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Publication numberUS6280042 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/329,609
Publication dateAug 28, 2001
Filing dateJun 10, 1999
Priority dateJul 3, 1997
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asCA2241232A1, CA2241232C, US6019477
Publication number09329609, 329609, US 6280042 B1, US 6280042B1, US-B1-6280042, US6280042 B1, US6280042B1
InventorsJoseph Wegrzyn, Jeff Holmes, Milt Erickson
Original AssigneeDual-Lite Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Emergency lighting device
US 6280042 B1
Abstract
An emergency lighting unit comprises a housing which contains the lighting unit circuitry. The housing includes a wall which defines at least one substantially circular opening therein. Extending partially through this opening is a substantially spherical lighting head containing a light source, such as a halogen lamp. The lighting head is rotatable by hand to any desired rotation to vary the field of illumination.
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Claims(46)
What is claimed is:
1. An emergency lighting unit for providing emergency illumination during interruptions in utility power, the emergency lighting unit comprising:
a housing, said housing defining an opening therethrough;
a substantially spherical lighting head within said housing and extending partially through said opening;
a light source mounted within said spherical lighting head and adapted to illuminate a region exterior of said housing;
a socket for retaining said spherical lighting head within said opening to provide said spherical lighting head with a direction of illumination while permitting generally spherical movement of said spherical lighting head to vary the direction of illumination thereof, said socket enclosing a portion of said spherical lighting head and having an internal shape corresponding to an external shape of said spherical lighting head; and
emergency electrical circuit elements electrically connected to said light source for providing emergency illumination during interruptions in utility power.
2. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1 wherein said socket comprises means for making frictional engagement with said spherical lighting head sufficient to fix the direction of illumination while permitting manual generally spherical movement of said spherical lighting head to vary the direction of illumination thereof.
3. The emergency lighting unit of claim 2, wherein said frictional engagement means comprises fingers bearing against an outer surface of said spherical lighting head.
4. The emergency lighting unit of claim 3, wherein said outer surface of said spherical head is textured to provide frictional engagement with said fingers.
5. The emergency lighting unit of claim 4, wherein said fingers are cantilevered from said socket.
6. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, wherein said retaining means includes means to limit generally spherical movement of said spherical lighting head.
7. The emergency lighting unit of claim 6, wherein said rotation limiting means comprise a plurality of fingers adapted to bear against an outer surface of said spherical lighting head.
8. The emergency lighting unit of claim 7, wherein said outer surface of said spherical lighting head has upstanding ribs against which said fingers bear to limit rotation of said spherical lighting head and varying of the direction of illumination of said spherical lighting head.
9. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, wherein said spherical lighting head comprises:
a first hollow semi-spherical member;
a second hollow semi-spherical member; and
means for interconnecting said first and second hollow semi-spherical members to form said spherical lighting head.
10. The emergency lighting unit of claim 9, wherein said first and second hollow semi-spherical members include means for limiting the relative rotation between said first and second hollow semi-spherical members.
11. The emergency lighting unit of claim 9, wherein said first hollow semi-spherical member includes internal means extending into said second hollow semi-spherical member for supporting said light source therein.
12. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, wherein said spherical lighting head includes means for supporting said light source therein.
13. The emergency lighting unit of claim 12, wherein said supporting means includes a plurality of posts upon which said light source is seated.
14. The emergency lighting unit of claim 12, wherein said supporting means includes a split ring which retains said light source within said spherical lighting head.
15. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, wherein said light source has electrical conductors extending therefrom and said spherical lighting head is provided with a conduit through which said electrical conductors pass from said spherical lighting head into said housing.
16. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, wherein said housing includes a substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall between a first end and an opposite second end, said substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall defines said opening.
17. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, further comprising:
a substantially spherical second lighting head within said housing and extending partially through a second opening in said housing;
a second light source mounted within said second spherical lighting head and adapted to illuminate a region exterior of said housing; and
means for retaining said second spherical lighting head within said second opening to provide said second spherical lighting head with a direction of illumination while permitting generally spherical movement of said second spherical lighting head to vary the direction of illumination thereof.
18. The emergency lighting unit of claim 17, wherein said second light source is electrically connected to said emergency electrical circuit elements for providing emergency illumination during interruptions in utility power.
19. The emergency lighting unit of claim 18, wherein said emergency electrical circuit elements comprise:
a rechargeable power supply operationally connected to utility power; and
means for connecting said first and second light sources to said rechargeable power supply when utility power is interrupted.
20. The emergency lighting unit of claim 17, wherein said housing includes a substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall between a first end and an opposite second end, said substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall defining said opening for said spherical lighting head and said second opening for said second spherical lighting head.
21. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, wherein said lighting unit adjacent said light source is a heat-resistant plastic.
22. The emergency lighting unit of claim 21, wherein said plastic is a flame-rated, ultraviolet stable, polycarbonate thermoplastic.
23. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, wherein said emergency circuit elements comprise:
a rechargeable power supply operationally connected to utility power; and
means for connecting said light source to said rechargeable power supply when utility power is interrupted.
24. The emergency lighting unit of claim 1, wherein said emergency power supply includes a battery and a charging circuit therefor.
25. The emergency lighting unit of claim 17, wherein said substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall defines a substantially rectangular and convexly curved exterior portion of said housing.
26. An emergency lighting unit for providing emergency illumination during interruptions in utility power, the emergency lighting unit comprising:
a housing defining an opening therethrough;
a substantially spherical lighting head within said housing and extending partially through said opening;
a light source mounted within said spherical lighting head and adapted to illuminate a region exterior of said housing;
a spherical mounting member for retaining said spherical lighting head within said opening to provide said spherical lighting head with a direction of illumination while permitting generally spherical movement of said spherical lighting head to vary the direction of illumination thereof; and
emergency electrical circuit elements electrically connected to said light source for providing emergency illumination during interruptions in utility power.
27. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26 wherein said spherical mounting member comprises means for making frictional engagement with said spherical lighting head sufficient to fix the direction of illumination while permitting manual generally spherical movement of said spherical lighting head to vary the direction of illumination thereof.
28. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26 wherein said spherical mounting member is a mounting ring.
29. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26 wherein, said spherical mounting member encloses a portion of said spherical lighting head and has an internal shape corresponding to an external shape of said spherical lighting head.
30. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26 wherein said light source is a halogen lamp.
31. The emergency lighting unit of claim 30 wherein said halogen lamp has a generally parabolic reflector and a halogen bulb centrally located therein.
32. The emergency lighting unit of claim 31 wherein said halogen lamp has a transparent lens sealing said reflector.
33. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26, wherein said housing includes a substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall between a first end and an opposite second end, said substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall defines said opening.
34. The emergency lighting unit of claim 33, wherein said substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall defines a substantially rectangular and convexly curved exterior portion of said housing.
35. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26, wherein said housing includes at least one wall between a first end and an opposite second end, said at least one wall defines said opening and provides an initial angular displacement to said spherical lighting head thereby creating a broaden illumination field for said spherical lighting head when the direction of illumination thereof is varied.
36. The emergency lighting unit of claim 35, wherein said at least one wall includes a substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall defining a substantially rectangular and convexly curved exterior portion of said housing.
37. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26, wherein emergency electrical circuit elements include a test switch and indicator lamp.
38. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26, wherein emergency electrical circuit elements include a transformer.
39. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26, wherein emergency electrical circuit elements include a rectifier.
40. The emergency lighting unit of claim 26, wherein emergency electrical circuit elements include battery charging circuitry.
41. An emergency lighting unit for providing emergency illumination during interruptions in utility power, the emergency lighting unit comprising:
a housing defining an opening therethrough;
a substantially spherical lighting head within said housing and extending partially through said opening;
a light source mounted within said spherical lighting head and adapted to illuminate a region exterior of said housing;
spherical mounting member for retaining said spherical lighting head within said opening to provide said spherical lighting head with a direction of illumination while permitting rotation of said spherical lighting head to vary the direction of illumination thereof, said spherical mounting member mounted on said housing and enclosing a portion of said spherical lighting head, said spherical mounting member comprises means for making frictional engagement with said spherical lighting head sufficient to fix the direction of illumination while permitting manual rotation of said spherical lighting head to vary the direction of illumination thereof, said frictional engagement means comprises fingers bearing against an outer surface of said spherical lighting head; and
emergency electrical circuit elements electrically connected to said light source for providing emergency illumination during interruptions in utility power emergency lighting unit.
42. The emergency lighting unit of claim 41 wherein said spherical mounting member comprises means for making frictional engagement with said spherical lighting head sufficient to fix the direction of illumination while permitting manual generally spherical movement of said spherical lighting head to vary the direction of illumination thereof.
43. The emergency lighting unit of claim 41 wherein said spherical mounting member is a mounting ring.
44. The emergency lighting unit of claim 41 wherein, said spherical mounting member encloses a portion of said spherical lighting head and has an internal shape corresponding to an external shape of said spherical lighting head.
45. The emergency lighting unit of claim 41, wherein said housing includes at least one wall between a first end and an opposite second end, said at least one wall defines said opening and provides an initial angular displacement to said spherical lighting head thereby creating a broaden illumination field for said spherical lighting head when the direction of illumination thereof is varied.
46. The emergency lighting unit of claim 45, wherein said at least one wall includes a substantially rectangular and convexly curved wall defining a substantially rectangular and convexly curved exterior portion of said housing.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a continuation of U.S. Ser. No. 08/888,155 filed on Jul. 3, 1997 now U.S. Pat. No. 6,019,477.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Technical Field

