Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS6310445 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/476,140
Publication dateOct 30, 2001
Filing dateJan 3, 2000
Priority dateJan 3, 2000
Fee statusPaid
Publication number09476140, 476140, US 6310445 B1, US 6310445B1, US-B1-6310445, US6310445 B1, US6310445B1
InventorsHamid Kashaninejad
Original AssigneeDialight Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Led indicator disable circuit and led indicator incorporating the led indicator disable circuit
US 6310445 B1
Abstract
Circuitry for an LED indicator which can enable and disable the LED indicator at appropriate times. An LED indicator, for example an array of LEDs, is driven by a driving circuit including a control circuit. An input is configured to sense an input line voltage in the LED driving circuit. A further circuit is connected to the input and outputs a first signal or a second signal based on whether the sensed input line voltage is above or below a threshold value. Further, a signal line connects an output of the further circuit to the control circuit of the driving circuit. The control circuit disables driving of the LED indicator based on the further circuit providing an indication whether the sensed input line voltage is above or below the threshold value. The LED indicator may find particular application in an LED traffic signal. With such circuitry in the present invention, a signal which is not intended to illuminate will not in fact illuminate.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(21)
What is claimed is:
1. An LED indicator disable circuit connected to an LED driving circuit, the LED driving circuit including a control circuit controlling LED indicator by enabling driving of the LED indicator when receiving a first logical signal and disabling driving of the LED indicator when receiving a second logical signal, comprising:
(a) an input configured to sense an input line voltage in the LED driving circuit;
(b) a circuit connected to said input and configured to output the first logical signal when the sensed input line voltage is above a threshold value and to output the second logical signal, opposite to the first logical signal, when the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold value; and
(c) a signal line configured to connect an output of said circuit to the control circuit, the control circuit disabling driving of the LED indicator when the output of said circuit is the second logical signal.
2. An LED indicator disable circuit according to claim 1, wherein the LED indicator is a traffic signal.
3. An LED indicator disable circuit according to claim 1, wherein said circuit (b) comprises:
(b1) a first transistor connected to said input to turn on when the sensed input line voltage is above the threshold value and to turn off when the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold value.
4. An LED indicator disable circuit according to claim 3, wherein said circuit (b) further comprises:
(b2) a second transistor to turn on when said first transistor is off and to turn off when said first transistor is on, an output of said second transistor being connected to said signal line.
5. An LED indicator disable circuit according to claim 4, wherein said second transistor is a field effect transistor.
6. An LED indicator disable circuit according to claim 1, wherein said input (a) comprises:
(a1) a diode connected to a line on which the input line voltage is developed; and
(a2) a zener diode connected between said diode and said circuit.
7. An LED indicator disable circuit according to claim 6, wherein said circuit (b) comprises:
(b1) a first transistor connected to said input to turn on when the sensed input line voltage is above the threshold value and to turn off when the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold value.
8. An LED indicator disable circuit according to claim 7, wherein said circuit (b) further comprises:
(b2) a second transistor to turn on when said first transistor is off and to turn off when said first transistor is on, an output of said second transistor being connected to said signal line.
9. An LED indicator disable circuit according to claim 8, wherein said second transistor is a field effect transistor.
10. An LED indicator for providing an indication on at least one LED, comprising:
(a) a driving circuit configured to drive said at least one LED based on an input line voltage, and including (al) a control circuit configured to control driving of the at least one LED by enabling driving of said at least one LED when receiving a first logical signal and disabling driving of said at least one LED when receiving a second logical signal;
(b) an input configured to sense the input line voltage;
(c) a circuit connected to said input and configured to output the first logical signal when the sensed input line voltage is above a threshold value and to output the second logical signal, opposite to the first logical signal, when the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold value; and
(d) a signal line configured to connect an output of said circuit to said control circuit, said control circuit disabling driving of said at least one LED when the output of said circuit is the second logical signal.
11. An LED indicator according to claim 10, wherein said LED indicator is a traffic signal.
12. An LED indicator according to claim 10, wherein said driving circuit (a) further comprises (a2) a full wave rectifier outputting the input line voltage.
13. An LED indicator according to claim 10, wherein said circuit (c) comprises:
(c1) a first transistor connected to said input to turn on when the sensed input line voltage is above the threshold value and to turn off when the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold value.
14. An LED indicator according to claim 13, wherein said circuit (c) further comprises:
(c2) a second transistor to turn on when said first transistor is off and to turn off when said first transistor is on, an output of said second transistor being connected to said signal line.
15. An LED indicator according to claim 14, wherein said second transistor is a field effect transistor.
16. An LED indicator according to claim 10, wherein said input (b) comprises:
(b1) a diode connected to a line on which the input line voltage is developed; and
(b2) a zener diode connected between said diode and said circuit.
17. An LED indicator according to claim 16, wherein said circuit (c) comprises:
(c1) a first transistor connected to said input to turn on when the sensed input line voltage is above the threshold value and to turn off when the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold value.
18. An LED indicator according to claim 17, wherein said circuit (c) further comprises:
(c2) a second transistor to turn on when said first transistor is off and to turn off when said first transistor is on, at output of said second transistor being connected to said signal line.
19. An LED indicator according to claim 18, wherein said second transistor is a field effect transistor.
20. An LED indicator disable circuit connected to an LED driving circuit including a control circuit controlling driving of an LED indicator by enabling driving of the LED indicator when receiving a first logical signal and disabling driving of the LED indicator when receiving a second logical signal, comprising:
(a) input means for sensing an input line voltage in the LED driving circuit;
(b) circuit means for outputting the first logical signal when the sensed input line voltage is above a threshold value and to output the second logical signal, opposite to the first logical signal, when the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold value; and
(c) means for supplying an output of said circuit means to the control circuit, the control circuit disabling driving of the LED indicator when an output of said circuit means is the second logical signal.
21. An LED indicator for providing an indication on LED indicator means, comprising:
(a) driving means for driving said LED indicator means by enabling driving of the LED indicator means when receiving a first logical signal and disabling driving of the LED indicator means when receiving a second logical signal;
(b) input means for sensing an input line voltage in sail driving means;
(c) circuit means for outputting the first logical signal when the sensed input line voltage is above a threshold value for outputting the second logical signal, opposite to the first logical signal, when the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold value; and
(d) means for supplying an output of said circuit means to said driving means, said driving means disabling driving of said LED indicator means when an output of said circuit means is the second logical signal.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is directed to circuitry utilized in an LED indicator, such as a LED traffic signal, which improves safety of the LED indicator by ensuring that it is on and off at appropriate times.

