Fig. 14 is a similar plan of the blank shown in Fig. 143. Fig. 15 shows right and left hangers made from said blank and joined together by a tieplate. Fig. 16 shows another ribbed blank separated from said sheet. Fig. 16 is an enlarged plan of said blank. Fig. 17 shows a hanger made from this ribbed blank.

Referring now to Fig. 1, A represents a plate or sheet of metal so rolled to the proper length, width, and thickness as to enable any desired number of blanks to be Cut therefrom without causing any appreciable waste of material. A blank B when separated from said sheet has the peculiar shape shown in Fig. 2, reference to which illustration renders it clear that said blank has one long straight edge 0 and par-' allel with it two shorter straight edges D E, of substantially similar length and joined .by an inclined edge F. Consequently the blank is wider at bottom than at top, and this wider end has a longitudinal slit G cut in it, which slit is in line withthe upper straight edge D. The blank having been cut to the above-described shape is formed into ahanger or stirrup in the following way: Its upper end is bent back at the dotted line 1, so as to form a horizontal bearing 2) to rest upon a wall or heading, while its lower end is bent forward at the dotted line 2, thereby afiording a horizontal seat 1) for supporting joists, 85c. The portion F E of the blank is then bent forward at the dotted line 3 until it stands at a right angle with reference to the plate B. (See Fig. 3.) Consequently the portion E of the blank projects some distance below the seat I), but is subsequently bent laterally in under said seat and riveted thereto, as seen at e in Fig. 4 thereby affording a very cheap and secure hanger which will suffice for all ordinary building purposes, because the seat is composed of two thicknesses of metal, and each one has a right-angle bend in it. ing a reversed facsimile of said blank, as at B O D E F G, right and left hand hangers or sections are afforded, and then by joining their seats together by a tie-plate H (shown in Fig. 5,) a stirrup can be afforded of any desired width. Such a stirrup can be used for By simply mak supporting a beam composed of a number of joists spiked together side by side; but the blank shown in Fig. 6 enables a wide hanger to be made without using a tie-plate, and consists, in fact, in making an equivalent of the two blanks B B out of one piece of metal. Accordingly said blank I has at its lower or wider end a pair of parallel longitudinal slots g g in line with the edges of its upper and narrower-end. It also has side pieces or wings E" E and inclined or oblique edges ff. To form a hanger from this blank, its upper end is bent back horizontally, so as to afford a wall or beam flange 2', while the lower end of said blank is bent forward horizontally, thereby producing the seat or j oist-support 1;. The from the plate A, is shown in Figs. 16 and 16 a and includes a central section or body I, a ;pair of integral parallel ribs a a, and two longitudinal slits g g, or, in other words,

portions E" f E f are then bent forward'and stand at right angles to the plate I. (See Fig. 7.) The ends of the sides E E are finally bent in under the seat t" and riveted thereto, thereby forming the complete hanger shown in Fig. 8. Fig. 9 shows an elaboration of this last form of the hanger, wherein the plate I has longitudinal corrugations or ribs 1 and a wall-plate I, that add very materially to its strength without increasing the cost of manufacture.

-- Fig. 10 shows a blank that differs very little from the one illustrated in Fig. 2, the difference consisting in slightly widening the narrower end of said blank, as at J, so as to form a vertical flange on the hanger, as shown at j, Figs; 11 and 12. right and left sections are joined together by a tie-plate H.

Fig. 12 shows a hanger made from a blank of the same shape as that represented in Fig. 6, with the addition of the proper widening of the upper end of this latter blank to afford a pair of vertical flanges j. Again, Fig. 12 shows a stiffening=plate K applied to the back and bottom of the hanger, which plate is usually cut from the sheet A when the other blanks are formed.

In an elaboration of our invention shown in Fig. 13 the sheet or plate A is so rolled as to have projecting from its back a number of parallel integral transverse ribs a and is so divided and slitted as to afford blanks of thesame size and shape as those represented in Figs. 2 and 6.

A counterpart of the more simple form of blank shown in Fig. 2 is represented at B in Figs. 14 and 11, and, remembering that this latter illustration shows the front, not the back, of said blank, the method of converting it into a hanger is as follows: The

. blank is first bent forward in the plane of the bending operation is indicated by the arrow in Fig. lat while the blank at this stage of manufacture is shown by Figs. 14? and 1%. The upper part of the blank is then bent eration.

shown at b in Fig. 14.

back, so as to afford a horizontal wall-bearing 1), and as a matter of course a portion of the rib a also becomes horizontal by this op The next step consists in bending the lower portion of the blank horizontally forward, thereby forming a joist seat, as Finally the lower portion of the wing F is bent laterally at a right angle and secured under said seat 13,

- as shown in Fig. le a part of the rib be- I width of seat can be made.

A more complex form of blank, also out this blank is a facsimile of the one represented in Fig. 6 and is bent in the same manner as the blank shown in- Fig. 14:, the only difference being that said blank I has two iwings F F, as shown in Fig. 16. i'these wings are properly bent around, they project at right angles from the front of the hanger, as indicated by the dotted lines f f By simply bending the lower portions of these j wings horizontally toward each other and 1 then uniting them with a tie-plate the com= plete hanger shown in Fig. 17 is produced.

In Fig. 11 a pair of these When other, so as to economize in cutting up the sheets or plate A; but a single blank will answer for these parts by simply bending them either forward or backward to form the wallbearings and seats.

From the above description itis evident the hangers shown in Figs. 4, 8, 9, 15, and 17 have their seats or joist-bearings formed of two thicknesses of metal, while the devices represented in Figs. 5, 11, and12 have seats made of three thicknesses of material, and as the plates A or A can be as heavy as can be cut the hangers will support a very great weight before bending or breaking.

WVe claim as our invention- 1. As anew article of manufacture, arolledmetal joist-hanger including a plate B, having at top a rearwardly-projecting bearing 1), at bottom a forwardly-projecting seat I), and, at one side, a flange F, provided at its lower end with a lateral bend E, secured under said seat b; thereby aifording a double thickness of metal where a joist is supported by said hanger, all as herein described. I

2. As a new article of manufacture, a wrought-metal joist-hanger including right and left sections, constructed as above described and having their seats united together by a tie-plate.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a wrought-metal joist-hanger blank I narrower at top than at bottom, and provided on its front with a pair of parallel integral ribs too edge; an integral rib being formed on the back of said blank, and a longitudinal slit being made in its wider end, which slit is par* allel with and along one side of the lower portion of said rib, all as herein described.

In testimony whereof We affix our signatures in presence of two witnesses.

RICHARD G. STEWART, JR. WALLACE A. STEWART.

W'itnesses:

JAMES H. LAYMAN, SPENCER M. J ONES.

Referenced by
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Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationY10S256/04, F16B7/0446