The present invention relates generally to electrical lighting sources. More particularly, it relates to emergency electrical lighting sources.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Under current local fire and building codes, buildings to which the public has access are required to have emergency lighting devices. These devices must provide specific amounts of illumination and have emergency backup power sources to provide emergency illumination to lights for a specified period of time during periods when utility power to the building is discontinued, thereby facilitating egress of persons from the building.

Traditionally, two incandescent lamps driven by a self-contained emergency battery power supply are used for illumination during power failure situations. A switching or transfer device will automatically operate the emergency illumination system when a power failure is detected.

While these traditional lighting arrangements perform adequately, they do have a few drawbacks. A major drawback is that the incandescent bulbs use large amounts of electrical power, thus requiring a relatively large emergency battery power supply for use during emergency lighting situations. Furthermore, while the incandescent bulbs provide adequate illumination, such bulbs do not have a long life in service and require frequent replacement.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel emergency lighting device using commercially available halogen lamps.

It is also an object to provide such a lighting device which allows the halogen lamps to be powered by an emergency battery power supply and associated charging and transfer circuitry during emergency power situations.

Still another object is to provide such a lighting device in which the halogen lamps are arranged to provide the amount of illumination required by building codes.

A further object is to provide such a lighting device which may be readily and economically fabricated and will enjoy a long life in operation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention comprises an emergency lighting unit in the form of a housing containing the necessary circuit elements, which may include a rechargeable power supply battery and battery charging circuitry such as a transformer, rectifier, transfer circuitry, test switch, and indicator lamp. The housing wall defines an opening through which partially extends a substantially spherical lighting head. The lighting head houses a light source such as, for example, a halogen lamp. The lighting head is rotatable within its opening to vary the direction of illumination provided by the light source.

Preferably, the rotation of the lighting head is restrained, as by friction, so as to fix the direction of illumination while allowing manual rotation to adjust the direction of illumination. Furthermore, a plurality of lighting heads may be employed—both to increase and disperse the illumination and for redundancy.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a lighting unit in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the lighting unit of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a front elevational view of the lighting unit of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a left end view of the lighting unit of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a right end view of the lighting unit of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a rear elevational view of the lighting unit of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a bottom view of the lighting unit of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a rear perspective view of the lighting unit of the invention with the housing detached from the back plate to reveal its interior construction;

FIG. 9 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the assembly of a lighting head portion of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view, illustrating in more detail an element of the lighting head of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of another element of the lighting head of FIG. 9;

FIG. 12 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the manner of assembly of the lighting head of FIG. 9 to the lighting unit housing;

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view illustrating the assembly of a mounting ring employed to mount the lighting head of the invention to the housing of the lighting unit;

FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view illustrating a portion of the housing and the lighting head mounted thereto; and

FIG. 15 is a block diagram of an emergency lighting circuit usable in the invention.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

With particular reference to FIGS. 1-7, there is illustrated an emergency lighting unit in accordance with the present invention. It comprises an integral housing having a convexly curved front wall 10, top wall 12, bottom wall 14, a left sidewall 16, and a right sidewall 18. The housing is closed by a backplate 20 which is designed to be mounted against a flat surface such as a wall or ceiling. FIG. 8 illustrates the housing separated from the backplate 20. When the backplate 20 is mounted to a vertical surface such as a wall, a pair of slots 22 a, 22 b (FIG. 8) in top wall 12 receive mating flanges 24 a, 24 b which extend from the top edge (as mounted) of the backplate 20. A pair of resilient latch members 26 a, 26 b snap into engagement with latch openings 28 a in the left sidewall 16 and 28 b in the right sidewall 18 when the housing is closed. A pair of flexible straps 30, 32 prevent the housing from separating completely from the backplate 20 during installation or maintenance. The backplate 20 includes a centrally located opening 34 for external power supply wiring W which supplies a rechargeable battery B, and other circuit elements generally designated as C in FIG. 8.

In an emergency lighting unit, the circuit elements C will customarily include an emergency power supply transformer, rectifier circuitry, transfer circuitry, battery charging circuitry, a switch, and an indicator lamp. The electronic components and circuitry are designed and mounted to a printed circuit board in a manner well known to those skilled in the art to charge the rechargeable battery B, as well as to switch to the emergency direct power supply provided by the rechargeable battery B if the alternating current power supply fails, as would be the case during a utility power outage. A test switch is used to test the operability of the emergency power supply.

As seen most dearly in FIGS. 1 and 5, the right sidewall 18 defines an elongated, U-shaped opening which forms a flexible tab 36 which carries a raised button 38. This forms a manual actuator for the test switch (not shown) which forms a part of the internal circuitry C. A small adjacent opening provides a window 40 for viewing the indicator lamp portion of the internal circuitry C.

A unique feature of the lighting unit of this invention comprises a pair of substantially spherical lighting heads 42 a, 42 b which partially extend through symmetrically positioned circular openings 44 (only one of which is shown in FIGS. 12-14). These openings 44 are positioned adjacent opposite ends of the curved front wall 10. The lighting heads 42 a, 42 b are identical, although they are mounted in reversed relationship within the housing due to the curvature of the front wall 10. Accordingly, only the left lighting head 42 a will be described.

The lighting head 42 a is designed to enclose a light such as, for example, a halogen lamp 46 and its power supply lamp socket 48, as illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 14. The lamp 46 can be a commercially available halogen MR-16 lamp, rated at 6 volts, 5 watts. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 3, lamp 46 has a halogen bulb 47 centrally located in a parabolic reflector 62 which is covered by a transparent lens 49. The lamp 46 is supported in a hemispherical shell 50 which defines a central conduit 52 in a boss 54, through which pass the electrical wire conductors 56 for supplying power to the lamp socket 48. Integral within the hemispherical shell 50, and extending outwardly therefrom, are four parallel tubular posts 58 a, 58 b, 58 c, 58 d. The outer ends 60 a, 60 b, 60 c, 60 d of these posts are chamfered so as to engage and support the generally paraboloidal surface of the reflector 62 of lamp 46, as is shown most clearly in FIG. 14. The lamp 46 is held in place against the post ends 60 a, 60 b, 60 c, 60 d by a semi-spherical containment shell 64 which snaps onto the hemispherical shell 50 by means of matching flanges 66, 68 as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10. The base 70 of the lamp 46 carries two prongs (not shown) which plug into the socket 48 to provide an electrical connection to the lamp 46. The lamp 46 is retained in this position by means of a resilient split ring 72 having an L-shaped cross-section, as is most clearly illustrated in FIGS. 9, 11, and 14. The split ring 72 fits in a circular recess 73 (FIG. 14) surrounding a central opening 75 in the containment shell 64.