2. Discussion of the Background

Utilizing light emitting diodes (LEDs) as indicators is common because, among other things, LEDs provide benefits of long life and low power consumption over conventional indicators such as incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, etc. Traffic signals utilizing an array of LEDs as an indicator are also known.

Traffic signals are generally powered from controllers located at each traffic intersection. Those controllers have load switches, which are typically solid state relays, that switch power on and off to the traffic signals. For safety reasons the controllers also include conflict monitor circuitry which is utilized to ensure safe operation of the traffic signal, among other things. More particularly, the conflict monitor circuitry seeks to prevent unsafe situations such as a light failing to illuminate or multiple lights illuminating simultaneously. To perform those functions the conflict monitor circuitry must determine for each traffic signal at the intersection which lights are on and which lights are off.

Conflict monitor circuitry senses voltage across a traffic signal light to determine if it is lit or not. This circuitry is typically set to comply with NEMA standards for traffic signal controllers. For red lights, the conflict monitor circuitry treats voltages less than 50 volts as “off”, 50-70 volts as “undefined”, and greater than 70 volts as “on”. Green and yellow lights are treated in similar fashion except at different voltages. They are treated as “on” for voltages of 25 volts or higher, undefined for 15-25 volts, and “off” for voltages less than 15 volts.

In the context of a red traffic light, it is most important that the conflict monitor circuitry accurately determine whether the red light is on. Otherwise, vehicle motorists could mistakenly enter an intersection when cross traffic is authorized, creating an unsafe condition. The conflict monitor circuitry exists to prevent this scenario, switching to a flashing mode when measured voltages imply no light or dual indication.

For the green or yellow lights the same voltage characteristic is measured. However, the most important characteristics for the green and yellow lights is that if the conflict monitor circuitry interprets the green and yellow lights as being off, that the green and yellow lights in fact be off. Otherwise, it is possible that both green and red signals are lit simultaneously, causing confusion and a possible safety hazard.