The inside wall of the hemispherical shell 50 carries a pair of internally extending stops 74 (FIG. 10) which are complementary to matching stops 76 a, 76 b, 76 c, 76 d (FIG. 9) in containment shell 64. When the shells 50, 64 are joined, the stops 76 a, 76 b, 76 c, 76 d extend into the hemispherical shell 50. The interference between the stops thereby limits the relative rotation of the two shells 50, 64 and prevents unwanted twisting of the wire conductors 56.

As seen in FIG. 9, the exterior of the hemispherical shell 50 carries four raised ribs 78 a, 78 b, 78 c, 78 d. These ribs 78 a, 78 b, 78 c, 78 d are spaced at 90° intervals around the opening or conduit 52. They serve to limit rotation of the lighting head 42 a relative to the housing front wall 10, as will be described below.

As will be clear from FIGS. 12-14, a bracket 80, which is integrally formed with The front wall 10, is positioned below the opening 44 on the inside of the housing. Above the opening 44 is a tapped boss 82. A mounting ring 84 fits within the opening 44 as shown in FIG. 14. The mounting ring 84 carries a raised circumferential rib 86 which bears against the inner surface of the front wall 10. A flat tongue 88 extends downwardly from the mounting ring 84 and into the bracket 80. The assembled lighting head 42 a is then inserted into the mounting ring 84 in the position illustrated in FIG. 14. The entire assembly is completed by a semi-spherical mounting member 90, which is best illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 14. It comprises a ring portion 92, from which extends a bottom mounting tab 94 which seats in the bracket 80, and an upper screw tab 96 which seats against the tapped boss 82 and is held in place by means of a screw 98.

The mounting member 90 is characterized by four cantilevered radial fingers 100 a, 100 b, 100 c, 100 d which are positioned to lie between the ribs 78 a, 78 b, 78 c, 78 d on the lighting head 42 a . They are also designed to bear resiliently against the surface of the hemispherical shell 50 of lighting head 42 a. They serve two important functions. First, the radial fingers 100 a, 100 b, 100 c, 100 d limit the rotation of the lighting head 42 a as they engage the ribs 78 a, 78 b, 78 c, 78 d on the rear of the lighting head 42 a, thereby preventing undesirable twisting of the electric conductors 56 attached to the socket 48 and limiting the aiming adjustment of the lighting head 42 a. Their second important function is to provide enough frictional engagement with the lighting head 42 a that the latter will not be inadvertently moved. The fingers 100 a, 100 b, 100 c, 100 d are pressed against, and resiliently engage, the rear surface of the lighting head 42 a, whereby exterior vibrations and the like encountered in normal building installations will not alter the aim of the lighting head 42 a, once it is set by the user. To assist this feature, the engaging surfaces of the shell 50 or the fingers 100 a, 100 b, 100 c, 100 d, or both, may be roughened, or otherwise textured, to increase the amount of frictional engagement therebetween.

As previously stated, the lighting head 42 b at the right end of front wall 10 and its mounting member are identical but reversed. Accordingly, the positions of the corresponding bracket and boss are reversed at that end, the bracket being at the top and the boss being at the bottom.

It will now be seen that there has been provided an emergency lighting unit in the form of a housing having a curved front wall, within which is mounted a pair of substantially spherical lighting heads which are independently adjustable. Not only are they independently adjustable but, due to the nature of their spherical mounting, they are capable of a wide range of movement which is easily achieved by hand manipulation. The curvature of the front wall 10 provides an initial angular displacement, broadening the illumination field. Furthermore, the unit has a trim appearance without unsightly protrusions, brackets, etc. The lamp 46 of either lighting head 42 a, 42 b is easily replaced by removing its split ring 72, withdrawing the lamp 46 and its socket 48, unplugging the lamp from the socket and replacing it with a new lamp. It is then returned to its position resting against the posts 58 a, 58 b, 58 c, 58 d and the split ring 72 is replaced.

The housing and backplate may be constructed of flame-rated, ultraviolet stable, ABS thermoplastic such as, for example, General Electric CYCOLAC®. If halogen lamps are employed, the plastic for any parts in contact with the lamps, e.g., the lamp housings, should be resistant to their high heat and are preferably constructed of a flame-rated ultraviolet stable polycarbonate thermoplastic such as General Electric LEXAN® 80676.