Even though line voltages for traffic signals are typically 120 VAC, it is possible for traffic signals to experience voltage potentials across them between 25 to 50 VAC, at which point the conflict monitor circuitry may not have a clear indication as to whether certain lights are on or off. Such a situation may also occur with incandescent lamps.

A potentially dangerous situation may arise when traffic signals are connected in a particular configuration which includes a high-impedance connection between an AC input neutral connection of two signals. Such a situation is further explained with reference to FIG. 1.

FIG. 1 shows a situation in which two traffic signals are connected to an input line voltage of 120 VAC and a neutral signal line. Load switches SR, SY, and SG for each color light are utilized to turn lights on and off.

In the situation shown in FIG. 1, the red traffic lights R1 and R2 are to be turned on and illuminate when switch SR is closed. In the instance when these red lights R1 and R2 are to illuminate, current flows through red lights R1 and R2 from the 120 VAC input line voltage to the neutral lines N1 and N2. However, if a high impedance 7 exists between the neutral line N1 from one signal head and its connection with the other neutral line N2, then the current may be diverted in a reverse path through green traffic signal G1 and yellow signal Y1, as shown by the arrows in FIG. 1. The current then flows in a normal direction through the green traffic light G2 and yellow signal Y2 to the output on the neutral line N2 to complete the current flow to the AC line. That is, a situation may arise in which high impedance 7 exists between the two common connections. The high impedance 7 is formed by a fault in the wiring connecting the lights. In such a situation as shown in FIG. 1, the green G1 and G2 and/or yellow Y1, and Y2 lights may appear somewhat illuminated at the same time as the red lights R1 and R2. In that situation, a red light and a green light facing in a same direction may be illuminated simultaneously, causing a dangerous situation as an oncoming motorist will not know whether to proceed or stop at the traffic intersection.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, one object of the present invention is to provide novel circuitry for an LED indicator which overcomes the above-noted and other drawbacks recognized by the present inventor. Such circuitry may find particular application to LED traffic signals.

A further and more specific object of the present invention is to provide novel circuitry for an LED indicator which can ensure that the LED indicator is only turned on at appropriate times.

A further and more specific object of the present invention is to provide a novel LED traffic signal with circuitry to enhance safety features and to ensure that the LED traffic signal operates properly.

The present invention achieves the above and other objects by providing novel circuitry for an LED indicator, such as a LED traffic signal, which can enable and disable the LED indicator at appropriate times. An LED indicator, for example an array of LEDs, is driven by a driving circuit including a control circuit. An input is configured to sense an input line voltage in the LED driving circuit. A further circuit is connected to the input and outputs a first signal or a second signal based on whether the sensed input line voltage is above or below a threshold value. Further, a signal line connects an output of the further circuit to the control circuit of the driving circuit. The control circuit disables driving of the LED indicator based on the further circuit providing an indication whether the sensed input line voltage is above or below the threshold value. With such circuitry in the present invention, a signal which is not intended to illuminate will not in fact illuminate.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A more complete appreciation of the present invention and many of the attendant advantages thereof will be readily obtained as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 shows a situation arising in background art which can be overcome by the present invention; and

FIG. 2 shows the novel circuitry of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now to FIG. 2, a schematic diagram of circuitry of the present invention is shown in further detail.

FIG. 2 shows an input portion 10 of a conventional LED indicator, which as noted above may typically be an LED traffic signal. The LED traffic signal input portion 10 includes an EMI filter 11 connected to AC input lines. An output of the EMI filter is provided to a full wave rectifier 12. An output of the full wave rectifier 12 is connected to a control IC 13. The control IC 13 in turn is connected to an LED array 14 and the control IC 13 controls the driving of the LED array 14. The LED array 14 may be any type of array of LEDs connected in series, in parallel, etc., and could in the simplest form be a single LED. It is most conventional in LED traffic signals for the LED array 14 to include several strings of series connected LEDs, each string connected in parallel.

The novel feature of the present invention is to include additional circuitry 20 which ensures that the LED array 14 is enabled and disabled from illuminating at the appropriate times.

The circuit 20 senses a line input voltage, e.g. the voltage output from the full wave rectifier 12, and provides a signal to the control IC 13 indicating the sensed line input voltage. The control IC 13 in turn then either enables or disables the LED array 14 based on the signal provided from the circuit 20.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2 the input line voltage sensed by the circuit 20 is an output of the full wave rectifier 12, although the point at which the circuit 20 senses the input line voltage may be other appropriate points of the LED traffic signal 10.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the Vsense input is derived by connecting the output of the full wave rectifier 12 to a series-connected diode D1 and a zener diode Z1, together with establishing the line voltage trip point. Connected to the zener diode Z1, through a resistor R1, is a base of a transistor Q1. Also connected to the resistor R1 is a resistor R2 in series therewith, and a capacitor C1 in parallel with resistors R1 and R2. The resistors R1 and R2 operate as a voltage divider to adjust the base drive of transistor Q1. The value of zener diode Z1 is selected to establish an appropriate trip point to turn transistor Q1 on and off. When the input line voltage is at 120 VAC the value of resistors R1 and R2 may be 220 KΩ, as an example. Capacitor C1 may also be, as an example, a 0.1 μF capacitor.

With such a structure in the present invention, when the voltage developed at the point between resistors R1 and R2, i.e. at the base of transistor Q1, exceeds a predetermined threshold level, i.e., the established trip point, the transistor Q1 turns on.

An output of transistor Q1 is connected to the gate of FET transistor Q2. Connected to the drain of the FET Q2 is a resistor R4. A resistor R3 is connected in parallel with the resistor R4. Resistors R3 and R4 operate as a pull up circuit for transistors Q1 and Q2. Resistors R3 and R4 may also have values of 220 KO, in the example noted above.

With such a structure in the circuit 20 of FIG. 2, when the FET Q2 is on, the drain of the FET Q2 is pulled to a logical “low” value. The control IC 13 recognizes the logical low value and based on such disables the LED array 14 from illuminating. Conversely, when the FET Q2 is off, a logical “high” value signal is supplied to the control IC 13, which based on such enables the LED array 14 to illuminate.

The circuit 20 of FIG. 2 operates as follows. When the sensed input line voltage is above the threshold trip value, the current to the base of transistor Q1 exceeds a certain value, and the transistor Q1 thereby turns on. That results in turning FET Q2 off, resulting in a logical high voltage being provided to the control IC 13. When the control IC 13 sees that logical high voltage, it enables power to the LED array 14. With this method, the LED array 14 can be powered to illuminate only if the input line voltage exceeds a certain threshold.

When the sensed input line voltage is below the threshold trip point, the transistor Q1 turns off, turning FET Q2 on. At that instance the control IC 13 receives a logical low value signal from the FET Q2. When the control IC 13 see the logical low value signal it disables the LED array 14 from illuminating. Thus, the LED array 14 does not illuminate if the input line voltage is below a certain threshold.

The circuitry of the present invention shown in FIG. 2 can avoid the improper situation shown in FIG. 1 in which both red and green lights are on at the same time. More particularly, assume that the circuitry 20 of the present invention of FIG. 2 is connected to each of the green lights 1 and 2 in FIG. 1, although the circuitry 20 may be connected to any number of traffic signals. In the situation in FIG. 1 in which the red lights 3 and 4 are to illuminate, the input line voltages to the green lights 1 and 2 will be well below a threshold value, as a result of the switch 5 being opened. Since the input line voltages to green lights 3 and 4 are below the threshold value, a control IC connected to each of the green lights 1 and 2 sees a logical low value from their respective circuits 20, which, in turn, disables the LED arrays in the green lights 1 and 2. As a result, the green lights 1 and 2 will not illuminate. Thereby, the improper current flowing through green lights 1 and 2 in such a situation does not result in green lights 1 and 2 illuminating.

The threshold value can be established at different points, although one beneficial value for setting the threshold may be 40 VAC. Such a voltage meets the criteria of assuring that for the voltage levels interpreted by the conflict monitor indicating that the red light is on (i.e. 50 VAC or higher), the red light will actually be on. Similarly, the voltage levels interpreted by the conflict monitor for the green or yellow lights being off (i.e. 25 volts or lower), will indicate that those lights are actually off.