The block diagram of FIG. 15 illustrates one form of circuit usable in an emergency light in accordance with this invention. A building's alternating current power supply 102 is supplied to a rectifier and filter 104 which, in turn, supplies rectified and filtered current to a battery charger 106 and a power failure detector 108. A transfer/low voltage disconnect circuit 110 responsive to the power failure detector 108 activates the lamps 46 with power supplied by the battery B.

It is believed that the many advantages of this invention will now be apparent to those skilled in the art. It will also be apparent that a number of variations and modifications may be made therein without departing from its spirit and scope. Accordingly, the foregoing description is to be construed as illustrative only, rather than limiting. This invention is limited only by the scope of the following claims.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6741324 *Aug 21, 2002May 25, 2004Il KimLow profile combination exit and emergency lighting system having downwardly shining lights
US6877880 *Dec 13, 2002Apr 12, 2005Toshiaki EndoElectric light for work
US7290905 *Sep 28, 2005Nov 6, 2007International Automotive Components Group North America, Inc.Trim panel assembly having a pivotal light mechanism
US7967468Jun 5, 2009Jun 28, 2011Levine Jonathan EAdjustable lighting device
US8356920 *Dec 12, 2007Jan 22, 2013Levine Jonathan ELighting device
US8733988 *Oct 5, 2012May 27, 2014Tsun-Yu HuangAdjustable sense lamp
US20120120669 *Nov 16, 2010May 17, 2012Mcclellan Thomas DavidLighting system and swivel fixture with led assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/20, 362/427, 362/287, 362/322, 362/238
International ClassificationF21V15/01, F21S9/02, F21V17/16, F21V23/04, F21V21/30
Cooperative ClassificationF21V23/04, F21S9/022, F21V21/30, F21V17/168, F21V15/01
European ClassificationF21V15/01, F21V21/30, F21S9/02E, F21V17/16D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 15, 2013FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20130828
Aug 28, 2013LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Apr 8, 2013REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jan 15, 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jan 26, 2005FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Sep 23, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: HUBBELL INCORPORATED, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DUAL-LITE INC.;REEL/FRAME:014515/0559
Effective date: 20030915
Owner name: HUBBELL INCORPORATED 584 DERBY MILFORD ROADORANGE,
Aug 25, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: ARCHITECTURAL AREA LIGHTING, INC., FLORIDA
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN INTELLECTUAL PROPE;ASSIGNOR:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, AS CORPORATE TRUSTEE;REEL/FRAME:015134/0001
Effective date: 20030715
Owner name: COLUMBIA LIGHTING, INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: COLUMBIA LIGHTING--LCA, INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: DUAL-LITE INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: JACUZZI INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: KIM LIGHTING INC., FLORIDA
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN INTELLECTUAL PROPE;ASSIGNOR:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, AS CORPORATE TRUSTEE;REEL/FRAME:015134/0001
Owner name: PHILLIPS TOWER - WEST TOWER, FLORIDA
Owner name: PRESCOLITE, INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: PROGRESS LIGHTING, INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: REXAIR, INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: SPAULDING LIGHTING, INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: SUNDANCE SPAS, FLORIDA
Owner name: ZURN INDUSTRIES, INC., FLORIDA
Owner name: PHILLIPS TOWER - WEST TOWER 777 S. FLAGLERWEST PAL
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN INTELLECTUAL PROPE;ASSIGNOR:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, AS CORPORATE TRUSTEE /AR;REEL/FRAME:015134/0001
May 28, 2002CCCertificate of correction
Mar 18, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, DELAWARE
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:ARCHITECTURAL AREA LIGHTING, INC.;COLUMBIA LIGHTING, INC.;COLUMBIA LIGHTING-LCA, INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:012707/0279
Effective date: 20020211
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY RODNEY SQUARE 1100 NORTH
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:ARCHITECTURAL AREA LIGHTING, INC. /AR;REEL/FRAME:012707/0279