Obviously, numerous modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the present invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described herein.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4211955 *Mar 2, 1978Jul 8, 1980Ray Stephen WSolid state lamp
US5661645 *Jun 27, 1996Aug 26, 1997Hochstein; Peter A.Power supply for light emitting diode array
US5770925 *May 30, 1997Jun 23, 1998Motorola Inc.Electronic ballast with inverter protection and relamping circuits
US6040663 *Aug 3, 1998Mar 21, 2000U.S. Philips CorporationCircuit arrangement
US6051935 *Aug 3, 1998Apr 18, 2000U.S. Philips CorporationCircuit arrangement for controlling luminous flux produced by a light source
US6057651 *Aug 24, 1998May 2, 2000Kabushiki Kaisha TecLighting apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6781316 *Jul 25, 2002Aug 24, 2004Koito Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Vehicle light apparatus
US6853150 *Dec 28, 2001Feb 8, 2005Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Light emitting diode driver
US7296913Jul 16, 2004Nov 20, 2007Technology Assessment GroupLight emitting diode replacement lamp
US7300173Dec 31, 2004Nov 27, 2007Technology Assessment Group, Inc.Replacement illumination device for a miniature flashlight bulb
US7318661Apr 8, 2004Jan 15, 2008Anthony CatalanoUniversal light emitting illumination device and method
US7448770Jul 31, 2007Nov 11, 2008Technology Assessment Group, Inc.Replacement illumination device for a miniature flashlight bulb
US7597456Oct 5, 2007Oct 6, 2009Technology Assessment GroupLight emitting diode replacement lamp
US7699494Oct 2, 2008Apr 20, 2010Terralux, Inc.Replacement illumination device for a miniature flashlight bulb
US7744242May 11, 2006Jun 29, 2010Arnold & Richter Cine Technik Gmbh & Co. Betriebs KgSpotlight for shooting films and videos
US7777430Oct 30, 2007Aug 17, 2010Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US7946730Aug 24, 2009May 24, 2011Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US8033682Mar 3, 2010Oct 11, 2011Terralux, Inc.Replacement illumination device for an incandescent lamp
US8240873Sep 6, 2011Aug 14, 2012Terralux, Inc.Universal light emitting diode illumination device and method
US8294371 *Aug 17, 2009Oct 23, 2012GE Lighting Solutions, LLCLED traffic signal with synchronized power pulse circuit
US8297796Jul 31, 2009Oct 30, 2012Terralux, Inc.Adjustable beam portable light
US8328385Sep 6, 2011Dec 11, 2012Terralux, Inc.Universal light emitting diode illumination device and method
US8328386Sep 6, 2011Dec 11, 2012Terralux, Inc.Universal light emitting diode illumination device and method
US8400081Jul 12, 2010Mar 19, 2013Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US8529088Jul 10, 2012Sep 10, 2013Terralux, Inc.Universal light emitting diode illumination device and method
US8632215Apr 25, 2011Jan 21, 2014Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US8702275Dec 14, 2011Apr 22, 2014Terralux, Inc.Light-emitting diode replacement lamp
US8710764 *Mar 8, 2013Apr 29, 2014Metrospec Technology LlcSolid state lighting circuit and controls
US20100123578 *Nov 17, 2009May 20, 2010Allied Telesis, Inc.Power Saving Devices and Systems, and Methods of Use and Fabrication Thereof
US20110037392 *Aug 17, 2009Feb 17, 2011Mohamed Cherif GhanemLed traffic signal with synchronized power pulse circuit
EP2366175A1 *Nov 17, 2009Sep 21, 2011Allied Telesis, Inc.Power saving devices and systems, and methods of use and fabrication thereof
WO2010098744A1 *Feb 24, 2009Sep 2, 2010Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method and system to lower power consumption
Classifications
U.S. Classification315/291, 315/120, 315/129, 315/307, 362/800
International ClassificationG05F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S362/80, H05B33/0884
European ClassificationH05B33/08D5
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 24, 2013FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Feb 3, 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jan 14, 2005FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jan 3, 2000ASAssignment
Owner name: DIALIGHT CORPORATION, NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KASHANINEJAD, HAMID;REEL/FRAME:010496/0592
Effective date: 19991230
Owner name: DIALIGHT CORPORATION 1913 ATLANTIC AVE., MANASQUAN